Tag Archive: The Nevilles


IRELAND: QUEST TWENTY SIX:

Day Four: Dublin: Although sadly we never had time to see anything of the city of Dublin as such, i did manage a few quick photos whilst traveling to our designated destinations, but certainly a city to come back to and explore at leisure.

 

Driving through Dublin!

 St Andrews Church: Although we were unable to actually stop here due to location and parking challenges, we did indeed drive past and acknowledged that it is now the Central Tourist Office for Dublin! Times change, people change and the use of buildings change, but let us not be sad as it is indeed good to see the building being used and vibrant, even though not in a religious sense.

The original St Andrews Church was located on present-day Dame Street, but disapeared during Oliver Cromwell’s reign in the mid-17th century. A new church was built in 1665, a little further away from the city walls and due to its shape was commonly known as the ‘Round Church’. Thomas Dalton, Lord Chancellor of Ireland was buried here in 1730. The population of the parish in 1901 was 3,058, in 1971 it was 300. It has to be noted also that there is a high Lithuanian population here.

You can read more about St Andrews Church in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Andrew%27s_Church,_Dublin_(Church_of_Ireland)

 

  • Bloodline Connections: Both Albert John Fordham (1928-1987) and John Fordham (1892) were baptised here.
  • Also connection to the Neville line.

Christ Church Cathedral/The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity: This is the cathedral of the United Diocese of Dublin and Glendalough and the cathedral of the Ecclesiastical Province of the United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel in the Church of Ireland. It is the elder of the capitals two medieval churches being founded in c.1030, the other being St Patricks Cathedral. There were extensive renovations being carried out while we were there which were tad disorientating, but the hoardings themselves were fun and very photogenic in themselves, giving an opurtunity for some colourful photography!

 

Christ Church Cathedral: There are many richly sumptuous artifacts and fine decor here, yet at the same time there are equally (or in fact more) relevant and important histotical artifacts seemingly hidden away in corners…

 

The ‘hidden’ artifacts; many of which relate directly to ‘The Neville’ bloodline; but just why would they be kept low key and mostly unmarked?

Christ Church is officially claimed as the seat (cathedra) of both the Church of Ireland and Roman Catholic archbishops of Dublin. The cathedral was founded probably sometime after 1028 when King Sitric Silkenbeard, the Hiberno-Norse king of Dublin made a pilgrimage to Rome. The first bishop of this new Dublin diocese was Dunan or Donat; the diocese was at that time a small island of land surrounded by the much larger  Diocese of Glendalough and was for a time answerable to Canterbury rather than to the Irish Church hierarchy. The church was built on the high ground overlooking the Viking settlement at Wood Quay and Sitric gave the “lands of Baldoyle, Raheny and Portrane for its maintenance.” Of the four old Celtic Christian churches reputed to have existed around Dublin, only one, dedicated to St Martin of Tours lay within the walls of the Viking city, and so Christ Church was one of just two churches for the whole city.

 

Some of the amazing and priceless artworks in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin; more photos from this cathedral can be seen in the section on Celtic Crosses (part one) and Templar Symbolism (part two)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_Church_Cathedral,_Dublin

https://christchurchcathedral.ie/visit-us/

Right next door to the cathedral is a venue known as Dublinia; a historical recreation (or living history) museum and visitor attraction focusing on the Viking and  Medieval history of the city. Dublinia is located in a part of Christ Church Catherdral, known as the Synod Hall.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublinia

  • Bloodline connection is to the Neville line

St Patrick’s Cathedral: Dublin: On this occasion, although on our itinery, we never actually made it to St Patricks Catherdral which was some distance away; the journey had been fairly long getting to Dublin from our base that morning and still lots lay ahead. But hopefully in the future was shall be sure to visit. Please do follow the links though to read up about it:

https://www.stpatrickscathedral.ie/learn/life-and-history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Patrick%27s_Cathedral,_Dublin

 

  • Bloodline connection is to the Neville line

St Nicholas Parish Church: Dundalk: After another drive through the Irish countryside we arrived in the busy town of Dunalk in County Louth; part of the diocese of Armagh. This is a bustling and very friendly town, it’s name in Irish is Dún Dealgan, which means “Dalgan’s fort” and it is the county town of County Louth. It is on the Castletown River, which flows into Dundalk Bay, and is near the border with Northern Ireland, halfway between Dublin and Belfast, so we had travelled a fair few miles that day. It has associations with the mythical warrior hero  Cu Chulainn.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dundalk

 

St Nicholas Parish Church, sits on a busy road junction in the heart of the town, surrounded by local shops, cafes and takeaways. Again once inside it is a beautiful church with a very peaceful energy. The original church was built in the 1220’s and some parts of the church have not born the ravishes of time very well, while in other parts restoration has been carried out.

 

The interior of St Nicholas Church

A Dr. Oliver Davies, who examined all the old churches of County Louth in 1945, put the probable date of the church in the thirteenth century and considered that it was the need of a rising seaport which called for its erection. In this connection it is suggestive that St. Nicholas is the patron saint of merchant venturers by sea, and that many sea ports have churches dedicated in his name. During the troubled times of the Rebellion in 1641-50, when Dundalk was taken by assault, and of the campaigns of Schomberg and James II, 1688-90, the church fabric became sadly damaged. It was re-roofed in part in 1702, as a stone in the vestry records, when Rev. Ralph Lambert was vicar, it was “restored in a new and more elegant form.” and as is the case for so many churches restoration continued down the centuries.

 

For a parish church St Nicholas did have some rather stunning stained-glass windows

https://www.stnicholas-greenchurchdundalk.com/history

http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=LH&regno=13701004

  • Bloodline Connection: the home of the ‘Fallen’ Nevilles of the Great War with actual records of the returned on ‘The Returned Army’ page.
  • NEVILLE, C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, Sapper, E V, 68 Division, Signal Corps, Royal Engineers. From New Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, Lieutenant, ERNEST W, Royal Engineers (Telegraphist). (Tempest’s Annual 1917)
  • NEVILLE, Sergeant, W, Royal Army Service Corps. From New Street, Dundalk.(Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, WILLIAM,  HMS Anemone. From 1 Brunswick Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Actual Records here:- http://www.jbhall.freeservers.com/the_returned_army_page_d.htm

Day Five: Belfast Jewish Community: As part of the Priory teachings we endevour to gain insight and understandings of all the earthly religions; to see common threads but also differences too. The Jewish community in Belfast dates back to 1079, but this building here was built in the 1960’s; as well as a temple of prayer and service it is also a community hub. The people there were very friendly and welcoming, and to someone who’s first time this was, the ladies kindly guided and engaged me in the service which was a massive three hours long due to the time of year!

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It is quite a big building; much bigger inside than it appears on the outside and  is decorated  in a modern style with lots of blue and light coloured wood. As expected, treasures of the religion are housed there for services, but as there was a service taking place when we visited (our reason for going) i was unable to take any photos. It has to be noted though that even in these so called enlightened times, there was a small police presence outside the building the whole time that worship was taking place.

http://www.belfastjewishcommunity.org.uk/history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast_Hebrew_Congregation

 

Bloodline Connection: The Neville line

St Anne’s Cathedral: Belfast: A beautiful building with the largest Celtic Cross on the outside that i have ever seen! St Anne’s Cathedral, also known as Belfast Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Donegall Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland. It is unusual in serving two separate dioceses (Connor and Down and Dromore). A cathedral is the place where a bishop has a seat but Belfast Cathedral is unusual in having the seats of two bishops – the Bishop of Connor and the Bishop of Down & Dromore. It is the focal point of the Cathedral Quarter, Belfast.

 

The first architect was Sir Thomas Drew, the foundation stone being laid on 6 September 1899 by the Countess of Shaftesbury. The old parish church of St Anne by  Francis Hiorne of 1776 had continued in use, up until 31 December 1903, while the new cathedral was constructed around it; the old church was then demolished. The Good Samaritan window, to be seen in the sanctuary, is the only feature of the old church to be retained in the cathedral.

 

In 1924 it was decided to build the west front of the cathedral as a memorial to the Ulstermen and women who had served and died in The Great War. The foundation stone for this was laid by the Governor of Northern Ireland, the Duke of Abercorn on 2 June 1925 and the completed facade, to an amended design by the architect Sir Charles Archibald Nicholson, was dedicated in June 1927. The cathedral is very grand inside and spacious and of course very photogenic!

 

 

Some of the beautiful artworks and stained-glass windows to be found inside Belfast Cathedral

 

The Columba Challice, The Hand of G-d; note the position of the fingers. The Pyramids in stained-glassan unusual design for a cathedral; if one looks close, one can see the sphinx too.

Bloodline Connection is that of the Neville line but we also saw a Forde reference too!

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Anne%27s_Cathedral,_Belfast

Stained-Glass Windows; the stories told: Throughout the lands of mankind, stories and myths have always been told; by scribes, by artisans, by painters, by monks in the old times, verbally by story tellers then and now, and of course by those craftsmen whom painstakingly worked on the stained-glass windows seen in churches all over our lands at certain sacred points in time. To understand the messages contained within, we have to look deep into our past history, yet not as we know it, not as we are told but of the real history, often hidden in plain-sight right there on the windows.

The windows often depict the life and death of ‘The Jesus‘, often showing him with a serpent entwined around a segment of the windows design. One would be forgiven to assume that it was a reference to the serpent of the well-known bible stories and in a way it is.  Yet it alludes to ‘The Serpent Priesthood‘; the path of the true Knight Templar. The serpent connects to freedom,  of being totally consumed by dogma; yet freedom has to be tasted within before it can be tasted without, so one (with knowledge of the Serpent Priesthood) learns over time how to control the serpent; how to be free.

The Jesus is often seen wearing the colours of the Templar (Neville) lineage, of Red and White (silver) representing blood and honour, especially in battle, with honour originating from the past monetery use of silver. Colours are never by accident; they are a very integral part of the hidden symbology and convey numerous meanings.

The lives and deeds of the saints are often depicted and of course it was St Patrick or Saint Columba here in Ireland;  a saint having a certain connection to an area will often be depicted in the local church windows, yet they are also shown in mythological  or esoteric connotations.

Of course many symbols and emblems to be found incorporated in these window designs again relate to the Neville bloodline, the Serpent Priesthood and to the Knight Templars, thus making them a fascinating source of history and thus traceble through time. But just why do these images always connect to each other in the way they do and how or why did they come to be? Enscriptions, together with Masonic and Templar symbols are very often placed strategically on the windows telling a truth without words, hidden from mankind.

The ladies in the life of the Jesus play a big part too, and if one looks closely at the windows, gender is not always what it seems to be either – or what we have been led to believe. Many artists of the day were involved in the creation of stained-glass windows, non more so than the Pre-Raphalite artists who were inexplicitly drawn towards mysticsm and knowledge. Celestial objects; the sun, stars and moon and other lesser-known planets, mean something much different in Templarism and often hold centre stage on many windows, often predicting the future times to come; yet offering a warning too. Caskets, boxes, scrolls, children and of course ‘The Lamb’ are often widely used too, as is nature and flowers, but always with a secret Craft meaning which eludes to the potions of creation.

 

.A selection of the stained-glass windows discovered in Ireland; many with messages hidden well within plain sight

So on these quests we are discovering among many things, how ancient buildings are speaking to us. The stunningly beautiful and exquisite artwork and mosaic tiles that adorn the wall and floors of many a church or cathedral is not just for the sake of the artwork alone, but also for the clues left to us, hidden ‘within stone’ of the true untold history of our country. All left for us to decipher; left for the astute truth seekers to discover and acknowledge – truly and surely a quest for the modern-day Knight…

Dan Brown did kind of have the right ‘idea’ in a very loose sense but was way, way off track with his actual facts and tellings; he had the wrong locations, the wrong churches and followed a few expertly placed red herrings, as one would. However the symbols of the past are all still here, expertly placed within plain sight for all to see, awaiting the astute to rip off their old hoodwinks and to decipher…..

These symbols do not connect to ‘modern day Christianity‘ for they hark back to a much older time, travelling through the lineages of The Knights Templars, the Free Masons, the Eastern Star, to the Egyptian Mysteries, to Ancient Sumeria and even much further back in time and beyond our world. The clues and stories have survived, yet few know of the real meanings and of the ‘placement’ of the clues in specific areas. It is truly a quest of a lifetime and most certainly beyond, and that is why we love these quests so very much!

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“The Grail Kingship is merely seasons in front.
So be it that all those whom disbelieve shall cease to remain” K. N.

“…show me that L.i.g.h.t that burns bright amongst the stars and the moon. Show me the dawn of a land that was never known and I shall see you in the trinity of time.” K. N.

Conclusion to our Irish Quest; many Templar secrets shared here:

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2018

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The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

DAY FOUR: The Minster Church of St Thomas Newport: This was our second visit to this church; we had previously arrived in the freezing cold, when the the church was closed and the snow had covered all around in a white shroud, so it was welcoming to see the church in a different ‘LIGHT’. St Thomas Church is a very vibrant church full of energy and life which emanates from the folks in charge, namely The Revd Kevin Arkell and his wife. So it was well worth the wait and also for the very warm and freindly welcome afforded to us. The church is slap bang in the middle of the town in a very surburban setting and ironically (or not) just outside and across the road from a Craft building of another kind…

 

The original late 12th-century church was dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury known as Thomas Becket (1118–1170). Later, under the rule of King Henry V111 of England, (1509–1547), when Becket was declared to have been a traitor, the Canterbury part of the name was dropped. Its name and the ambiguous dedication to St Thomas was thereafter, over time, assumed by many to refer to Thomas the Apostle. From the 18th century its deterioration made any renovation futile, and funds were raised for a new church on its site. The new church was built over the years 1854 and 1855 to a design by the architect S. W. Dawkes of Cheltenam. Reflecting the building’s history, but arguably unusual, the new church was dedicated on the feast of Thomas the Apostle to both him and St Thomas of Canterbury. The tower contains a ring of 12 bells.

Inside the church is a wealth of history and information and the church is actively setting up its own achive and history corner and can boast some amazing and historic artifacts; there is also a wealth of old photographs which are posted here. Revd. Kevin and his wife have an enthusiastic team around them who have some good projects on the go and ideas to draw in the community, children and all; so the very best of luck to them.

 

Sarrui Sarru: St Thomas’s Church has a great deal of history attached to it; it has some amazing stained glass windows that also show a wealth of past history; from the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line and of course the Fluer de Lys, towards the top of the window. Looking to the top we see the cross, a symbol representitive of, or a reminder that there is no such a thing as a ‘king on earth’ or ‘Sarrui Sarru’ from the ancient Sumerian meaning ‘King of Kings’;The Jesus’. A reminder then that throughout all the battles of the civil wars etc, the end result/the end game would alwayd be ‘The Jesus’….

Merkabah: One of the most detailed stained-glass windows in St Thomas’s, Newport is the second window below which shows six triskellian; three to  the left and three to the right, masked in gilted gold but right at the top of the window and clearly shown, is the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, re-inforcing the fact that the cross is a new addition; the Merkabah was/is the symbol used for aeons before the modern-day cross, a new addition to the christian faith, took its hold upon history and also the minds of people. If we go back to grass roots, what people think of as ‘The Star of David’, the Merkabah, is in actual fact the true representation of christianty and for very good reasons too.

 

Window one is representitive of the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line, the Fluer de Lys and the Sarrui Sarru. Window two shows the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity

Museum Section: Within this section of the church are some very beautiful and ancient artifacts; a few of which can be seen here including some amazing archive photos which we were giver permision to photograph. There are also some beautiful old bibles, ancient wooden chests and a wonderful wooden carved depiction of the last supper.

 

 

<click on all images to enlarge>

The Pulpit: The pulpit is from the old church and is carved in wood and thought to be carved by Flemish craftsmen.  It is original and displays some very intricate carvings around its sides, some of which i managed to get some close ups of. It is unique insomuch that the figures carved on it are not biblical at all but are relating to the sciences and philosophies of the time. Also round the top of the pulpit is reference to the ‘trumpet’, as mentioned in the Book of Revelations; some of which have already occured….

 

The Font: There are two fonts here; the later one is shown here with carvings all around that we have become so familiar with over the course of these quests; the older of the two is to the right of the altar. When the church was rebuilt the original font was not returned with the pulpit etc, so the new font was built at the south door. Then someone came knocking on the door to say that the old font had been found in a garden in Newport and had been used as a bird bath for many years! So the church now boasts two fonts; the new one being used for major baptisms.

 

The newer font with its very symbolic and familiar carvings, the descriptions of which can be found on other quests… <click to enlarge>

Taize Service: In the evening of our daytime visit we were most fortunate to be invited back by Revd. Kevin, to a candlelit evening of chanting and meditation, a taize service, something that i had not encountered before. It sounded so lovely that we immedietly said yes. Although it was a taize servive for the christian lent, one can easily adapt it, in one’s own mind, to suit ones own path or spirituality or even to just enjoy the experience and chanting as a whole. It was a small intimate gathering; there was a small choir from the church’s own choristers attending, dressed in formal long red robes and every participant attending was invited to hold a lighted candle throughout the service.

We can all relate to the words below taken from the introduction to the taize service, whatever our faith. In The Priory, in Templarism, we do have an understanding of G-D. but from a different perspective to the christian understanding and we do not actually worship any higher being, yet have an acknowlegement of such. So a perfect end to a perfect day…

“Many trivial things in our lives shift our focus away from God. This evening we worship in the style of Taize style, clear your mind and let the music, prayers and readings help you to focus on God. We ask God to calm our hearts and clear our minds of life’s many distractions as we come to worship”

 

 

….and finally more of the artworks from around St Thomas Church including the Neville Sheild in situ over the entrance just below the organ, more beautiful stained-glass windows, carvings from around the altar, the Ford connection and a glimpe of the wonderful ceiling <please click to enlarge>

You can see more of and read about the history of this church in the links below:-

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • John Thomas Neville 1878 – 1953: directly connected to the church, Great Grandson of Edward King 1878 -1953 amd Great Grand Uncle of our lead researcher)

All Saints Church, Calbourne: A possitive change in the weather bought us to the little church of All Saints in Calbourne, although extensive roof repairs are being carried out we were still able to wander around inside. The church is set atop a ‘hill’ amidst picturesque rolling countryside. The church is medieval with the tower being rebuilt in 1752; its churchyard contains the commonwealth war graves of two British soldiers of World War 1. The church is built with Isle of Wight stone rubble with some flintwork and tiled roofs. The church is grouped with Holy Spirit Church, Newtown.

 

In the middle part of the church extensive roof repairs are being carried out and thus there was scaffolding up inside and out, yet we were still able to gain good access and take some unusual as well as general shots and a good video too.

 

You can hear much more about the church and its metaphysical and Craft connected history and further facts that relate to mythology by linking to our video below…

St Thomas Newport & All Saints Calbourne

 

 

Further shots that relate to the windows, the ‘spinning wheel’ and an unusual plaque tucked on a window ledge to the left of the altar and of course the Neville shield…

 

We were not able to gain access to the graveyard due to the health and safety reasons of the scaffolding being up but one can see an alternative view of the spinning wheel from the outside  <please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • A full Neville connection with McAndrew
  • A full connection to Robert McAndrew 1829 – 1879 (3 x Great Uncle to our head researcher) born in Elgin and died at Calbourne

Read more about the building and its construction here:

 

Holy Trinity Church, Cowes: This church at the popular seaside resort of Cowes has a very commanding position directly overlooking the sea but sadly on this occasion the church was well and truly closed to us, so a quick wander around its perimeter to take some quick shots for the record was all we could muster.

 

The church is situated on the north-east side of the Isle of Wight; the town of Cowes is world famous for its yachting and other sea-side related activities. Holy Trinity Church was conscecrated on midsumers day in 1832 by Bishop Sumner, the Bishop of Winchester as a ‘place of worship on Cowes foreshore for the sailors and seafarers’. The church was built in distintive yellow Isle of Wight brick in the Gothic style. The building was designed by Mr William Bramble of Portsmouth. In 1862 the church was enlarged by the addition of a Chancel and Sanctury. One of the penalties of being so close to the sea is that the land underneath the building tends to move. During the past year extensive works have been carried out to stabilise the buliding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Cowes

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • Maurice Neville: 1915 – 1990 (2 x cousin, twice removed to our head resercher)

 

 

Our intrepid researchers chilling out on the sea-front in Cowes; and yes after all that snow and ice it really was that glorious!

St Mildred’s Church Whippingham: It had turned into a stunningly gorgeous and sunny day when we arrived at Whippingham; who could have guessed that two days earlier the island had been covererd in a blanket of snow and ice and at one point we had to have assistance to get our vehicle up an icy slope! As we drove up to the church it looked a picture in the glorious sunshine set amidst its beautiful grounds.

 

The village of Whippingham and the church are best known for their connection with Queen Victoria. Whippingham was the centre of a royal estate supporting Osborne House and Barton Manor. Queen Victoria always took  close interest in ‘her people’ at Whippingham. This fact is reflected in the many memorials in St Mildred’s Church which commemorate members of the royal family and household. The chancel of the church was built in 1854/55 by the architect Albert Jenkins Humbert, although Prince Albert is thought to have had a guiding hand. The remainder of the church was constructed in 1861/62; a side chapel is dedicated to the Battenberg/Mountbatten family. Sadly the church was shut, so no interior shots but you can discover more in the links below:

However we did manage to see some rather interesting carvings and windows from the outside of the church, indicating very strongly the Craft connection here. The carvings around the entrance porch were particularily fascinating as they point towards an Enochian connection (the root/route of Craft), the windows depict the ten pillars and above the archway a square and compass is very evident, showing ‘one point still in darkness’ telling a tale of masonic and templar connections to this church.

 

<Please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodine Connection here is:

  • Robert Neville: 1907 – 1969 (2 x cousin twice removed to our lead reasearcher)

 

 

At the end of a very busy and revealing day; time to unwind with the sun and the views and all that St Mildred’s Church and the beautiful Isle of Wight has to offer

DAY FIVE: All Saints Church, Ryde and homeward bound…  So our last day on the beautiful Isle of Wight had arrived all too quickly and yet just one final destination before we ventured forth on the ferry and over the seas back to England. All Saints Church is a parish church located in Ryde; not very far away from where we were staying. The building is a landmark of the island; the spire being visable from many points around the island and indeed even from the mainland itself, projecting beyond the very skyline.

 

Although the church has lost a lot of its sacred energies it does still contain some beautiful carvings and artworks, all of which are well worth a look at. The church, which is often referred to as the ‘Cathedral of the Island‘ is a grade two listed building. It was built between 1868 and 1872 by the architect George Gilbert Scott; the spire was an addition in 1881/82 and is climbed early on the Feast of Ascension to sing an Ascension hymn. There are some lovely stained-glass windows here including one dedicated to the memory of Samuel Poole, in the Chapel of the Good Shepherd, but many windows were destroyed in the second world war.

 

The carvings around the font show a merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, a simple carved cross also utilises the merkabah and one can see other artworks here too:

Bloodline Connection is:

  • Alfred Neville (1904 – 1997) 2nd cousin 2 x removed to our head researcher)

 

 

The Isle of Wight proved to be an island of revelations and surprises and provided us with many more dots to connect on our quests for the true bloodlines, but what does that actually means and why….?

Please stay connected with us for our next quest to Ireland, Quest 25, going back to the start….

 

The Keeper of Scrolls March 2018: email me for further info ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

“A perfumed tree, how sweet the smell… But a fruitful tree is far from wells,

Doth carry the roseline from land to air, then once to the four winds as all do stare”

 

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The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

QUEST TWENTYFOUR: MARCH 2018. It was a very cold and wintery day as we journeyed over to the Isle of Wight on Quest 24. Amazingly though, and i guess because most folks were house bound and heeding the weather warnings, the journey was swift and without incident. with even the ferry ride being calm. However upon landing on the island the weather set in and snow and ice gave a serene beauty to the already stunning countryside.

 

 

Leaving Plymouth and arriving on the snow-bound Isle of Wight

DAY ONE AND TWO: Timeless snowscenes at Newport Minster, Carisbrooke Priory, St Mary the Virgin Church, Carrisbrooke, the slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle and the United Reformed Church, Shanklin. Today was a day of simply enjoying the stunning views and taking photos; most churches and venues we had planned to visit were shut with folks staying wisely at home apart from those brave souls who were braving the snow covered slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle with sledges in tow! We slithered and slipped our way though the day, braving a few very slippery slopes and icy roads but certainly made the most of it!

Reading on through this quest; some churches were kindly opened to us for a second visit and for that we thank all concerned; more detailed accounts are to be found by scrolling through. However those not opened to us are/were still very much a part of this quest and the reason we are doing them. All churches are part of a metaphysical/physical sacred alignment, all are ‘perfect points in time’: all tell a story of the past, present and future, all are a part of a whole truth and a part of the path we follow…

 

 

Newport Minster; picturesque in the snow

 

 

Serene snow-covered views: Carisbrook Abbey, showing the Neville Sheild and brave sous sledging on Carisbrook Castle slopes <click on all images to enlarge>

 

 

The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrook looking stunning covered in snow.

 

 

The timelessness of a snow covered Carisbrook and an ‘orb’ just outside the church. <click to enlarge>

 

 

The United Reformed Church, Shanklin in a timeless snow covered setting..

DAY THREE: St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrooke: So on our second visit to this church, which sits high on a hilltop with commanding views over the town, we were thankfully able to gain access. The parish of Carisbrooke is one of the largest on the island in both size and population and also one of the oldest. Carisbrooke Church is considered to be ‘the most important ecclesiastical building on the Isle of Wight’. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book and the present nave of the church was built in 1070 as decreed by William Fitz-Osbert who was governor of the island. It was originally attached to the Priory of St Mary the Virgin, which was occupied by monks from the Abbey of Lyra (now Lire) in Normandy. The noble tower, the crowing glory of the church (photos seen above), was erected fifty five years after the dissolution of the monastry. Later still are the two large windows of the north wall which date from the sixteenth century when Bishop Fox  held the see of Winchester. His rebus, a fox is carved on one of the label stops. Much more on the history can be found by following the link below:-

http://carisbrookestmary.org.uk/history/

 

 

Beautiful artworks within the church include a window showing ‘The Lamb of God’ pointing to a strong Templar influence, the Neville shield indicating the bloodline movement, the other two shields, when merged represent ‘Temperence’ and ‘Fortitude’. the statue of the madonna and child by John Skelton in 1969 and some very unusual carvings of a Sumerian nature…

The Bloodline links of interest here are:-

  • Penelope Fordham (1838-1879) Granddaughter of Edward King Fordam of Hertfordshire. She was born in Godshill and died in Godshill

All Saints Church, Godshill: The Church of the Lily Cross…. Where the Four Points Meet: Just as the name would suggest, this is an amazing church, set atop a sacred mound that rises above a very pretty and historic town. The earliest church at Godshill was built in the Saxon period, possible during the reign of Edward the Confessor, but the current church is is almost entirely 15th century and built by the monks of the Sheen Priory. The hill on which the church stands was the site of pagan worship long before christianity reached the Isle of Wight. All Saints is the largest medieval church on the island and one of the most visited and photographed, which is partly due to the treasure, found inside the church, of a 15th century wall painting of Christ crucified on a lily; a very Templar symbol.

 

 

The Lily Cross, or as it was formely known, ‘The Budding Cross’ is to be found painted on the east wall of the south transept and although this areas was locked up i did manage some shots through the bars. Although there are similar depictions in Europe, this is the only ‘Lily Cross’ in Britain and dates from the middle of the 15th century. Sadly during the Reformation the painting was white-washed several times; though we dont know if this was to preserve it or destroy it. t was only rediscovered in the 19th century and carefully cleaned and is now amazingly clear and brightly coloured

 

 

The Lily Cross’ and the entrance to where it is displayed <please click on images to enlarge>

I know that there is much more to the significance and meaning of The Lily Cross, yet it is very hard to find any indepth explanations but this below, together with a christian symbolism of the lily, is the nearest i could get to any thing that had a bite to it. So for the moment Godshill is keeping its secrets…

http://www.paintedchurch.org/godshill.htm

 

For a more detailed tour around the church with an explanation of the importance of the church, it’s symbolism and Templar connections please see our link to our youtube channel.

Godshill Church, the Isle of Wight

Always looking around with eagle-eyes, i was very pleased to see this significant symbol enscribed on the wall of the entrance porch of this ancient church, as it meant a lot to see it there, on The Church of the Lily Cross. Not as commonly thought, the Awen symbol, as significantly older with a deeper meaning; a footprint on the sands of time carved into the fabric of reality….

 

 

 

 

The above photos show the Knight Templar connection, the Judaic connection of two cherub statues, the ‘Gatekeeper’ statue, together with the mother and child that indicate a full Templar layout to the church (relating to Wisdom, Strength and Beauty). Our video explains much more… <click on photos to enlarge>

https://godshillparish.co.uk/history.php

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/HAM/IOW/Godshill

The Bloodline Connections here are:-

  • John Peter Fordham 1810 – 1846 (3 X Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • George Albert Neville 1914 – 1989 (Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • Penelope Amelia Fordham 1838 – 1879 (Granddaughter to Edward King Fordham)
  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Frank Albert Bartram 1883 – 1962 (Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)

 

The Four Major Physical and Metaphysical lines of our quests all come together here at Godshill. So we have the Neville line, the Fordham line, the Clarke line amd the Bartram line ie “Where the Four Points Meet”…

 

You can read much more about the church and its treasures by following the links below:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints’_Church,_Godshill

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/wight/churches/godshill.htm

 

St Lawrence, Vetnor: Being a pilgrim on the earthly plane is what a journey is all about; each step taken with intent and mindfulness, tuning into the physical and the metaphysical. As with our quests, very much of the metaphysical as well as the physical and being pilgrims in time treading the earthly plane…

 

 

A gorgeous and tiny, tiny ancient church, Parish of St Lawrence on the Isle of Wight, on a hilltop as per usual and overlooking a rugged landscape down to the sea.. Still used today and still visited by pilgrims as the two seeking refuge from the cold on this particular day. Small but with some very interesting treasures to be found inside with deep meanings….
I can imagine in days past, pilgrims making their way along a dirt track, with the cold wind blowing their cloaks around them; and this the only shelter for miles around….
Visiting these sites bring history and our past alive and one gets a true sense of walking with our ancestors. I dunno, just being there made me connect like a point on a circuit board and think of these things.

 

 

So tiny, yet very beautiful in a very simplistic yet spiritual way for centuries used by pilgrims and Templars alike; often one and the same…

St Lawrence, which is much older than Ventnor, is a village found on the south side of the Isle of Wight, west of Ventnor which many do consider to be a part of the town. St Lawrence is situated on the undercliff, where it is subject to frequent landslides. In the 19th century, St Lawrence was the subject of am ambitious plan to develope the village as a resort to rival Ventnor by a German developer named William Spindler, a man who had made his fortune as a chemist in Berlin and who lived on the island from 1881 to his ndeath 1889 amd subsequent burial at Whitwell. he did have enormous influence as a developer but most of his projects have now fallen prey to the ravages of time.

The small St Lawrences Church at Ventnor, dates from the 12th century and is one of three churches in St Lawrence and is easily missed and not the church that the tourists make a bee-line for with the Pre-Raphalite windows. This infact is the church that really matters; it is tiny and simple yet exudes it’s history, with some of the artifacts being very special indeed. Before the addition of a chancel in 1830, it was only 25 feet long and 11 feet wide and was considered the smallest church in England. It has a 15th century baptismal font,  a stoup that is about 500 years old and a series of 18th century hat pegs. The piscina niche is almost the same age as the church. The ‘Jesus’ is shown in beautiful red robes and wearing the garnet stone; the significance of which, within various ‘inner’ Craft circles, goes deep and powerful.

 

 

The ‘Jesus’ wearing the significant garnet stone around his neck, the open bible, the Neville shield, the list of past ‘bloodline’ rectors and the ancient wooden carving <click to enlarge>

Bloodline connections here are:

  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Brent R. R. Neville; a rector here in 1902 (ancestor of our head researcher)
  • Edward S. Bartrum; a rector here in 1912 (ancestor of our head researcher)

For a full tour around this wonderful little church in Ventnor and to catch up on a snowy scene from outside Carrisbrooke church, please se our link:-

Carrisbrooke & Ventor on the Isle of Wight

https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101225276-old-church-of-st-lawrence-ventnor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Lawrence,_Isle_of_Wight

 

St Andrew, Chale: It had turned into a wet and rainy day, yet the journey was very worth it as this church proved to be a treasure trove of surprises.This medievil church is in the parish of Chale on the Isle of Wight and was founded by Hugh Gendon in 1114 when it was dedicated to St Andrew, though the present day church dates from the 14th century. Originally it was a Catholic church, but on the reformation it became part of the Church of England where for 900 years services have been held in St Andrew’s and in those years the church has been extended many times, with the tower being added in the 15th century. Read more about the church below:-

https://www.chalebayfarm.co.uk/st-andrews/

 

 

The church’s dedication to St Andrew has been explained in three ways. Firstly, St Andrew was a fisherman and fishing played an important part in this coastal community. Secondly, it could have been named after the man who paid to have it built. Another explanation is that the closest saint’s day to that on which it was dedicated is St Andrew’s. There is no evidence to give any of these explanations greater probability.  St. Andrew’s, although high above the sea, is exposed to the wind. The stonework is dotted with lichens; these are evidence of the purity of the air, which is damp enough to cover some stones very thickly.

 

 

Inside the church are some beautiful artifacts and windows that tell a tale or two of a history not generally know to the public. <click on an image to enlarge>

 

 

The ‘Angelic’ beings around the altar are interesting (all being slightly different) and relating to the ‘four pillars’ A more detail explanation can be found in the video below…

 

 

The stained-glass windows show symbols with meanings that go beyond what is percieved as a ‘christian’ church, especially the window depicting ‘The Scribes’ with the full Enochian symbolism in view, which will once again cause one to pause, to consider the true roots/routes of what we know as ‘christianity….  <click to enlarge>

 

The Bloodline Connections here are:

  • John Wright Neville, 1845 – 1878 (1st cousin 3 x removed to our head researcher)

 

Christ Church, Totland, Alum Bay: This church is in the Isle of Wight Deanery and the Diocese of Portsmouth. It is the western most parish in the Diocese and includes the tourist attractions of Colwell Bay, The Needles, Alum Bay and Tennyson Down.  Although the church is located at the geographical centre of the parish, the heart of the village is nearly half a mile down the hill at the site of the church hall.  It is situated in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the church itself has a beautiful and tranquil burial ground in a very natural and peaceful setting.

 

The parish of Totland Bay was formed in 1875 out of the parish of Freshwater and includes the famous Needles Rocks and Lighthouse. That the legal formalities were carried through satisfactorily was mainly due to the Revd Christopher Bowen, MA, a resident who most generously gave the land necessary for the church, churchyard, vicarage house and school. To him and his friends we are also indebted for “their energy and patient efforts” in connection with “the building and consecration” of the church. In recent years the vicars of Totland Bay have also acted as honorary chaplains to the keepers of the lighthouse. In 1869 a temporary church of wood was erected opposite the present parish church where it stood until the latter, begun in 1874, was finished a year later. It was then re-erected on the beach and for a time served as the village reading room and library. It now belongs to the Totland Bay Hotel and Pier Co, and serves as annexe to the hotel.

Inside, the church is fairly and surpringly spacious, though to be honest, many of the original artifacts are no longer there and sadly the church has lost much of its original ‘energies‘. It does however have some very nice stained glass windows, and on the outside wall before the main entrance, a rather lovely and prominent carving of ‘The Lamb of God‘ (the Agnus Dei)

 

<click on all images to view and enlarge>

Follow the link below to see more photos and to read much more on the history of Christ Church: http://christchurchtotland.org.uk/about-us/

The Bloodline Connections here are:

  • James Fordham 1857 – 1881: Great grandson of Edward King Fordham of Herfordshire (connected to Godshill)

 

  • Due to circumstances beyond our control and the weather; we were unable to visit the following so the bloodline connections are listed below…

Carrisbrooke Castle: Sadly due to the weather, time of year and maintenance occuring we were unable to make to the castle or get near enough to take photos.

  • John Fordham 1835  – 1898 (Grandson of Edward King Fordham of Herforshire and 1st cousin, 6 x removed from our lead researcher)

The Needles: We had hoped for a tour around but again the weather and the time of year were not in our favour.

  • George Albert Neville 1914 – 1989 (Grand Uncle to our lead researcher)

The United Reformed Church, Shanklin: The doors were closed to us on ths very cold day…

  • Frank Albert Bartram 1893 – 1962: (Great Grand Uncle to our lead researcher)

Osborne House: Closed due to the time of year and maintenance.

  • James Neville 1825 – 1856 (Great Grand Uncle of our head researcher)

 

March 2018 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ on behalf of The Priory

email ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

“A perfumed tree, how sweet the smell… But a fruitful tree is far from wells,

Doth carry the roseline from land to air, then once to the four winds as all do stare”

 

 

QUEST TWENTYTHREE: DAY FIVE: JULY 2017

  • St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: 
  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth
  • St Nicholas Church, Bolden

St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: So day five of our wonderful quest to the north of England and Scotland, where we travelled across time to Raby country, came upon us all too soon. On this last day we were sadly unable to gain entry into St Cutberts Church in Darlington and so just a few photos of the exterior and a link for further info will be all I can leave you with on this occasion, yet suffice to say still an important connection on our quests in tracing the Neville lineage.

https://co-curate.ncl.ac.uk/st-cuthberts-church-darlington/

<click on all images here to view & expand>

  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth: When we arrived at St Nicholas Church we also found it to be locked up, but upon making a quick phone call, a very nice lady, married to the vicar, and who coincidently used to lived in our neck of the woods in Cambridge, came to our rescue key in hand and was only too willing to let us in and give us a personal tour around. Obviously thus so, we were not at liberty to make any videos on this occasion, but yet another important link on our quests to tick off.

https://www.southtynesidehistory.co.uk/archive/people/children/625438-st-nicholas-church-hedworth-lane-boldon-colliery

St Nicholas Church, Bolden: Yet again this lovely little church in Bolden, near the quarry, with it’s very interesting graveyard, was not accesable to us. It is in a truly peaceful setting, yet it is the empty tomb near the entry that compells, and draws one in to wonder about it’s untold tale….  But sadly it was not giving up it’s story on this particular day 😉

http://www.boldon.yolasite.com/st-nicholas-church-boldon.php

And so our journey to the north was almost at it’s end; but as way of some downtime, just to chill and relax we spent some wonderful hours exploring; namely wandering around St Pauls Monastry, Yarrow, which is a beautiful world heritage site, with it’s connection to the scribe, the venerable Bede. Interestingly a theme seemed to have presented itself with yet another vacated tomb; surely tales to unfold and discover….  An ancient face looked knowingly down from above.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/st-pauls-monastery-jarrow/history/

And then as evening fell we enjoyed some beautiful beach and sea downtime, sand and shore, at both Southshields and Northshields; heralding a perfect end to a most perfect quest of many discoveries, not neccesarily of the mundane, but with many pieces of a jigsaw puzzle of truth slotting into place.

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2017

DSC02494 (1)

“Let everyone who can hear, listen to what Spirit is saying to the churches; Everyone who is victorious shall eat of the hidden manna, the secret nourishment from heaven, and I will give to each”

QUEST TWENTY THREE: DAY FOUR: 

  • ST MARY’S THE VIRGIN CHURCH: STAINDROP

ST MARY’S THE VIRGIN CHURCH: STAINDROP This day was to prove to be our most significant to date with many pieces of the quest jigsaw puzzple falling into place. The meanings and purpose of the past, present and future were to be revealed in the hear and now; but yet as always only those meant to know will have heard the whisperings…. The church was full of very significant artifacts which were very relevant to our quests and to the teachings of The Priory as a whole. The metaphysical world simply collides with the mundane world here with some very wonderful and magical occurences revealed… It is of no further suprise that there are many Templar and Masonic features prominent about the church.

 

St Mary’s Church Staindrop from the outside, showing the ‘Eastern Star’ sundial above the porch, a good indication of more to come….

 

Nestled in the valley between Bishop Auckland and Barnard Castle on the main A688, Staindrop has been described as “quite simply one of the prettiest villages in County Durham.” It stands as one of the gateways into Teesdale, with its long village greens making it a typical rural Durham village. The village is also one of great antiquity with some evidence of neolithic activity, but it gained importance in the time of King Canute when he gave his manor at Staindrop and its surrounding ‘appendages’ (hamlets and houses) to the newly founded priory at Durham Cathedral in 1031. The church itself stands at what was once the Easternmost end of the village next to the Langley Beck, just past the magnificent Raby Castle, which we had visited a couple of days previously. More on the history via these links:-

http://www.stmarysstaindrop.org.uk/Staindrop/History.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staindrop

 

Above are some general views of the interior of the church showing the beautiful architectural and artistic features within. <click on photos for a larger view>

The shield on the font is depicted showing the cresent moon and the Sinclair Cross, the shield or plaque on the wall depicts the alignment of two families (two bloodlines), the church records records a ‘Ford’ (my bloodline and lineage), the close up of the window shows the ‘merkaba’ a familiar ‘Knight Templar symbol, the kneeling pads show the Neville Symbols and the window (possibly) shows the ‘Three Mary’s’.

Let Alek show you around and take you on a tour of his own family bloodline; explaining in full all the ‘family connections’ and the ‘Templar/Masonic/Priory’ symbolism which abounds within the church.

ST MARYS CHURCH: STAINDROP

 

 

To see all the Neville Family tombs in detail, as mentioned in the video and read the historical writings please click on each image to enlarge

 

 

For me personally a most ‘magical’ discovery was seeing with my own eyes the appearance of what looked like a ‘moon’ or ‘sun’ on the church floor with clouds scurrying past; a perfect disc formed by the rays of the sun through the centre of the red rose in the window above. Directly underneath was what apeared to be the ‘all seeing eye’ but i could also see a ‘square and compass’. At a certain perfect point in time an alignment will occur… a snippet of this is in the video above.

 

<click to enlarge>

There is so much more to this vast universe than our human existence or our human perception of it.

The ladder of knowledge is there for all to climb.

Happy in acceptance am i when i discover that what i once thought i knew was nothing more than human illusion…

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“the Keeper of Scrolls” August 2017

DAY THREE CONT:

  • HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON
  • HAILES CASTLE
  • HOLY ISLAND

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON: Still in Scotland, day three continued with our next visit which was to be the Holy Trinity Church at Haddington in the diocese of Edinburgh.  Set in a kind of small cul-de-sac off from the main street in a heritage area, both church and grounds are beautifully kept; from the outside the church looks quite small yet upon entering it appears much larger than it looks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haddington,_East_Lothian

With funds raised by the congregation and a very generous donation from the Earl of Wemyss, the first phase of the church building was constructed in 1770 on the site of the original ‘Lamp of Lothian’ which, from the middle of the thirteenth century until 1555, had been the property of the Franciscan Friars. It was built of a local stone known as Rattlebags, a volcanic agglomerate (a complex breccia made of fragments of lavas). An article in the transactions of the Antiquaries of Scotland published in 1792 describes the building as a very elegant chapel. Holy Trinity Church is a Grade B Listed building and is in the Haddington Conservation Area.

 

In 1843 the church was ‘Gothicized’ with the addition of the nave parapet, nave south elevation window surrounds (note the lancet shape), porch and shallow apsidal sanctuary, using a different stone, a finer, pale buff sandstone.  The same year, the committee appointed to report on the state of the building described it as being extremely uniform and homely. Following completion of the reconstruction, a service of dedication to the Holy Trinity and of consecration was perfor med by the Rt Rev Charles Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh, who in 1814 had returned to Scotland to serve as an Incumbent in Haddington.

 

The interior of the church showing ‘The Jesus’ using the now familiar ‘Ninasian Salute’ used by Priory members. Symbols such as the Lamb of God and other Templar symbols are to be discovered throughout the church and a beautiful tapistry on the altar, which is described as three angels, though it could be the ‘Three Marys’.

In 1930, the present Chancel was added to replace the apse and the interior remodelled in neo-Byzantine style by the Scottish architect B N H Orphoot. The Chancel external walls were built of Rattlebags and sandstone but have reinforced concrete detailing such as columns, arches, decorative bands and the corbel course below the gutter.

 

The church also had some interesting detail on its exterior walls <click on all images to enlarge>

Holy Trinity Church had some nice features and details both inside and out; it was a peaceful enough place but i got the feeling that  lot of the older artifacts from the past had been removed or had not stood the test of time and therefore the older ‘energies’ were no longer there

http://holytrinityhaddington.co.uk/

HAILES CASTLE: We paid an unexpected visit to Hailes Castle; one time home to Mary Queen of Scots.The castle is a mainly 14th century castle about a mile and a half south west of East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland and is quite secluded and hidden away. This castle, which has a fine riverside setting, belonged to the Hepburn family during the most important centuries of its existence. The castle was founded as a fortified tower house by Hugo de Gourlay before 1300, making it one of the oldest constructions of its kind in Scotland. The castle has a long and interesting history which one can read more of on the internet and it is certainly worth a visit to look around and explore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailes_Castle

 

This is where Mary Queen of Scots was staying as an adult, for it was deemed to be a safe place for her; secluded and hidden away and she had freinds and allies on her side; however this was not to be and history tells us otherwise…..

Just opposite the castle is a hill fort by the name of ‘Traprain Law‘ that rises in an imposing fashion above the horizon. It has an interesting name, yet was only known as ‘Traprain Law’ from the late 18th century, taking its name from a local hamlet. This is etymologically a Cumbric name cognate with Welsh tref ‘farm’ and either pren ‘tree’ or bryn ‘hill’. Law comes from the Old English word hlāw, meaning a burial mound.

It rises about 221m (724 feet) in elevation and is located 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Haddington. It covered at its maximum extent about 16 ha (40 acres) and must have been a veritable town. Whether it was a seasonal meeting place or permanent settlement is a matter of speculation.  Also speculated is whether the site is the site of an actual pyramid or not….  But it was a burial place by around 1500 BC with evidence of occupation and signs of ramparts after 1000 BC and has been ocupied at various points throughout it’s history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traprain_Law

 

Trapain Law together with Hailes Castle: an interesting area to stop a while to soak up more history…

HOLY ISLAND: The last point of call for day three was to be Holy Island; more of a winding down visit after a very busy day where many miles were covered. We arrived on the off chance knowing that the tides may not be in our favour and this did prove to be true. The evening sunset was amazing, so no better place in which to unwind whilst watching (and dodging) the beautiful incoming tides. When the tide is out one can pass happily back and forth from the main land to Holy Island and Lindisfarne, but when the tide is incoming one literally has to watch ones back and ones parked car as we discovered!

 

What better way to end the day than to watch the tide coming in…. <click on images to enlarge>

https://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumerland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD. It was an important centre of Celtc Christianlty under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindidfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Normsn conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550. Much more can be red about it’s history here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindisfarne

 

“Incoming Tide!!!”

So day three came to an end in a rather beautiful and fun fashion; not much to comment about on ‘The Neville‘ front but suffice to say that the whole area is steeped in ‘Neville’ history and intrigue with a very special day to come on day four…

 

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Aug 2017

 

 

QUEST TWENTY THREE CONT:

  • ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH
  • ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND
  • DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH

ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH: ESCOMBE NEAR BISHOP AUKLAND: Escomb is situated two miles west of Bishop Auckland in the Wear Valley. The church was built around 675AD with stone probably from the Roman Fort at Binchester and is the oldest church in the country. It was originally thought that the church was an offshoot of one of the local monastries at Whitby of Hartlepool, but this s only one of several possibilities as there are no known written records until 990AD.

The church, as one would expect is small and simple, befitting the time in which it was built. It is set amidst a well kept graveyard with some unusual gravestones in the burial ground with an ancient sundial above the porch entrance.

Once inside, one can tell the church is lovingly looked after; it has a beautiful stillness and peace about it and one can still see a few traces of the medieval painting on the archway entrance to the altar area, although some items such as the shield once prominent upon the wall has sadly not stood the test of time, as befalls many original items once prominent in many churches and some of the original paintwork about the church has also fallen prey to the ravages of time.  Thers is also a very ancient cross behind the altar depicting the ‘Fleur De Lys’ which one can barely make out do to age and earthy time… There were beautiful fresh flowers within the church and a tapistry of Celtic design crafted by local people, set in an alcove on the wall. There was a lovely feeling of peace and some very calming energies here. There was also an interesting phenomona of the greenery outside of the church displaying as a beautiful shade of blue through the church windows, which indeed it should be…

 

<click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escomb_Church

Let Alek explain further in this short video below & show you around to explain the connections to the Neville bloodline.

ESCOMBE SAXON CHURCH

 

 The church is well looked after and well loved, which one can most certainly tell.

 

DAY THREE: ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND: Of course everyone is very familiar with Rosslyn Chapel, (formerly known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew) due to it’s inclusion in popular modern fiction and movies. I had visited the chapel previously yet was very much looking forward to visiting it again. The previous time i had visited, the chapel was hidden behind scaffolding; much renevation work was in progress, but as a bonus we did however get to walk around the actual roof of the chapel along the scaffolding itself – an experience not to be missed! So to see the chapel now in all it’s unfettered splendour was to be a treat indeed.

http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

The chapel has strong connections to the Sinclair family, who have been it’s custodians  over the years and also connections, as one would rightly expect, to the Knight Templars, in particular to the ROS and the Scottish Rite. Rosslyn Chapel was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness of the Scoto-Norman Sinclair family. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery. The Neville connection here is that the Sinclairs and the Nevilles have ‘been in bed together’ since the dawn of time!