Tag Archive: Alpha to Omega


A Heartbeat in Time…

A heartbeat in time
A single breath
A sign to savour
An ancient word
A path to walk
Yet non to tarry
A taken oath
In blood not broken
A chalice of hope
A guiding Light
A weary pilgrim
Wandering home
From first to last
From dusk til dawn
An earthly crown
In heaven borne
A ticking clock
A rising tide
A trumpet loud
A clash of thunder
Clouds and sky
Both ripped asunder
Climbing Angels
Giving hope
Catch their hem
A foot on the rung
Alpha to Omega
Nearly home….

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ September 2020

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

“Within Craft teachings many acronyms are used for the purpose of the Craft Journey, thus keeping infomation secure and safe for those whom are meant to ‘know’ and ‘see’,  and those whom are meant to truly do. Of course, the word G.R.A.I.L. could be interpreted as such, as an acronym, which would make sense in respect of our teachings and codes. The original meaning in Latin, (which of course could be a giant red herring if the word is an acronym) means cup or vessel, but not necessarily a cup or vessel as we know it, but in a metaphorical sense, adding meaning to any story. It is portrayed as a chalice type of vessel for story-telling purposes, but a vessel can refer to a living vessel too…”

QUEST 28: INTO FRANCE: DIJON & AUTUN

2ND NOVEMBER 2019

So on Saturday the 2nd Nov we made an early start as we bade farewell to Luxembourg and its lovely old churches and very wet weather! One last look from our very modern apartment window and we were off on the road again on a very long journey; a four hour drive this time, yet exciting non the less! We were on our way to Dijon, France!

Saint Michael’s Church, Dijon, France: As soon as we arrived in the old part of Dijon and parked outside of St Michael’s Church, i knew i would love it here. Dijon is the capital city of the historical Burgundy region in eastern France and one of the country’s principal wine-making areas. It is known for its traditional mustard, vineyard tours, autumn gastronomic fair and building styles ranging from Gothic to art deco. Most folks would know of Dijon because of the mustard made in the region and of course one could not visit without sampling and buying some of the lovely mustards sold there, which we certainly did; both traditional and more modern varieties. The buildings are old and traditional and no attempts are made to modernise them; they just blend effortlessly into the landscape as if they have always been there. The earliest archaeological finds within the city limits of Dijon date to the Neolithic and later Dijon became a Roman settlement named Divio, located on the road from Lyon to Paris. The province was home to the Dukes of Burgandy from the early 11th until the late 15th centuries when Dijon was a place of tremendous wealth and power, one of the great European centres of art, learning and science. It now holds an International and Gastronomic Fair every year in the autumn.

I felt very at home in the quaint old streets of Djion <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dijon

This church is a very imposing building in an Gothic/Renaissance architectural style with an amazing frontage. The first building on the site of the Church of Saint-Michel was a chapel, dedicated to the Archangel Michael. It’s first mention was found in urban Chronicles dating back to the IX century and was built of wood, being located in the cemetery. In the beginning of XI century, the chapel already had the status of a parish church, yet could not accommodate all the parishioners in the hours of worship. It was therefore decided to build a more spacious building, it was consecrated in the year 1020 by the Bishop of Dijon. The majestic façade of this flamboyant Gothic style church was completed at the peak of the Renaissance period and reflects the three classical styles. On the tympanum of the main doorway is the Last Judgement by the Flemish painter, Nicolas de la Cour.

From a Craft point of view there was very strong ‘pyramid energy’ there with connected symbolism within the church; it was also very interesting to see a knights memoriam from 1573, that has a direct connection to the Fordham surname; (the Fordham line) which was an amazing find, and of course connections once again to our ‘Quest for the Grail’. Also lots of emphasis here to the ‘All Seeing Eye’, proving that christianity as we know it today, is quite different from what it used to be a few centuries back in the past. Christianity has certainly evolved but one can not help but think – has it evolved for the better…?

Some of the symbolic artifacts in St Michaels Church, Djion, with emphasis to the ‘All Seeing Eye’ and a Knights Memorial connecting to the Fordham Line. <click to enlarge>

http://worldtourisminfo.com/france/3349-The-Church-of-StMichel-photo-description-Eglise-SaintMichel-de-Dijon.html

http://dijoon.free.fr/bestof/stmichel.htm

Stopping off at Djion on our long journey from Luxembourg to Autun in France proved to be a lovely and very interesting stop; after the church we wandered around the old town, browsed in old shops, bought some mustard and other treats, and even saw a little bookshop that seemingly could have come straight out of the movie ‘The Ninth Gate,’ and had lunch in a very funky bar in the new part of Djion 😉

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his info here on his Grail Quest.
  • Fordham line connection re knights memoriam from 1573

Sunday 3rd Nov: Autun, Bourgogne: Back on the road again, we made our way, driving for several hours through France to the large (as once was) Roman stronghold of Autun, which would have been thriving back in the day. When we arrived at our accomodation we could not have been more pleased ansd amazed for it was like a mini chateau with beautiful views from the inside windows.

Our beautiful chateau in Autun France; as beautiful inside as out 🙂

Autun is a  commune in the Saone-et-Loire department, France. Located in the Boudgogne-Franche-Comte region, it was founded during the Principate era of the early Roman Empire by Emperor Augustus as ‘Augustodunum to give a Roman capital to the Gallic people. In Roman times the city may have been home to 30,000 to 100,000 people, according to different estimates. Nowadays, Autun has a population of about 15,000. Yet back in the day, Autun was a huge transient community, with blocks and blocks of Roman soldiers, businesses and trades passing continually through; an extra 70 thousand people; phenomenal really. Augustodunum was a planned foundation replacing the original oppidum Bibracte, located some 25 km (16 miles) away. Several elements of Roman architecture such as walls, gates, and a Roman theater are still visible in the town.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autun

The Temple of Janus: On the agenda today was to be the Roman temple of Janus (Nergal), only just up the road from where we were staying,and very imposing and dominent upon the landscape with a great feeling of power with human sacrifices being made here. Janus is usually shown with two faces, looking into both the past and the present: The god of doorways, new beginings, new transitions and gates; hence in Roman mythology; the Gatekeeper and Nergal. Janus was able to assist folks on their journey (from a spiritual point of view), unlike the more modern St Christopher whom assisted upon the physical journey. A stautue of the Gatekeeper (usually holding keys) is to be found in many churches far and wide; usually on the left hand side of the church or in the north/east quadrant, guarding the entrance. Interestingly, England takes one of it’s months, January from the cult of Janus; very appropriate for the first month of the year.

The very impresive Janus Temple <click to enlarge>

The  temple, a Romano-Celtic religious structure lies in the center of a vast sanctuary, whose extent and complexity was revealed by excavations conducted between 2013 and 2016. The site’s history dates back to Neolithic times and underwent an important phase of monumental construction in the 1st century CE. The temple was abandoned at the onset of the Early Middle Ages, and its structures were later reused in the fashioning of a Medieval defensive work. The temple has retained two sides of its square cella at a height of over 20 meters, as well as vestiges of its ambulatory and side structure foundations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Janus_(Autun)

The Roman Ampitheatre: The next port of call was the very well preserved Roman ampitheatre where great public events would have been staged in past times and if one were to close one’s eye today and listen carfefully, one can almost here the roar of the crowds and the rumbling wheels of the racing chariots! The semi-circle of stepped seating is very well preserved and one can see underground ‘caves’ presumably for holding animals and gladiaters (maybe poor slaves too) Discovered a few years back by accident, concerts and gigs are now held here and nearby is the House of the Warden of the Roman Theatre. The link below contains a lot of extra info to the theatre and to the whole area, so well worth a look.

https://www.romeartlover.it/Autun.html

The Roman Ampitheatre and Wardens House <click to enlarge>

The Pyramid of Couhard: The pyramids of the area, which we visited next, two more being nearby of which there is not much written about, hold great energy and power within the landcape, obviously from a templar point of view, one reason why we are questing here and one reason why Arthur, on his own Grail Quest would have also been here in the area. The pyramid we visited is different to the ones we have aforetime visited, and unlike the ones found in Egypt either, for this one had funerary connections. When the land was being excavated and being prepared for farming, thousands and thousands of cremated ashes were found in urns, all dotted around the area. When further excavations were carried out, a big pillar/marker was found dating from about 100 AD. This turned out to be the marker post of a memorial garden, similar to todays modern rose memorial gardens; a very fascinating place with more than a hidden secret or two…. The views from atop the pyramid area is amazing, one can see the cathedral in the distance and of course the mystery more pyramids in the landscape.

http://worldtourisminfo.com/france/2994-The-pyramid-PierredeKuhar-photos-description-Pyramide-de-Couhard.html

The Pyramids and views <click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Arthur (real name-Lucius Artorius Castus from the family Artoria) passed through Autun, as part of the Roman army and as a military commander
  • Nascien Desposyni; our head researcher’s 49th GGF (480-551)

Next a total delight, not part of our quest as such but a rare find indeed, because of it’s mystery, history and heritage, this little church just in the vicinity of the pyramid at Couhard, just drew us inside. Ancient and full of amazing energy, it harks back to a time when christianity was more magical and ‘pagan’ than modern day paganism and the rites performed were so very different from todays christianity.

There were symbols here that connected to magic, the enochian ways, the All Seeing Eye, the Alpha to Omega in true magical context, proving that what is be refered to as ‘the occult’ in many circles is certainly deep Craft or old christian knowledge, waiting to be dicsovered here; but hidden within plain sight and never actually ‘seen’…

Please click on each image to fully reveal the symbolism here

We stopped at a lovely town for a lunchbreak and a spot of food shopping, but i have completly forgotten where!

Eglisse, Church of Saint Ferreol, Le Bourge, Curgy: After lunch and another short journey, still remaining very much in the area we found ourselves at what was without a shadow of a doubt, a true Templar church. Geographically one of the most prominent places in the area, this church was originally built and owned by the Knights Templar, as the surroundings and building would indicate and one of the most truest templar builds that one could see in one’s lifetime. The Templars would have operated from out of this religous building until the year 1369, until it all suddenly came to a halt due to the Papal Bull and the subsequent arrest of the Knights Templars. Moving forward in time Pope Clement VII (1478-1534) performed a marriage ceremony for Catherine de Medici (1519-1589) (his niece) to King Henry II of France. The wedding took place here, in this church, on 28th Oct 1533. What an honour and how wonderful to actually go inside where kings, lords, ladys etc had been to what was certainly a major wedding of that time.

Sadly not much on the internet, especially in English that i can share but did find a mention to the series of statues, the very wooden polychrome of the XVIIth century and in the cul-de-four of the apse, and to the splendid wall painting of the XIIth century of the Christ in glory in a mandorle, above the altar, surrounded with the tétramorphe, the four evangelists represented by the symbols of the book of Ezéchiel and of the Apocalypse.

A wonderful church, steeped in Knights Templar history and most certainly a place, at the left side of the main altar, where knights would have received their ‘accolade’, would have been made knights; very much like the famous painting entitiled ‘The Accolade’ but for real here. See our video below for much more detail. At the other side of the altar, hidden behing a curtain, is an original painted fresco featuring the Archangel Raphael with a sun disk above and very much worn away, an ascending Benu Bird. On the way out we stopped near a modern representation of the Maddona or Ava Maria or Mary Magdalen or the Black Maddona, to ponder upon the many names used for this Lady within time and space, yet all one and the same within history.

Thje Templar & Roman sites of Autun

 

 

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  1. Desposyni connections to the area, both Nascien (450-494) and Galains (480-551) (48th GGF)

 

Putting aside the spiritual side of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind expanding in itself; an experience that i fully embraced and will never forget. A sense of being ‘on the road’ is mind expanding, a great and can be likened to Life’s Great Journey – a true gift indeed. Many friends and followers have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in depth write-ups, so have a good idea of what the quests are about. It is always from a physical, spiritual and metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests, which deepen with every new journey.

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”  March 2020

Knights of the Red Order

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

DSC09879.JPG 1

THE GRAIL QUEST

“The Grail was claimed to have healing abilities and to bring enlightenment connecting it to the metaphysical realms. Long before the time of Jesus, (the Jesus) stories tell of Angels (Djinn) (Ninansians) bringing the ‘cup’ from heaven and given to ‘sacred’ or round table knights, which ties in nicely with the tales of King Arthur’s knights partaking of their quest to find the Holy Grail. If the grail was bought from heaven, which seems very likely, to Tara, then why and what was it’s purpose here on this earth, has it still got a purpose today and how or if, does it connect to humankind?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY & LUXEMBOURG

31ST OCTOBER 2019

Germany into Luxembourg

  • Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz: Germany
  • Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City
  • Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg
  • Saint Sebastion Church, Ettelbruck

Day Five: We knew we would have a long day ahead as we made our way on day five on Thursday 31st October (a memorable date in many calendars) driving from Germany into Luxemboug, but with some lovely places to see on the way and the weather was most definitely in our favour. The sun was shinning and the weather was extremely warm as we arrives at our first and most beautiful destination of the day. Even the chemtrails in the skies above (not often seen in Germany) did not lower our spirits. After a two hour drive we arrived in Koblenz, Germany.

Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz, Germany: Modern day Koblenz is very popular with tourists and one can certainly see why; it is very pretty with mountains around and sits on the banks of the Rhine, where the river is joined by the Mosselle. It is full of energy and life; i had visited before as a pure tourist and my memories of it were very possitive. Koblenz was established as a  Roman military post by Drusus around 8 B.C. Its name originates from the Latin meaning “(at the) confluence” of the two rivers. The actual confluence is today known as the “German Corner”, a symbol of the unification of Germany that features an equestrian statue of Emperor William 1. As the Roman Soldier that he was, King Arthur travelled through here; and a representation of him inside the church certainly attests to this fact. The history of the area has a strong connection to the Romans which one can read much more anout in the link below.

Koblenz is a principal seat of the Mosel and Rhenish wine trade, mineral waters, the manufacture of automotive parts, pianos, paper, cardboard, machinery, boats, and barges. Since the 17th century, it has been home to the Konigsbacher brewery, the Old Brewery in Koblenz’s city centre, and now a plant in Koblenz-Stolzenfels. It is an important transit centre for the Rhine railways and for the Rhine navigation. The headquarters of the German Army Forces Command was located in the city until 2012. It’s successor, the new formed German Army Command is based at the von-Hardenberg-Kaserne in Strausberg, Brandenburg. In the more ancient part of Koblenz stand several buildings which have a historical interest. Prominent among these, near the point of confluence of the rivers, is the Basilica of St Castor or Kastorkirche, dedicated to Castor of Karden, with four towers. The church was founded in 836 by Louis the Pious, but the present Romanesque building was completed in 1208, the Gothic vaulted roof dating from 1498. In front of the church of Saint Castor stands a fountain, erected by the French in 1812, with an inscription to commemorate Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

The unique representation of King Arthur, situated just inside the side door, testament to him having travelled through here as a Roman soldier which is of paramount importance for people to know; nearby a winged serpent and and angel keep silent watch over….

The Basilica of St. Castor:  is the oldest church in Koblenz situated at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle. A fountain called Kastorbrunnen (Castor Well) was built in front of the basillica during Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and the church is worth seeing for the historical events that have occurred in it. See link below for deatailed history.

The church of St. Castor was built between 817 and 836 by Hetto, the Archbishop of Trier with the support of Emperor Louis the Pious, just outside the city of Confluentes, the city founded by the Romans and dedicated on 12 November 836, but Louis did not come to Koblenz until after the consecration of the church, pointing to the importance of the Archbishop in the building of the church, especially as the church was until the 13th century outside the city of Koblenz. The church honours St Castor who is said to have worked as a missionary on the Moselle in the 4th century and to have founded a religious community in Karden, Rizza, the alleged daughter of Louis the Pious, is venerated in the church as a saint of the city of Koblenz and her shrine still stands in the church.

As one would expect the church is kept in immaculate condition with many piecies of fine artwork displayed

An extra treat of the day, and a very enjoyable one at that was a ride on the cable car across the beautiful Rhine, which was situated just behind the church, so far too good an opurtunity to miss and one could also get a great view of the equestruan statue mentioned above. What a lovely day it had turned out to be!

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur as the Roman Soldier travelled through Koblenz.

It was an interesting two hour drive as we made our way across the German border and into Luxembourg, over what proved to be a very mountainous and scenic route, but as we got higher and higher nearer to the clouds the weather closed in and it was a very wet day as we pulled into Luxembourg City; still very exciting though!

Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City: The cathedral here is situated in a very built up area so it was very hard to get good views of it especially in the rain and gloom, and the photos did i manage to take were quite atmospheric. Howerver once inside the cathedral it, is a whole different story and it really was most beautiful, full of many paintings and tapestries and also very busy with tourists on such a wet day. It was originally a Jesuit church, and its cornerstone was laid in 1613. It is the only cathedral in Luxembourg and is a noteworthy example of late gothis architecture; however, it also has many Renaissance elements and adornments. At the end of the 18th century, the church received the miraculous image of the Maria Consolatrix Afflictorum, the patron saint of both the city and the nation.  Around 50 years later, the church was consecrated as the Church of Our Lady and in 1870, it was elevated by Pope Pius IX to the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

Luxembourge and cathedral on a very wet and gloomy day!

From 1935 to 1938 the Cathedral was enlarged and expanded: the rebuilding of the exterior architecture on the Gothic-style cathedral presented a challenge, since the goal was to harmoniously integrate the church with the surrounding buildings, as well as the old residential houses. The Cathedral has three towers, the west tower, which was the tower of the Jesuit church and which contains the bells, the east tower, and the central tower, which stands over the transept. When the Cathedral was enlarged in 1935-1938, the east and central towers were added. The central tower, which is only a third of the height of the other towers, consists of a wide, pyramid-shaped base and a narrow peak covered with copper. On Good Friday, 5 April 1985, around mid-day, work on the roof caused the west tower to catch fire. The church bells, i.e. the Virgin Mary bell, the Willibrord bell, the Peter bell, and the Cunigunde bell were destroyed in the fire. When the tower collapsed, the roof of the central aisle was also partly damaged. It took until 17 October 1985 for the tower to be repaired. It was here that King Arthur found his information and instructions in his quest for the Grail, at this pivotel point in time; a point in time indicated as to its true meaning by researching the old maps of Luxembourg…

The many stunning artworks inside the cathedral <click to expand>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

As we were staying in Luxembourg for a couple of nights it was nice to not have far to travel to our digs on that very wet night; the modern apartment we stayed in was very posh and shiny with a ‘touch’ button for almost everything! All needs catered for exept as seems the norm in Europe – they dont ‘do’ toasters!!

Day Six: This day started off quite bright but the further we got into the scenic side of Luxembourg and i guess higher up, the weather did close in on us again, but very dramatic no-the-less! Wiltz is a lovely old town in the Luxembourg mountains, although not too much about it or the church on the internet, but according to the internet it is a commune with town status in north-western Luxembourg and situated on the banks of the river Wiltz. It was also a battleground in the Battle of the Bulge, near the end of  World War II.  The name “Wiltz” comes from a Celtic word meaning “on the creek.” Wiltz was originally inhabited by the Celts, and was first documented in 764AD. It received its town rights in 1240. The counts of Wiltz are among the oldest in Luxembourg

Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg: This church does sit up in the mountains amidst stunning scenery and one often has to take one’s shots on the move as it were, for good views do come and go, so one takes one’s chances. There are many buildings around this church so not many good views down at ground level. There are many churches and cathedrals in Europe, and this is just one, that go by the name of ‘Notre-Dam’, which means ‘Our Lady’, (The Virgin Mary in various forms explained in future quests) yet most folks only know the one in Paris, many thinking that, that one is ‘the’ Notre-Dam, yet that is far from the truth. Although quite plain and stark on the outside, the beauty and artworks within have to be seen to be believed, all so lovingly looked after with a very ancient feel to the church with the the ancient ‘energies’ still there, and it is there that King Arthur recieved further instructions on his quest for the Holy Grail, on his travels/pilgramage around Europe. Sometimes one needs to travel to the ‘back of beyond’ as it were to see the correct and meaningful churches; for we too are travelling the route that Arthur took – what a wonderful journey we are being treated too with knowledge and enlightenment in abundace along the whole route. The church here unsurpringly, given the magnetics of the area, had the most amazing energy, which all connects to the quest for the grail; a very powerful place both physically and metaphysically.

Notre-Dam Church set amidst Luxembourg’s mountains.

In the European churches and cathedrals one can not help but notice that what one in this country would be described as ‘occult’ symbols are very present and evident in these old buildings, hinting at an older christianity very far removed from what is practiced in the UK today. Various versions of ‘The All Seeing Eye’ and the ‘Marasa/Alpha-Omega’ symbols were particulary evident and also if one looks closely quiet a lot of Enochian sybolism. This would indicate a time, a common point in time, before there was a separation of religions. It was here that King Arthur found his information in his Grail Quest.

There are some lovely artworks here, (see above) one wooden-carved statue in particular (guarding the entrance) showing some very unique and meaningful (to Craft) hand gestures – close up shown on the video. There is a wonderful representation of the Ave Maria over a ‘sea serpent’, very unusual and not often seen; she has her foot upon the serpent; obviously Maria/Mary is connected to the sea…. There is also an interlocking Alpha to Omega upon the altar cloth, which of course represents many other things including pyramid energy. In front of the altar is a traditional gong, where it is usually a bell. The Lamb of God here at the High Altar is unusual, a slightly different pose with the ‘All Seeing Eye’ looking down upon it, surrounded by sunflowers, roses and berries and at the very top ‘The Queen’ with her scribe carrying a sword. All very beautifully carved in wood with many historical connections to Templarism and to King Arthur and his pilgrimage, all within this stunning church at Wiltz.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

Watch our video here:

Germany into Luxembourg – Koblenz, Luxembourg & Wiltz

After a lovely lunch at Wiltz we made our way once more into the mountains of Luxembourg; although it was a damp day, the scenery looked spectacular and oh so green and pretty. Fate took our hand once again and although our next unplanned destination was not a part of the actual quest itself, these little surprises do present themselves from time to time when one is off the beaten track, and who can resist a sign indicating a little historic chapel down a narrow mountain road! Thus we found this little octagonal chapel, dedicated to Saint Kunigunde and the only one of its kind in Luxembourg – so what an amazing find; a treasuee in the green mountains indeed.

A unique octagonal chapel chanced upon in the mountains on a wet and pleasant day

Saint Sebastien Church, Ettelbruck:  It was still raining when we made our way into Ettelbuck, which according to the internet is another commune with town status; the towns of Warken and Grentzingen are also within the commune. Until 1850, both Erpeldange and Schieren were part of the Ettelbruck commune as well, but both towns were detached from Ettelbruck by law on 1 July 1850. Ettelbruck lies at the exact spot where three rivers meet: the Sauer, the Wark, and the Alzette. This location has historically made Ettelbruck a major transportation hub for the country second only to the city of Luxembourg.

Germany occupied Ettelbruck on 10 May 1940 and US forces first liberated the town on 11 September 1944 but Germany retook the town on 16 December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. US General George S. Patten on Christmas Day, 25 December 1944, led US troops in the final liberation of Ettelbruck from Nazi occupation. One of Ettelbruck’s main squares is named Patton Square, and is located at the exact spot where the German offensive into Luxembourg’s Alzette Valley was stopped, ending its attempt to reoccupy the country as a whole. Since 1954, the town has held a Remembrance Day celebration each July honoring General Patton and the US, British, French, Belgian and Luxembourgish troops who fought with him there.

Saint Sebastien Church and Ettlebruck town square: even though very damp we had a very enjoyable stroll around

The church is situated next to Henri Muller Street, which had a real personal connection to our lead researcher, whom felt very at home there. Again, not a lot on the internet about the church but i did find this with some nice illustations – see link below. The first stone of the present Neoclassical-style parish church of Saint Sebastien was placed in 1841. However, completion of the building was delayed due to marshy conditions. Finally, four lateral circular chapels were added to reinforce the building. Although completed in 1851, the church was not conscecrated until 1864 by the bishop Monseigneur Nicolas Adames. The interior of the Church houses several precious art objects: an oil painting by Joseph Probst titled “Le buisson ardent”, an African Shona sculpture, a beautiful eight-and-a-half register organ and several remarkable stained-glass windows presenting, among other things a panorama of Ettlebruck. The parish church was badly damaged during the Ardennes offensive. The formal reopening of the restored church took place in 1948.

In the church are to be found an emblematical representaion of ‘The Four Corners’ or ‘The Four Directions’ which are of particular interest from a Craft point of view and not generally known of in this context. Shown upon the four windows are The Sash, The Disc, The Challice and The Cross. The quest for the grail was particulary strong there and it was also another site where (King) Arthur found his information in respect of his grail quest.

The Four Corners or Four Directions, emblematical of higher knowledge

Luxembourge had proved to be very revealing in respect of Arthurs grail journey, also to us on our quest; knowledge recieved to be digested and devoured over the weeks to come….

Blood Line Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here on his Quest for the Grail.

And so we returned to our high-tech digs for one more night before embarking upon a four hour journey into France the next day. Luxembourg had proved to be beautiful, revealing and very wet!

“Let Angels tell tales; and Demons too

Let the secret of The Grail forever ring true”

 

Knights of the Red Order February 2020

The Keeper of Scrolls’

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

From the beginning to the end…..

For MG 3

Fortunately we still just about, live in a country with a culture where we can all freely have and express our individual opinions about anything and everything; yet at the same time respect our fellow creature’s points of view, even if they conflict with our own. I often see a lot of anger and strong opinions on social media; conflicting viewpoints, with ‘friends’ being ‘unfriended’ from peoples lists, when personal viewpoints are not shared ones. Quarreling about words is of no value and will only have a negative effect on those who listen or read.

In the blink of the universal eye, this does not really matter, social media does not matter, for the true purpose of human existence is yet to be revealed to the many. In future times who is to say what is right and what is wrong, for it is all subjective and relates to given timelines of humanity and current thinking modes. In future times, it matters not one jot who fell out with whom or who agreed with whom or who said what. When one ‘draws’ away from the insular traits of modern humanity, all this bickering and self opinions is revealed as totally pointless in the bigger scheme of things and is proved to be totally ego based. Many view this planet as a  ‘prison planet’ and indeed once one crosses over the threshold of profound knowledge one can see why so.

 

For MG 4

Many cultures and religions on planet earth worship false prophets and false gods with people choosing to allow their lives and how they live them, to be dictated to them by man-made rules created by those whom wish to keep their followers under control and in total darkness. These people will never know freedom of thought and choice, and sadly do not know they have no freedom of choice in the first place.  Even the so called enlightened ‘spiritual paths’ also provide teachings not to be of truth, often based on man’s misinterpreted mythology; thus they misinform their followers too. But as said, we all still have freedom of choice so it is up to each individual to discover the truths for themselves or not; to believe what they want to believe.

Go tread lightly folks on this precious journey called life, see the unsee-able, look behind the mundane world and question everything, question the reason for everything, all the whys and the wherefores, seek truth out at every turn, even though it may not be where you think it is or what you believe it to be. Truth is not pretty and does not come gift wrapped with a beautiful bow, so keep an open mind, yet neither is it a personal opinion of any self-elevated individual human. Look above and beyond humanity for the answers that really are already inside of us, within our very DNA; for those whom are meant to know, really will in time, know and will awaken.

 

For MG

Where-ever we are on this planet peace is always to be found within each individual and has nothing to do with the control or illusion of religion or politics. Learn and evolve to become the best you can be, break the barriers of the mind in order to truly grow and to expand your consciousness, it is more than possible. Seek knowledge and personal growth; question everything you are told by those who would profess to know. The illusions of life are starting to collapse and new concepts of truth are coming out into the open and being embraced, so always ask yourselves, why all the lies in the first place? What is it that humanity is not supposed to know and why? All else will then start to fall into place, petty arguments and differences especially will seem pointless. Don’t be ‘mind-controlled’ but be ‘mind-awakened’ and make each step matter; find your own way, in your own way, be individual not ‘one of the crowd’. Do not follow established man-made paths and viewpoints, take a big step out of the glaring light, above and beyond the ‘roar of the crowd’ and try a little bit of quiet shade; you may just be surprised at what you will find there in the shadows…..

That is the thing though; the human species has evolved way beyond the original purpose and intent of its creators. Over time human brains have developed and continue to develop above and beyond the purpose intended, but they dont know what for or where they are heading with this. A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing; one only has to look at how mankind is destroying the planet by greed and consumerism; mankind in these closing decades has not treated this planet well and has allowed greed and the fulfilment of ego to be the ‘be all and end all’ goal. All the carefully created balance of nature now being thrown out of the window. Of course many more human creatures live in the dark than will ever evolve towards the light of full knowledge, of whom and what they really are. Most live in the moment in the glare of the ‘Neon God’ they have created for themselves and have not an inkling of the huge possibilities that could lie ahead. Yet for those with a passion and a yearning for knowledge, those with a deep love and a hankering for the ‘Old Ways’ and for truth, the possibilities for growth within the right hands are endless and boundless.

 

For MG 5

As a teacher and guide (of Craft) I will always endeavour to guide humanity towards open doors wherein this knowledge lies, but that is all a teacher can do; gentle guidance and encouragement; it is up to each individual, whether or not they choose it, to step over that threshold or not. Knowledge once gained cannot be ‘un-gained’ yet knowledge gained can change one’s way of life and thinking for all times; those things that were once unthinkable become the norm, the thinkable and nothing can and ever will be the same again. I love to teach, love to share and love to experience with students that ‘light bulb’ moment when I know that their lives have been changed for always, above and beyond the norm; it is and always will be a very rewarding experience to share this brand new beginning with folks. Time is marching on and nothing is infinite, everything has a beginning and an end, yet new travellers are always welcome, those seekers of truth, those creatures with a sense of adventure, with a deep thirst for knowledge who wish to walk the road less travelled with us.

Family is above and beyond any earthly blood ties; honouring blood ties of another kind. For those who wish to follow the ‘ways of the blood’, of the original way, the journey is often long and ardarous, with one questioning every aspect of one’s current life and it’s associations. If within my life I can change just one person’s perspective of their reality, if i can cause them to stop and think about the very nature of reality, then I am very happy.  I try and give clues, give pointers and directions for people to follow and to maybe study up on more. In time they may wish to join us in the fold of Priory; to become as one with ‘family’ or they may simply go their own way, forever enlightened. Whatever happens to planet earth in future times, one thing is sure, the species known as humans will survive the coming end times, albeit in numbers much, much less than we are familiar with today and that will be a good thing. Each student is guided by the Elders of the path to a place of safety within the physical and metaphysical realms where temporal doorways do exist to cross through. To those students who have suceeded through the mundane’s constant  tempting of  them not to succeed, the true beauty of reality will at last be revealed.

 

For MG 1

 

‘Stay well and stay sharp’

‘Fan go maith agus fanacht géar’

 

Craft Tutor and Keeper of Scrolls

June 2017

 

 

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