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Quest 28: The Grail Quest

“Some sources say the Grail Bloodline came from Christ, but we of Craft know it to be much older, yet ‘the’ Jesus was still a carrier of the royal bloodline in this timeline. We have been taught in later degrees that the dynasty of kings whom descended from this royal bloodline were known as sorcerer-kings, some of whom hinted or even stated outright that they were in fact descendants of Lucifer. There is much speculation too of the royal/grail bloodline being connected to Cain/Samael/Lilith and Asmodeus; far too much to write about here but maybe for another day?  We can of course pause for some dot connections here; why sorcery? What is the connection to the Knights of the Round Table? What is the connection to the Templars? What is the connection to the Apostles? Could they all be one and the same; i.e. all have the same source?”

Germany: Wednesday 30th October 2019

St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf, Germany: a dull, slightly wetter day today, but certainly not cold as we drove an hour from our digs, to reach St Nicholaus Church in a very quiet suburb of Dusseldorf; the capital and second-largest city of the most populous German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, after Cologne. The city lies in the centre of both the Rhine-Ruhr and the Rhineland Metropolitan Regions; most of the city lies on the right bank of the Rhine (as opposed to Cologne, whose city centre lies on the river’s left bank). “Dorf” means “village” in German  but of course these days Dussledorf is now a large city. There are strong Roman connections here, and thus to King Arthur, yet when the Roman Empire was strengthening its position throughout Europe, a few Germanic tribes clung on in marshy territory off the eastern banks of the Rhine. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the odd farming or fishing settlement could be found at the point where the small river Dussell flows into the Rhine. It was from such settlements that the city of Düsseldorf grew.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCsseldorf

St Nikolaus Church is a beautiful church and it was such a shame to find it locked, for it was the place of instruction for King Arthur, which is interesting for us and our quest, as it is also the very same place where our head researcher’s grandfather recieved his instruction, for he was here in the area in relation to ‘religious’ reasons. So who know what treasures lie waiting inside but sadly the church was locked so those treasures inside were not for our eyes on this occasion, and we could find no telephone number to make contact with anyone.

This is an older-style church which has been here for the last 300 years, but obviously as we know with churches, built upon a much older and sacred site. There are some really nice Roman/Knights Templar connected artworks in the grounds of the church; a lovely peaceful feel to the site and a great shame we could not get inside. There is very little on the internet about this church, although it does have a facebook page, but more for social activities rather than history, so this church will remain an enigma…

The grounds and artworks at St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf <click on an image to expand>

St Nickolaus Church, Dusseldorf; last video on link

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur; his place of Instruction
  • Place of instruction also of our head researcher’s grandfather
  • Frotmund (Frotherius) link to the year 794 AD

Cologne Cathedral, Cologne, Germany: An approximately 50 minute drive bought us to the hustle and bustle of Cologne; one of Germany’s most well-know and much visited city. It is the largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth-most popolous city in Germany. With slightly over a million inhabitants (1.08 million) within its city boundaries. Cologne is the largest city on the Rhine and also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region.  Centered on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia’s capital of  Dusseldorf, where we had just driven from.

Cologne was founded and established in Ubii territory in the 1st century AD as the Roman Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, the first word of which is the origin of its name. An alternative Latin name of the settlement is Augusta Ubiorum, after the Ubii. “Cologne”, the French version of the city’s name, has become standard in English as well. Cologne functioned as the capital of the Roman province of  Germania Inferior and as the headquarters of the Roman military in the region until occupied by the Franks in 462. During the Middle Ages the city flourished as being located on one of the most important major trade routes between east and western Europe. Cologne was one of the leading members of the Hanseatic League and one of the largest cities north of the Alps in medieval and Renaissance times. Prior to World war two, the city had undergone several occupations by the French and also by the British (1918–1926). Cologne was one of the most heavily bombed cities in Germany during World War II, with the Royal Air Force (RAF) dropping 34,711 long tons (35,268 tonnes) of bombs on the city. The bombing reduced the population by 95%, mainly due to evacuation, and destroyed almost the entire city. With the intention of restoring as many historic buildings as possible, the successful postwar rebuilding has resulted in a very mixed and unique cityscape.

The hustle & bustle of Cologne with many styles of architecture

Cologne Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of St Peter: is a Catholic cathedral whch lies right in the heart of Cologne and it’s famous spires can be seen from right across the river and makes for a compelling sight. It was actually built upon a past Roman Temple and a Roman museum is nearby full of fascinating history and finds. It is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires. The towers for its two huge spires gives the cathedral the largest façade of any church in the world. Construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 but was halted in 1473, unfinished. Work did not restart until the 1840s, and the edifice was completed to its original Medieval plan in 1880.

When construction began on the present Cologne Cathedral in 1248,  the site had already been occupied by several previous structures. The earliest may have been for grain storage and possibly was succeeded by a Roman Temple built by Mercurius Augustus. From the 4th century on, the site was occupied by Christian buildings, including a square edifice known as the “oldest cathedral” commissioned by Maternus, the first bishop of Cologne. During excavations of the present cathedral, graves were discovered in the location of the oldest portion of the building; including that of a boy that was richly adorned with grave goods and another of a woman, popularly thought to be Wisigard. Both graves are thought to be from the 6th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cologne_Cathedral

Sadly there is no actual spirituality left at the cathedral, yet it is non the less a very splendid and impresive building, loved and visited by thousands. There is a bloodline connection here to King Marcomer 38-458, and there is much meaningful Templar symbology contained within this beautiful building.

Cologne Cathedral is full of beautiful & meaningful peices of art upon the floor and above… <click on an image to expand>

Grail Bloodline Conections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458 (51st GGF) born here, though a prior building.
  • King Arthur; the place of apprenticeship

St Paul’s Cathedral, Munster, Germany: With night-time almost upon us it was hit and miss whether we would make it to Munster on time to gain access to the cathedral as it was a two hour drive from Cologne, but made it we did by the skin of our teeth. The cathedral is a very imposing building set in a big square in the heart of the city and with festive lights sparking from the nearby shops, it cut quite an impresive sight. The name Munster is said to derive from Latin and Greek words meaning monastry and the building does indeed have a very monastry feeling to it. It is an independant city  in North Rhine-Westphalia,  Germany. It is in the northern part of the state and is considered to be the cultural centre of the Westphalia region. It is also capital of the local government region Munsterland and is today it is known as the bicycle capital of Germany. The city’s built-up area is quite extensive. There are no skyscrapers and few high-rise buildings but very many detached houses and mansions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster

Munster Cathedral; very impresive looking in the dark.

Münster Cathedral or St.-Paulus-Dom is the cathedral church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Munster in Germany, and is dedicated to St Paul. It is counted among the most significant church buildings in the city and along with the City Hall, is one of the symbols of the city. The cathedral stands in the heart of the city, on a small hill called Horsteberg, which is encircled by streets and the and the Munstersche Aa river. Today the cathedral is the parish church for this area. The cathedral had two predecessors. The first cathedral (called the Ludgerus Dom, 805-1377) stood to the north of the current cathedral; the second cathedral was built in the tenth or eleventh century and was demolished during the construction of the third and current cathedral between 1225 and 1264. The imposing westwek with its nearly identical towers was built as part of the second cathedral around 1192 and was incorporated into the current building. As a result, the cathedral is a mixture of styles, combining the Romanesque westwerk, old choir and west towers with the Gothic nave, transepts, high choir and ring of chapels.

Some rather nice artifacts inside the cathedral including the mechanical clock, that found us ‘stealing’ our photos of it, much to the disgruntlement of the cathedral ‘holy man’ and ‘jobsworth’!

As it was dark outside, there seemed to be a lovely warm glow inside the cathedral and there were one or two lovely items that needed closer examination but time and the lateness of hour were not in our favour. However it has to be said that both my brother and i objected to being hurried along in quite a ‘gruff’ fashion by one of the so called ‘holy men’; the priest ‘on duty’ there who was intent in getting us outside of the doors as quickly as possible for the ‘witching’ hour of 7pm was striking. We were at the door, having finished our historical research and just wanted to take a quick photo of the beautiful clock and its mechanism, just inside the door, but he was having non of it, making sure we knew they were now closed! So we just had to take the photos anyway. My brother and i are both ordained as priests and we were treated disrespectfully, but other than this it is no way to treat anyone whom has travelled from afar to visit a sacred building; ‘jobsworths’ are everywhere it seems and holy buildings are no exception, we were not expectng clergy to act like this. A lovely building yet sadly again with no spirituality.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster_Cathedral

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458, whom was educated here.
  • King Arthur

‘The Red Cross is the coded symbol used within the Grail teachings and you will see this symbol in many places around the globe’

 

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

 

QUEST 28: THE GRAIL QUEST

“Over the years the Grail has been linked to (the) Jesus (at the last supper), being it is said, the cup that Jesus and his disciples drank from, yet also the cup that caught Jesus’s blood while on the cross. But the accounts of a crucifixion we know to be untrue, so we must discount them. Even so they could still have drunk from a cup, a ‘vessel’. In the Knight Templar teachings/degrees we are informed that the Grail was in fact ‘Jul’, carrying the sacred royal bloodline; further info on this is that the Son of Christ (the anointed) is referred to in the Essene scrolls as ‘Gebiya’, which is Hebrew for ‘Goblet’, and further a name (or term used) for him was ‘Jul’; The Green Man of Destiny, again showing the translations and distortions over time”

Germany: Tuesday 29th October 2019

We journeyed across Holland to reach Germany by late afternoon; the weather had been sunny all day and everywhere was looking very resplendent and autumnal. We were to stay three nights in Haltern,  Norddrhein- Westfalen, a small and very pretty village in the German countryside, where once there had been a castle, a fortress in Roman times and Haltern would have once been within the castle grounds, so the whole area has a wealth of history. Let it be noted that King Arthur was born in the North-Rhine, Westphalia, Germany. We had a basement flat in a lovely garden setting and had everything we needed for the next three nights. It was a peaceful area, very spiritual with many shrines along the roadsides.

Haltern, the lovely area of Germany we stayed in with garden steps leading down to our apartment.

Day Three: St Mary Magdalene Church (St Maria Magdalena) Stiftskirche: This lovely small church with its connections to King Arthur’s conception and Mary Magdalene, was only a few minutes drive from where we were staying and turned out to be a gorgeous sunny start to a very good day. The church was originally a monastry in 1166, just before the town was formed in 1200’s. It does indeed have a very ‘monastry’ kind of feel to it. As far as our grail quest goes, in respect of following in the footsteps of King Arthur, this was the place where he  recieved his instruction. One must never disregard churches for they are as a vast library of information and knowledge; knowledge that often seems very far removed from that which one understands of as ‘christian’, for the hidden knowledge coded within plainsight (for all to see) can tell a vastly different story to that which is commonly told or shared.

St Maria Magdalena as known, Stiftskirche

The church was founded in 1166 by Count Otto von Ravensberg as a Premonstratensian Nuns Monastery. In 1550 it became a secular temple for the ladies after the unrest culminated throughout the Reformation, the Flaesheim nuns no longer accepted their abbot and the archbishop approved new statutes in 1558.
The monastery was still used during the 18th century as a supply institute for unmarried ladies of the surrounding nobility. The abbey buildings were destroyed in 1790. Only the west tower is certainly from the early days. When Napoleon occupied the Rhineland in 1803, the ownership of the monastery.

On the outside of the building is a very interesting door, showing depictions of bible scenes; of importance to this path and this quest (The Priory/Knights of the Red Order) is one in particular showing ‘Adam’ and ‘Eve’ being cast out of Eden, having very important significance and implications to this path. There is also another very interesting carved plaque of a knight on horse back on another wall. Many churches and cathedrals do show knights on horseback riding through; where do these images come from and why? If one casts one’s mind back to a previous mention, churches are as vast libraries and the symbolism if read correctly tell many a tale or two from past times and in this case many a knight has ridden through many a church, maybe on many a quest….

Knights on horseback & biblical scenes telling stories that resonate in the world today…

There were some peaceful energies within the church and some original old wooden artifacts too.

King Arthur, also known as Lucius Artorius Castus, German born and said to have recieved his instructions here, which would make sense for in his earlier years as a Roman soldier having strong connections to the area; and travelling through here. Inside the church is an amazing vaulted ceiling and an impresive golden eagle upon the wooden carved altar. Some of the disiples are depicted upon the windows either side of the altar and also Mary and Martha upon the carved part of the altar, bathing the feet of the Jesus. There are many beautiful carved artworks here and suprisingly on one painting is Jesus portrayed with ginger hair, not often seen but proving just how the different cultures and countries represent the Jesus. A beautiful statue representing ‘Non shall pass but those of God’ on the left of the altar and to the right a small urn with the chiro symbol scribed upon it, a newish font with cherubs is also to be seen.

Above is a very profound statue of Mary Magdalene, shown in her colours, those used across all continents; a red dress covered by a blue robe, (sometimes vica verca) representing The Blood, blue and red, oxygenated and de-oxygenated. A fairly modern set of paintings adorns the right-hand wall, but like most churches they do show the Jesus dying on the cross, which according to our Templar/Priory/Koro reseach is untrue, for the way of those times was actually to be crushed between two boulders; it was only actual theives and low scale people whom were put to death on crosses. History is not always what it is puported to be… Of interest is one particular painting here, is the last painting in the sequence of Jesus being supported into a coffin (or taken out?) by three of his diciples; the positioning of their legs telling ‘stories within stories’ (early masonic degree symbolism?) Though Christ is not looking very dead at all – very much alive in fact and almost seems to have wings, modern art but very deep and meaningful. One can see the paintings and everything else mentioned in the video link below:-

Day Three Germany: Haltern, Dortmund, Essen

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur (conception & birthplace)
  • Mary Magdalene
  • Frotmund link

Roman Museum: Westfalisches Romermuseum: Our next port of call was across country, with a forty minute drive towards Dortmund to a church with Fisher King connections. However on our way there we called in at the Roman Museum: Westfalisches Romermuseum; although not a site on our quest as such, it was an important place for us to visit for as we now know with knowledge gained on this path, King Arthur was indeed a Roman centurion known as Lucius Artorius Castus and as such would have travelled with the Roman army when upon his own grail quest, so it was important to get a taste and feel of the times. The museum showed an excellent film which really did get down to the nitty gritty of the times and hard conditions of those days.

Remains and artifacts from the Roman Museum

https://www.livius.org/museum/haltern-westfalisches-romermuseum/

Marien Church Dortmund: So we next made our way to Dortmund, the third-largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia after Cologne and Dusseldorf and Germany’s eighth largest cityand about 40mins away from the museum. It lies in the  Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region and is considered the administrative, commercial, and cultural centre of the eastern Ruhr. Founded around 882, Dortmund became an Imperial Free City. Throughout the 13th to 14th centuries, it was the “chief city” of the Rhine, Westphalia, the Netherlands Circle of the Hanseatic League.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dortmund

St Mary’s Church or Marienkirche is located in the heart of the city amidst the hustle and bustle of the city streets with shops all around. We thought it was closed as could find no obvious way in until a very helpful cyclist led the way to a rather closed looking entrance. Often in these churches the entrance is never where one thinks it is. The area around the church was getting ready for the winter festivities with market stall, wooden grottos and fun fair rides being erected all around!

Since the Reformation it has been a Lutheran parish church of St Marien. The church was destroyed in World War Two, but larely rebuilt and restored and it now also serves as a concert venue for sacred music. It show elements of Romanesque and Gothic architecture and houses some peices of notable Medieval art. A cruxifix hangs in the triumphal arch which separates the congregation for the clergy. There was a rather wonderful ‘All Seeing Eye Plaque’ upon one of the walls, some lovely wooden carvings, some knights emblems and shields and some beautiful paintings and sculptures, but sadly lots of the original artfacts have been removed. The grail quest link here is to The Fisher King, who was the 10th Grand Master of the true Knight Templars, who have a strong link in time to this area

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marienkirche, Dortmund

The enigmatic ‘All Seeing Eye’ plus some of the other artworks in the church <click to expand>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • The Fisher King 10th GrandMaster, Frotmund 764-850 (39th Great Grandfather)
  • King Arthur

St John the Baptist Church Essen:  Another 40 mins drive away and we arrived in the vibrant city of Essen with its winter festival activities well under way! Street vendors and market stall, music, fun fair and a big wheel, with all the shops open late. There was a happy bustling festive feeling with the pedestrian precinct and surrounding area really alive! And we enjoyed a lovely walk around after we had been in the church. Essen is the central and second largest city of the Ruhr, the largest urban area in Germany. Its population of 583,109 makes it the ninth largest city of Germany, as well as the fourth largest city of the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia.  Founded around 845, Essen remained a small town within the sphere of influence of an important ecclesiastical principality (Essen Abbey) until the onset of industrialization. The city then, especially through the Krupps family iron works, became one of Germany’s most important coal and steel centers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essen

The Catholic parish church of St. Johann Baptist is a Gothic hall church in Essen, dedicated to John the Baptist, which stands on Kettwiger Straße, the main street of Essen, in front of Essen Minster, to which it is connected. On account of its position and the fact that its spire towers over the Minster, visitors often mistake it for part of the Minster. The church is descended from a chapel of St John the Baptist, which already belonged to Essen Abbey in the tenth century. According to the will of Abbess Theophanu who died in 1058, candles were to be burnt in her memory ad sanctum Iohannem, which appears to be the first mention of the church. The dedication of the church to John the Baptist suggests that it was originally a baptistry. The foundations of this original chapel were identified in archaeological excavations after the Second World War. In 1264, the Abbess Berta von Arnsberg promoted the chapel to the rank of a filial parish church of the Abbey. The church was rebuilt in 1471 as a gothic hall church and a rectangular east choir was added. From 1699 until 1768 the baroque furnishings were added. These included choir stalls, side altars and a pulpit. The pulpit was replaced by one in the rococo style in 1769. The church was renovated and repainted in 1968.

The church had a lovely warm spiritual feeling to it making everyone feel very welcomed. There was a service being held at the time we visited with many folks in attendance and the church was actually very packed. For this reason we could not stroll around or coment at all so nestled in quietly at the back to embrace the experience. From sitting at the back i managed to take a couple of photos and a little video of the service without moving from my seat, so hopefully everyone can get an idea and sense of the church.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Johann_Baptist,_Essen

 

  • Grail Bloodline Connections:
  • Frotharius 794-883 (38th Great Granfather) known as Faramond.
  • King Arthur

 

“Time keeps its secrets hidden; crack the code of time and all will be revealed”

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

In Blessed Darkness….

DSC02450 (1)

In blessed darkness will I walk my path, with footfalls silent on the earth.

Never alone I wander through an age of eternal night time

Yet fear not my lack of human companionship.

Under heavens starry canopy my becoming of self completes;

For I see the world for what it is

And in acceptance I surrender to the future.

I see the dark and light as one as they become each other.

I see the sun, moon and stars revealed through times illusion

And I see the earth bound in sorrow; secrets hidden from mankind’s view.

And yet I also see myself; I see my secret beyond the skin,

I feel the truth flowing as blood upon the land;

In truth and being I unravel upon the sands of time.

Those I knew as kin, never were

And those that truly speak come to me through ages past

Whispering the secrets to my existence from their alabaster beds.

I read the signs left hidden by kindred long ago,

I see the glory revealed in echoes of lives that still resonate

Upon the unending shores of time.

Yet is it only I who truly sees their unwritten language of the past,

Who feels their energy and patterns of life reverberating through my body?

A record left of all times gone and those yet to come.

I tread the path of the guardians, the watchers, the keepers and the protectors of Light.

I know they watch me; yet leave me be; acceptance.

Yet when the blood finally flows and the rising water cleanses

I too will protect and in my becoming, rise to new heights of understanding

Watching from the shadows I bide my time

Wearing this cloak of glorious darkness I await my time

When I too will whisper my tale upon the Hills of Destiny to those whom would listen.

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

September 2017

 

 

 

QUEST 28: A GRAIL QUEST

“The Grail has often been seen as something un-tangible with many different opinions on what it actually is. Is it an ideal, a physical object, something metaphysical, or something else entirely? Does it relate to the philosopher’s stone? Is it a mystical and transformational experience? Is it a link or a key? Is it a blue-print for something? Has it a connection to immortality? Whatever it is, it is very elusive, yet like a magnate draws folks towards it, keeping out of reach to most, but why is it on this earthy plain and why so sought after? King Arthur certainly travelled phyically on a journey to discover it; his Grail Quest. Here we journey in his footsteps trying to find and unravel the clues on our own particular Grail Quest – Quest 28.”

Day One: East of England: Sunday 27th October 2019

This quest, quest 28, was to be the quest of all quests and was to take us around Europe on the trail of King Arthur and his own quest for the holy grail. Indeed five countries awaited us as we expectantly made our way from Cambridge, England across the North Sea to Europe, taking in Holland, Germany, Luexembourg, France and Belguim on this very exciting epic  adventure; a road trip of a lifetime!

map

What an epic journey awaited us!

St Mary’s Church, Holton St Mary: Holton St Mary is a village and civil parish in Suffolk, England. Located on the B1070 around five miles south-west of Ipswich and half a mile from the A12 (which forms the parish’s south-east boundary), it is part of Babergh district. The western end of the parish is part of the Dedham Vale Area of Oustanding Natural Beauty and the Higham meadow nature reserve. The name of the village is probably derived from the Anglow-Saxon ‘Holan Tun’ or ‘Hola’s Farm,’ It may also mean ‘farm in the hollow.’ It is likely that Holton experienced some Roman influence, being so very close to main Roman road north from Colchester, approximately along the route of the present-day A12. Holten is mentioned in the Domesday Book Survey of 1086 as having a population of 19 including 4 slaves.

http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/holtonstm.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holton_St._Mary

St Mary’s Church is a peaceful church, with some lovely energires there; built in a very rural setting amidst open countryside and small villages. There is a connection at this church, to Cornwall, Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, so tying in with the ‘grail’ aspect right away. This church, like so many others is built upon an original pagan, sacred site and thus hidden within the rocks of the tower, built into the north-west buttress there is a large glacial boulder, a ballast used by pagans of the day in rites for sacrificial purposes. Yet even before those pagan times, going back to the so called ‘dark ages’, pilgrims would have visited this site on their wanderings. So more here is about what is below than what is above and of there being a very special sacred reason why churches are built precisely where they are built; it was never random….

The buried sacred glacial stone area, used for ritual purposes, overwhich the font now stands. In the same area we have some interesting symbols including the rose and the fleur de lys, both of which scream templarism.

The church, even though small does contain a great sense of spirituality and spiritual wealth as our video and photos show. There are connections here to Lancelot and his emblem; the lion. There are some very interesting depictions on the windows – not be overlooked, such as two crossed feathers and the rest of the church contains symbols to The Lamb of God, the Alpha to Omega, the Motherland and the Dove of Peace holding an acacia twig and some subtle references to Mary Magdalene via the Flue de Lys and thus to the Knights Templars and to the Fordham line via Lancelot Desposyni. Also seen is the Neville shield and the Merkabah; all of the Templar lineage.

Some of the very subtle images and windows within St Mary’s Church, Holten St Mary that relate to Mary Magdalene, Lancelot Desposyni, the true bloodlines and to Templarism. All a part of a knights journey – a modern day quest. <click on an image to enlarge>

Bloodline Connections:

  • Mary Magdalene.
  • Lancelot Desposyni
  • King Arthur
  • The Fordham line
  • The Neville line

Lancelot Flag

Lancelot’s flag in battle: The Desposyni Line; most of it is worn through but one can still make out his symbol, the design very reminiscent of a knights head.

All Saints Church, Great Oakley: Great Oakley is a village and  civil parish in the Tendring district of Essex. It is a long, narrow parish lying on the top of a low (25 m) ridge south of Ramsey Creek which drains northeast towards  Harwich. The parish extends south to Oakley Creek, a branch of Hamford Water, where stood Great Oakley Dock, now disused. The church, dedicated to All saints, contains some Norman work. The living thereof is in the gift of St  John’s College, Cambridge. The Domesday Survey does not distinguish between Great and Little Oakly, but records two manors there.

The church stands at the west end of the village and consists of a nave and chancel of pebble and flint rubble with limestone dressings, a west tower of septaria and red brick with a weatherboarded upper storey and a pyramidal roof, and a south porch of red brick. The nave is 12th century, lengthened at a later date, the chancel is early 14th century, and the west tower 15th century, rebuilt in 1766. The only Romanesque feature recorded here is the Purbeck font. Again it is set in peaceful rural surroundings with much more on the inside than one would ever guess from the outside appearance. Another small church with some lovely energies and some very meaningful artifacts inside; there are Dutch connections both inside and out, especially in the architecture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Oakley,_Essex

https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/1501/

A peaceful church with calming energies and straight away, once inside the church we could see from a commemorative war plaque upon the wall mention of one of our ‘bloodline families’ (a Coporal E. Clarke) bold as brass, reiterating the fact that this is indeed a true bloodline quest. Interestingly not that many miles away from where we have previously researched the Fordham & Clarke lines in Hertfordshire. Again some lovely stained-glass windows, but very interestingly this church sports two gold Triquetra (similar to a triskelion) both on a green background; one as the altar cloth and one on the lectern. This symbol is often known as a ‘trinity knot’ when parallel doubled-lines are in the design. The design is used as a religious symbol adapted from ancient Pagan Celtic images by Christianity. It is similar to the  Valnut, a Norse symbol. The symbols here appear to be composed of of three overlapping Vesica piscis symbols. The green here represents Ireland, the colour of Ireland thus connecting us back to the quests and to the bloodlines of to the Kings of Ireland.

The Triquerta symbol, connecting our quest & this church to the Kings of Ireland <click to enlarge>

An intertersting artwork behing the altar depicts ‘The Jesus’ symbolically upon the cross (not actually for he never was crucified) and he is shown with his hands in the sign of the Ninasian salute and with a Templar cross upon his head. To the left side of the altar is a lovely stone carved ‘throne’ within the church walls, where special visiting folks would have sat, around the area are carvings of knights (crusaders) and crowns, albeit very worn in time now, but original and importantly still in place. Again symbolism that connects to the Knight Templars and to Lancelot Desposyni. The intricate metal work across the altar area depicts the red and gold rose, within black scroll work, with fleur de lys and red pillars; the black, red and gold of Craft. To the right of the altar, a stone upon the floor to a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, a Reverend John Townson of York; so a few connections here and i ponder upon the ‘trinity’ connection of the altar cloth…

Many connections in this church across the ‘ley lines’ or ‘energy lines’, connecting the physical to the metaphysical and to those beings whom have previously been upon this earthly plain….

See our video to take a tour around these two peaceful churches

St Marys Church & All saints Church, Essex

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • The Forham line
  • The Kings of Ireland
  • Lancelot Desposyni
  • King Arthur
  • L.C. E Clarke

So day one is complete and it is now off to Harwich for an evening pub meal at the Alma Inn, Harwich and then to board the (almost) midnight ferry over to Holland (it was actually 11pm!) The sea was calm but expectations were high; the cabins were warm and cosy though sleep came and went in a flurry of excitement as Eurpope awaited in the morning…..

Day Two: Holland: Monday 28th October 2019

So after a very calm and relaxing overnight ferry crossing we arrived upon the shores of a very busy and bustling Holland. The roads and style of driving there are very different from the UK and not just because of left-hand driving either, they all seem to drive extremely close to one another and very scarily too! Driving straight out of the ferry into this ‘other world’ was indeed a baptism of fire! So thus we drove through Holland to reach our first stop of the day of our exciting adventure – Rotterdam which was about a forty-five minute journey from the ferry.

St Lamburtus Church, Rotterdam, Holland: The neo-gothic Saint-Lambertuskerk stands in Kralingen on the corner of the chic Hoflaan. The church was built between 1875-1878 by Evert Margry, a pupil of the renowned P.J.H. Cuypers. Saint Lambert is the patron saint of Kralingen. During the war the church and its distict of Kralingen suffred damage during the bombing on 14th may 1940 and the Germans took the church bells and removed them to Germany. In 1947 the parishioners from the district donated two church bells to the church.

St Lamburtus Church, Rotterdam, Holland, almost ‘cathedral-like’, with a connection to King Pharamond. <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

A rather stunning church set in a pretty area with lots of trees and cycles, inside is to be found some amazing Craft related windows and a connection to Cambridge. We would have loved to have stayed longer to have a really good look around, but sadly we could not as a ‘lady in charge’ insisted that our visit be cut short and that we leave pronto, due to a funeral shortly taking place. A lovely feel to the actual church (if not her attitude) with a connection to King Pharomond.

A selection of some of the beautiful windows containing such Craft & Templar symbolism such as the All Seeing Eye, the Chiro, the Rose, The Alpha to Omega and the Dove. <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

DSC09271 (1)

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • King Pharamond (50th Great Grandfather to our head researcher) 430-499 Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.
  • King Arthur

We said farewell to Rotterdam as we continued our travels through Holland making our way towards Utrecht, about one hours drive in theory, but with a stop for a delicous meal along the way in a lovely resturant that opened up it’s kitchen for us early- a most welcomed gesture!

DSC09288 (1)

Cathedral of St Martin: Utrecht, Holland: Whilst a beautiful building to look at, both inside and out, sadly this cathedral had lost much of it’s spirituality and it’s artifacts, two things that often go hand in hand for various reasons over time. However at both the front and back entrances were placed over the doorways two rather splendid knights on horseback carvings. Utrecht itself is the fourth largest city and a municipality of the Netherlands, capital and most populous city of the province of Utrecht. The city centre has many ancient buildings and structures dating back to the High Middle Ages and has been a religious centre since the 8th century.

Knights on horseback above the two entrances <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

St. Martin’s Cathedral or Dom Church is a Gothic church dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours, which was the cathedral of the Dioces of Utrechtduring the Middle Ages. It is the country’s only pre-Reformation cathedral, but has been a Protestant church since 1580. It was once the Netherlands’ largest church, but the nave collapsed in a storm in 1674 and has never been rebuilt, leaving the tower isolated from the east end. The building is the one church in the Netherlands that closely resembles the style of classic Gothic architecture as developed in France. All other Gothic churches in the Netherlands belong to one of the many regional variants. Unlike most of its French predecessors, the building has only one tower, the 112-metre-high (367 ft) Dom Tower, which is the hallmark of the city. Architecturally this cathedral was very stunning to look at, with some interesting items inside, it was set in a lovely area with some interesting buildings and symbols around.

Cathedral of St Martin: Utrecht, Holland; beautiful to look upon with a connection to Nascien Desposyni <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

Inside were some wonderful plaques and memorials often featuring skulls and skeletons as was the ‘fashion’ of the times and some significant tomb carvings upon the floor….

Some of the architecture and remaining artifacts still to found inside the cathedral

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Martin%27s_Cathedral,_Utrecht

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Nascien Desposyni; 49th GreatGrandfather. 450-494 Somnant, France & ancestor to Lancelot.
  • King Arthur

The area around the outside of the cathedral was historic with an old gaol house and some interesting sun symbols on the buildings.

There is a deep purpose and meaning to all our quests and if you have been following you will by now, maybe have discovered that it is at these particular points in time that one can discover the sacred energies that run through our lands, energies that have often lain undiscovered for centuries…”

 

‘At Grail Castle with four aligned, Hidden Knowledge for us rewind’

 

‘Knights of the Red Order’

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ December 2019

 

 

 

 

“And so Quest 27 sadly draws to a close: Moors, sea & heaven, all spectacular and atop the moors in the sunshine, one could be forgiven for thinking that one was oh so near to heaven, for in reality one actually is. Dartmoor at times was wonderfully moody, wild and desolate and high, high up the rains merged into the clouds. Churches sat alone and serene on top of hilltops reached only by winding lanes. England at it’s best, and when safely tucked up for the night in our converted chapel acommadation, one can only give thanks for this life. Down upon the rocky shores life ebbs & flows with the tides; dreams come true and perceptions change as challenges to reality are met…”

“One is so near the clouds on the top of Dartmoor that one can really get a sense & feeling of being able to reach out & touch the firmament above. Today I felt so incredibly and wonderfully close to it. Reach out & touch the beauty before it is too late.”

Day Five: All Saints Church Okehamton: All too soon Sunday, our last day of this amazing and revealing quest was upon us: the weather was still gorgeous and so we intended to make the most of every moment and as we drove across beautiful moorland we could not help but to be in fine spirits.

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon and it is situated at the northen edge of Dartmoor with a population of 5,922 (2011 census). The town itself was founded by the Saxons; the earliest settlement on record being from 980 AD, known as ‘Ocmundtune’, meaning settlement by the Ockment, a river which runs through the town, which grew because of the medieval wool trade and there are some noteble buildings in the town. The oldest building is the castle which dates back to the Domesday Book and which was once the largest castle in Devon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okehampton

The church itself, up a hill at the edge of town is very secluded, peaceful and pretty and is almost set within a woodland setting and yet is still at the heart of its community. A Church has stood on this hill since Saxon times when the little hilltop village of Ocmundtune was closely grouped around its (probably wooden) Church and surrounded on all sides by dense forests. With the building of Okehampton Castle soon after 1066, present day Okehampton began to develop in the river valley and the little Saxon village was progressively abandoned. The church is a grade two listed building, mostly built in perpendicular style and rebuilt in 1842

https://tickets.twomoorsfestival.co.uk/sales/view-venues/all-saints-church-okehampton

 

Inside the very well-kept church is an array of symbolic artefacts relating to Craft and beyond as shown above: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

The stained-glass windows are also very stunning pieces of art showing much symbolism.

  • Blood line connection: Our lead researcher’s 10 x Great Grandfather, Sir George Clark 1509 – 1580. Born in Holland but registered later in Devon, having connections to Colyton with buisness in Okehampton.

“The oh so peaceful and gorgeous Devon countryside where one can literally hear a pin drop and one gets the reality of being truly in the clouds……”

St Andrews Church Moretonhamstead: We drove through some wonderful and practically isolated countryside where one could actually hear a pin drop, to reach Moretonhamstead (anciently Moreton Hampstead) a pretty market town, parish and ancient manor in Devon, situated on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor, within the Dartmoor National Park. At the 2011 census the population of the parish was 1,703; the parish church is St Andrews.

The  Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as ‘Mortone’; which derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town’s situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 ‘Hampstead’ had been added to the name which simply means “homestead”, The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place. The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and with Moreton as its major settlement.

Wool and (in later years) the manufacture of woollen cloth, formed the basis of the town’s economy for over 700 years. The economy was evidently healthy when Moreton Hampstead established a water-powered fulling mill before the end of the 13th century.Read more in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moretonhampstead

This grade one listed parish church is to be found at the eastern end of the town; it was originally built in 1418 and had heavy restorations in 1856 and 1905. It is quite spacious inside with some nice stained glass windows. It is in a rather lovely position overlooking the countryside as are many of the churches we visit. There’s something really special about a cemetry on a hillside with a wonderful view over the surrouding countryside; it can evoke all sorts of feelings and connections inside of one, but sadly, the sacred energies once attached to the church here long ago, are now departed…

St Andrews Church with an interesting plaque just inside the porch

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101334222-church-of-st-andrew-moretonhampstead#.XT3mJnt7l1s

Interia shots of the church showing some lovely stained glass with some close up detail: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

St Werburgh’s Church Wembury: This amazing 14th century church sits on the cliff edge overlooking the ocean and the enigmatic Mewstone and it really is the jewel in Devon’s crown.

“The Lifes that meets the sea in hidden and mystical Wembury”

Wembury is a village on the south coast of Devon, very close to Plymouth Sound, located south of Plymouth; it is also the name of the peninsular in which the village is situated. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty with a beautiful beach well known for surfing and rock pooling, and basking sharks can be seen in the summer near the Mewstone. The population of the electoral ward was 4,455 in the 2011 census. The name ‘Wembury’ may derive from a place name containing the name ‘Woden’ and noted by a John Mitchell Kemble that it was called ‘Wodnesbeorh’. Saxons colonised south-west Devon during the 7th century founding agricultural settlements in the area and the church is dedicated to the Saxon saint, Saint Werburgh. Of course it is a delight for holiday makers with it’s sandy beaches and crystal clear sea.

The mysterious triangular Mewstone, which is uncannily similar to the rock just off Tintagel, is very visable from the beach. In the past it was inhabited and has been a prison, a private home and a refuge for local smugglers. It’s most infamous resident was Sam Wakeman who avoided transportation to Australia in favour of the cheaper option of transportation to the Mewstone, where he was interned for seven years. After his internment on the island he remained there paying his rent by supplying rabbits for the Manor House table. It is said Sam Wakeman is responsible for carving the rough stone steps to the summit of the Mewstone. The artist Turner has painted the island several times, after sketching it during a sailing trip. However the island does have many secrets and not everything is as it would seem….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wembury

The church, standing as it does on the clifftop overlooking the sea and Mewstone is a firm favourite for couples getting wed.

Inside the church, which was built in the 14th century and visited by mesolithic man, is a stunning array of carvings, both stone and marble quite unlike anything i had seen before, ancient, unusual and intriging, including a rarely seen Serpent Goddess holding the ‘Staff of Wisdom’. She is surrounded by a representation of the angels, yet this time shown in their very dark guise; maybe showing their true selves? This brings to mind the phrase, of the angels masking themselves as demons and the demons as angels themselves within the Light and Dark of the world.

Also displayed in oils and gilt is the Neville shield (the Royal Crest), indicating the strong connection to our deepening bloodline quest. The shield always displays the unicorn and lion, but why, leaving much to think about upon the sphere of time. A genuine knights helmet is displayed up high; kind of hidden in plain sight really…  Also, yet again, another connection revealed here to Lancelot Desposyni, taking us deeper into our bloodline quest, with connection to our future quest in Europe, when we will follow in the footsteps of the Knights of the Round Table. The bible here is open on Romans 9:4, (G-d’s Soverign Choice) which if read may bring revelations to the reader…. There is mention too of the ‘Black Rod’ with further connections to Ely in Cambridgshire; much for the astute student to research and discover.

<please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

 

Watch the video below and find out so much more of the history of the church and surprisingly of its connection to Ely, our area and to see many of the wonderful carvings in real time (starts at 2.00)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU5qmTaCRbs&t=1s

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni (our head researcher’s bloodline) was in this area, this place at around 562 AD, in respect of purpose and spirituality.

“I sat around, but was not found, I took a trip and did not fall,
I saw the moon, but not the sky. When time was tough, I reached up high.
A height in time and trip to thee. For in times telling the mystery.>
For seek to find, and trip to rule I saw the sun, with the sky and all”

 

And so sadly this quest 27, has drawn to a close with much to digest and many revelations swirling around like the tides upon the sands. Much then to take on board, but before we depart, why not chew the cud with us, with memories and thoughts of an amazing and wonderful time in Devon and Cornwall….

Devon & Cornwall: A Mythic Quest

Chewing the cud of a very mythic quest!

But time does certainly not stand still for these ‘Questers’, for in the blink of an eye we will be embarking on Quest 28 with a new name and a new look; all a part of our continued evolution on this earthly plane. Those of you with eyes peeled and ears open may have noticed our many references to King Arthur and his Knights (the true men/energies behind the myths). So we are off to Europe at the end of October to travel in the footsteps of those real knignts – please be with us and follow us all the way!

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” August 2019

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

A day of following a trail to find a knight of renown and connecting to a Lady true. The trail took us to Tintagel, via Boscastle where words were spoken on the breeze to those whom could hear. Bloodlines and energy lines all finally making sense…

QUEST 27 CONTINUES…

Saturday had arrived and wonderfully we were still experiencing the most gorgeous of weather, made even the more enjoyable in the knowledge that it was very wet and cold back home, further north. This part of the quest, day four, took us to Clovelly, Boscastle and Tintagel.

All Saints Church Bideford, Clovelly: This pretty little secluded Norman church, not far from Clovelly village is set in a lovely wooded graveyard and on the day we arrived, bluebells and other springflowers were everywhere. It looked very magical. The church actually stands in the grounds of Clovelly Court, and is bounded by the Court’s walled garden. The church was begun in the 12th century on the site of an earlier timber building. The Norman church was a simple cruciform building, consisting of a nave, chancel, and transepts. As the population of Clovelly grew, more space was needed, and in the 14th century a north aisle was added.  The renovation may have been carried out by William Cary, lord of the manor, who received permission to make the church collegiate in 1387. Cary’s plan was to establish a college of 6 chaplains under a Warden, but the plans were never implemented, and All Saints remained a simple parish church.

 

Clovelly Church set in the grounds of Clovelly Court <please click on an image to enlarge>

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/clovelly.htm

Although there has been a church building at this site from 630 AD, in actual fact there has been a place of actual ‘gathering’ here from the early 500’s AD here. Lancelot Desposyni, who is our lead reseachers x 48 Great Grandfather and of the bloodline we are tracing on our quests, was here in this area around about 530 AD.

We have discovered that the Desposyni line links onto the Fordham line, and the Fordham line links onto the Clark line (with or without an E!). The Clarks and the Fordhams have had a very long association with each other; almost since the dawn of time! References to both lines and the Nevilles too can all be seen in this very church.

See our video for more detail & references, together with explanations on the meanings of church symbolism and so much more. (2nd clip on link at 17.56)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=227s

 

Some of the stunning windows that contain references to Lancelot, the Nevilles, the Fordams and to the Lamb of God (a riddle in itself) See much more in our video above…

Clovelly is a totally unspoilt fishing village in Devon that seems to be lost in time, with no cars or traffic of any kind allowed.  It is privately owened and there is a rather steep charge to enter the village, almost as steep as the way down into the village itself! So thus we did not enter…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovelly

  • Bloodline connections: Lancelot Desposyni (from the Fordham line) Born 520 AD & our head researchers 48 x Great Grand Father)
  • Also references in All Saints Church to the Nevilles, the Clarkes and the Fordhams

Boscastle: For our quest, for Craft and research reasons, this pretty little coastal village and fishing port on the north coast of Cornwall was certainly on our agenda. But for obvious reasons there is a lot of falseness around, but if one can see past all the fake touristy consumer traps, it is a lovely little spot. In cornish the name means Kastel Boterel and it is part of the civil parish of Forrabury and Minister. Its harbour is a natural inlet protected by two stone harbour walls built in 1584 by Sir Richard Grenville and it is the only significant harbour for 20 miles along the coast.  The village extends up the valleys of the River Valency and the River Jorden. Heavy rainfall on 16 August 2004 caused extensive damage to the village and made all the headlines as water raged through the village in a torrent, washing away all in its path. It was a terrifying ordeal for all those who experienced it.

 

The very pretty albeit touristy village of Boscastle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boscastle

One cannot visit Boscastle without a visit to the infamous Musuem of Witchcraft which draws many folks to the area for a multitude of reasons. It is a strange place seemingly stuck firmly in an earthly time warp of a particular era and earthly perception. There were quite a lot of negative vibes there, but i was pleased to see a few items and symbols that alluded to Enochian and Templar magic and thus to ‘real’ Craft. It is difficult to know just how much of these ‘histories’ of old witchcraft and folk magic are actually real or not, or simply came into being at the time wicca was birthed and have been elaborated upon over the years since. Magic like any path should always evolve, as especially too should the practitioner and not get stuck within the realms of ‘myth and magic’.

 

An array of interesting items from the museum, some of which show a connection to Craft and Enochian magic.

After driving from Boscastle to Tintagel, it was time for a welcomed coffee before visiting King Arthur’s Hall; a site of an ancient and sacred underground spring, and thus we found ourselves in a quaint little cafe on the main street – just up our street in fact!

 

Tintagel: Tintagel or Trevena  (Cornish: Tre war Venydh meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall in England. The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena until the Post Office started using ‘Tintagel’ as the name, in the mid-19th century. Until then, ‘Tintagel’ had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish. The population of the parish was 1,820 people (2001 census), but decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with and steeped in the legends of King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. There are many literary and film associations with the village and like Boscastle it attracts more than its fair share of moden-day witches, pagans and role players whom simply fail to see the real truths right under their noses and their swishing capes…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel

King Arthur’s Hall: King Arthurs Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s. It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the “Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table”, behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction, and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell. In 1927, the “Order of the Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table” was formed in Britain by Frederick Thomas Glasscock (a retired London businessman, d. 1934) to promote Christian ideals and Arthurian notions of medieval chivalry. Glasscock was resident at Tintagel (in the house “Eirenicon” which he had built) and responsible for the building of King Arthur’s Hall (an extension of Trevena House which had been John Douglas Cook’s residence and had been built on the site of the former Town Hall and Market Hall). The hall is now used as a Masonic Hall, and is home to four Masonic bodies as the photos below show.

 

Masonic symbolism which always feature on our quests; the meaning of which certainly pre-dates modern-day Freemasonary <click on an image to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Arthur%27s_Hall,_Tintagel

Since 1952, the building has been used as a Masonic Hall and is home to the King Arthur Lodge No. 7134. In 1962 a Royal Arch Chapte was formed by the Lodge, and the building is used by some other lodges to hold their installation meetings. The hall is now as home to four Masonic bodies:

  • King Arthur Lodge No. 7134 which was warranted on 13 November 1951;
  • St Enodoc Lodge No. 9226 which was consecrated on 30 May 1987;
  • King Arthur Royal Arch Chapter No. 7134 which was consecrated on 31 March 1962;
  • Tintagel Castle Lodge of Mark Master Masons No. 1800 which was consecrated on 23 April 1999.

 

It is certainly a stunning building inside, where one gets a real sense of a ‘Grand Hall’, the sort of hall where King Arthur could certainly have conducted his buisness, feasted and ruled from. The masonic influence is everywhere in the building too; it being an amazing and fitting building to hold lodge meetings. The day we went, a ‘Fairy Fayre’ was taking place, bringing together, the psychic, spiritual, witchy and pagan worlds, which meant entry was free on that day, but clear photos of the halls design were out of the question.

The very striking stained glass windows and the emblems associated with them are the work of Veronica Mary Whall (1887–1967) who was an important stained glass artist, painter, and illustrator and part of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She created 73 windows for King Arthurs Hall, Tintagel, that opened in 1933. As of 1997 it is considered to be the largest collection of stained glass panels of  King Arthur made in the 20th century and a great example of Arts and Crafts workmanship. I have tried to include as many as i can here, together with some of the descriptions.

 

Tintagel is steeped in the tales of King Arthur, but few know of the real Lancelot or King Arthur & that they did indeed walk upon these shores: for everywhere we went we were reminded of the ‘knightly virtues’ by which each knight, then and now always endevours to live by. A true knight must always follow the codes of their life and of course importantly their oaths, for an oath taken can never be ‘untaken’ as it resonates on the metaphysical planes as well as the physical.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_Whall

St Materiana’s Church Tintagel: In St Materiana’s Church, Tintagel; a site sacred and profound on so many levels with deep connections to Mary Magdalene and our quests, are some amazing and sacred artefacts, which although themselves do not go back to the actual ‘dawn of time’, they allude to and tell true stories that do. This church is so relatable to this ‘quester’ on a very personal level, both physical and metaphysical, for very profound reasons; important discoveries were truly made here. There are those rare moments in life (in time) where myth and reality collide head on and time seems to stop and one finds one’s self catching ones breath. Out of this comes an understanding so deep that one’s whole life simply falls into place and nothing can ever be the same again. As those whom have gone before, in who’s footsteps I walk, I will continue to guide those whom seek the light…

The parish church of Saint Materiana, stands on a very isolated, yet beautiful location some distance away from the village of Tintagel. Almost on top of the cliff-edge, it’s rocky headland view commands stunning views across the ocean. The church is a Church of England,  grade 1 listed building; the first church on the sight, thought to have been founded in the sixth century, as a daughter church of Minister

 

St Materiana’s Church on the cliff-top is a peaceful and profound sacred site with connections to both Mary Magdalene and Lancelot Desposyni <click to view>

The existing church may have been created in the late 11th or early 12th century. Art historian Nikolaus Pevsner (writing in 1950) suggested that its Norman-era design includes some Saxon features, while the tower may be 13th or 15th century in date. The most significant change in its design was the restoration in 1870 by Piers St Aubyn which included a new roof. Later changes include a number of new stained glass windows: many of these portray saints, including St Materiana, St George and St Piran. There are three modern copies of Old Master paintings, and a Roman milestone bearing the name of the Emperor Licinius (d. 324).

 

The church has connections to both Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, both whom have walked upon these lands and visited this church in times past. Mary traveled from France to England; to Cornwall in fact before the church was even here but never the less it was indeed a sacred mound and Mary would have known this. This site would have been her first port of call, for she would eventually land in Scotland. Inside the church are many artefacts, some with hidden meanings that connect to Templarism and certainly to Mary Magdalene herself, especially in the lower part of the Lady Chapel. Lancelot, also journying from France was here in Cornwall around 538 AD, almost one might say on a pilgrimage, as indeed some of us are doing today.

 

Often hidden histories lie hidden for years but surface at perfect points in time and maybe just for a moment of earthly time they share…

Saint Materiana’s Church Tintagel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Materiana%27s_Church,_Tintagel

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni x 48 Great Grandfather or our head researcher, from the Fordham line. Born 520 Ad in France.

For one of our party this quest and indeed St Materianna’s Church with knowledge of Mary Magdalene herself proved to be a revelation of profound importance and significance…

“On sadled shores in time of hands, A riddle for one in all the land, A time to know and a time to learn, A time to sew and a time to burn. That burning sensation of all inside, as one reaches the top of Tintagels perfect site… But what of space and time and fate?”

After a busy day, what better end could there be for a beautiful evening, than a short drive to Port Issac to chill out in the Old School House having a lovely meal…

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  July 2016

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle

St Edmund King & Martyr Church, Kingsbridge: Just a short drive along peaceful country roads bought us to our next scheduled stop which sadly on this occasion was closed to us, so a few shots of the outside will have to suffice. The symbols on the windows looked significant so a shame we could not get in – though we did have a good look aound the town, where there were some amazing charity shops!

The church is an Anglican churched dedicated to St Edmund the Martyr: once a parish church, it is no longer is used for regular worship. St. Edmund’s Church, is mainly in the Perpendicular style and retains some 13th century features including a font, but was enlarged and reconsecrated around 1414. The oldest part of the church is the 13th century crossing tower. The rest of the church is much altered with the addition of a large chapel in 1849. Further rebuilding of the nave was conducted in the late 19th century. There are a few other medieval remains in the south chancel chapel. Parts of the Rood Screen have been used to make the pulpit and the readers desk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Edmund,_King_and_Martyr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsbridge

Hope Cove: So the last port of call for the day, for a bit of ‘down time’ and the best vegan pizza i have ever tasted, was the stunningly beautiful ‘Hope Cove’. Hope Cove is a small seaside village within the civil parish of South Huish in South Hams, Devon. It has tw beaches and is sheltered by the headland of Bolt Tail. The name ‘Hope Cove’ may derive tautologically from the Old Norse word hóp meaning “bay” or “small inlet”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Cove

 

  • Bloodline connections: is that of Thomas Neville of Dartmouth, born 25/02/1810 & died 03/01/1893 & our lead questers 4th Great Grandfather. Originally from Tollesbury in Essex & died in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia & a frequent visitor to the area on Templar Business.
  • V. MacAndrew from the plaque in St Petroc’s Church
  • George Fairlie-Clarke from the memorial in church graveyard
  • Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, depictedvon the church window of St Petrocs.
  • Thomas Neville again, connected also to Kingsbridge and Hope Cove

Join us for part three when we discover more secrets of time at Tintagel!

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ June 2019

THINK OF ME

Think of me and you think of Mary
Think of Mary and there I am.
Light a candle in the dark
Feel the love
Feel the warmth
Feel the Light.
See me and you see Mary
Touch me and feel her grace.
Gather on the shores
And see with clear vision
The truth that binds us.
Look at me and see Mary
Find her in the darkness and there I shall be

mm

“The Keeper of Scrolls” June 2016

So much to embrace & look forward to as The Priory is about to set out upon Quest Twenty-Seven no less! On our journey for truth we will endevour to unravel the hidden histories of these lands, we will set forth into the kingdoms of Devon & Cornwall for our next knightly adventure.

Quest 27: Devon and Cornwall: So our quest was at last upon us and it couldn’t have got here quick enough. On Wednesday May 1st, we made our way to Gunnislake just inside the Cornish border, but wait! Our quest starts right here!

Day One: Princetown: St Michael & All Saints Church.  Princetown is a village in the Dartmoor national park and is the principle settlement of the civil parish of Dartmoor Forest. Princetown is known for being the site of Dartmoor Prison and is around 1,430 feet above sea level; the highest settlement on the moor and one of the highest in the UK and is surrounded by moorland; thereby attracting many hikers and walkers, especially in the summer months.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princetown

It was a typical wet and misty Dartmoor afternoon when we arrived at St Michael & All Saints Church, Princetown; the Archangel St Michael being the patron saint of sick people, the elderly and of people of ‘order’ whom work in the military. Contrary to the ‘official’ write-ups of the church, it is built on an ancient sacred ‘energy’ site, connected to our quests, even though the current building itself is not that old. The church is of a simple design and built between 1812 – 1814 by prisoners captured in the Napoleonic Wars with France, and the War of 1812 with the United States, all of whom were held in Dartmoor prison. The east window contains stained glass of 1910, in memory of the American prisoners who helped to build the church. It is a designated Grade II* listed building but is now sadly a redundant church in the good care of the Churches Consevation Trust.

St Michaels & All Angels Church sitting amidsts the stuningly serene Dartmoor

Inside the church are many interesting artfacts, and as one would expect some poignant military memorabilia too, lest of all a seat saved in the front pews for soldiers unknown, which one can glimpse in the video. Interesting to note that our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, but he married a Mary Ann from Princetown and there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, in this very church! The church had a lovely feel about it and felt much older; the beautiful and intriging wooden carvings around the pulpit, one of which portrays an animal head on a human body, certainly seemed older. The lovely tapestry of St Michael portrays the correct Celtic Cross, with the saint wearing blue, red and gold robes. The beautiful stained-glass window above the altar portrays the life and death of  ‘the Jesus’, from left to right in story-book style. Also on one of the wooden chairs to the left of the altar are some very interesting carvings of a direct Enochian origin, relating and connecting the church firmly to our path…

Inside the church, showing the window, the St Michael tapestry and the Enochian carvings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Michael,_Princetown

Outside in the graveyard, very noticably separate from the rest of the gravestones is the secluded area where the prisoners have been laid to rest; separated in death as they were in life. Rather ironical really as death makes no distinction; we are all as one in death…

Take a tour around the church & discover our links & bloodline history for yourself

St Michael & All Angels Church Princetown

Day One: Walkhampton: St Mary the Virgin Church. Walkhampton is a village and civil parish on the western side of Dartmoor, in Devon. The village lies on the Black Brook, a tributary of the  River Walkman, about 4.3 miles south-east of Tavistock set amidst beautiful unspoilt countryside.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walkhampton

Walkhampton church, which is a grade one listed building, is situated on an ancient elevated site about half a mile north-west of the village and can be seen for miles. Unlike most churches which face east, it faces north-east, the direction of the rising sun on the longest day. The present building, which is built of granite and has a tower with four prominent pinnacles, dates from the 15th century, with much later alteration, including restoration in 1860–61. For 400 years until 1985 the church had no dedication and was known simply as “Walkhampton Church”, but in that year it was dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. Research has indicated that it may have been originally dedicated to St Dionisius of Walkynton. Sadly the church had already been locked when we arrived so we had to content ourselves with a stroll around the outside. It is a pretty chuch standing amidst some gorgeous countryside, so who knows what we may have found inside…

St Mary the Virgin; a pretty church built on an ancient site in beautiful Devon

And so onto Cornwall, where our digs for the next five nights was to be the converted Ebenezer Chapel, now flats; ours named aptly as ‘Pilgrims Rest’.

Gunnislake is a large pretty village in East Cornwall situated in the Tamar Valley; an extremely beautiful area on the outskirts of Dartmoor in Devon. There is a history of mining in the area, but this is no longer active, but in it’s day was one of the richest mining area of Europe. It has a small railway station which serves the local villages of the area. The geo-magnetics of the area are very powerful and interesting, especially for those using ‘earth-based’ satnav… (something to ponder on)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake_railway_station

  • Bloodline Connections: Princetown: Our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, and he married a Mary Ann from Princetown; there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, inSt Michael & All Angels Church, Princetown.
  • John’s father was Earl Henry Neville, 2nd Earl of Abergavenny; a destination of a previous quest.
  • Walkhampton: Jonh Neville (as above) was stationed, as a soldier, in the area circa 1800’s,  6th great uncle.
  • Gunnislake: connections with the Clarke, Fordham & Neville surnames.

And of course finishing off the day with a gorgeous meal in a wonderful atmospheric local pub and resturant as one must always have balance in life “Reverence & Mirth in equal measures”

Day Two: Buckfastleigh & Buckfast Abbey: We drove across beautiful Dartmoor to reach Buckfast Abbey, with a stop for lunch at this delightful and peaceful beauty spot in Dartmoor, which in the summer months is absolutely teaming with visitors.

Buckfastleigh is a small market town and civil parish in Devon situated at the edge of the Dartmoor National Park.  It is part of Teignbridge and is a centre for tourism, and home to Buckfast Abbey.  The town has grown as a mill town known for it’s woollen mills, corn and paper mills and a tannery supported by the rivers Dart, Mardle and the Dean Burn; water being an essential natural resource used in the manufactoring of wool and other products. Buckfastleigh is medieval in origin and the name Buckfast means stronghold, and Leigh would have been the pastures belonging to Buckfast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfastleigh

The very beautiful Benedictine monastry at Buckfast, known as Buckfast Abbey, is just near the edge of Dartmoor. After many ups and downs the monks are still there today and live a very peaceful devotional life. The Abbey is self-supporting with a farm, where vegetables are grown and animals are raised and a shop which sells wine, honey and religous items etc. The monastry is most famous for it’s Buckfast Tonic Wine, a delicous fortified wine that the monks have been making since the 1890’s

Buckfast first became home to an abbey in 1018. The first Benedictine abbey was followed by a Savignac (later Cistercian) abbey constructed on the site of the current abbey in 1134. The monastry was surrendered for dissolution in 1539, with the monastic building stripped and left as ruins, before being finally demolished. The former abbey site was used as quarry and later became home to a Gothic Mansion House.

The position of the hands in the above carving is very relevant to the Priory, our path and the truth of our quests; also note the Enochian influenced carvings around the doorway; all of which allude to teachings and truths of our path that are much older than the actual building here.

In 1882 the site was purchased by a group of French Benedictine monks, who refounded a monastery on the site, dedicated to Saint Mart. New monastic buildings and a temporary church were constructed incorporating the existing Gothic house. Work on a new abbey church, which was constructed mostly on the footprint of the former Cistercian abbey, started in 1907. The church was consecrated in 1932 but not completed until 1938. Buckfast was formally reinstated as an Abbey in 1902, and the first abbot of the new institution, Bonniface Natter was blessed in 1903. Despite all this it did feel a very peaceful place with some stunning works of art, windows and artifacts inside.

 

The abbey is full of stunning artworks, many with hidden symbolic messages; there are extra meanings here in several of these photos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfast_Abbey

https://www.buckfast.org.uk/

Next and without further ado, we made our way to Exmouth Marina and Harbour to embark upon a scheduled boat trip along the Jurasic Coast. Not a part of the quest as such but something that would be informative and fun.

Exmouth itself is a port town, civil parish and seaside resort, sited on the east bank of the mouth of the River Ex, and is 7 miles east of Exeter. The two ecclesiatical parishes, Littleham and Withycombe Raleigh, that make up the town of Exmouth today can be traced to pre-Saxon times. The name of the town derives from its location at the mouth of the River Ex estuary, which ultimately comes from an ancient Celtic word for fish.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exmouth

We had booked to sail with Stuart Line Cruises, leaving from Exmouth Harbour at 2:15 and it was scheduled to be an over three hour trip, along the ancient coast line. This jurasic coast line is a world heritage site, attracting many visitors. It is England’s only natural UNESCO World Heritage Site; the circular cruise sails along the oldest section of the site, known as the Triassic Era.  The cruise certainly did show the age, beauty and importantly, the fragility of our coastlines. Here on the video below one can see the magnificance of the ‘sea stacks’ and hear a spot of the commentary on the video too. It was rather blustery out at sea but lots of snuggly blankets were thankfully provided.

The beauty of England’s Jurasic Coast Line

Englands Jurasic Coast Line & the Beauty of Devon and Cornwall

  • Bloodline connections: Buckfastleigh has connections to the Clarke surname and family link.

“The Keeper of Scrolls” May 2019

email me:  moon.willow@ntlworld.com

The land does not give up it’s secrets easily yet leaves clues hidden within the landscape of time for those whom are willing to decode the riddles…

THE FALL THROUGH TIME.

Angel lost; fell through stone
Blood and clay far from home.
Fell to earth through stormy waters,
Rebirthed in water, Leviathan’s daughter.

A million years, a thousand stars,
Dismissed from heaven at the eleventh hour.
A portal of slaughter or man’s salvation,
Demon hunger, a sacrament waiting.

Blood red flesh
Bound as one.
Blood is truth
Under a sun.

A Messenger spoke of truth or dare
Told the tale to those with no fear.
In chambers deep with no rebirth,
Secrets kept by G-d on earth.

A magic hill,
A golden tomb
Forever hidden,
Mankind’s doom.
Beauty stirred
Within a thought,
A test of time,
Battles fought.
Love was lost,
Grail diluted.
A story done
But never ended.

Time is endless
Existence not.
A waking serpent,
A fire to stoke.
A dark knight waiting,
The church’s curse.

Turn around
Turn around
My little child.
Water is wet
Wind is wild.
Those we shall meet
And meet again,
Brothers, Sisters,
Lovers. Friends.

Within a season
Within a time
A purpose known
Yet living a lie.

Stoke the embers
Raise the flame,
Time has come
And come again.
Cycles repeat
And repeat once more,
We are born to death,
Few reborn.
Dark waters spilled
Under a dome,
Within a thought
Dark beauty sought.

Ice and fire
Carry the key.
A sinking land
Eternally.
Those we have loved,
We will love again
As ‘we’ carry the Flame
Again and again.

 

The Keeper of Scrolls Feb 2019