Tag Archive: The Nevilles


“Quest 31 around the west country of England has proved so far, to have been an amazing quest, despite the very challenging hot weather when we were so thankful for the air conditioning in the car. All the apartments we stayed in have been more than up to scratch, and the places visited and the  knowledge gained has been second to non, life altering and path afirming. One more day then home: lots to write up on, as you see here. I do hope all of you will continue to follow and learn with me as i share knowledge and photos galore. As said, all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time: past, present and future becoming one. Knowledge becomes personal power, when mysteries unravel and ancient codes reveal their truths to the ones whom can truly see….  All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it seems….”

‘BENEATH A ROCK ALIVE’

Day Six Wednesday 5th August: Church of St Mary, Templecombe: We left our lovely apartment in Plymouth to travel to pastures new and more adventures. It was to be a long day of traveling through counties galore it seemed! Intercepted by a lovely visit to Simouth Old Fore Street for lunch and retail therapy and then traveling onwards to the Templar church at Templecombe, which yet again was very sadly shut; such a shame as it is a very interesting church with a particular important artifact to be seen inside. Even more of a shame given the church’s Templar history (see below). It has to be said, that yet again G-ds doors were shut to true pilgrims on a sacred journey, something that is becoming all too familiar. No wonder G-d has abandoned this planet! Sacred sites with no access – it makes one wonder! One wonders how the christian church can survive in these times, for they are seemingly still in the ‘dark ages’ and need to move with the times and find ways of inspiring people to attend – which they certainly won’t do with all their doors locked! Mosques for example, are open 24/7 and are full of attendees!

Old Fore Street and Coastline, Sidmouth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth

Templecombe is a village in Somerset five miles south of Wincaton, 12 miles east of Yeovil and 30 miles west of Salisbury with a population of 1,560, forming along with Combe Throop, the parish of Abbas and Templecombe. Templecombe derives its name from Combe Templariorum, after the Knights Templar who established Templecoombe Preceptory in the village in 1185. After they were suppressed in 1312 it was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem who held it until the Dissolution of the Monastries after which it was acquired by Richard Duke of Otterton, Devon. An attempt to discover ‘the village of the templars’ was made by the ‘Time Team’ television series, in a programme first shown in 1996. Late in the investigation, an old tithe map revealed the location of the Templar site, and an old stone boundary wall was found to be still standing seven feet high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templecombe

Photos from outside of St Mary’s Templecombe; showing what could have been if we were allowed inside… <click to enlarge>

The Anglican Church of St Mary at Templecombe, Somerset was built in the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building. The parish is part of the benefice of Abbas and Templecombe, Henstridge and Horsington. The church was probably established during the period when the manor was held by Shaftesbury Abbey, but granted to the Knights Templar while it was held by his descendant Serlo FitzOdo, who established a preceptory in the village in 1185. The preceptory served as an administrative centre for the lands held by the Templars in the south west of England and Cornwall. It may also have been used to train men and horses for the Crusades. After the Knights Templar were suppressed following the 1307 order by Pope Clement IV, it was granted to the Knights of St John, who held it until the dissolution of the monastries. Parts of the original 12th-century church remain, the foundations being Saxon, but it underwent a major Victorian restoration in the 19th century, including a rebuilding of the chancel plus a new  vestry.

In the church is a painting on wooden boards of a head, (see photos above) which was discovered in the roof of an outhouse of a local building in 1945. The painting is thought to be from the 13th century, with a connection to the Templecoombe Preceptory (or Combe Templariorum) which was established in the village in 1185. It was given to the church in 1956. For many years the head has been believed to be that of Christ without the halo which was the norm in religious iconography at the time. The Knights Templar were suppressed partly because of their use of the image of Christ without the halo. There has been speculation linking the image to the Shroud of Turin and other suggestions link to the image being of John the Baptist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Mary,_Abbas_and_Templecombe

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Desposyni (520-593) France. 48 x GGF of the Fordham Line.

After an interesting day of visits and travel we arrived at our cosy flat in the suburbs of Southampton, not far from the docks and our home for the next three nights!

‘OF BATTLES DRAWN’

Day Seven Thursday 6th August: St Mary’s Church, Southampton: It was already a sweltering hot morning when we arrived at St Mary’s Church, Southhampton, so we were very pleased to find the doors open and a welcoming coolness greeting us inside. Sadly due to ‘Miss Rona’ and our churches being habitually shut to pilgrims, we are always delighted when we are able to find welcoming open doors, and so it was with St Marys; a chuch full of life and vigor and being part of the modern times with a very forward thinking attitude. A vibrant church totally living in the times with much going on and an increasing attendance, all down to Adam the facillitator of the site whom has bought his enthusiasm and possitive vibes to the church! A huge lesson to be learned by many of those whom are connected to churches on many levels.

Southampton is a city in Hampshire, 70 miles south-west of London and 15 miles west of Portsmouth A major port close to the New Forest, it lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water, at the confluence of the River Test and Itchen with the River Hamble joining to the south. The history of the area has always been influenced by the sea and rivers. Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

St. Mary’s Church, is a Church of England parish church, and the largest church in the port city of Southampton. This is the mother church to this former county town with its forerunners spanning back to the first Saxon settlements of the 7th century, including a major collegiate church of the European Middle Ages dedicated to the same patron saint. Parts of the church date to the 1880s. Interestingly, in 1914 the sound of its church bells inspired the song, ‘The Bells of St Mary’s’, originally recorded in 1919 by Frances Alda and later sung by Bing Crosby in a film of the same name. The church has listed building status expressly due to its church tower and spire being local landmarks. The interior and walls were gutted in World War II and rebuilt in 1954-6 save for the tower, which was architect designed. There have been up to six other churches on the site, with records entered in the Domesday ook.

The interior is very well looked after with one of the largest organs in South-East England. The church is full of some very interesting artifacts and has a collection of some stunning windows full of meaning, that tell an ancient tale or two.. We were shown around by Adam, a lovely guy, whom considers himself as a facilitator and certainly has his finger on the pulse as far as having a very modern approach, and thus increasing the congregation in leaps and bounds.

Many seafaring references are to be found within the church with an interesting plaque dedicated to the memory of the musicians whom perished on the Titanic, one of whom was of the Craft bloodlines we are documenting; especially poignant to our own head researcher, for this was his own relative on board the Titancic on that fateful night….

Some of the often poignant seafaring references to be found in St Mary’s Church, Southampton <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Mary%27s_Church,_Southampton

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • James Fordham (1697) Ware, Herts  9 x GGF of the Fordham line

Christchurch Priory Christchurch:  A lovely treat as this was not on our official list for today! It was an extremely hot day and we both struggled in the heat, and once again we were very thankful for the air-con in the car. So yes this church was a treat indeed, not on our list but very much a part of our quest and lovely to find it open. A wonderful experience here with so much amazing symbology within the building, telling tales of past truths, still relevant in today’s world; some stunning windows too which were so so full of meaning. Very nice too, to see clear documented reference to the Neville line – the main bloodline of our quests and an extremely important bloodline within history.

Christchurch is a town and civil parish in Dorset which adjoins Bournemouth to the west, with the new Forest to the east. Founded in the seventh century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour, which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the Priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port, and was later fortified. During the 18th and 19th centuries it had a colourful history with smuggling! The town’s harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch,_Dorset

Christchurch Priory is an ecclesiastical parish and former priory church in Christchurch in Dorset. It is one of the longest parish churches in the country and is larger than many English Anglican Cathedrals. The story of Christchurch Priory goes back to at least the middle of the 11th century, as the Domesday Book of 1086 says there was a priory of 24 secular canons here in the reign of Edward the Confessor. The Priory is on the site of an earlier church dating from 800AD. In 1094 a chief minister of William II, Ranulf Flambard, began the building of a church. Local legend has it that Flambard originally intended the church to be built on top of St Catherines Hill, but during the night all the building materials were mysteriously transported to the site of the present priory. By about 1150 there was a basic Norman church consisting of a nave, a central tower and a quire extending eastwards from the crossing. It was during this period that another legend originated, that of the miraculous beam. The legend of the miraculous beam dates to the early 12th century. The story is that a beam was found to have been cut too short when it was hoisted into place. This would have been embarrassing for the carpenters since the wood was expensive and would be difficult to replace. There was however a mysterious carpenter who had worked and eaten alone. The following day the carpenters returned and found the beam was now fitted in place. The unknown carpenter was never seen again, and the story came to be that it was Jesus Christ who had intervened. The church became Christ’s Church in commemoration of the event. The miraculous beam can be seen today and is located in the Priory’s ambulatory.

The church is full of interesting artifacts including a framed family tree chart mentioning Cicily Neville <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch_Priory

Some of the many stunning windows inside the church <click to enlarge>

   

‘OF  KINGS ATTUNED’

St James Church Poole: After a welcomed lunch alongside the river at Christchurch we felt refreshed and cooled down but sadly the next port of call on this very hot day, St Jame’s Church in Poole was closed to us, so just a few photos from outside was all we managed.

Poole is a large coastal town and seaport in Dorset, 21 miles east of Dorchester and adjoining Bournemouth to the east. Human settlement in the area dates back to before the Iron Age. The earliest recorded use of the town’s name being in the 12th century when the town began to emerge as an important port, prospering with the introduction of the wool trade, later becoming one of the busiest ports in Britain. In the Second World War, Poole was one of the main departing points for the Normandy landings. Poole is a busy tourist resort with it’s large natural harbour and beautiful beaches. The town is a commercial port with both freight and passenger ferry services, connecting to Jersey, Guernsey, as well as to Saint-Malo in Brittany, where we had visited on Quest 28. The town’s name derives from a corruption of the Celtic word bol and the Old English word pool meaning a place near a pool or creek. The area around modern Poole has been inhabited for the past 2,500 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poole

St James is a Church of England parish church in Poole on the south coast of Dorset, originally built in 1142. The church is located in the historic quarter of the town, near Poole Quay. It is the parish church for the St James sub district of Poole. The church has long been associated with the local fishing trade and is known locally as ‘the fishermen’s church’. The church has an unusual weather vane fashioned in the shape of a fish. The church was mostly rebuilt around 1820, in Georgian style. The church is seen as a good example of English Georgian religious architecture and it is designated it a Grade II listed building. But without gaining access there is not really much else to mention.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James%27_Church,_Poole

https://stjameschurchpoole.weebly.com/history.html

Grail Bloodline Connections: 

  • Lieut. Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

Before leaving Poole we spent a lovely time relaxing by the historic quayside; it was like a south of France day!

SOLDIERS WARS’

Nothe Fort Barrack Weymouth: Although the fort was closed by the time we arrived, the grounds around the outside overlooking the sea were just stunning, so it was enjoyable wandering around and relaxing there, despite the heat. Located at the entrance to Weymouth Harbour and overlooking Portland Harbour, the Nothe Fort was built between 1860-1872 to protect the Naval Harbour at Portland.

Weymouth is a seaside town in Dorset, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel.  The town is 7 miles south of Dorchester 5 miles north of the Isle of Portland. Weymouth is a tourist resort, situated halfway along the Jurassic Coast; a World Heritage Site important for its geology and landforms. The stunning harbour has cross-channel ferries, and is home to both pleasure boats and private yachts. The history of the borough stretches back to the 12th century, including it’s involvement in the spread of the Black Death, it was also a major departure point for the Normandy Landings. King Henry VIII had two Device Forts built to protect the south Dorset coast from invasion in the 1530s: Sandsfoot Castle in Wyke Regis and Portland Castle in Castletown. Parts of Sandsfoot have fallen into the sea due to coastal erosion. During the English Civil War, around 250 people were killed in the local Crabchurch Conspiracy in February 1645.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weymouth,_Dorset

Situated at the end of the Nothe Peninsula, jutting eastwards from the town of Weymouth and Weymoth Harbour; the coastal defence at the site was built between 1860 and 1872 by 26 Company of the Royal Engineers, to protect Portland and Weymouth Harbours, with Portland becoming an important Royal Navy base. Shaped like the letter D, the fort was built with bomb-proof casemates and deep magazines. Work began on the Nothe Fort in 1860 and the first soldiers to be staioned there were No 2 Battery Royal Artillery (Tatton-Browns) The fort was abandoned in 1956 as it was no longer required as a coastal defence and then used by the Royal Navy as stores, before being purchased by the local council in 1961. It is now a museum and remains one of the best-preserved forts of its kind in the country. The fort and its outer gateway have been Grade II listed since 1974. It’s fusee steps, located in Nothe Gardens, have been Grade II listed since 2000; constructed for hauling trolleys transporting ammunition, spares and stores from the quay to Nothe Fort. In 1978, the Nothe Fort, tramway and searchlight battery at The Nothe, also became scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

https://nothefort.org.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothe_Fort

See our video below of the Fort and beautiful surrounding scenery!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-3JA2vuILY

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • William Henry Fordham (1832) Lewes, Sussex  3 x GGF

AND KNIGHTS THAT FALL’

Day Eight Friday 7th August: St Pauls Church Ringwood: Today was to prove to be an overwhelmingly hot August Day; a bit too much for me in fact, yet we made our way towards our first destination of the day. Sadly again the church was shut, so a stroll around the outside had to suffice with some interesting roof-dwelling creatures looking down upon us!  The church stands in the market place and is an important landmark, the tower being visible from the top of the hill at picket post on the A31 some three miles east of Ringwood, as well as from high ground at Ibsley Common in the Forest.

Ringwood is a bustling market town in south-west Hampshire, located on the River Avon, close to the New Forest, northeast of Bournemouth and southwest of Southampton. It was founded by the Anglo-Saxons, and a weekly market has been held there since theMiddle Ages. Ringwood is recorded in a charter of 961, in which King Edgar gave 22 hides of land in Rimecuda to Abingdon Abbey. The name is also recorded in the 10th century as Runcwuda and Rimucwuda. The second element Wuda means a ‘wood’, Rimuc may be derived from Rima meaning ‘border’, hence ‘border wood.’ The name may also refer to Ringwood’s position on the fringe of the New Forest, or on the border of Hampshire.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringwood

The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 of 1086. It was rebuilt in the 13th century and survived until 1853, when it was completely knocked down and rebuilt. We could not get inside to discover it’s history or find much on the internet apart from a few bits as bobs, such as the church containing a 15th-century monumental brass of John Prophete, Dean of Hereford and York. The church was built of rough dressed squared Swanage stone, limestone dressings with a plain tile roof and is of a cruciform plan. It is a tall restrained church in late Early English/early Decorated style.  Interestingly, according to the internet, the patron of the parish church of St Peter & St Paul is the Dean of King’s college, Cambridge.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

TO MOTHER’S WOMB’

St Marys Church Ringwood: A deceptively simple looking grade I listed building set way back at the end of a wide spacious bricked pathway, but with the unusual feature of a large blue sundial set above the entrance to the church, which looked uncannily like a pyramid! The church, which is actually in the small village of Ellingham, west of the New Forest, has a very pretty garden graveyard around the back and some very attractive brickwork on the building itself. Ellingham is most famous for the story of Alice Lisle, who’s tomb can be found inside the church, and whom was executed by the infamous Judge Jeffreys in 1685, on the charge of harbouring fugitives after the defeat of the Monmouth Rebellion. Ellingham church was built in the 13th century. It is thought that there was an earlier, probably Saxon, church on the site. It is described in early charters as the church of St Mary or as the church of All Saints with the chapel of St Mary. It was added to in the 15th century, and the red-brick west wall was rebuilt in 1746. The church was restored in 1869-90 by Thomas Graham Jackson It has a large blue sundial located over the porch of the church.

St Mary’s Church Ringwood, showing it’s wonderful sundial/pyramid, its pretty graveyard and attractive brickwork <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellingham,_Hampshire

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

‘IN SALISBURY A WIND DID FALL’

St Marks Church Salisbury: Sadly once again the church was closed, so we had to make do with a walk around the outside of the building. Salisbury is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, at the confluence of the rivers Avon, Nadder and Bourne. The city is approximately 20 miles from Southampton and 30 miles from Bath; both of which we have visited on this quest. Salisbury is in the southeast of Wiltshire, near the edge of  Salisbury Plain. Of course the area is very well-known for Stonehenge, which has no Craft significance at all, but there are a lot of history and archaeological findings connected the whole area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury

The church is in quite a built up area on a junction with roads traversing around, yet it nevertheless has a spacious and pretty garden graveyard. Even though it was closed, the church is said to be an active church in Sailsbury. It was built in 1892–94 to the designs of Joseph A. Reeve and has been a Grade II listed building since 1974. St Mark’s was built to serve the northern region of Salisbury, which at a time was undergoing much residential expansion; the foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rev. Edward White Benson, on 27 April 1892, accompanied by the Bishops of Salisbury, St Asaph and Truro. St Mark’s exterior is faced with stone from the Hurdcott Quarries, with dressings and window tracery in Doulting stone. Around the exterior of the building are some interesting additions to the architecture, so although we could not gain access we still managed some interesting photos.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mark%27s_Church,_Salisbury

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Sir John H Fordham (1432) Kelshall, Hertfordshire  18 x GGF

THE ROMANS HAD THEIR WAY’

Day Nine Saturday 8th August: St Mary the Virgin Church Gosport: Due to the very intense heat of the last two days, i was too poorly to participate in this day’s agenda, so we changed some of our planned visits and thus my dear Craft brother ventured out on his own. This church turned out to be very relevant to him and he took some great photos too. There is hardly anything on the internet on this church apart from it being an ancient, Grade I-listed church of Rowner, considerably extended twice in the late 20th century, in the 1960’s and again in the 1990’s, to considerable acclaim from architectural writers. It is a Norman church and the oldest building left standing in Gosport. it was extended in the Early English style with Victorian additions added after restoration. There are apparently some fine monuments in the church, including a rare limestone Sepulchre altar tomb to John Brune dated 1559.

Gosport is a town in Hampshire on the south coast of England, situated on a peninsula on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour, opposite the city of Portsmouth, linked by the Gosport Ferry. Until the last quarter of the 20th century, Gosport was a major naval town associated with the defence and supply infrastructure of Her Majesty’s Naval Base Portsmouth. There is a great sea-faring and naval tradition in the whole area, much of which is reflected in the churches and cathedrals, especially in the stained-glass windows. The name Gosport, is purported to derive its name from ‘goose’, but  an alternative etymology of ‘gorse’ is not supported by the regional name for this plant, “furze”. A third theory, claiming a derivation from “God’s Port” is believed to be a 19th-century invention, and yet this is the slogan of Gosport as seeen upon its emblem. The Rowner area of the peninsula was settled by the Anglo Saxons and is mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle as Rughenor (rough bank or slope). Both Rowner and Alverstoke, the name coming from the point where the River Alver entered the Solent at Stokes Bay, were included in the Domesday Book. Rowner was the earliest known settlement of the peninsula, with many Mesolithic finds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosport

 

St Mary the Virgin Church with gravestones relating to the Clarke bloodline…

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Baron George Neville (1440) Aberga 14 x GGF

All in all a marvelous quest-listen to Karl sharing the bloodlines and chewing the cud!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_k8KuzYV2s&t=5s

“So thus this marvelous and amazing quest has come to an end, and because of the infamous ‘Miss Rona’ we will be enforced to take a sabbatical from roaming for the time being. Memories are very sweet and long lasting though, and will more than treasured over the winter months with so much to mull over and to continue to digest and learn from, in some cases until the end of time.

During my time as Craft i have given up all my past beliefs. It has been very freeing, they were nothing but manmade chains around my soul. Religions are all a form of control. One can still enjoy all the many myths as good old stories, for hidden within them one can still find the truth if one has faith and looks hard enough, just as in life too, one can, if loyal and steadfast and with faith discover the truth and the Grail….

and so the Grail Quest continues…..”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

AKA Reverend Janis

AKA ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

December 2nd 2020

QUEST 31 CONT: “Still very much walking in Arthur’s footsteps and continuing our quest for the grail in the magical and beautiful south-west lands of England, we left our apartment in Roman Cirencester on Sunday 2nd of August to travel in a southerly direction towards Plymouth, yet with lots of exciting stops along the way. This day was to take us even nearer to Arthur and The Grail”

‘WHAT DID RALPH LEAVE BEHIND?’     

DAY THREE: SUNDAY 2ND AUGUST: ST MARY REDCLIFFE CHURCH. REDCLIFFE BRISTOL.   

Framed by the River Avon and the Floating Harbour, Redcliffe is a bustling commercial hub. It is home to ancient landmarks such as the medieval, Gothic-style St. Mary Redcliffe Church with its with stained-glass windows and 18th-century ironwork, residential tower blocks and the port of Bristol. It is bounded by the loop of the Floating Harbour to the west, north and east, together with the New Cut of the River Avon to the south.nn Redcliffe takes its name from the red sandstone cliffs which line the southern side of the Floating Harbour. These cliffs are honey-combed with tunnels, known as the Redcliffe Caves, constructed both to extract sand for the local glass making industry and to act as store houses for goods. Interesting to us, in the 12th century, Robert Fitzroy gave the Knights Templar part of Redcliffe, which then became known as Temple Fee. The Templars were granted the power to hold courts and execute felons. This right passed, along with the fee, to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem after the suppression of the Templars.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcliffe,_Bristol

The parish church of  St Mary Redcliffe is an impresive looking church within a setting of green grounds; it is one of Bristol’s best known churches, with the spire at a height of 292 ft (90m) making it the tallest building in the city, and one of the largest parish churches in England, yet sadly on the day we visited, the church was well and truly locked to all visitors. Whether this was due to corona virus or whether it was the policy to keep G-d’s door so unwelcoming is anyone’s guess, but either way the small amount of pilgrims and visitors would pose no threat at all and if the reason was not because of the virus, one does have to question why such an important church would be so locked?

The church itself is an Anglican parish church, the bulding being constructed from the 12th to 15th centuries and has been a place of Christian worship for over 900 years. It was famously described by Queen Elizabeth I, who spoke highly of the church, as “the fairest, goodliest, and most famous parish church in England”. Yet the mystery of our quest remains of just what was left behind? Little is left of the earliest churches on the site although a little of the fabric still remaining has been dated to the 12th century. Much of the current building dates from the late 13th and 14th centuries when it was built and decorated by wealthy merchants of the city. The spire fell after being struck by lightning in 1446 and was not rebuilt until 1872. Although the church plan dates from an earlier period, much of the church as it now stands was built between 1292 and 1370 and the first church was built in Saxon times. Obviously there would have been some fascinating artifacts to see, but sadly today we were unable to enter this church.

During the Bristol Blitz in the Second World war a bomb exploded in a nearby street, throwing a rail and tram from the tramway over the houses and into the churchyard of St Mary Redcliffe, where the rail became embedded in the ground. The rail is left there as a monument. An accompanying memorial plaque reads “On Good Friday 11th April this tramline was thrown over the adjoining houses by a high explosive bomb which fell on Redcliffe Hill. It is left to remind us how narrowly the church escaped destruction in the war 1939-45.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary_Redcliffe

St Mary Recliffe – important yet sadly very closed…. <please click on image to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:  

  • Earl Ralph Neville;1364 Raby Durham (16 xGGF)  “What did Ralph leave behind?”

‘FROM LEFT TO RIGHT’

BRISTOL CATHEDRAL BRISTOL:

Bristol is a city in south-west England with a population of 463,400, between Gloucestershire to the north and Somerset to the south, with South Wales just across the Severn Estuary. Iron Age hill forts and Roman villas were built near the confluence of the rivers Frome and Avon, and also around the beginning of the 11th century, the settlement was known as Brycgstow “the place at the bridge”. Bristol was a starting place for early voyages of exploration to the New World and on a ship out of Bristol in 1497 John Cabot, a Venetian became the first European to land on mainland North America. At the height of the Bristol slave trade from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slave ships carried an estimated 500,000 people from Africa to slavery in the Americas. The Port of Bristol has since moved to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Dock. Bristol’s modern economy is built on the creative media, electronics and the aerospace industries, and the city-centre docks have been redeveloped as centres of heritage and culture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol

BRISTOL CATHEDRAL: formally the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, is a Church of England cathedral in the city of Bristol. Founded in 1140 and consecrated in 1148, it was originally St Augustine’s Abbey but after the  Dissolution of the Monastries it became in 1542, the seat of the newly created Bishop of Bristol and the cathedral of the new Diocese of Bristol. It is a Grade I listed building and as with many of our cathedrals, stunning to look at both inside and out inside, but all spirituality or sacred energies long dissapated. Covid restrictions were very much applying here, so visitor numbers limited yet sadly the visitors whom were there, were unacknowlegded by the clergy there….

In a beautiful setting and ‘Covid ready’ <please click to enlarge>

The eastern end of the church includes fabric from the 12th century, with the Elder Lady Chapel, which was added in the early 13th century. Much of the church was rebuilt in the English Decorated Gothic style during the 14th century despite financial problems within the abbey. In the 15th century the transept and central tower were added. The nave was incomplete at the Dissolution in 1539 and was demolished, but in the 19th century Gothic Revival, a new nave was built. The western twin towers, showing a big similarity with Wells Cathedral in Somerset, designed by John Loughborough Pearson were completed in 1888. The cathedral has tall Gothic windows and in addition to the cathedral’s architectural features, it contains several memorials and an historic organ. Little of the original stained glass remains, some being replaced in the Victorian Era with further losses during the Bristol Blitz.

Stunning to look at yet no spirituality left… <please click to enlarge>

https://bristol-cathedral.co.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Cathedral

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  1. Sir Ralph Neville : 1301 Raby (18 x GGF) ‘From left to right’

“WHAT CONNECTIONS?”

THE NINE MAIDENS STONE CIRCLE/BELSTONE STONE CIRCLE. OKEHAMPTON. After the heat and sterile enviroment of the city i was pleased to be driving all the way to Dartmoor where i knew great adventures and true spirituality would great me. Dartmoor has always had a place in my heart and although it was a long drive, it was a relaxing and enjoyable drive through gorgeous scenery and pretty villages. This was to be the highlight of the day by any mile! When we reached Belstone village it was quite a little trek upwards and over the moors to gain access to the circle and one had to take ones time, but the steady walk was enjoyable and well worth it. There was hardly anyone around and the few folks whom were there were chatty but did not linger. The sacred energies and earth magnetics are very evident and strong here; the St Michael Ley Line runs right through the circle or rather the stone circle was purposefully placed upon the ley line; the frequencies are very strong here and at times felt as if time was truly standing still and the stones breathing…. A powerful place on so many levels, the day being full of revelations…..

The Belstone Circle – full of magic and mystery <click to enlarge>

The Nine Maidens, is a bronze age circle and settlement located near the village of Belstone on Dartmoor, in Devon, and one can still see evidence of the settlement in the landscape all around the circle, and yet it was so much more than that. It is also known as the Seventeen Brothers, for there were in actual fact seventeen stones, including an altar stone, just outside the main circle; in these days is no longer complete. It is said that the circle may have been called the ‘nine maidens’ due to the origins of the number nine and to the connections of the site of the number nine, ie the ninth, the ‘hidden one‘. The number nine in sacred geometry from a Ninansian perspective (grammer and language) means ‘the hidden one’. The number nine has many magical or occult meanings such as the ninth gate, the nine stones, the nine maidens, the nine ships, the nine battles. All relating to the ‘hidden one’, the secret underlying knowledge of Craft. Folks whom are astute and tuned in will certainly pick up on this while visiting the circle and will feel the energies for themselves. And of course there are secrets hidden there that maybe no one in our life times will ever know, things forever hidden from the current cycle of mankind. The stones here are so much more significant than Stonehenge or Avebury yet are almost deserted so maybe the curse is working and is in actual fact a blessing?

The stones here are so much more significant than Stonehenge or Avebury<click to enlarge>

There are many folklore tales attached to the stones and despite the fallen stones of the past, the locals are said to be apprehensive of restoration work, believing that anyone whom tampers with the stones will be cursed. Locals cite a film crew which added an extra stone to the circle in 1985; the ‘curse’ was the unfortunate loss of the only copy of the film, ‘The Circle of Doom’, in the post. The St Michael’s ley line, which runs 350 miles from Lands End to Hopton on Sea, Norfolk, via Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk, is one of our points of study and focuss on this quest, and runs right through the Nine Maidens. This ley-line goes through many sites dedicated to St Michael, such as St Michael’s Tower on Glastonbury Tor, with the line matching the sunrise on 8 May when the Catholic Church celebrated the apparition of St Michael. Local folklore too suggests that the stones dance: The stone circles on Dartmoor, are said to have been made “when there were wolves on the hills, and winged serpents in the low lands.” On the side of Belstone Tor, near Okehamton is a small grave circle called “Nine Stones.” It is said to dance every day at noon. The stones are also said to have originally been nine maidens who were cast into stone and damned to dancing every noon for eternity as a punishment for dancing on the Sabbath. Equally, the story has involved seventeen brothers. It is also said that the ringing of the nearby church bells brings them to life.

The Altar Stone and Burial Chamber <click to enlarge>

From our point of view, from a Craft and Quest point of view this is said to be a far more important site in the true tellings of King Arthur, of Lancelot Desposyni and the Fordham line, than even Tintagel, which is a bit of a very big red herring. Also we know that in the distant past the site has in actual fact been used as a burial chamber – yet for whom, being far enough above sea level to be placed forever safe in this realm. I was very relunctant to be leaving the moors and the stones behind after our visit.  So it was a sad farewell and heavy heart i felt in leaving this wild magical beauty behind me to trave to pastures anew. I attained new knowledge up on those moors and felt the energies of the land shift and change, felt time stand still as vibrations pulsed, and dimensions shifted. I felt acknowledged as a part of a whole. Up on the moors, the energies were very strong; a place where the metaphysical truly connected to the physical and whispers on the winds told a hidden tale or two….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Maidens_stone_circle

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

Sir John H. Fordham: 1423 Kelshall Hertfordshire (18 x GGF) ‘What Connections?’

And so after a magical end to day three of Quest 31 we made our way towards our very posh apartment at Phoenix Quay, Plymouth where we would be spending the next three nights. The apartment overlooking the harbour and night ferry terminus to Spain treated us to some lovely views and sunsets from its huge windows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHEFtsG5tjE

Please enjoy our (very windy!) video of Belstone Circle

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

“Onwards then as our quest continued, to Buckland near Plymouth, Brentnor near Tavistock, Tideford near Saltash, Talland Bay near Loo, Charles Town near St Austell, Trevone near Padstow and Temple near Bodmin. Not all would be opened to us but the ‘jewel in the crown’ would prove to be the amazing Temple Church on Bodmin…”

 

THE GRAIL QUEST

” Even in our modern times, the Grail still represents hope to people, yet still remains something unattainable, something still very much an enigma. Many of the tales trace it, as a vessel, back to Joseph of Arimathea, whom it was said collected Jesus’s blood from the cross and whom was said to have bought it to England. Yet as already stated, the lineage of the grail goes back to much earlier times,  and as we already know, we can discount the tales of a challice collecting blood from the cross, for we know the crucifixion tales to be untrue. Yet if Joseph was of the ‘pure bloodline’, which Templar knowledge indicates he was, the tales take on another meaning, Over time many and various churches and religions have claimed different successions and connections to the Grail and there are claimed to be many ‘resting places’ for the Grail, some believable, some not, but of course that does depend on what the Grail actually is. It could be resting/hiding within Time itself (within a ‘cloak of time’), maybe hidden in secret underground chambers of sacred buildings, kept watch over by guardians. Some say it found its way to Scotland and has a connection to the enigmatic Neville family whom may have guarded over it themselves.  Mary too, is said to be connected to it, in her own right and through her relationship with Jesus, and she too found her own way to Scotland. Lots of accounts refer to the blood of Christ or the flesh/DNA of Christ as being of pure blood, of being the Grail, and Christ certainly knew and kept the secrets to his grave.  So, did Christ possess the Grail or was it the ‘knowledge’ of the Grail he possessed? If Lucifer’s secret is the Holy Grail, that would certainly mean that Christ/Jesus/Lucifer knew the secret; that unattainable secret of the Holy Grail.”

QUEST 28: FRANCE, DUNKIRK & BELGUIM

12TH  NOVEMBER 2019

After three great days in La Boussac, our amazing trip was almost over and we left France to begin our journey towards Belguim via Dunkirk. Luckily yet again the sun was shining and it was a gorgeous Autumn day when we set forth. We journeyed all the way from the south of France up to Dunkirk and i managed to take some quite good shots on the way.  The drive was interesting and very scenic and the weather was good.  It was a long journey, of gorgeous autumn colours, dramatic skies and an amazingly huge suspension bridge that crossed a wide, wide estuary somewhere along the route. It was very windy and high up so not all lanes were open. The nearer we got to England though, the more horrid the weather became, settling down later.

Our last big road trip of the quest taking us out of France, towards Belguim, Dunkirk and back to good old Blighty! That bridge was so high and scary in the windy conditions – much higher than it looks! <click to enlarge>

Catholique Collegiale Notre-Dame-de-la-Crypte a Cassel: Cassel France: Quite late in the day we arrived here at Cassel, France. It had become quite chilly now and was getting dark, but there were shops still open and folks around, so we had a nice stroll and bought in supplies for when we reached our digs.

Cassel, from the Dutch meaning Kassel is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. Built on a prominent hill overlooking French Flanders, the town has existed since Roman times. It was developed by the Romans into an important urban centre and was the focus of a network of roads, which are still in use today, that converge on the hill. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Cassel became an important fortified stronghold for the rulers of Flanders which was repeatedly fought over before finally being annexed to France in the 17th century. It was the headquarters of Marshal Ferdinand Foch during part of the First World War. In 1940, during the German invasion of France, Cassel was the scene of a fierce three-day battle between British forces and German forces which resulted in much of the town being destroyed. Today the town, which was rebuilt following the war, is a popular destination for visitors to French Flanders.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassel,_Nord

As the hour was late and the skies darkening, we half expected the church to be closed and spent dilligent time wandering around the seemingly closed building until at last we found a way in via the big stiff old wooden doors! Our efforts were well worth it as the church is beautiful inside and like a lot of these seemingly plain on the outside churches, what greets one inside is often amazing!

Sadly i could not find much on the internet in English about the churches history apart from a few lines from the above link, so most of my comments are from pure observation. The Collégiale Notre-Dame de la Crypte is Cassel’s main church, built in brick. Parts date from the 11th century but the main part is a 16th-century  Gothic structure of a design known as a hallekerk or hall-church, peculiar to Flanders and Artois. It comprises a huge rectangular space with three gables, three aisles, three apses and a square tower over the transept.

Many interesting symbols inside the church & the  ‘All Seeing Eye’ is prominent, together with relevant heraldry & shields. Some beautiful windows are here too & ornate artworks. A nice feel to the church connecting to the Desposyni bloodline.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Galains Desposyni (48th GGF) 480-551, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.
  • Nascien Desposyni(49th GGF) 450-494, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.

The hour was late, dark and very wet when we arrived in Dunkirk and visability in respect of driving was very confusing. We were staying right in the middle of Dunkirk, near the river, in a very built up area with  lots of traffic lights, bus lanes and one way systems. It took us several tries to find a way out of the one-way system in order to reach our apartment – which we could see but not actually get too! Well done to my dear driver though for his persistence and patience! Tomorrow we are venturing into Belgium.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne, Belgium: So the day had arrived – Friday 8th November and the last day of this amazing quest and fabulous road trip. We found the church fairly easily and it looked quite inviting and very well maintained from the outside with planted flowers and a nod to it’s fishing history by way of the historic fishing vessel outside. However once we gained access and got inside through the main doorway, it was dissapointing to find a vast and very locked glass screen acoss the entrance barring any access into the rest of the church. So sadly the only photos i have are of the outside and taken through the glass screen. A shame as there were very relevant artefacts and info to be seen there. Based on a design by the Veurne-based architect Joseph Vinck, this aisled neo-Gothic hall church in yellow brick was built in 1891, at a time when De Panne was still a fishing hamlet of Adinkerke and a chapel built circa 1878 stood on this site. The tower was added in 1936, by which time the church was no longer located in the centre of town due to the construction of the Dumont Quarter.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne showing the historic fishing vessel <click to enlarge>

De Panne is the westernmost Belgian coastal town, sharing a border with France. It has a population of almost 10.800 people. Its history is closely linked with Adinkerke, nowadays a small village, situated about 3 kilometres from the sea.  The situation used to be reversed, for during the late 18th century, De Panne was part of the larger parish and municipality of Adinkerke. Because of the growing importance of coastal tourism from the late 19th century on, De Panne eventually transformed into a larger town than Adinkerke, beoming independent in 1911.  Originally De Panne was primarily a fishing place, founded in 1783. The fisheries, especially the small herring fisheries close to the coast, in De Panne flourished from the middle of the 19th century, and the fishing community steadily grew. Around the turn of the century, a number of shipyards were active in De Panne, while several small fish smoke houses were also present in the village. By courtesy of the local history and heritage club ‘De Panneboot P1′, the town possesses one of the last traditional inshore fishing vessel of the Flemish coast, also named the ‘Panneboot P1’. The vessel is an example of a ‘pannekotter’, the smaller successor of the famous ‘pannepot’, now on display in front of the Saint Peter’s Church of De Panne. On occasion, the ‘Panneboot P1’ still sails and from time to time, the ship is used for educational purposes

http://www.coastalwiki.org/wiki/Fisheries_in_De_Panne

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Panne

Very selective views through the huge secured glass panel

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

Sadly, our very last day of this wonderful experience has come upon us all too soon. Lots of pieces of a very large puzzle to ponder over and put together but it will all be revealed in time, as they say. We have visited amazing places and met many folks – some friendly, some not, sadly often ‘church’ folks were not welcoming, but that’s for another day.

Saint Bavo Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium: When we arrived in Ghent it was certainly a lovely day and the city was full of life with lots of hustle, bustle and energy; trams and buses busily swung around the narrow city streets. Ghent is a city and a  municipality in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is the capital and largest city of the East Flanders province, and the third largest in the country, exceeded in size by Brussels and Antwerp. The city originally started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Leie and in the Late Middle Ages became one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe, with some 50,000 people in 1300. It is a port and university city. Around 650, Sain Amand founded two abbeya in Ghent: St Peter’s and St Bavo’s. Around 800,  Louis the Pious, of   Charleymagne, appointed Finhard, the biographer of Charlemagne, as abbot of both.  The city grew from several nuclei, the abbeys and a commercial centre. However, both in 851 and 879, the city was plundered by the Vikings. Within the protection of the County of Flanders, the city recovered and flourished from the 11th century, growing to become a small city-state By the 13th century, Ghent was the biggest city in Europe north of the Alps after Paris, bigger than Cologne or Moscow. Within the city walls lived up to 65,000 people.  Lots about Ghent in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghent

 The main city square of Ghent; full of life with lots of shops and resturants nearby!

The Saint Bavo Cathedral, also known as Sint-Baafs Cathedral, an 89-meter-tall Catholic Gothic Cathedral is the seat of the dioces of Ghent, is named for Saint bavo of Ghent and contains the well-known Ghent Altarpiece. It is built on the site of the former Chapel of St. John the Baptist, a primarily wooden construction that was consecrated in 942 by Transmarus,  Bishop of Tournai and Noyon. Traces of a later Romanesque structure can be found in the cathedral’s crypt. Construction of the Gothic church began around 1274. Continuous expansion, in he Gothic style were carried out from the 14th through 16th centuries. In 1539, as a result of the rebellion against Charles V, who was baptized in the church, the old Abbey of St. Bavo was dissolved. Its abbot and monks went on to become canons in a Chapter that was attached to what then became the Church of Saint Bavo. When the Diocese of Ghent was founded in 1559, the church became its Cathedral and construction was considered complete June 7, 1569. Sadly in the summer of 1566, bands of Calvinist iconoclasts visited Catholic churches in the Netherlands, shattering stained-glass windows, smashing statues, and destroying paintings and other artworks they perceived as idolatrous. However, the altarpiece by the Van Eycks was saved. It was a beautiful looking cathedral but sadly yet again had lost much of its ‘energy’, not helped by the negative attitude of one of its human ‘religous’ helpers, trying to bar me from taking a photo of a sheild relevant to our quest. A beautiful building with many stunning works of art, but sadly with no actual spirituality…

There were some stunning marble memorial carvings that made good use of the skull imagery. There were some beautiful oil paintings, along with relevant Craft/Quest related heraldry and sheilds <click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Bavo%27s_Cathedral,_Ghent

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Bloodline connection associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

All that remained now was just one more view from our apartment window aside the river in Dunkirk before setting out on the road again in the morning and back home to the UK via the channel tunnel!

“On this epic journey we experienced the different energies of many lands as we followed in the footsteps of King Arthur around Europe and found out that churches are not what they seem;  I also found an amazing light inside me that I never want to dim. Putting aside the spiritual aspect of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind-expanding in itself; an experience that I fully embraced. So that was it; an amazing quest fullfilled and I for one cannot wait until our next adventure.

Many of you have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in-depth write-ups on these pages, so have a good idea of what the quests are all about and why. It is always from a physical, spiritual and more importantly a metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests and now we have bought ‘the grail’ into the mix.

The buildings we visit are built on very sacred sites, yet it is not the buildings as such, as to why we are there. The sites are of sacred, pyramid energy; the buildings atop have come and gone over the centuries, leaving no clues in the buildings since, as to their purpose and real reason within the rhyme of time; except of course to those whom can decode the symbols. The churches could be describes as ‘markers’ in time and space.

The quest, the King Arthur quest, traces his journey to these sites, it was his quest then, just as it is our important quest now; a journey of learning sacred knowledge, that has often been hidden within very time and the landscape itself. But yet most importantly never told of in history, yet the links are now appearing, like the colours of a magic painting book when the water is added, for when knowledge and understanding is added to our life, magically the truth appears.

We have visited many pyramid sites, some where the earth magnetis were so strong, that the so-called ‘sat-nav’ (which works via earth-based communications anyway), was caused to spin around in circles; going crazy due to the pyramid energy. The energy can often be overwhelming causing one to lose balance and feel a bit ‘woozy’ at times until one tunes into it and finds one’s balance. There is always so much more to space and time than meets the eye.”

DSC09853

“The Keeper of Scrolls” March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

The Knights of the Red Order

“And so Quest 27 sadly draws to a close: Moors, sea & heaven, all spectacular and atop the moors in the sunshine, one could be forgiven for thinking that one was oh so near to heaven, for in reality one actually is. Dartmoor at times was wonderfully moody, wild and desolate and high, high up the rains merged into the clouds. Churches sat alone and serene on top of hilltops reached only by winding lanes. England at it’s best, and when safely tucked up for the night in our converted chapel acommadation, one can only give thanks for this life. Down upon the rocky shores life ebbs & flows with the tides; dreams come true and perceptions change as challenges to reality are met…”

“One is so near the clouds on the top of Dartmoor that one can really get a sense & feeling of being able to reach out & touch the firmament above. Today I felt so incredibly and wonderfully close to it. Reach out & touch the beauty before it is too late.”

Day Five: All Saints Church Okehamton: All too soon Sunday, our last day of this amazing and revealing quest was upon us: the weather was still gorgeous and so we intended to make the most of every moment and as we drove across beautiful moorland we could not help but to be in fine spirits.

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon and it is situated at the northen edge of Dartmoor with a population of 5,922 (2011 census). The town itself was founded by the Saxons; the earliest settlement on record being from 980 AD, known as ‘Ocmundtune’, meaning settlement by the Ockment, a river which runs through the town, which grew because of the medieval wool trade and there are some noteble buildings in the town. The oldest building is the castle which dates back to the Domesday Book and which was once the largest castle in Devon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okehampton

The church itself, up a hill at the edge of town is very secluded, peaceful and pretty and is almost set within a woodland setting and yet is still at the heart of its community. A Church has stood on this hill since Saxon times when the little hilltop village of Ocmundtune was closely grouped around its (probably wooden) Church and surrounded on all sides by dense forests. With the building of Okehampton Castle soon after 1066, present day Okehampton began to develop in the river valley and the little Saxon village was progressively abandoned. The church is a grade two listed building, mostly built in perpendicular style and rebuilt in 1842

https://tickets.twomoorsfestival.co.uk/sales/view-venues/all-saints-church-okehampton

 

Inside the very well-kept church is an array of symbolic artefacts relating to Craft and beyond as shown above: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

The stained-glass windows are also very stunning pieces of art showing much symbolism.

  • Blood line connection: Our lead researcher’s 10 x Great Grandfather, Sir George Clark 1509 – 1580. Born in Holland but registered later in Devon, having connections to Colyton with buisness in Okehampton.

“The oh so peaceful and gorgeous Devon countryside where one can literally hear a pin drop and one gets the reality of being truly in the clouds……”

St Andrews Church Moretonhamstead: We drove through some wonderful and practically isolated countryside where one could actually hear a pin drop, to reach Moretonhamstead (anciently Moreton Hampstead) a pretty market town, parish and ancient manor in Devon, situated on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor, within the Dartmoor National Park. At the 2011 census the population of the parish was 1,703; the parish church is St Andrews.

The  Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as ‘Mortone’; which derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town’s situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 ‘Hampstead’ had been added to the name which simply means “homestead”, The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place. The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and with Moreton as its major settlement.

Wool and (in later years) the manufacture of woollen cloth, formed the basis of the town’s economy for over 700 years. The economy was evidently healthy when Moreton Hampstead established a water-powered fulling mill before the end of the 13th century.Read more in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moretonhampstead

This grade one listed parish church is to be found at the eastern end of the town; it was originally built in 1418 and had heavy restorations in 1856 and 1905. It is quite spacious inside with some nice stained glass windows. It is in a rather lovely position overlooking the countryside as are many of the churches we visit. There’s something really special about a cemetry on a hillside with a wonderful view over the surrouding countryside; it can evoke all sorts of feelings and connections inside of one, but sadly, the sacred energies once attached to the church here long ago, are now departed…

St Andrews Church with an interesting plaque just inside the porch

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101334222-church-of-st-andrew-moretonhampstead#.XT3mJnt7l1s

Interia shots of the church showing some lovely stained glass with some close up detail: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

St Werburgh’s Church Wembury: This amazing 14th century church sits on the cliff edge overlooking the ocean and the enigmatic Mewstone and it really is the jewel in Devon’s crown.

“The Lifes that meets the sea in hidden and mystical Wembury”

Wembury is a village on the south coast of Devon, very close to Plymouth Sound, located south of Plymouth; it is also the name of the peninsular in which the village is situated. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty with a beautiful beach well known for surfing and rock pooling, and basking sharks can be seen in the summer near the Mewstone. The population of the electoral ward was 4,455 in the 2011 census. The name ‘Wembury’ may derive from a place name containing the name ‘Woden’ and noted by a John Mitchell Kemble that it was called ‘Wodnesbeorh’. Saxons colonised south-west Devon during the 7th century founding agricultural settlements in the area and the church is dedicated to the Saxon saint, Saint Werburgh. Of course it is a delight for holiday makers with it’s sandy beaches and crystal clear sea.

The mysterious triangular Mewstone, which is uncannily similar to the rock just off Tintagel, is very visable from the beach. In the past it was inhabited and has been a prison, a private home and a refuge for local smugglers. It’s most infamous resident was Sam Wakeman who avoided transportation to Australia in favour of the cheaper option of transportation to the Mewstone, where he was interned for seven years. After his internment on the island he remained there paying his rent by supplying rabbits for the Manor House table. It is said Sam Wakeman is responsible for carving the rough stone steps to the summit of the Mewstone. The artist Turner has painted the island several times, after sketching it during a sailing trip. However the island does have many secrets and not everything is as it would seem….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wembury

The church, standing as it does on the clifftop overlooking the sea and Mewstone is a firm favourite for couples getting wed.

Inside the church, which was built in the 14th century and visited by mesolithic man, is a stunning array of carvings, both stone and marble quite unlike anything i had seen before, ancient, unusual and intriging, including a rarely seen Serpent Goddess holding the ‘Staff of Wisdom’. She is surrounded by a representation of the angels, yet this time shown in their very dark guise; maybe showing their true selves? This brings to mind the phrase, of the angels masking themselves as demons and the demons as angels themselves within the Light and Dark of the world.

Also displayed in oils and gilt is the Neville shield (the Royal Crest), indicating the strong connection to our deepening bloodline quest. The shield always displays the unicorn and lion, but why, leaving much to think about upon the sphere of time. A genuine knights helmet is displayed up high; kind of hidden in plain sight really…  Also, yet again, another connection revealed here to Lancelot Desposyni, taking us deeper into our bloodline quest, with connection to our future quest in Europe, when we will follow in the footsteps of the Knights of the Round Table. The bible here is open on Romans 9:4, (G-d’s Soverign Choice) which if read may bring revelations to the reader…. There is mention too of the ‘Black Rod’ with further connections to Ely in Cambridgshire; much for the astute student to research and discover.

<please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

 

Watch the video below and find out so much more of the history of the church and surprisingly of its connection to Ely, our area and to see many of the wonderful carvings in real time (starts at 2.00)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU5qmTaCRbs&t=1s

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni (our head researcher’s bloodline) was in this area, this place at around 562 AD, in respect of purpose and spirituality.

“I sat around, but was not found, I took a trip and did not fall,
I saw the moon, but not the sky. When time was tough, I reached up high.
A height in time and trip to thee. For in times telling the mystery.>
For seek to find, and trip to rule I saw the sun, with the sky and all”

 

And so sadly this quest 27, has drawn to a close with much to digest and many revelations swirling around like the tides upon the sands. Much then to take on board, but before we depart, why not chew the cud with us, with memories and thoughts of an amazing and wonderful time in Devon and Cornwall….

Devon & Cornwall: A Mythic Quest

Chewing the cud of a very mythic quest!

But time does certainly not stand still for these ‘Questers’, for in the blink of an eye we will be embarking on Quest 28 with a new name and a new look; all a part of our continued evolution on this earthly plane. Those of you with eyes peeled and ears open may have noticed our many references to King Arthur and his Knights (the true men/energies behind the myths). So we are off to Europe at the end of October to travel in the footsteps of those real knignts – please be with us and follow us all the way!

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” August 2019

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

A day of following a trail to find a knight of renown and connecting to a Lady true. The trail took us to Tintagel, via Boscastle where words were spoken on the breeze to those whom could hear. Bloodlines and energy lines all finally making sense…

QUEST 27 CONTINUES…

Saturday had arrived and wonderfully we were still experiencing the most gorgeous of weather, made even the more enjoyable in the knowledge that it was very wet and cold back home, further north. This part of the quest, day four, took us to Clovelly, Boscastle and Tintagel.

All Saints Church Bideford, Clovelly: This pretty little secluded Norman church, not far from Clovelly village is set in a lovely wooded graveyard and on the day we arrived, bluebells and other springflowers were everywhere. It looked very magical. The church actually stands in the grounds of Clovelly Court, and is bounded by the Court’s walled garden. The church was begun in the 12th century on the site of an earlier timber building. The Norman church was a simple cruciform building, consisting of a nave, chancel, and transepts. As the population of Clovelly grew, more space was needed, and in the 14th century a north aisle was added.  The renovation may have been carried out by William Cary, lord of the manor, who received permission to make the church collegiate in 1387. Cary’s plan was to establish a college of 6 chaplains under a Warden, but the plans were never implemented, and All Saints remained a simple parish church.

 

Clovelly Church set in the grounds of Clovelly Court <please click on an image to enlarge>

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/clovelly.htm

Although there has been a church building at this site from 630 AD, in actual fact there has been a place of actual ‘gathering’ here from the early 500’s AD here. Lancelot Desposyni, who is our lead reseachers x 48 Great Grandfather and of the bloodline we are tracing on our quests, was here in this area around about 530 AD.

We have discovered that the Desposyni line links onto the Fordham line, and the Fordham line links onto the Clark line (with or without an E!). The Clarks and the Fordhams have had a very long association with each other; almost since the dawn of time! References to both lines and the Nevilles too can all be seen in this very church.

See our video for more detail & references, together with explanations on the meanings of church symbolism and so much more. (2nd clip on link at 17.56)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=227s

 

Some of the stunning windows that contain references to Lancelot, the Nevilles, the Fordams and to the Lamb of God (a riddle in itself) See much more in our video above…

Clovelly is a totally unspoilt fishing village in Devon that seems to be lost in time, with no cars or traffic of any kind allowed.  It is privately owened and there is a rather steep charge to enter the village, almost as steep as the way down into the village itself! So thus we did not enter…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovelly

  • Bloodline connections: Lancelot Desposyni (from the Fordham line) Born 520 AD & our head researchers 48 x Great Grand Father)
  • Also references in All Saints Church to the Nevilles, the Clarkes and the Fordhams

Boscastle: For our quest, for Craft and research reasons, this pretty little coastal village and fishing port on the north coast of Cornwall was certainly on our agenda. But for obvious reasons there is a lot of falseness around, but if one can see past all the fake touristy consumer traps, it is a lovely little spot. In cornish the name means Kastel Boterel and it is part of the civil parish of Forrabury and Minister. Its harbour is a natural inlet protected by two stone harbour walls built in 1584 by Sir Richard Grenville and it is the only significant harbour for 20 miles along the coast.  The village extends up the valleys of the River Valency and the River Jorden. Heavy rainfall on 16 August 2004 caused extensive damage to the village and made all the headlines as water raged through the village in a torrent, washing away all in its path. It was a terrifying ordeal for all those who experienced it.

 

The very pretty albeit touristy village of Boscastle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boscastle

One cannot visit Boscastle without a visit to the infamous Musuem of Witchcraft which draws many folks to the area for a multitude of reasons. It is a strange place seemingly stuck firmly in an earthly time warp of a particular era and earthly perception. There were quite a lot of negative vibes there, but i was pleased to see a few items and symbols that alluded to Enochian and Templar magic and thus to ‘real’ Craft. It is difficult to know just how much of these ‘histories’ of old witchcraft and folk magic are actually real or not, or simply came into being at the time wicca was birthed and have been elaborated upon over the years since. Magic like any path should always evolve, as especially too should the practitioner and not get stuck within the realms of ‘myth and magic’.

 

An array of interesting items from the museum, some of which show a connection to Craft and Enochian magic.

After driving from Boscastle to Tintagel, it was time for a welcomed coffee before visiting King Arthur’s Hall; a site of an ancient and sacred underground spring, and thus we found ourselves in a quaint little cafe on the main street – just up our street in fact!

 

Tintagel: Tintagel or Trevena  (Cornish: Tre war Venydh meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall in England. The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena until the Post Office started using ‘Tintagel’ as the name, in the mid-19th century. Until then, ‘Tintagel’ had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish. The population of the parish was 1,820 people (2001 census), but decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with and steeped in the legends of King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. There are many literary and film associations with the village and like Boscastle it attracts more than its fair share of moden-day witches, pagans and role players whom simply fail to see the real truths right under their noses and their swishing capes…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel

King Arthur’s Hall: King Arthurs Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s. It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the “Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table”, behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction, and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell. In 1927, the “Order of the Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table” was formed in Britain by Frederick Thomas Glasscock (a retired London businessman, d. 1934) to promote Christian ideals and Arthurian notions of medieval chivalry. Glasscock was resident at Tintagel (in the house “Eirenicon” which he had built) and responsible for the building of King Arthur’s Hall (an extension of Trevena House which had been John Douglas Cook’s residence and had been built on the site of the former Town Hall and Market Hall). The hall is now used as a Masonic Hall, and is home to four Masonic bodies as the photos below show.

 

Masonic symbolism which always feature on our quests; the meaning of which certainly pre-dates modern-day Freemasonary <click on an image to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Arthur%27s_Hall,_Tintagel

Since 1952, the building has been used as a Masonic Hall and is home to the King Arthur Lodge No. 7134. In 1962 a Royal Arch Chapte was formed by the Lodge, and the building is used by some other lodges to hold their installation meetings. The hall is now as home to four Masonic bodies:

  • King Arthur Lodge No. 7134 which was warranted on 13 November 1951;
  • St Enodoc Lodge No. 9226 which was consecrated on 30 May 1987;
  • King Arthur Royal Arch Chapter No. 7134 which was consecrated on 31 March 1962;
  • Tintagel Castle Lodge of Mark Master Masons No. 1800 which was consecrated on 23 April 1999.

 

It is certainly a stunning building inside, where one gets a real sense of a ‘Grand Hall’, the sort of hall where King Arthur could certainly have conducted his buisness, feasted and ruled from. The masonic influence is everywhere in the building too; it being an amazing and fitting building to hold lodge meetings. The day we went, a ‘Fairy Fayre’ was taking place, bringing together, the psychic, spiritual, witchy and pagan worlds, which meant entry was free on that day, but clear photos of the halls design were out of the question.

The very striking stained glass windows and the emblems associated with them are the work of Veronica Mary Whall (1887–1967) who was an important stained glass artist, painter, and illustrator and part of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She created 73 windows for King Arthurs Hall, Tintagel, that opened in 1933. As of 1997 it is considered to be the largest collection of stained glass panels of  King Arthur made in the 20th century and a great example of Arts and Crafts workmanship. I have tried to include as many as i can here, together with some of the descriptions.