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Please note that as my saved drafts keep dissapearing i will need to publish as i go along – whether finished or not! It can be a bit heartbreaking when hours of work just vanish….

The ‘Dragon’ at Loughcrew Cairns

After our lovely stay at the cottage near Newcastle and the beautiful Mourne Mountains, we once again ‘packed our bags’ and found ourselves ‘on the road’ again and travelling towards a new destination. The previous four days had been amazing with lots of adventures and new knowledge attained. Lots to digest though and plenty to think about for sure, in the coming weeks….

 

All this to come! Keep tunning in folks!

Day Four: Sat 3rd July:

Roscommon Castle

War Memorial

Day Five: Sun 4th July:

Kells Round Tower

St Combus Church

Loughcrew Cairns

Day Six: Mon 5th July:

St James Church

St Pauls Church

Church of the Assumption

Atlantic Coast

Day Seven: Tues 6th July:

Bru na Boinne

Burial Mound

Hill of Tara

Day Eight: Weds 7th July: Achill Island

St Dympnas Church

Achill Henge

Dooega Village

Day Nine: 8th July: Galway:

Galway Catherdral

Day Ten: 9th July: Tipperray

St Marys Church: Town and countryside

Day Eleven: 10th July: Blessington:

St Marys Church

Day Twelve: 11th July:

Church of St Molaise

Mountcharles Pier

St Nicholas Church

Waterfall

James Chain Memorial

Night Ferry Home!

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Grounding and settling down in Ireland was a much quicker process than last time we were there; tuning into the energies, we quickly found our feet and indeed became energised by it all. With lovely realxing views from our accomadation, we swiftly settled in, full of anticipation into quest mode…”

Thursday 1st July: St Coleman’s Church: Newcastle: St Colemans Church is situated in a quiet area of Newcastle, in lovely spacious grounds with views all around. Newcastle is a small yet beautifully vibrant coastal resort in County Down, with a population of 7,672 at the 2011 Census. It lies within the Mourne Mountains district and is extremely popular. The name of the town is thought to derive from the castle built by Felix Magennis of the Magennis clan in 1588, which stood at the mouth of the Shimna River. This castle was demolished in 1830. The Mourne Mountains are the setting for many local myths and legends. There are stories of ‘The Blue Lady’, a woman abandoned by her husband whose ghost still haunts the mountains, and more recently the idea of a wild cat living in the Mournes. Many of the stories although having true origins are only folklore and give many of the towns attractions their names, such as Maggie’s Leap being named after a local girl called Maggie, who leapt over the impressive chasm to her death while fleeing soldiers with a basket of eggs. You can read much more via the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle,_County_Down

A peaceful site but little known about the church….

Sadly though, this little church was closed to us on this day: it was erected and opened in 1927, but the site would have been established long before that. There are some interesting artworks and pulpit to see inside, if we had been able to actually get inside. The parish graveyard adjoins St Colman’s. The churchyard is about 1 mile from the Church of Ireland Church, to which it belongs. It is therefore, technically a church cemetery as it is detached from the church. There are two Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war here. One of which, in the South-West part, is the grave of an unidentified Naval rating whose body was sadly washed ashore in May,1918.

Such a peaceful gravyard with some splendid memorials within <click to enlarge>

It is written that St. Colman’s mother Queen Rhinagh, when in an advanced state of pregnancy in late 559 A.D., became the object of jealous hatred of her husband the King. The King had heard that according to a prophecy of authority his future son (St. Colman) was destined to surpass in greatness all the others of his illustrious lineage. Fearing the worst for her child still in her womb and for herself, Rhinagh was obliged to flee her husband’s company. She was nevertheless caught by the King’s men and cast with a heavy stone tied around her neck into the deepest portion of the Kiltartin river. Miraculously, Our Blessed Lord intervened, and in an instant, the heavy stone floated like a cork to the surface, bringing Rhinagh and her future offspring (St. Colman) safely to the river’s bank.

You can read more about St Coleman and his miraculour birth and life here:

http://www.stcolman.com/life_baptism.html

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883 Collooney, Sligo (1858 – 1932)  Karl’s 3 x GGF

Inch Abbey: Downpatrick: (from Irish Dún Pádraig,) meaning ‘Patrick’s stronghold’ is a small town about 21 miles south of Belfast in County Down, Northern Ireland. It has been an important site since ancient times and it’s cathedral is said to be the burial place of Saint Patrick. Downpatrick had a population of 10,822 according to the 2011 Census. It is known for it’s historical connection to St. Patrick; the town being named after him. It is believed during the 5th century he had lived in Downpatrick and is currently buried in Down Catherdral. An early Bronze Age site was excavated in Downpatrick, revealing two round houses and some archaeological evidence indicates a Neolithic settlement at the Cathedral Hill site.

Lots more to read here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Downpatrick

Inch Abbey, located on the north bank of the Quoile River, was founded by John de Courcy in atonement for his destruction of Erenagah Abbey. The buildings are mainly from the 12th and 13th centuries. The first monastery established on the northern banks of the river Quoile in 800 AD was known as Inis Cumhscraigh, but clearly the area was in use way before that, in order (from a Craft connection) for King Niall (see below) to have an interest in the area. Nothing remains of the early monastery, but traces of the Early Christian earthworks enclosure can be seen on aerial photographs. The setting is really beautiful, and you can see why the Anglo-Norman knight John de Courcy established the Cistercian abbey here in c.1180. It is believed the Abbey was founded as an act of repentance for his destruction of the Abbey at Erinagh three years earlier.

Layout of how Inch Abbey would have looked <click to enlarge>

The abbey was colonised with monks from Furness Abbey in England. It was built to a typical Cistercian layout, a large cruciform church with a low tower at the crossing of the north and south transept. The cloister garth is situated to the south of the church. Along the east of the cloister are the ruins of a vestry, chapter house, parlour and day room. To the south is the refectory and kitchen. There was a well and a bakehouse situated to the southwest of the cloister. The abbey, which retained a strong English influence refusing to accept Irish monks into the community, was remodelled in the 15th century, before being suppressed in 1541. It’s name is derived from the Irish word inis, meaning ‘island’, referring to the fact that the monastery was originally surrounded by the River Quoile. Interstingly another ‘Game of Thrones’ location.

Beautiful Inch Abbey <click to enlarge>

At the time of King Niall (Karl’s 46th GGF) there was also a lot of Danish influence in the area, which will be a story for another day, but the Vikings did plunder the settlement in 1149 AD and carried out a great deal of destruction, that later had to be rebuilt, so the abbey has always been under attack over the years. What is interesting is that it was almost ‘lost in time’, because of how the valley is situated and how the land lies, a lot of the valley area was covered up totally, and it was only through exavations, that what was hidden was revealed again and the abbey discovered underground. This does prove that there is so much history hidden underground, and still to this very day much lies hidden, Sometimes the history is only revealed when new bulidings or carparks etc are excavated, so much still hidden within the earth. But in a way this is similar to history and knowledge being buried within the minds of folks, especially Craft or spiritual folks; the knowledge is buried deep within but unlike the buildings, time will forever hide it, and the passing of a person, unlike the simple passing of time will never reveal the knowledge gained – unless of couse we of Craft, of these modern times can pass it on to true and willing students – the ball is in your court guys – do you or do you not wish to learn the ways and knowledge of Craft or shall it be forever hidden within time itself?

More words and pictures here: http://www.megalithicireland.com/Inch%20Abbey,%20Downpatrick.html

 Grail Bloodline Connections

  • King Niall 342 AD.  Karl’s 46 x GGF but with a big connection here to the Neville surname.

Ballee Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church. Downpatrick: This T-shaped meetinghouse has been at Ballee since 1721, originally a thatched building but at some point, later in the eighteenth century, a new roof was built from Memel pine. Later still the old box pews were removed and used to fit out new rooms in the church. But the walls are the same walls that have stood as silent witness for three hundred years. There’s no minister here and the church is amalgameted with a nearby church. We were very lucky to meet and chat to Lorna, who was very kind and made a special effort to get the key to let us in. So very lucky to get inside to take some good photos but sadly no video for we were escorted around on this occasion, not underestimating the kindness shown though.

Ballee Non-Subscribing Presbyterian Church. Downpatrick <please click on the image to view>

There are some lovely artworks and plaques on the walls, a wonderful collection of vintage religious books and elaborate timbers/roof beams, imported from the far eastern end of the Baltic Sea, from trees 100’s of years old, from the lands that were once East Prussia. Trade links with the Baltic were already established at the time by the Presbyterian merchants in Belfast. The church inside is very well looked after, with lots of natural wood used and the flaming emblem of the non-subscribing church on the pulpit cloth and plaques are indeed very striking. I noticed the interesting barrel-shaped mausolea, mostly dating from the late eighteenth or early nineteenth centuries in the graveyard here and other graveyards in the area too. Downpatrick has a large number of what have been describes as being of ‘the barrel-vaulted variety, rather like a Nissen-hut ’.

Karl discovered some of his own family line here in the cemetry; the ‘Hill’ surname <click to enlarge>

Again a connection here to King Niall 342 AD; the name of which would later become the Neville surname, in time becoming the House of Neville, traced into Scotland, County Durham, Raby and Raby Castle itself (see previous quests), showing how fascinating it is, the migration and movement of names.

https://velvethummingbee.com/category/ballee-non-subscribing-presbyterian-church/

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Niall 342 AD.  Karl’s 46 x GGF but with a big connection here to the Neville surname.

Castle Ward National Trust: Strangford Downpatrick: ‘The very popular ‘Game of Thrones’ is based in this area, where lots of filming has taken place, and this is certainly what many folks tune into, but these two questers here have never seen it. It certainly is a stunning area, all the countryside around is magnificant. The unique 18th-century mansion, famed for its mixture of architectural styles with its gothic and classical style collide at Castle Ward, rests on rolling hillsides, looking out over the tranquil waters of Strangford Lough. One can walk or cycle along the Lough trail or through the sheltered woodlands and spot butterflies, rabbits, ducks, and swans. One can step into a fantasy world of castles and dragons, when exploring the Georgian farmyard, the lough shore, and film locations for Game of Thrones. The restored Victorian  sunken gardens are a gardeners delight. There is a lot of walking, but even though very beautiful, not really suitable unless one is very fit.

The whole area is connected to the High King of Ireland, King Conaill, 409 AD, in the Ulster area, which folks may know from the ‘red hand’ of the flag, seen in many places and buildings in Ireland.  The Neville house or line has always had a big connection/obsession with the colours of Red, White and Black which featured very prominently in the early degrees of Craft, so there still may be some connections there, yet to be discovered.

The sunken gardens at Castle Ward and the view looking over towards ‘Winterfell’

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Ward

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • High King of Ireland, King Conaill (409 AD, Ulster) The Neville surname lineage. Karl’s 45 x GGF

Temple Water: Downpatrick: This very picturesque beauty spot is part of the Castle Ward estate and of course a part of our quest too. On foot a lot of walking needed to be carried out to get there but we did get some wonderful views overlooking this artificial, yet stunning lake. There are various trails and walks that take one around the lake, upon the shores. The whole arera is rather focussed on family activities these days.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • ‘Those that are hidden in time’….. clues hidden under this manmade lake maybe…..

Audley’s Castle: Portloughan Downpatrick: Again another ‘Game of Thrones’ location and one can certainly see why, but long before that of course and much more important is it’s connection to our quests. One can park quite near, just a short walk up a gentle slope with wonderful views or one can, if up to it, drive up the very ‘off the beaten track’ way. It is a spendid building, what remains of it, with wonderful views overlooking the Temple Lake and it has a small courtyard area alonside it, where one can sit on the wall and admire the view. As a castle in it’s heyday it would have commaded an excellent position. It is 15th-century, located 1 mile north-east of Strangford, County Down on a rocky height overlooking Strangford Lough. It is a three-storey tower house, named after its 16th century owner, John Audley, of an Anglo-Norman family who held land in the area in the 13th century. There are thousands of small stone towers similar to Audley’s Castle in the Irish countryside, made for the lesser lords and gentry. Most were built in the late Middle Ages (roughly 1350–1550). Audley’s was built towards the end of this period. It was sold, with the surrounding estate, to the Ward family in 1646 and used in 1738 as an eye-catching focus of the long vista along Castle Ward’s artificial lake, Temple Water. The site has a number of paths to allow you to get to the Castle.

But also a connection here to King King Conaill, 409 AD, Ulster and of the Neville lineage.

Audley Castle and Temple Lake <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audley%27s_Castle

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • High King of Ireland, King Conaill (409 AD, Ulster) The Neville surname lineage. Karl’s 45 x GGF

Friday 2nd July: St Mary’s Church, Lordship: Riverstown: So the first church of the day and to our delight we were able to get inside. However there is not a lot on the internet about the area or the church. The Parish of Riverstown incorporating Sooey and Gleann is located just off the N4, 15 minutes outside Sligo town. Riverstown, historically called Ballyederdaowen (Irish: Baile idir dhá Abhainn, meaning ‘town between two rivers’), is a village in County Sligo, known for its musical traditions.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Riverstown

St Mary’s Church, Lordship: Riverstown:

St Mary’s Church, Lordship was immaculately kept, both inside and out and there were some beautiful windows and artworks to see inside. Sadly there was not a lot on the interent about it; just a simple word or two such as the fact that the OS 1835 survey shows a cruciform ‘R.C. Chapel’ here and present nameboard states ‘Erected 1834’. Remodelled or rebuilt 1858-74 by architect John Murray. This Catholic parish church in the Cooley Peninsula dates from 1834. It stands alongside the R173.

Some beautiful and symbolic artworks and windows <click to view>

As always on these quests, whether we gain entry or not to a particular church or site we are able to mark off the ‘trail’ of the ‘lines’ as they travelled around, back through time to the days (in this case) of the 1700’s and 1800’s.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1932) Karl’s 3 X GGF

Church of the Immaculate Conception: Lisaturrin: A stunning looking church, in the parish of Kingscourt, in a very elevated position with amazing views all around and happily again we were able to gain access. This time we managed to squeeze in before the start of a funeral, which at the time we was not aware was imminent. An interesting church with a connection to John Fordham 1883, we do know that the Fordhams were originally out of Colooney, south/east of Sligo and prior to that, they were in France (the Desposyni line) and because of the migrational patterns the Fordhams spent time in this area of Cavan County. The whole area is quite mountainous and one can easily get ‘off the beaten track’ and explore wherever the tracks may lead to, but we do have to stick to the main purpose that is at the heart of our quests.

An impressive Victorian Gothic-Revival church, embellished with fine stonework and stained glass, designed by Cavan architect William Hague (1836-1899), and built to replace an earlier chapel. The plan and elevation are reflective of a literal interpretation of medieval church plan and elevations. The colourful note added by the alternating slate and stone to the exterior are aesthetically pleasing, while the variety of stonework finishes to both interior and exterior exemplify local craftsmanship of the period. The retention of original detailing such as floor tiling and pews is also important. The building is of national artistic significance for its stained glass windows by the Dublin-born painter and stained glass artist Evie Hone (1894-1955), commissioned 1946, as well as windows from the studio of Harry Clarke, added c.1960. There are also some stuning Celtic crosses in the gravyard (see above) and you can read more about the stunning windows and interior from the link below.

A beautiful interior with many symbolic artworks and windows <click on image for close ups>

https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/40310009/church-of-the-immaculate-conception-hall-street-dunaree-kingscourt-cavan

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1932) Karl’s 3 X GGF

Virginia Church: Virginia: Quite a large church in big grounds right in the heart of Virginia on a busy road junction. Again we could not get in but had a good look around before having a lovely lunch (outside because of covid) in a bistro across the road. Virginia (Irish: Achadh an Iúir, meaning ‘field of the yew) is a town in County Cavan, Ireland. Founded in the 17th century at  as a plantation town, it now holds both local industry and commuter housing. Founded at Aghanure it was named Virginia after Queen Elizabeth 1 of England, the “Virgin Queen.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia,_County_Cavan

Virginia Church, some lovely old Celtic crosses <click to enlarge>

The church serves as a symbolic focal point in this former plantation town, the church enjoys a monumental setting which is enhanced by its ample grounds and mature trees. The plan is simple but effective, placing the focus on the church tower and spire which can be seen from a distance. The building is a good example of a Board of First Fruits church with early nineteenth century ‘gothic’ style details such as the cusp mouldings in the windows and crenellated parapet buttresses serving more decorative than structural functions. Major alterations were made to the church following a storm on Christmas night in 1818 when the steeple fell and destroyed the roof, and after a fire which caused major damage in 1830. There are some attractive old Celtic crosses in the graveyard.

St Mary’s Church of Ireland: Dillonsland: It was a very fleeting visit to this church as we could not even get into the grounds for a wander around – so a few quick snaps from the roadside had to suffice! The modern Navan Parish is made up of five mediaeval parishes: Athlumney, Cannistown, Donaghmore, Dunmoe and Navan. Although cemeteries still survive in these locations, the churches were suppressed in the Penal Laws era, with many surviving simply as derelict buildings. St. Mary’s Church is named after the mediaeval Augustinian abbey which was located on the outskirts of the Parish called St. Mary’s. St. Mary’s Abbey and its associated granges were suppressed on the orders of King Henry VIII, the English monarch.

Just a few quick snaps from behind the railings!

Detached church, built c.1815, with three-bay side elevation to nave, having single-bay chancel attached to east. Earlier three-stage pinnacled tower, built 1762, attached to west. Set behind railings in graveyard. Double-pitched and hipped roofs, natural slates, dentil eaves course, cast iron gutters. Uncoursed rubble limestone walls with ashlar trims signal and diagonal pinnacled buttresses at corners and west wall – some pinnacles removed. Perpendicular-style openings with stone frames and timber tracery, dark coloured glass, 1870’s east window. Surrounded by graveyard with graves dating from mid 18th century, ashlar gate piers and cast iron railings and gates c.1870.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary%27s_Church%2C_Navan

https://www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/14009410/st-marys-church-of-ireland-church-church-hill-townparks-navan-county-meath

http://www.navanhistory.ie/index.php?page=st-mary-s-church-of-ireland

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1932) Karl’s 3 X GGF

See our video on the first few days of our adventure!

Karls Comments on the First Few Days

The Purpose of the Quests from Karl: “The purpose of what the quests are really about, and what we do on these quests is to ‘sign off’ or ‘tie off’ some of the churches that we know from the past, which will of course mean different things to different people. What we are trying to do is to establish the past in order to try and understand the future, and of course we have the Grail in that line there, along the way. As i have said so many times before – what is the Grail? It is a mystery and perhaps it will always remain a mystery, perhaps it is meant to, but what’s interesting is, there are different messages that our forefathers, our ancestors left for us in different places, and these churches often have the signs, and symbols and codes that will allow us to see and know which direction the path is following in. Will we ever find the Grail – who knows, perhaps the Grail has been with us all the time, who knows that?  At the end of the day though the Grail means something, and it’s a pathway to follow”

 

Ireland is a beautiful place and we hope it stays that way for many years to come……

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ August 2021

<moon.willow@ntlworld..com>

 

“After about 18 months of trying to get to Ireland on this mighty long awaited quest because of covid, we were full of happiness and anticipation to have finally made it. The journey to the Liverpool ferry was of course part of the quest itself, visiting two beautiful churches along the way and for those who have been following our quests you will have picked up maybe, the reason why we visit the sites we do. Altogether it turned out to be at least a 2000 mile round trip where we travelled from coast to caost of both the north an south of Ireland; a truly amazing adventure!”

Day One: Tuesday 29th July 2021: Saint Savours Church: Aston-by-Stone, Stone. Set in a gorgeous part of the English countryside, in a ‘middle of nowhere’ peaceful setting, this church really did look a picture postcard, with beautifully maintained gardens and flowers everywhere. An interesting little church but sadly closed. Yet when one looked closely a few surprises with a little ‘secret’ around the back….

Aston-by-Stone: Staffordshire: The pretty silhouette of the spire of St Saviour’s Church is what folks see at first, yet there is also the Catholic Church of St Michael in the grounds of Aston Hall, now run by a small group of nuns who care for sick and aging clergy. The relics of St Chad were rediscovered in the chapel at Aston Hall in 1838, where they had been hidden during the Reformation. Legend has it that a cross on the Hall’s boundary wall marks the spot where a monk was killed by lightning. There is a large pond and old osier bed, reflecting the connection to the potteries, that require baskets for transporting their products. A stream runs down to the pool at Aston Farm, which at one time provided the power for a waterwheel. This wheel still exists and was used to grind corn, and earlier this century to power a milking machine.

The name Aston is probably derived from the Anglo-Saxon for ‘Ashtown’ and was recorded in the Domesday book as Estone. It is an ancient crossing point, and a ford or bridge has existed there since the 15th century, and pre-dates the bridge in Stone. The main road from Stafford to Stone crossed the Trent in Aston until the Stafford-Stone turnpike was opened in 1761. The former is now a quiet lane, with a narrow humped-backed canal bridge on a bend and the banks are rich in wildflowers. There is an old wharf at Mill Farm, the site of a water-powered flint mill. Ground flints were also required by the Potteries.

St Savours Church: Situated in Church Lane, Aston, the church serves the area of Aston, and Little Stoke. 1846, the architect was James Trubsham, the steeple was added in 1870 by J R Botham. It is Gothic style and an A grade 2 listed building, with a stone with slate roof, nave, chancel, and north-west tower with broach steeple. It has a good east window by C A Gibbs and a WW2 memorial plaque. The parish church was built in the Early English style during the 1840s by local landowners, the Parker-Jervis family. As it was closed due to covid (i guess) there was no chance of getting inside to take any photos. It is recorded that the church has records from about 1870 circa, however there are older records going back to 625 AD, from the very foundation of the church, which clearly there had to be, as Karl’s 49 x Great Grandfather was there in his own time up until 494 AD.

Upon the church building are carvings of geometric pyramid shapes (meaningful in Craft) and a Lord and Lady take guard over the entrance, while round the back of the church a secret path leads to a treasured building with an angel keeping a silent watch… <click to enlarge>

Symbols in stone, an angel guards a secret path to a building unspoken of, and the Lord and Lady stay silent…..

After doing some research on the internet it seems that the mysterious building is the Parker Jervis Mausoleum, which sadly gives the appearance of being very unattended, but maybe it is meant to look that way? It is a Grade 2 listed building built in 1864 by John Wood for the Parker Jervis family of Aston Hall, made from Hollington sandstone ashlar. It is rectangular on the plan with walls having a pronounced batter with roll moulded cornice in the Doric style. <interestingly a few masonic references here> A blocking course conceals a flat roof of stone,with a straight head doorway on the short side, with plain lintel and a plank door with wrought-iron hinges. The mausoleum is sunk into the ground of the churchyard with roughly hewn sandstone retaining walls. It was erected at the expense of the Honourable Edward Swinfen Parker Jervis of Little Aston Hall and his son Edward John Parker Jervis of Aston House, Aston by Stone, and consecrated on 9th April 1864. I do not know whom Parker Jervis was, apart from being a prominent person in his day, or if anyone (or anything for that matter) is still lain inside the mausoleum, but it is a fascinating and secretive building hidden away as it is, and one cannot but wonder why? Maybe more rresearch for another day…..

http://www.mmtrust.org.uk/mausolea/view/491/Parker_Jervis_Mausoleum

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Nascien Desposyni, the name of which later became the Fordham line/surname. He visited the area in 466AD (lived 450-494 Sommant, France) and is Karl’s 49 x GGF.

Day One: Tuesday 29th July 2021: Our Lady & Saint Nicholas Church: Liverpool. The Anglican Parish Church of Liverpool is on a site said to have been a place of worship since at least the 1250s. The church is situated close to the River Mersey near the Pier Head and controls a prominent view. One would have thought it to be easy to locate, right on the river front as such, but what with all the road-works in the area and placement of the windows and other things within the car, we ended up driving around for a bit before finally seeing it! Of course Liverpool is a very vibrant and busy city with lots of regeneration going on, especially in the waterfront area where we were.

A sailors church overlooks the quayside, the old resides amongst the new, symbols set in stone and wood, past memories cherished in time….

The Chapel of St Nicholas (Patron Saint of Sailors) was built on the site of St May del Quay, which in 1355 was determined to be too small for the growing borough of Liverpool. It is recorded as a designated Grade II listed building and was constructed between 1811 – 1852 from designs by architect’s Edward C Butler and Thomas Harrison. It is an active parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, ye sadly although folks were around there, we were still not allowed in to do our research – so maybe not that active then in respect of visitors traveling from afar?

The church was once the tallest building in Liverpool at 53 metres from 1813–1868 when surpassed by the Welsh Presbyterian Church in Toxteth. The church stands in the heart of Liverpool Business District and is one the city’s oldest and most historic churches. There was a nice peaceful energy there and some very symbolic pieces in the gardens and upon the church exterior walls.

Many fascinating symbols of a Craft nature are to found all over the church here & who knows what was waiting to be found inside… <click to enlarge>

There has been a place of worship on this spot since at least 1257 with St Mary Del Quay mentioned in records from around this time, a larger chapel was constructed in 1362 and dedicated to St Nicholas patron saint of mariners, as Liverpool grew as a city the church grew in size doubling itself by the 15th century. During the Civil Wars the defeated and captured Parliamentarians were imprisoned in the church. The continued growth of the city saw a spire added in 1747 and the Churchyard extended two years later, around 1775 the church underwent extensive rebuilding due to its state of disrepair but by 1810 the church was once again in a state of neglect to such an extent that the spire collapsed with tragic consequences, the tower was rebuilt in 1815 and till 1927 the church changed very little but on the 21st of December 1840 the church suffered wartime bomb damage, the tower and administration section of the church survived but what we see today was rebuilt post war.

Lord Edward Neville had a particular interest in this church, around about 1471 AD, although he was based in Abergavenny, he was very interested in what was going on in Liverpool at that particular time and of the deep-rooted connection to religion and of how people lived their lives on a daily basis revolving around religion, at that time.

The garden area is fabulous and very well kept – a little oasis of tranquillity in fact and there are so many statues and memorials there which are a delight to see and the views of the three graces are stunning from the church grounds, which one can read more about from the last link below.

The gardens here are full of meaningful memorials <click to view>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lord Edward Neville 1471AD Abergavenny Karl’s 13 x Great Grandfather

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_Our_Lady_and_Saint_Nicholas,_Liverpool

https://www.lan-opc.org.uk/Liverpool/Liverpool-Central/stnicholas/index.html

https://www.thetrailblazer.co.uk/blog/liverpools-3-graces-a-brief-history-1

 

Liverpool skyline at dusk showing the Three Graces

 

From Cambridge to Liverpool, and now it was time to catch the night ferry and in the morning we will be in Ireland; we were both so excited and full of anticiapation, hardly believing we were actually on our way after all this time – so dreams do come true and all one needs is patience and an understanding of time… The night ferry crossing from Liverpool turned out to be very smooth and comfortable, in our lovely new cabins, and despite hardly any sleep for a couple of nights, i felt rested and excited. A new day and a new adventure was waiting – touring the Mourne Mountains and coastal areas of Newcastle; it’s all so stunningly beautiful and will all be below… I was feeling very blessed.

 

Leaving Liverpool with a magical looking quayside….<click to expand>

Day Two: Wednesday 30th July 2021: After a cosy and comfortable night on the ferry, we disembarked at Belfast at 6am; a time of day that this writer rarely ever sees! But the excitement of being in Ireland and finally starting this major important quest quickly overcame any thoughts of tiredness. Driving through Belfast it was sunny and quiet, but of course it was very early! The suburbs of Belfast looked very attractive in the early morning light, which just served to motivate us on our way even more.

A suuny early morning drive through Belfast <click to enlarge>

St John’s Church. Hilltown. County Down: After a short drive, admiring the scenery along the way, we arrived at St John’s Church, Hilltown, a small village within the townland of Carcullion (Irish: Carr Cuilinn) in County Down, the main village of the parish of Clonduff, with a population of 899 people in the 2001 census. Hilltown has eight public houses in the high street, a legacy from 18th century smugglers who shared out their contraband here. The village has a livestock market on alternate Saturdays and a Georgian market house opposite St John’s parish church (1766) which adjoins the old inn, the Downshire Arms. Hilltown did not get its name from the two hills that it spreads over, but was named after the Hill family and Wills Hill, 1st Marquess of Downshire; the family were English politicians who also gave their name to nearby Hillhall and Hillsborough.The Hills founded the village in 1766 so people living in the area could find employment in the linen industry, and also built the church in the eighteenth century. Despite its early history, Hilltown has a very strong connection to Irish culture. It is a strongly nationalist/republican village, as is Cabra and the surrounding rural areas that comprises the parish of Clonduff. Throughout the troubles, both had a small contingent of paramilitaries, mainly the Provisional Irish Republican Army.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilltown,_County_Down

As we probably suspected St John’s Church was closed, maybe due to covid but also it was still fairly early in the day! The original building on the site was built 9th August 1771, and the current building was built near the site of the ancient pre-penal times catholic parish church. The gable of the ancient church still remains with an old graveyard surrounding it, the ruins forming part of the district crest. Nearby is the largest fairy thorn bush in Ulster and according to local legend called ‘Old Bull and Bush’, which grew, it is said, from a stick planted by a priest who had used it to drive off a bull which had knocked over the church wall several times during construction. The church was designed by Thomas Duff in 1842, but the building was suspended during the famine years, then completed in 1850. From a Craft/Quest perspective John Fordham paid a vist here in 1883 for a meeting, but also something interesting may have occured in that area in the same year, so is there as connection there?. An interesting church with lots of connections to the past and like all the churches we visit on our quests, it not the buildings we visit but the connection to why the church was built there originally. A reason then, that over time the churches have been built upon over and over again until the true reason has become well and truly hidden in time. One has to look deep to discover just why these churches are built in these specific places, and in these current times often in isolated places but usually in an elevated position – so lots to think about folks! Some lovely views, but as we could not get in we simply had a stroll around.

Churches built upon over and over again  – why? <click to enlarge>

Read more below:

History

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1832) Karl’s 3 x GGF

St Malachy’s Church. Main St. Castlewellan:  So a further short drive to reach St Malachy’s Church in Castlewellan; a bustling, vibrant little town. Sadly although the church was open, a funeral service was taking place and so out of respect for the mourners we did not venture inside and sadly we could not stroll around the grounds either, out of respect  for all those whom were there… However we stayed awhile as we found a nice littel cafe almost opposite the church, in which to have a tasty breakfast and wonderful coffee! Castlewellan (Irish Caisleán Uidhilín ‘Hugelin’s Castle’) is as said, a small town in County Down in the south-east of Northern Ireland close to the Irish Sea, beside Castlewellan Lake and Slievenaslat mountain. It is  not far from the Mourne Mountains, with a population of 2,782 people in the 2011 census. It has a wide main street which runs through two main squares lined with chestnut trees, designed by a French architect for the Annesley Family. The town is unique within Ireland due to its tree-lined squares both in the old town (upper square) and new town (lower square) as well as its very wide main street. The old market house in the upper square was built in 1764 and now houses the public library. 12 July 1849 saw the Dolly’s Brae conflict when up to 1400 armed Orangemen marched from Rathfriland to Tollymore Park near Castlewellan. On their homeward journey, shots were fired and police were unable to control the situation. None of the Orangemen were harmed, but it was estimated that about 80 Catholics were killed and homes burnt. Castlewellan throughout the course of ‘the troubles’, had a significant paramilitary presence in the village, mostly through the presence of the Provisional Irish Republican Army

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castlewellan

The church is a Catholic church and is in the centre of the town and was built in the 1880’s on the site of an older church, by father James McWilliams, from designs by Mortimer H. Thomas. From photos on the internet, there looks to be some interesting pieces inside; many of the adornments and beautiful pieces were provided by donations and bequests of Messrs. Mooney Brothers, merchants of Castlewellan. The church was constructed from Magheramayo granite and it is certainly magnificant to look at with a very Italian feel to it. It’s name, from Saint Malachy, bears more than a passing connection to Malak, meaning ‘messenger’ from the Sumerian times, so there could be a connection to the church, but as we could not go inside maybe the clues and answers are yet to be discovered, and of course a connection again to John Fordham.

A fine, Italian-style building, so sad we did not get inside…. <click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1832) Karl’s 3 x GGF

The drive to the next church took us towards the lovely town of Newcastle and the Mourne Mountains, where we stopped for a short while along the coastal path, near the Bloody Bridge to admire the view and take some photos. The scenery in this area is beyond beautiful, and is almost divine i might add! It was such a glorias day and we were certianly feeling blessed to be here.

Enjoying the scenery around Newcastle and The Bloody Bridge footpath before being on the road again towards our next destination! There are always interesting things to see along the roads in Ireland, many that relate to Ireland’s history. <click on image to enlarge>

 

Kilhorne Parish Church. Annalong, Newry: Situated near the Mournes and the sea, Annalong is a picturesque fishing village in the heart of the ‘Kingdom of Mourne’. Annalong (Irish: Áth na Long, meaning ‘ford of the ships’) is a seaside village in County Down, Northern Ireland at the foot of the  Mourne Mountains. It is situated in the civil parish of Kilkeel and the historic baronry of Mourne. It had a population of 1,805 people at the 2001 census. The village was once engaged in exporting dressed granite and is now a fishing and holiday resort.

Kilhorne means ‘church of the river’. This church is on the site of an old Pre-Reformation Catholic church with traces still of the old cemetery. It was built in 1840 with the chancel added 1883. Rev. George M. Black was appointed perpetual curate 17 Oct 1846, under the patronage of Rev. Close of Kilkeel. This magnificent church is located directly on the north-east coast of Ireland facing the Irish Sea and North Channel. It is a small Gothic church, consisting of nave, projecting chancel and side-corner modern vestry. Fronted by a square 3 stage tower with crenellation, and corner pinnacles. It has a front pointed arched recessed door with moulding and clock face. It has tall lancet windows along the nave. with ashlar quoins, and a modern Chinese granite disability ramp and a pitched slate roof with strap pointing. But sadly we could not get inside so who knows what treasures and clues it could have provided us on our quest.

As probably expected, some lovely anchor symbols in the graveyard and beautiful words upon a gravestone… <click to enlarge>

This historic church had stood in its original condition until the early 1980’s after which it was painstakingly restored to its present state. The restoration work was carried out by Mourne Granite Quarries, using Mourne granite. Part of the restoration work included removing the original aging render on the exterior of the building and exposing the beautiful coarse cut granite we see today. The newly exposed granite was then sand-blasted and re-pointed. The deterioration is ongoing though so work too has to be ongoing. I guess the wonderful site of this church, right overlooking the sea makes up for all the restoration work. In the graveyard there are graves to those killed in action…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annalong

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham 1883. Collooney, Sligo (1858-1832) Karl’s 3 x GGF

And so after a very busy day, we finally made it to our cosy and welcoming cottage near Newry, our home for the next two nights….

A last look at the marvelous Mournes for the night…. <click to enlarge>

Some last words from Karl (Neville): “What a #Quest32 we had guys. There was no stone left unturned on this returning visit to the Emerald Isle. Some may even mark an area of County Mayo as the remains of Atlantis? Who can say? What is good to know about both Northern Ireland and Eire, is that the people are awesome, the views are divine, and the food is second to none. Bring it on Ireland ! We toured many churches and places of interest that Janis will be lisiting on her social media feeds and webpages, (she is!) so be sure to check these out. What a ride, what an adventure – Pieces of the jigsaw are certainly coming together…”

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ aka moon.willow@ntlworld.com
July 2021
<more to follow – so keep watching folks!>

 

 

 

 

 

“FOR THOSE WHOM HAVE DREAMED OF A WORLD WITHOUT BOUNDARIES, THOSE WHOM HAVE SEEN THAT SHADOW IN THE CORNER OF THEIR EYE, AND THOSE WHOM HAVE HAVE HEARD THAT ‘ECHO IN TIME’.” K.N.

“It’s always exciting when someone you know brings out a new book and even more exciting when that ‘someone’ is one’s best friend and tutor and founder of ‘The Knights of the Red Order’.
Both the new books and the excellent podcast below, are full of amazing knowledge and info, giving an indepth insight into our Craft path of ‘The Knights of the Red Order’. I hope lots of you folks will watch and enjoy – and maybe even ask a question or two…” J.F.

<click the link below for the books>

THE GENESIS CODE. FINDING CAMELOT. UNDER THE DOME

A little lowdown then on these three important books (in my own words), for all you ‘Truth Seekers’ out there. These books are the cornerstone of the teachings of The Knights of the Red Order, formally known as The Priory and follow on from the previous Knight Templar and Priory books.

 

THE GENESIS CODE: Many would consider this book to be controversial in it’s exploration of human ancestry and the existence of G-d. Time and space is crossed to reveal the true royal bloodline, taking us back to the beginning of humankind, travelling up to date, exploring the existence of G-d and the Arch Angels along the way. The understanding of sacred rites, blessings and the importance of colour is also included. It is the first step to understanding that our reality is not as previously taught and will empower one to think outside of the box.

 

FINDING CAMELOT: Not as many would think, another book about King Arthur and his Knights, but rather a sharing of the true metaphysical links and truths of this famous legend throughout time and space. It explains many connections with the physical to the metaphysical realms and of how cycles do indeed repeat. It also explains in great depth, the true structure of our reality, of our world and of the creation of humankind (not for the faint-hearted) but for those wishing to evolve. It also touches on the fate and murder of Jesus by humankind. The earth’s magnetics and how ‘leylines’ work is explained from a perspective of the world not being round. It opens one’s mind to the other ‘energies’ and indeed species out there and of how signs and magical practices play an important role to open ones minds to unexplored truths. Once one reads this book, one certainly can never ‘go back’.

 

UNDER THE DOME: Natural and supernatural aspects are contained within this book. The fact that we all live ‘under the dome’ in a prison planet or false reality certainly does put many things into perspective, but also what is really beyond our known reality? As always, blessings, rites and practices are included. The truth of death and dying is also part of that which no one is told about, as is how ‘religion’ has supressed the truth for centuries. Controversial most certainly and many folks will not even be able to go here – yet in order to evolve, mankind needs to understand the true nature of the reality we all live in.

We always say that those whom are meant to to will certainly ‘get it’, will evolve, move on and seek out more….

“Do you want the truth or something beautiful?” It is up to us to decide.  🌹⚔️⚜️🌹

 

Mr Karl Neville was recently the subject of a very excellent podcast produced by Angelina Carleton which one can view in it’s entirety here below by clicking on the link, and also read the transcript below, with questions and aswers by Karl and Angelina:

SACRED MYSTERIES THROUGH LEGACY

SACRED MYSTERIES THROUGH LEGACY: The Neville Family Legacy Curated

<Karl’s answers to Angelina’s questions are in italics>

Have you ever been told something but, there was more to the story? What if there is additional knowledge to help you evolve as you unravel a mystery?

There’s always more to any story. The facts are that we need to explore and almost DISECT the story to find the truths contained within.
  • DISECT
  • TRUTH WITHIN
  • FACTS
  • SUGGESTION
What if symbols are a language that can allow us to understand our past?
  • CUNIFORM FROM SUMERIANS
  • SOLOMONS ALPHABET
  • ANGELIC ALPHABET
What if the codes are also trying to tell us something?
  • THEY ARE
  • REASONING
  • FUTURE MEMORY
  • SUB-BLIMINAL
Are there secrets that have been left out of the public domain of knowledge?
    • YES
    • ALWAYS WILL BE
    • TRUTH HAS TO BE EARNED

Like the adventures of Professor Langdon in the movie, The Da Vinci Code, we too can find ourselves on journey of exploration. Here to provide his perspective and to overcome any myths and perceptions is my cousin and author, Karl Neville, who will dive deeper into these subjects. Karl, can you tell us a little bit about your last 3 books…?

I WILL REFER TO ANOTHER’S PERSPECTIVE, ONE OF MY STUDENTS OF MANY DECADES AND HER PERSPECTIVE ON THEM… “The Knights of the Red Order, formally known as The Priory and following on from the previous Knight Templar Books and Priory Books”. (see The Genesis Code, Finding Camelot, and Under The Dome descriptons above)

Let’s start with any objections, to get them out of the way: can you identify objections to your book’s contents?

  • To try to halt the ‘charade’ in this life
  • To empower people to realise that the Priest is no more clear on ‘G-d’s word’, than the tramp onthe street
  • That the power is through knowledge, ensure you have some
  • It is the power of thought and a ‘collective’ focus that ensure the raising of energy

 

If the idea that the Holy Grail is a bloodline, by interfering with the current Vatican narrative, would that intefer with their stream of income?
The Bloodline is an aspect of the Grail, but not the whole of it

What has the response been from rabbis and clergy regarding the content in your books?
Generally a PC approach – But, most remain silent

What was right and wrong about the movie, The DaVinci Code directed by Ron Howard? How would You address any doubters?

Elements of the ‘Last Supper’ (Right)
Vatican has suppressed information (Right)
The Priory (Right)
Jesus never claimed to ‘walk on water, or air (Wrong)

As your books are the cornerstone of the teachings of The Knights of the Red Order, formally known as The Priory, would you share what these cornerstones are?

  • Wisdom and knowledge
  • A belief in off-world species in whatever context
  • Understanding that the Earth and its reality is a training ground of learning
  • Understanding that it is the biological electricity/energy that is used from this reality

​Given the risks and the controversy, why is it important for you to share what you know? In other words,how do you think it will assist the reader in their journey?

  • Every scenario or situation has a ‘Perfect point in time’, if it is meant to happen, it will
  • Its about sharing knowledge so that those whom have an attentive ear shall listen

I opine that developing and executing one’s legacy is part “healthy ego” and part “conscience”; what was on your conscience in having the courage to write these latest three books in your name vs. a pen name? After publishing many books, I finally realised that if I write it, I must stand by it

  • I would not say its about courage – Its about standing by your beliefs.

I also opine that defining, developing and executing one’s legacy requires self-knowledge, no longer Being distracted by other’s opinions. What did you learn about yourself in the process of writing these last 3 books?

  • More than I care to share in many avenues of thought and process
  • As strange as it may seem to many. I seem to wake up after sleep with new knowledge, frequently
  • It is said that when you here a ‘high-pitch’ tone in your ears, that you are receiving futureknowledge. This happens to me frequently

In THE GENESIS CODE you share insights about human ancestry and the existence of G-d? From your view, why do you think this knowledge has been suppressed in the scientific and educational communities?

  • For control and greed of course
  • So to assume that role on the ‘pedestal’
  • Would society continue if it knew the total truth?
You were saddened by the passing of Prince Phillip, husband to Britain’s Queen Elizabeth, and you also mention the true royal bloodlines – how does this connect with today’s royal families or, does it challenge the current narrative?
  • Yes, it does challenge the current stream – Yet, as we know, Prince Philip was from a good German stock in history.
What went into your research and the time it took you to gather the data on ley lines, family tree research, photographs or any other evidence?
  • I have spent my entire life researching (and receiving) information for the books. I cannot think of life without research
If there is one thing you would like others to know about the existence of G-d and the Arch Angels, what would it be?
  • That G-d is of a species called ‘Triangulus’ and that the Arch Angels are a real as the driven snow

Would you challenge our understanding of reality and why thinking outside the box matters? i e the Understanding of sacred rites, blessings and the importance of colour.

  • Challenge is an odd word to use, as it implies a battle. What I publish is out in the ‘ethos’ for all to access, but only if they choose to do so.

After your book The Genesis Code, comes “FINDING CAMELOT” what made you want to share the actual metaphysical links and truths of this famous legend throughout time and space, in expanding the narrative around King Arthur and his Knights?

  • Well, its all connected is the first thing to say. It was a good way to  explain to readers that ‘energy-lines’ can be eternal and transferred from one dying creature to a living creature.
What are some of the connections between the physical and the metaphysical realms as well as how cycles repeat?
  • An ‘association’ would be a better term to use. Some interact constantly with each realm, some merely interact at the point of death in this realm. Whilst others, never interact at all.
As it relates to the structure of our reality, would you speak further (or deeper) about our world and of the creation of humankind?
  • Key Points: Earth was engineered. Humans were engineered. A science lab of sorts.
  • Vollan needed to ascertain how physical attachments would communicate with free-energy. Of course there was more to this than first meets the eye. In order to have knowledge of such, research into the form of a dragon would be best suited. The dragon is strong, sneaky, cunning, and most importantly; observant of its surroundings.
What is your view about the fate and murder of Jesus by humankind (or the Romans?) as well as the earth’s magnetics and how ‘leylines’ work? (i.e. an energy sacrifice?)
  • The fate of Jesus was never really pre-determined. Therefore it was not fate. What G-d neeedd to know is how the humans at that time wouldinteract with Jesus. Clearly, we know the answer to that one, but what a different world it would have been if Jesus had not been murdered in the way that he was. Of course, this was not on a cross as many think. He was crushed by a boulder on a rocky slab.
Let’s talk magic for a moment (or the 5th element of the ether). In the perspective of the Earth not being round, what are the other ‘energies’ out there? From a math or logical vantage point , how is this possible?
  • There are many layers to the Earth. The inner cell is where we reside today. Space is more of a fluid base than nothing. Dark matter is a play on words and really, as always, the world at large are being lied to.
How do signs and magical practices play a role to opening one’s minds to unexplored truths and how could this help the reader in their life?
  • Its all about ‘Frequency’. Signs and symbols allow the ‘internal mind’, that sub-conscious, to absorb the energies and meaning. Once that is absorbed into the sub-conscious, it is project through the conscious state, thus to become a form of frequency.
In exploring the supernatural aspects of this reality, living ‘under the dome’ in a prison planet or false reality, why do you believe this theory is so quickly and repeatedly debunked in MSM? [i.e. we might wake up]
  • The clear purpose of ‘trolls’ are provided so to debunk the theory at every possible stage. It is not in the interest of the few, for the many to understand their purpose in the universe. They are concerned that anarchy may ensue.
What is beyond our known reality? [i.e. blessings, rites and practices are included. The truth of death and dying is also part of that which no one is told about, as is how ‘religion’ has suppressed the truth for centuries.]
  • A whole new form of existence. Multiple species and wars of unimaginable force.

Controversial most certainly and many folks will not even be able to go here and yet in order to evolve, mankind can grow from understanding the true nature of the reality we all live in. You say those whom are meant to will certainly ‘get it’, will have their souls evolve, in discovering additional truths… Do you believe young people are more ready to learn today?

  • Indeed, the tide is definately turning, shift, in directions that wethought were not possible. Yet, but some odd irony, it may be a little too late.
Who do you think would be most open to appreciating this knowledge to public readers?
  • Those whom have dreamed of a world without boundaries, those whom have seen that shadow in the corner of their eye, and those whom have heard that ‘echo in time’.
​Any other myths that you would like to dispell regarding Friday the 13th, 1307 or the Knights Templars? The gospel of Philip was left out – what other books were left out re: public reading? What of the name, the Desposyni re: the bloodline of Jesus?
  • Desposyni is the name of the bloodline of Jesus – Yet, it has many meanings and many purposes across space and time. As for specific dates in time, they are a mere illusion, for time is measured in different ways in different times. For example the Julian calendar and the current Gregorian calendar.
Sometimes the movies leave hints, what hints do you agree with that Hollywood has shown audiences that align with your book’s contents? Why do you think the decision makers in Hollywood decided to  release the DaVinci Code [there are about 1 billion Catholics in the world and 6 million non-Catholics (not Christian)]?
  • Hollywood invested $125M in the budget and then, grossed $760M – do you think people voted with their checkbook?
  • There are ‘others’ in this world that spend their lifetime attempting to alter the ‘status quo’.But who are they? Or rather, what are they?
Historically, who do you think knew the secrets [i.e. Leonardo, the painter, did he have some knowledge and was Ron Howard a KT to take on the movie project?]
  • Leonardo was definitely a member of the Order, there is no way he could not be.
Though it is not for the faint of heart to develop and execute one’s personal legacy, you are doing it. Thank you for sharing your example as social proof.
  • If all eyes were to see, then man would know that the truth of time is within every living creature, every living organism, and every hidden species.

 

Thanks to Karl, Angelina and Janis

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ 25th June 2021

<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

St Michaels Mount in Cornwall and Mont St Michel in Normandy – both straight out of ‘Myths & Legends’

A Tale of Two Mounts: Allow me to transport you to two beautiful and seemingly out of the world places across the seas; St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, England and Mont St Michel in Normandy, France, both are beautiful and fairy tale worlds with much in common. Both mounts have many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen and to see the tales unravel of past and present within the dimesions. The Archangel Michael is said to have appeared at both sites and of course both sites sit upon significant ‘energy lines’.

Traveling to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, one can either take a small boat ride when the tide is high or walk across the man-made granite causeway between mid-tide and low water. The mount and its castle is indeed a faitytale sight rising up out of the seas as one approaches. The mount’s Cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe, some would say, many more tales that lie hidden under the surface ‘folk memory’. It is a very ‘energetic’ place which is no surprise, for it is a part of the famous St Michaels Ley Line.

A short journey across topaz coloured seas…

Historically, and in a Craft sense too, St Michael’s Mount is a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, yet they also share very similar myths, legends and sightings. It was given to the Benedictine religous order by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century and it is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries. (Many more historical facts can be read on my actual quest write up previously posted) All over the Island references can be seen to the Arch Angel Michael, and also at Mont St Michel in France too; my focus here. Over the years there have been instances of earthquakes and floods destroying older buildings and even a tsunami which caused great loss of life along this part of the Cornsh coast.

Imposing upon the rocks

In history St Michael’s Mount was in the possession of the monks of the ‘sister’ isle of Mont St Michel in Normandy, at around the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066 and it was in the twelfth century that the monks built the church and priory. In 1193 the mount was seized by Henry La Pomery and again, (moving on in history) during the ‘Wars of the Roses’ was held by the Earl of Oxford. Yet do not let us forget or undestimate the many secret and hidden reasons for earthly wars and the attainment of power among men. For the history of these magificant lands is very far removed from modern-time ventures. What is important, especially on a Craft level, is the foundation of something that has been ‘hidden’ for centuries, and yet remains the knowledge within the walls of that which was moved.

St Michael: The angel Michael is said to have appeared to fishermen here in the 8th century AD. There are tales that date back to 495AD, of seafarers being lured to the rocks by mermaids, but then saved by an apparition of St Michael, whom guided them to safety. Within the history of the mount a series of miracles and legends of the apearance of Saint Michael have bought folks of all faiths to this island for centuries. The church on the island is of course named after St Michael and has a beautiful statue of the angel inside.

Local Legends of Giants: Amongst the rock, within the leylines and energy-flow, a local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant named Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack, who lived in the town of Marazion, the ‘gateway’ to the mount made an appearance. Jack knew that the town had to destroy the ‘curse of the beast’ and took on this gigantic menace, whom had an appetite for cattle and for children. So one evening Jack ventured onto the cobble-stone causeway and blew his horn. The beast came down the mount to see what the noise was and Jack sneaked around and up the mount to reach the stone called ‘The Stone Heart’. Jack smashed the stone heart with his horn and the beast dissapeared, never to be seen again. Another version tells of Jack slaying the giant by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

The Giants Well – halfway up

Solomon’s Cross: Hidden away peacefully on a quiet terrace of the island overlooking the sea, and never written about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever, yet to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant pointer to the  ‘Neville Bloodline’. So for this first time on our quests we had a mention of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands, of a connection to the High Kings of Ireland and of their travels to further afield.

 

Where he needed to be….

Our lasting thoughts of this day would be with that single solitary cross, which everyone passes by and that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty and tellings beyond the mundane…

Mont Saint-Michel: Mont Saint-Michel in lower Normandy, France rises up over the French landscape overlooking the land for miles around. The actual Abbey lies at the peak of a rocky islet less than half a mile off the coast of Normandy from land, the commune there was made accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey, but still defensible due to incoming tides stranding or drowning would-be assailants. The island remained unconquered during the Hundred Years War where a small garrison fended off a full attack by the English in 1433, until Louis XI recognised the reverse benefits of its natural defences and turned it into a prison.  Now a rocky tidal island, with modern access roads, the Mont occupied dry land in prehistoric times.

Rising up out of the Normandy landscape

The abbey is an essential part of the structural composition of the town that the feudal society constructed. At the very top, G-d, the abbey, and the monastery. Below this, the Great halls, then stores and housing, and at the very bottom (outside the walls), fishermen’s and farmers’ housing.  The monks there durung first century of their institution, venerated the archangel Michael. The Mont became a place of prayer and study, but the stable period, during the reign of Charlemagne ended when he died. At first, pilgrims kept coming to the Mont but after the Vikings captured the Mont in 847, the monks departed. The abbey has had a rich and varied history and starting in 1922, Christian worship was again practiced in the abbey. The wealth and influence of the abbey extended to many daughter foundations, including St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. (more historical facts can be found on the relevant quest pages) The tides vary greatly, at roughly 14 metres (46 ft) between highest and lowest water marks. Popularly nicknamed “St. Michael in peril of the sea” by medieval pilgrims making their way across the flats, the mount can still pose dangers for visitors who avoid the causeway and attempt the hazardous walk across the sands from the neighbouring coast.

At the very top St Michael on the spire

The access to the Mont, unlike its sister in Cornwall is often by a ‘standing-room’ only shuttle bus, across the bay, with a bit of a walk at the other end. Old very steep stone steps take one to the very top of the mont, it is a long and ardurous journey up, with many rests needed along the way. The abbey complex is much bigger than one would imagine with many facets to it. In times past one can easily imagine what an isolated life the monks and visiting knights here, would have led. A gold statue of St Michel rest atop of the spire there. There are many lovely traditional shops and resturants on the island and a Templar pressence is very obvious there too, which is of no surprise. Sadly all the sacred ‘energies‘ that would have been there at one point in time are now no more; probably eroded away by mankind’s unspiritual interactions; interactions that are as much about ‘giving back’ as ‘receiving’ (taking) upon the shores of time. Folks fail to realise this and energies dissipate and move as and when (or where) they need to. There is so much more to this world and these important sites than folks will ever realise.

Local Legends: The original site was founded by an Irish hermit, who gathered a following of his own from the local community. The island was called Mont Tombe (Latin: tumba) and the story goes that one night in the year 708, the Archangel Michael, leader of God’s armies against Satan, appeared to St. Aubert, the bishop of Avranches, in a dream. The archangel ordered the bishop to build a sanctuary in his name at the top of the island. Aubert ignored this order; after all, it was only a dream. The next night, the Archangel Michael appeared again and repeated his order to build a sanctuary at the top of Mont Tombe in his honor. Again, Aubert was unconvinced, and in any case, building a church on overgrown and rocky terrain on an isolated mount surrounded by the sea would be an immense task. Thus, it suited the bishop to ignore this recurring dream. Faced with such obstinacy, St. Michael realized that he would need to work on his powers of persuasion, so as Aubert slept the following night, the Archangel Michael pressed his finger into Aubert’s forehead and repeated his command. Aubert awoke the next morning to find that the archangel had burned a hole in his head. He needed no further convincing! In late 709, a church was built and devoted to Archangel Michael.

St Michel depicted in a church painting

St Michel and the Dragon: Apparently, it is no coincidence that St. Michael chose this location for the church. Some believe that it was on this mount that St. Michael won his mighty victory over the dragon, described in the New Testament’s Book of Revelations (12:7-9):

“And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, and prevailed not… the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent called the Devil and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him”.

There are many tellings on the internet of St Michael and the dragon/satan at Mont St Michel, of a quarrel between them and St Michel needing to escape from his malicious neighbour whom kept him in poverty. St Michel tried to protect himself and built a home on an islet in the open ocean (what would eventually be known as Mont Saint Michel).  For protection, he surrounded his island with treacherous quicksand. St Michael ended up making various promises and deals with the devious devil, to save and protect himself and eventually saved himself and kicked the devil off the island.

Slaying the ‘dragon’….

Connections to King Arthur: Sir Beldivere was a trusty supporter of Arthur from the beginning of his reign, and one of the first knights to join the Knights of the Round Table. He helped Arthur fight the Giant of Mont St Michel in Normandy; a giant that ravaged France until confronted by King Arthur. It abducted the niece of the King of Brittany and took her to his cave in the mountains known as Mont St. Michel. He plundered the nearby villages, spreading fear among the locals. Hearing this, King Howel asked for the help of King Arthur and his knights to kill the Giant. King Arthur ventured with Sir Kay, Sir Bedivere and two squires.They rode through the deserted forests until they they were within site of Mont St. Michel. Upon the mountain range they saw two fires burning, one to the east and one to the west. King Arthur could not decide which one to investigate first and so he sent Bedivere to the smaller fire. Bedivere journeyed across the rocky terrain and drew his sword when he heard movements. When he came to the fire he met an old woman mourning next to a tomb. She told him that she cried for the death of a girl that she had nursed since childhood who had been killed by the Giant. She told Bedivere to leave this place now before the devilish beast killed them all. Bedivere reported back to King Arthur who decided to travel to the other larger fire alone. King Arthur with sword and shield in hand, approached the Giant in an attempt to catch him off-guard. The Giant rose up immediately and took a club of oak which he put in the fire. The two fought ferociously until King Arthur cut the Giant between his eyebrows. Blinded by blood the Giant thrashed about with his club and eventually caught Arthur’s arm. The King wrestled free and after exchanging blade against wood, the King thrust his sword under the Giant’s crocodile skin armor and killed him. He then called for assistance from Sir Kay to behead the enormous man, and prove to the locals that the Giant had been slain.

Who is Saint Michel? Angels have always been with us upon this earth, whether we wish to admit it or not, they have been here in many guises over many centuries and have been known by other names including The Watchers. Angels are able to cross the boundaries of time and space in all dimensions. St Michael is associated with this earth, with the energy of the earth, with leylines in particular, especially the famous line named after him. His name appears time and time again, upon this earth, especially where churches named after him are concerned. He is the angel that is seen to be fighting for good and is seen to be victorious over evil and is known as Prince of the Heavenly Host. He is the angel whom will fight the dragon, the ancient serpent, known as the devil or satan. Many paintings and statues of him are to be found at the sites that bear his name; the sites upon The St Michel Ley Line.

St Michael from Brentnor Church on The St Michael Ley Line

The St Michel/Apollo Ley Lines: Ley lines are electro-magnetic energy lines that run through our earth. Both St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall and Mont St Michel in Normandy have these ley lines running through them. The Appollo line runs through Normandy and The St Michael Line runs through Cornwall; the point of connection between the two lines is at St Michaels Mount, where the cross over, the intersection forms a Templar Cross. Ley Lines are part of the grid of energy that covers the surface of the earth, connecting many ancient spiritual sites. (Much more on Ley Lines and accurate mappings can be found in the excellent new book ‘Finding Camelot’ by Karl Neville). The lines do have special significance upon this earth and what is clear is that they have a special significance within the riddles of the Grail Quests too. The St Michael Alignment runs through the southern part of England and many sites upon it’s 350 mile course do bear the name of St Michael. The St Michael Ley Line is an important aspect of the island in Cornwall, having been under the sea on the ocean bed for many a good year and the ‘energies’ there draw folks to it time and time again in the hope of discovering something more to life. At the side of the ancient church of St Michael, the very rock is said to grant ‘romantic wishes’ for anyone whom touches the rock and asks for their wishes to be granted.  Much of this of course has to do with the energy of the Mount connecting with the person’s ‘power of though’, something that Craft/Templar folks will know a lot about. This thus enables them to put across a more convincing reason and understanding to their loved one. Whatever you think you know already about the St Michael’s Line, you will probably be wrong, for the line embeds, diverts and repeats itself in ‘mirror-images’ throughout the earth with ease, and through time and space. It is likely to alter it’s ‘projections’ in the near future too, for as the earth changes, so do the lines.

 

The Appollo Line amd the St Michael Line intersect at St Michael’s Mount

So these two magnificant sites both named after St Michael have been very significant within time and space, especially earthly time and space, both with tellings of battles fought and giants slain, also battles fought for good over evil. St Michael, so it is said has appeared at both sites and is a part of the energy alignment there, part of the energy alignment of the earth which bear his name. Of course the many sacred sites on the lines (and the leylines themselves) go back much further than modern day pagans believe, although the folks of old whom were in tune to these alignments, being guided to be so, did create (under guidance) the ‘waymarkers’ in time upon the sites, but they were not the ‘pagan’ folks we are lead to believe they were.

Let us then stop and consider for one moment. We know that throughout time and space, the same ‘energy line’ will have different names upon this earth, as the quest tales, my writings and stories bear witness to, time and time again. So let us consider then, is St Michael, actually Azazel? For the St Michael energy line lies within the earth, Azazel too has ‘earthly’ connections, for ‘he’ was/is buried for many centuries deep within the earth…. and as we know there is no such thing as coincidence….

‘Never underestimate an Angel for they may not be whom you think they are’

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ May 2021

AKA <moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

Sources: Previous Quest posts and teachings, ‘Finding Camelot’ by Karl Neville – available now on Amazon!

 

On Cornwall’s Moor

Written from my true experiences….

 

Whispers within the landscape
A pulse vibrating
A breath
The hidden heart
On Cornwall’s moor
A needed sanctuary
When knights a travelling came
Lost in time
Out of time
Three lions roared
To leave their mark
The Dove hovers above
A blood red cross
Dimension’s change
Tis neither the beginning nor the end
Suspended forever in its own time
Tales unfold
Entwined within old ash roots
Never told
The land keeping its own counsel
Ancient eyes watch from the shadows
In recognition
Traveling pilgrims in modern dress
Also acknowledge
All gone before
Seeing within the green of the land
The sanctity of a bloodline
Secrets forever carved in stone
Spell the unspoken word
Tell an untold tale
Energies exchanged
Footprints left
Forever upon the moors

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

May 2021

“The truths have always been protected over the years, within this very shallow world of men; truths hidden behind tales of misadventure, tales of misdoings and tales of misdirecton, thus keeping that which needs protecting, forever secret, yet hidden totally within plain sight…”.

What a fantastic day to finally escape into the countyside on Quest 31a, squeezed in unexpectedly as we carefully move out of lockdown. We last quested a whole year ago and due to covid restrictions all the quests have been put on hold, so it was wonderful to finally be out and about in Norfolk on the 31st March 2021!

The main subject of todays quest is the Batram Bloodline: ‘the Brandenburg Batrams’, a line and a name with many mysterious meanings, which will take us back into Europe, to Italy and Gemany in particular, on our Quest for the Grail and it’s meaning upon this earthly plane.

Bartram, Battram, Barthram, are the main surnames associated with the German origin of ‘Bertram’, which means ‘Famous Raven’. The Famous Raven is often referred to as the ‘Phoenix’. Very interesting topics of discusion and research are beginning to reveal themselves here. Brandenburg is just West of Berlin and the origins of this Bartram line.

🌹⚜⚔🌹

QUEST 31a: All Saints Church, Dickleburgh, Diss: It was a gorgeous and sunny spring day and the drive out to Norfolk could not have been better, with green shoots and leaves spurting forth with new growth, and the sound of birdsong all around these quiet country lanes. The Parish of Dickleburgh is found about 6 miles north-east from Diss, close to the Norfolk/Suffolk border. It lies on the old Roman road to Caistor St Edmunds. Dickleburgh is well serviced, with All Saints Church, a busy little village store, a pub, a large playing field and other village type amenities.

The village’s name either means ‘Dicel’s or Dicla’s fortification’, or more specifically could also mean a place-name; Dic-leah, ‘wood/clearing of Diss’ or ‘ditch wood/clearing’. The name is also said to derive from an Irish monk by the name of Dicul who had a brief settlement (burgh) in the area in the late 6th century, nothing of which survives today. Although unconfirmed, this may be the same Dicul monk quoted by the Venerable Bede (673-735) in his “Ecclesiastical History of the Anglian Nation”. He tells the story of the conversion of the South Saxons and mentions the Irish monk, Dicul, who had a small monastery in ‘Boshanhamm’, which today is Bosham in Chichester, West Sussex. Dickleburgh is part of the parish of Dickleburgh and Rushall in the county of Norfolk and District of South Norfolk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dickleburgh

The church is 500 years old and has interestingly been in the patronage of Trinity College, Cambridge since the seventeenth century. It is a grade one listed building, built around 1503 and of course a sacred site was there long before the actual building. It seemed to a very lively church, important to the community, and the folks tending the church and graveyard could not have been more helpful and freindly.

It was the Bartram line we were researching on this day, and straight away the family tombstones revealed themselves to us! <click to enlarge>

The church consists of a chancel, nave, vestry, west tower and south porch. The walls are made of flint and freestone quoins and execpt for the tower, are strengthened with buttresses.

There is a new and impressive looking organ inside and a stunningly beautiful east window containing many musical-intrument playing angels, and a transfiguration of the ascension scene plus other figures from the bible. The octagonal font is of particualar interest, especially to us, for Grail clues are hidden there…. Although what the genreal public sees are the shields of the Holy Trinty, Bury Abbey (with three crowns), the Passion, (with cross, spear, reed with sponge, nails and whip) and the blessed sacrement (with three chalices). Around the base are alternating lions and ‘wildmen’ with clubs.

Upon the ornate entrance to the church are more important and useful symbols for joining more of the dots of our quests.

The church has a lot of its original woodwork, a beautiful east window full of detail and a rather interesting screen at the end of the altar pews, upon the various plaques and lists upon the inside walls are to be found the Batram names,  and of course a very lovely and peaceful energy there. There are a few military references both in and outside the church. So what a good start to the day with much knowledge gained.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Samuel Bartram 1726-1801 (7xGGF)
  • Barnabus Bartram 1795-1878 (5xGGF)
  • Henry Bartram 1826-1909 (4xGGF) Moved to Barnet, Middlesex-thus the start of the ‘London Line’

St John the Baptist Church Bressingham: Our second visit of the day was to the village and civil parish of Bressinham in Norfolk. The name Bressingham is of Anglo-Saxon origin and refers to the homestead of Briosa’s people. This town of Bressingham was given by Osulph le Sire, and the lady Laverine, or Leofrine, his wife, to the abbey of St. Edmund’s in Bury in about 963. By the time of Edward the Confessor, the abbey owned slightly more than half the town; the rest being owned by Almar, the Bishop of Elmham. Almar’s part was also a manor, and held in William the Conquerors time by Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.  The town was then two miles long, and a mile and a half broad, it extended at that time into Shimpling, Fersfield, Shelfhanger and Roydon.

Sadly we were unable to gain access to inside the church, although we could have phoned for private prayer but decided to move on. The link below has a good selection of photos for you and an interesting write up too.

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/bressingham/bressingham.htm

The origins of the church date from around 1286; it being a medieval parish church dating mainly from the 14th and 15th centuries. It has an important set of carved pews, which probably date from he 16th century, act of mercy. The chancel is 13th century with the tower being rebuilt in the 1440s, the nave and aisles in 1480-1527; these may incorporate the 14th century very fine carved nave roof. The chancel roof is 18th century with a 19th century restoration. The important set of pews mentioned, have carved end panels in a 16th century style featuring defaced figures representing acts of mercy and deadly sins. The boxed pews are examples of 17th century woodwork.

Interestingly one of the tombs in the graveyard caught our eyes. For it had a rather Roman style and feel to it, with two pillars at each end that alluded to Boaz and Joachim. In the central area were the ‘four quarters of the sun’ something very rarely mentioned, and yet the design could also be shells – a Fisher King connection maybe and worth some more research. Also in the window of this historic church was to be found the enigmatic ‘Raven Symbol’, almost signposting the way to Germany for us….

The tomb with the Fisher King and Roman Connection <please click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Jonathan Bartram 1699(Billingford) – 1783(Dickleford) with an association to Bressinham (8xGGF)

St Mary the Virgin Church Pulham St Mary: Now at our third church of the day, we were really enjoying being out in the sunshine, and having a lovely sense of freedom after being cooped up because of Covid for so long. However still being very safe with masks and santizers and of course always keeping our distance. Pulham Saint Mary is a small village and civil parish in Norfolk, about 8 miles from Diss. Old maps and documents name the parish or village “Pulham Saint Mary the Virgin”, the latter two words are in modern times dropped, and Saint is typically abbreviated. The earliest recorded spelling is Polleham. Pulham is referenced in the  Domesday Book as a single manor (Pulham St Mary with what is today called Pulham Market) and being part of the Earsham hundred. The name Pulham is thought to mean the farmhouse, homestead or enclosure by the pool, water meadow or stream. There is a ‘beck’ (Norfolk dialect for a small watercourse) that flows by both villages. The Romans may have had a settlement in Pulham St Mary as pieces of Roman tile, coin and oyster shells have been found in the area. In 1912 under conditions of secrecy a large base, RNAS Pulham, was constructed for the operation of airships, given the nickname locally of “Pulham Pigs”. RNAS Pulham operated as a Royal Navy base until 1918 when it was transferred to the new Royal Air Force.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulham_St_Mary

The Domesday book of 1080 mentions an Anglo Saxon church in Pulham, but there is no trace of it today. The church of St Mary the Virgin which gives the village the ‘St Mary’ of its name, is believed to date back from 1253. The parish church is of flint construction with parts that date back to the thirteenth century. It is mainly perpendicular in style, has a square tower with 8 bells, and was restored by Bodley in the late 19th century, although many of the original features still remain. The church registers date back to 1538. The impressive porch, built about 1478, was described by Nikolaus Pevsner as ‘something phenomenal’.  It is decorated with large figures of angels and other images and the pierced parapet is comparable to work at both Blythburgh and Attleborough churches.

We could not get inside the church to see the many interesting features inside, including a 15th/16th century stone font whose decoration was plastered over to prevent mutilation from Cromwell’s men and was only discovered during restoration in the late 19th century. The screen, partly medieval and partly restored, has large painted panels filled with 15th century images of the Apostles. The chancel is the oldest part of the church and contains some very important early English features including a double piscina in the south wall. It is thought to date from the 13th century and is very rare in Norfolk churches. Other notable features include the 15th century benches, a 16th century lectern and some glass dating back to the 14th century, indicating the fine windows that existed from a very early date. There is also evidence of the presence of the old Guild Chapel which once stood on the site of the present vestry. It was rebuilt in the centre of the village in 1401 and is now part of the Pennoyer Centre.

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/pulhamstmary/pulhamstmary.htm

But of the utmost importance and relevance to us of Craft, is the famous and stunning late 15th century porch and the ‘library’ of Craft information around the porch. The tower and porch work together to create a sense of grandeur, with many ‘riddles’ intertwined there in plain sight. The porch is actually magnificent, not least because it hides within its carvings some very important Grail clues. Hidden amongs the ranks of angels on one side holding shields, and angels with musical instruments within their niches on the other, could be hidden some of the most important clues we have yet experienced. The angels on the west side play wind instruments, while those to the east play stringed instruments. Pride of place, in the spandrels of the doorway, is the Annuciation, of the highest artistic quality and in amazing condition. Also aparently the stained glass windows in the porch have clues to the Grail, which sadly i missed on this occasion…

Just look above at this amazing porch and try to unravel all the clues hidden there…. <click to enlarge – you will really want to!>

The Grail is indeed a mystery and it has been so for many centuries; over the years it has been purported to be many things, such as the son of Christ, a chalice, or vessel of some description. But the truth is, the Grail was in fact never meant to be found, so the only person who would ever find the Grail, would be the winner of all space and time! Only time and further quests will tell…. So the Grail Quest continues, not only looking for the Grail itself but for the meaning of the Grail, something that is overlooked by many. What is interesting, at the front of the porch here is a link via the artefacts and engravings, that directly link this church to a church in North-East Italy, which we hope to go to sometime within the next year – coronavirus permitting of course. So a question remains which i will leave with you, is it not so much that people are so busy living full yet shallow lives that they know nothing of the Grail or is this how things are actually meant to be and the Grail is not meant to be found….?

   

A library of info above our heads….

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Erasmus Bartram 1768(Pulham Market) – 1854(Dis, Norfolk) (6xGGF)

St Peter Church Billingford: This is such a very pretty area, very green and lush, very open with lots of winding lanes and small villages and today the area looked stunning, although i imagine it could be harsh in wintertime. Billingford, a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk, about 3 12 miles north of East Dereham. The village is just north of the River Wensum, which forms the southern boundary of the parish. West of the village, between Elmham Road and the River Wensum, is the site of a Romana-British settlement. The site is unusual in having evidence that occupation continued into the early Anglo-Saxon period. Artefacts recovered from the site include a gold amulet. The Domesday Book of 1086 records the toponymas Billinge-forda. An entry for 1212 in the Boof of Fees records it as Billingeford. It is derived from Old English and means “the ford of Billa’s people”.

Lovely sentiment from the churches porch

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billingford,_Breckland

https://www.heritage.norfolk.gov.uk/record-details?TNF168-Billingford-(Breckland)-(Parish-Summary)

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/billingford/billingford2.htm

 

St Peter Church Billingford on an incline yet hidden away in a bend in the road, showing two ‘Clarke’ tomstones in the graveyard <click to enlarge>

The church is very much hidden away, standing on a hill to the north of the village and only presenting itself when almost upon it, in an interesting curve in the road. How lucky we were to find it open and to discover that it is usually always open; how wonderfully refreshing in these times. The earliest part of the church of St Peter is the baptismal font, which is 13th-century, yet the actual origins of the church are around 1300AD, and according to the records on the wall, there was a rector here in 1250, so the church is older than that. The present building is largely 14th-century, built of flint with an octagonal west tower and is a Grade 1 listed building. The tower is one of Norfolks half a dozen or so octagonal towers, with the church being mostly 14th century with a couple of later windows. Tall Victorian benches fill the middle of the nave, which although unusual is not unique, there is no central walkway, creating a different sense of feeling inside, together with the eastward slope.

 

Also unusual and much older than it looks, is the rather wonderful font with its sloping octagonal bowl and sides carved with sets of sixteen double arches. The font is said to be so old that it may even pre-date the church and have come from somewhere else or even from an earlier building on the site. Also wonderfully beautiful is the 16th century giant latten lecturn, depicting an eagle standing on an orb. Norfolk has ten of these and interestingly this is a rare unpolished one, creating a different effect to it. The east window here, showing the transfiguration has replaced a much larger one, which can be seen be the changes in the plasterwork. Sadly though there were many artifacts from the church that have ‘been lost in time’, probably do to rebellions, wars and attacks on the church, which sadly has happened a lot in the past. The whole church is very well preserved and one gets a true sense of the period, of the times, apart sadly from the artworks that have been removed. One cant help but wonder, where in the world today are all these wonderful and meaningful peices of art that have been removed from our churches. I did notice when travelling in Ireland and Europe that the churches there are still full of their wonderful and ancient peices of art that allude to a time of a much different christianity than of today and which display clues to a much deeper and maybe even darker kind of worship. An interesting thought then at why maybe ancient artworks are no longer in our churches….

In respect of the quest bloodlines, there is a ‘Charles Ford’ on the wooden wall plaque near the font; the Fords as we know eventually ended up in London. There is much original woodwork in the church and some very old carvings around the high altar, all in an amazing state of preservation and the video below shows all this up very well. The church name banner hanging at the side of the altar shows the Alpha to Omega, but also the ‘M U’ sign, taking one back to the Sumerian connection. Upon the altar i think we translated the words wrongly and it actually is “My Peace I Give Unto You”- see the photo or video and decide for your selves.

Woodwork and carvings all amazingly presevered and give an essence of ‘past time and place’

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Jonathan Batram 1695(Billingford) – 1783(Dickleburgh) (8xGGF)

Church of St Mary Magdalene Beetly: Beetley is a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk and situated four miles north of Toftwood. Beetley was part of the Manor of Elmham, held by William Beaufoe, Bishop of Thetford, with the name deriving from the two Anglo Saxon words betel and bietel, both words applying to a clearing where wooden mallets are made. Beetley was then part of the parish of Bittering Magna, however the Parish divided into Beetley and Gressenhall. Beetley was then combined together with the neighbouring parish of East Bilney in 1935.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beetley

Sadly we could not gain access to the church, even though the Rectory was just next door, so a stroll around the graveyard needed to suffice. The Church is believed to be built on the site mentioned in the Doomsday Book (1087) and is dated to 1320, with it’s origins going back to 1401 AD. It is a grade 1 listed building and like many of these ancient churches, seemingly tucked away off the beaten track. The tower of the church was heightened in the 16th Century, with the north isle being demolished in the 18th century and with windows being installed in the wall. It is built of ashlar and some brick dressings. From the photos online the church looks very simple in decor inside, but apart from that without going inside it is hard to comment. In the graveyard were some tombs within cast-iron railings, one of which was a Templar grave marked by a mysterious and intriging ‘Templar Stone’ The church is said to be set on a interesting ‘Cross-Junction’ of magnetic fields, linking to the Grail and to that of Brandenburg in Germany. Sadly howerver we did not pick up on any energy at all there, so can only assume the particular ‘energy’ that was there, is now no longer so.

The fenced off graves showing the mysterious’Templar Stone…. <click to enlarge>

https://www.derehamanddistrictteam.org.uk/our-churches73257/st-mary-magdalen-beetley/

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/beetley/beetley.htm

Grail Bloodline Connections: The connections here are that of the Grail itself and of the clues today that presented themselves to us, guiding us on our forthcoming journey and quest to Germany and Italy, where can jin some more of those hidden dots…..

 

For more info and footage from the day please see our youtube link 🙂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdbbwNYJQhg

To those of us whom are observant, especially of Craft, feathers can often appear out of nowhere, bringing deep and profound messages from the angelic realms, whom are always watching, always observing…

🌹⚜⚔🌹

April 2021 The Quests continue….

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

 

 

 

 

 

Only the Light….

When the sands of time run out

When all thoughts return unto their source

When the steeple bells no longer ring at twilight

And the city lights fade into an earthly past

 

When the shores of time are memories

When the wave no longer breaks the shore

When the moon and sun with truths intact, just cease

In my silence on the winds I will know I loved you.

 

From the beginning to the end

From the new dawn to the ancient night

From high above the roar of human kind

Only one Light will shine

 

In the silence that surrounds you

In the becoming of my soul

In the Light I carry forwards

I will know, I will know, I will know….

 

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

January 2021

‘Still chasing the tide…’

“Within the histories of these lands are tales woven from time; tales of heroic knights, of knightly endevours, of battles fought for kingship and power. Magical tales trapped within time’s own landscape, of demons, of magic and the unexplained. For all to see and enjoy. Our earthly plane has always been a place of mystery and mythology, of historical deeds, of legendary bloodlines and valiant endeavours by the brave to unlock the riddles of the past, to unravel the mysteries. Humans have tried for centuries to find the pieces of an ancient puzzle, often hidden within the very land itself; each piece has been carefully placed, often just out of reach but well within plain sight. Let me share some experiences that i have enjoyed… “

‘Raising the Devil’ at St Mary’s Church, Akenaham, Suffolk

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St Mary’s Church near Akenham in Suffolk is right off the beaten track; up an inclined grassy pathway that winds past Rise Hall (formerly Rice Hall); one of the church’s ancient manors. The church nestles timelessly in the beautifully English countryside or so it would seem… This lovely little, almost abandoned church does however hold some secrets connected to a very interesting past. It has the nickname of ‘St Mary’s in the Fields’ and stands on a rise amidst the meadows, over a quarter of a mile from the nearest road and a challenge in itself to actually locate it. Once at St Mary’s the views across the surrounding countryside are truly stunning. Yet again, another church that seemingly no-one wants ‘outsiders’ to find and like Borley Church there are no road signs or directions to it. We ended up having to ask directions a few times from folks who seemed quite reticent to give them. There are several very interesting tales about St Mary’s Church, stories of strange ‘happenings’, folks seeing ‘ghosts’ appearing in the church windows, a world war two bomber, on hs way home, literally dumping his bombs nearby and obliterating the church, and there are the reports from the village of the bells ringing for no reason. It has even been said that one can ‘raise the devil’ by walking thirteen times, widdershins around the church – a challenge indeed!!

Raising the Devil

So here we were, all ready and expectant outside this small church in Suffolk where we were about to put the ‘raising of the devil’ tale well and truly to the test. We had our ‘willing’ volunteer, who was about to travel widdershins around the church thirteen times while being filmed and monitored at different stages on his way to prove, is it myth, is it legend or is it real?

 

Off goes the willing volunteer – 13 times widershins! Beware the darkening sky!

So, the journey began and as our ‘willing’ researcher made his tentitive way widdershins (anti-clockwise) around the church, we all waited expectantly. As he journeyed around the church, we all began to notice some strange changes in the overall atmosphere of the area, and more than one of our party experienced some definite ‘pressures’ to the forehead with a feeling of tenseness occurring, around about the 6th lap. On completing all the laps, a weird unexplained ‘darkness’ had descended and quite quickly and to be honest the whole atmosphere had changed, around the church. It had become decidedly ‘heavy’ and the little monitor we had with us to record the ‘frequencies’ had certainly changed in the time we had been there, so we knew ‘something’ of some kind had happened.

So was it the very devil’ himself making his presence know, or was something else afoot, were there unexplained ‘energies’ there on the site, or maybe just coincidence? Although as anyone knows there is no such thing as coincidence – not in this world!

Important to note that when our volunteer went around on the 6th lap of the church, a black cloud arrived overhead, yet ONLY above the church and the immediate vicinity with hail stones occurring – yet not down at Rise Hall or anywhere else for that matter! On our volunteer’s 6th lap widdershins, our head researcher, had an intense pressure in the front and side of his head which was also when the black cloud arrived. It was strange to observe, fascinating and interesting…

Of course, one has always to keep an open mind and decide entirely for one’s self. England is full of these such tales and experiencing them for one’s self can be an eye opening experience. Why not make a trip out into the rural wilds of magical England and see and experience for yourself…..

“Places of power

Where enegy abounds

Hidden tales

Within our lands”

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ AKA ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

January 2021

 

 

 

 

 

“Quest 31 around the west country of England has proved so far, to have been an amazing quest, despite the very challenging hot weather when we were so thankful for the air conditioning in the car. All the apartments we stayed in have been more than up to scratch, and the places visited and the  knowledge gained has been second to non, life altering and path afirming. One more day then home: lots to write up on, as you see here. I do hope all of you will continue to follow and learn with me as i share knowledge and photos galore. As said, all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time: past, present and future becoming one. Knowledge becomes personal power, when mysteries unravel and ancient codes reveal their truths to the ones whom can truly see….  All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it seems….”

‘BENEATH A ROCK ALIVE’

Day Six Wednesday 5th August: Church of St Mary, Templecombe: We left our lovely apartment in Plymouth to travel to pastures new and more adventures. It was to be a long day of traveling through counties galore it seemed! Intercepted by a lovely visit to Simouth Old Fore Street for lunch and retail therapy and then traveling onwards to the Templar church at Templecombe, which yet again was very sadly shut; such a shame as it is a very interesting church with a particular important artifact to be seen inside. Even more of a shame given the church’s Templar history (see below). It has to be said, that yet again G-ds doors were shut to true pilgrims on a sacred journey, something that is becoming all too familiar. No wonder G-d has abandoned this planet! Sacred sites with no access – it makes one wonder! One wonders how the christian church can survive in these times, for they are seemingly still in the ‘dark ages’ and need to move with the times and find ways of inspiring people to attend – which they certainly won’t do with all their doors locked! Mosques for example, are open 24/7 and are full of attendees!

Old Fore Street and Coastline, Sidmouth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth

Templecombe is a village in Somerset five miles south of Wincaton, 12 miles east of Yeovil and 30 miles west of Salisbury with a population of 1,560, forming along with Combe Throop, the parish of Abbas and Templecombe. Templecombe derives its name from Combe Templariorum, after the Knights Templar who established Templecoombe Preceptory in the village in 1185. After they were suppressed in 1312 it was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem who held it until the Dissolution of the Monastries after which it was acquired by Richard Duke of Otterton, Devon. An attempt to discover ‘the village of the templars’ was made by the ‘Time Team’ television series, in a programme first shown in 1996. Late in the investigation, an old tithe map revealed the location of the Templar site, and an old stone boundary wall was found to be still standing seven feet high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templecombe

Photos from outside of St Mary’s Templecombe; showing what could have been if we were allowed inside… <click to enlarge>

The Anglican Church of St Mary at Templecombe, Somerset was built in the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building. The parish is part of the benefice of Abbas and Templecombe, Henstridge and Horsington. The church was probably established during the period when the manor was held by Shaftesbury Abbey, but granted to the Knights Templar while it was held by his descendant Serlo FitzOdo, who established a preceptory in the village in 1185. The preceptory served as an administrative centre for the lands held by the Templars in the south west of England and Cornwall. It may also have been used to train men and horses for the Crusades. After the Knights Templar were suppressed following the 1307 order by Pope Clement IV, it was granted to the Knights of St John, who held it until the dissolution of the monastries. Parts of the original 12th-century church remain, the foundations being Saxon, but it underwent a major Victorian restoration in the 19th century, including a rebuilding of the chancel plus a new  vestry.

In the church is a painting on wooden boards of a head, (see photos above) which was discovered in the roof of an outhouse of a local building in 1945. The painting is thought to be from the 13th century, with a connection to the Templecoombe Preceptory (or Combe Templariorum) which was established in the village in 1185. It was given to the church in 1956. For many years the head has been believed to be that of Christ without the halo which was the norm in religious iconography at the time. The Knights Templar were suppressed partly because of their use of the image of Christ without the halo. There has been speculation linking the image to the Shroud of Turin and other suggestions link to the image being of John the Baptist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Mary,_Abbas_and_Templecombe

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Desposyni (520-593) France. 48 x GGF of the Fordham Line.

After an interesting day of visits and travel we arrived at our cosy flat in the suburbs of Southampton, not far from the docks and our home for the next three nights!

‘OF BATTLES DRAWN’

Day Seven Thursday 6th August: St Mary’s Church, Southampton: It was already a sweltering hot morning when we arrived at St Mary’s Church, Southhampton, so we were very pleased to find the doors open and a welcoming coolness greeting us inside. Sadly due to ‘Miss Rona’ and our churches being habitually shut to pilgrims, we are always delighted when we are able to find welcoming open doors, and so it was with St Marys; a chuch full of life and vigor and being part of the modern times with a very forward thinking attitude. A vibrant church totally living in the times with much going on and an increasing attendance, all down to Adam the facillitator of the site whom has bought his enthusiasm and possitive vibes to the church! A huge lesson to be learned by many of those whom are connected to churches on many levels.

Southampton is a city in Hampshire, 70 miles south-west of London and 15 miles west of Portsmouth A major port close to the New Forest, it lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water, at the confluence of the River Test and Itchen with the River Hamble joining to the south. The history of the area has always been influenced by the sea and rivers. Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

St. Mary’s Church, is a Church of England parish church, and the largest church in the port city of Southampton. This is the mother church to this former county town with its forerunners spanning back to the first Saxon settlements of the 7th century, including a major collegiate church of the European Middle Ages dedicated to the same patron saint. Parts of the church date to the 1880s. Interestingly, in 1914 the sound of its church bells inspired the song, ‘The Bells of St Mary’s’, originally recorded in 1919 by Frances Alda and later sung by Bing Crosby in a film of the same name. The church has listed building status expressly due to its church tower and spire being local landmarks. The interior and walls were gutted in World War II and rebuilt in 1954-6 save for the tower, which was architect designed. There have been up to six other churches on the site, with records entered in the Domesday ook.

The interior is very well looked after with one of the largest organs in South-East England. The church is full of some very interesting artifacts and has a collection of some stunning windows full of meaning, that tell an ancient tale or two.. We were shown around by Adam, a lovely guy, whom considers himself as a facilitator and certainly has his finger on the pulse as far as having a very modern approach, and thus increasing the congregation in leaps and bounds.

Many seafaring references are to be found within the church with an interesting plaque dedicated to the memory of the musicians whom perished on the Titanic, one of whom was of the Craft bloodlines we are documenting; especially poignant to our own head researcher, for this was his own relative on board the Titancic on that fateful night….

Some of the often poignant seafaring references to be found in St Mary’s Church, Southampton <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Mary%27s_Church,_Southampton

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • James Fordham (1697) Ware, Herts  9 x GGF of the Fordham line

Christchurch Priory Christchurch:  A lovely treat as this was not on our official list for today! It was an extremely hot day and we both struggled in the heat, and once again we were very thankful for the air-con in the car. So yes this church was a treat indeed, not on our list but very much a part of our quest and lovely to find it open. A wonderful experience here with so much amazing symbology within the building, telling tales of past truths, still relevant in today’s world; some stunning windows too which were so so full of meaning. Very nice too, to see clear documented reference to the Neville line – the main bloodline of our quests and an extremely important bloodline within history.

Christchurch is a town and civil parish in Dorset which adjoins Bournemouth to the west, with the new Forest to the east. Founded in the seventh century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour, which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the Priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port, and was later fortified. During the 18th and 19th centuries it had a colourful history with smuggling! The town’s harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch,_Dorset

Christchurch Priory is an ecclesiastical parish and former priory church in Christchurch in Dorset. It is one of the longest parish churches in the country and is larger than many English Anglican Cathedrals. The story of Christchurch Priory goes back to at least the middle of the 11th century, as the Domesday Book of 1086 says there was a priory of 24 secular canons here in the reign of Edward the Confessor. The Priory is on the site of an earlier church dating from 800AD. In 1094 a chief minister of William II, Ranulf Flambard, began the building of a church. Local legend has it that Flambard originally intended the church to be built on top of St Catherines Hill, but during the night all the building materials were mysteriously transported to the site of the present priory. By about 1150 there was a basic Norman church consisting of a nave, a central tower and a quire extending eastwards from the crossing. It was during this period that another legend originated, that of the miraculous beam. The legend of the miraculous beam dates to the early 12th century. The story is that a beam was found to have been cut too short when it was hoisted into place. This would have been embarrassing for the carpenters since the wood was expensive and would be difficult to replace. There was however a mysterious carpenter who had worked and eaten alone. The following day the carpenters returned and found the beam was now fitted in place. The unknown carpenter was never seen again, and the story came to be that it was Jesus Christ who had intervened. The church became Christ’s Church in commemoration of the event. The miraculous beam can be seen today and is located in the Priory’s ambulatory.