Tag Archive: Cornwall


St Michaels Mount in Cornwall and Mont St Michel in Normandy – both straight out of ‘Myths & Legends’

A Tale of Two Mounts: Allow me to transport you to two beautiful and seemingly out of the world places across the seas; St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, England and Mont St Michel in Normandy, France, both are beautiful and fairy tale worlds with much in common. Both mounts have many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen and to see the tales unravel of past and present within the dimesions. The Archangel Michael is said to have appeared at both sites and of course both sites sit upon significant ‘energy lines’.

Traveling to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, one can either take a small boat ride when the tide is high or walk across the man-made granite causeway between mid-tide and low water. The mount and its castle is indeed a faitytale sight rising up out of the seas as one approaches. The mount’s Cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe, some would say, many more tales that lie hidden under the surface ‘folk memory’. It is a very ‘energetic’ place which is no surprise, for it is a part of the famous St Michaels Ley Line.

A short journey across topaz coloured seas…

Historically, and in a Craft sense too, St Michael’s Mount is a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, yet they also share very similar myths, legends and sightings. It was given to the Benedictine religous order by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century and it is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries. (Many more historical facts can be read on my actual quest write up previously posted) All over the Island references can be seen to the Arch Angel Michael, and also at Mont St Michel in France too; my focus here. Over the years there have been instances of earthquakes and floods destroying older buildings and even a tsunami which caused great loss of life along this part of the Cornsh coast.

Imposing upon the rocks

In history St Michael’s Mount was in the possession of the monks of the ‘sister’ isle of Mont St Michel in Normandy, at around the time of the Norman Conquest of 1066 and it was in the twelfth century that the monks built the church and priory. In 1193 the mount was seized by Henry La Pomery and again, (moving on in history) during the ‘Wars of the Roses’ was held by the Earl of Oxford. Yet do not let us forget or undestimate the many secret and hidden reasons for earthly wars and the attainment of power among men. For the history of these magificant lands is very far removed from modern-time ventures. What is important, especially on a Craft level, is the foundation of something that has been ‘hidden’ for centuries, and yet remains the knowledge within the walls of that which was moved.

St Michael: The angel Michael is said to have appeared to fishermen here in the 8th century AD. There are tales that date back to 495AD, of seafarers being lured to the rocks by mermaids, but then saved by an apparition of St Michael, whom guided them to safety. Within the history of the mount a series of miracles and legends of the apearance of Saint Michael have bought folks of all faiths to this island for centuries. The church on the island is of course named after St Michael and has a beautiful statue of the angel inside.

Local Legends of Giants: Amongst the rock, within the leylines and energy-flow, a local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant named Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack, who lived in the town of Marazion, the ‘gateway’ to the mount made an appearance. Jack knew that the town had to destroy the ‘curse of the beast’ and took on this gigantic menace, whom had an appetite for cattle and for children. So one evening Jack ventured onto the cobble-stone causeway and blew his horn. The beast came down the mount to see what the noise was and Jack sneaked around and up the mount to reach the stone called ‘The Stone Heart’. Jack smashed the stone heart with his horn and the beast dissapeared, never to be seen again. Another version tells of Jack slaying the giant by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

The Giants Well – halfway up

Solomon’s Cross: Hidden away peacefully on a quiet terrace of the island overlooking the sea, and never written about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever, yet to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant pointer to the  ‘Neville Bloodline’. So for this first time on our quests we had a mention of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands, of a connection to the High Kings of Ireland and of their travels to further afield.

 

Where he needed to be….

Our lasting thoughts of this day would be with that single solitary cross, which everyone passes by and that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty and tellings beyond the mundane…

Mont Saint-Michel: Mont Saint-Michel in lower Normandy, France rises up over the French landscape overlooking the land for miles around. The actual Abbey lies at the peak of a rocky islet less than half a mile off the coast of Normandy from land, the commune there was made accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey, but still defensible due to incoming tides stranding or drowning would-be assailants. The island remained unconquered during the Hundred Years War where a small garrison fended off a full attack by the English in 1433, until Louis XI recognised the reverse benefits of its natural defences and turned it into a prison.  Now a rocky tidal island, with modern access roads, the Mont occupied dry land in prehistoric times.

Rising up out of the Normandy landscape

The abbey is an essential part of the structural composition of the town that the feudal society constructed. At the very top, G-d, the abbey, and the monastery. Below this, the Great halls, then stores and housing, and at the very bottom (outside the walls), fishermen’s and farmers’ housing.  The monks there durung first century of their institution, venerated the archangel Michael. The Mont became a place of prayer and study, but the stable period, during the reign of Charlemagne ended when he died. At first, pilgrims kept coming to the Mont but after the Vikings captured the Mont in 847, the monks departed. The abbey has had a rich and varied history and starting in 1922, Christian worship was again practiced in the abbey. The wealth and influence of the abbey extended to many daughter foundations, including St. Michael’s Mount in Cornwall. (more historical facts can be found on the relevant quest pages) The tides vary greatly, at roughly 14 metres (46 ft) between highest and lowest water marks. Popularly nicknamed “St. Michael in peril of the sea” by medieval pilgrims making their way across the flats, the mount can still pose dangers for visitors who avoid the causeway and attempt the hazardous walk across the sands from the neighbouring coast.

At the very top St Michael on the spire

The access to the Mont, unlike its sister in Cornwall is often by a ‘standing-room’ only shuttle bus, across the bay, with a bit of a walk at the other end. Old very steep stone steps take one to the very top of the mont, it is a long and ardurous journey up, with many rests needed along the way. The abbey complex is much bigger than one would imagine with many facets to it. In times past one can easily imagine what an isolated life the monks and visiting knights here, would have led. A gold statue of St Michel rest atop of the spire there. There are many lovely traditional shops and resturants on the island and a Templar pressence is very obvious there too, which is of no surprise. Sadly all the sacred ‘energies‘ that would have been there at one point in time are now no more; probably eroded away by mankind’s unspiritual interactions; interactions that are as much about ‘giving back’ as ‘receiving’ (taking) upon the shores of time. Folks fail to realise this and energies dissipate and move as and when (or where) they need to. There is so much more to this world and these important sites than folks will ever realise.

Local Legends: The original site was founded by an Irish hermit, who gathered a following of his own from the local community. The island was called Mont Tombe (Latin: tumba) and the story goes that one night in the year 708, the Archangel Michael, leader of God’s armies against Satan, appeared to St. Aubert, the bishop of Avranches, in a dream. The archangel ordered the bishop to build a sanctuary in his name at the top of the island. Aubert ignored this order; after all, it was only a dream. The next night, the Archangel Michael appeared again and repeated his order to build a sanctuary at the top of Mont Tombe in his honor. Again, Aubert was unconvinced, and in any case, building a church on overgrown and rocky terrain on an isolated mount surrounded by the sea would be an immense task. Thus, it suited the bishop to ignore this recurring dream. Faced with such obstinacy, St. Michael realized that he would need to work on his powers of persuasion, so as Aubert slept the following night, the Archangel Michael pressed his finger into Aubert’s forehead and repeated his command. Aubert awoke the next morning to find that the archangel had burned a hole in his head. He needed no further convincing! In late 709, a church was built and devoted to Archangel Michael.

St Michel depicted in a church painting

St Michel and the Dragon: Apparently, it is no coincidence that St. Michael chose this location for the church. Some believe that it was on this mount that St. Michael won his mighty victory over the dragon, described in the New Testament’s Book of Revelations (12:7-9):

“And there was war in heaven: Michael and his angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels, and prevailed not… the great dragon was cast out, that old serpent called the Devil and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world: he was cast out into the earth, and his angels were cast out with him”.

There are many tellings on the internet of St Michael and the dragon/satan at Mont St Michel, of a quarrel between them and St Michel needing to escape from his malicious neighbour whom kept him in poverty. St Michel tried to protect himself and built a home on an islet in the open ocean (what would eventually be known as Mont Saint Michel).  For protection, he surrounded his island with treacherous quicksand. St Michael ended up making various promises and deals with the devious devil, to save and protect himself and eventually saved himself and kicked the devil off the island.

Slaying the ‘dragon’….

Connections to King Arthur: Sir Beldivere was a trusty supporter of Arthur from the beginning of his reign, and one of the first knights to join the Knights of the Round Table. He helped Arthur fight the Giant of Mont St Michel in Normandy; a giant that ravaged France until confronted by King Arthur. It abducted the niece of the King of Brittany and took her to his cave in the mountains known as Mont St. Michel. He plundered the nearby villages, spreading fear among the locals. Hearing this, King Howel asked for the help of King Arthur and his knights to kill the Giant. King Arthur ventured with Sir Kay, Sir Bedivere and two squires.They rode through the deserted forests until they they were within site of Mont St. Michel. Upon the mountain range they saw two fires burning, one to the east and one to the west. King Arthur could not decide which one to investigate first and so he sent Bedivere to the smaller fire. Bedivere journeyed across the rocky terrain and drew his sword when he heard movements. When he came to the fire he met an old woman mourning next to a tomb. She told him that she cried for the death of a girl that she had nursed since childhood who had been killed by the Giant. She told Bedivere to leave this place now before the devilish beast killed them all. Bedivere reported back to King Arthur who decided to travel to the other larger fire alone. King Arthur with sword and shield in hand, approached the Giant in an attempt to catch him off-guard. The Giant rose up immediately and took a club of oak which he put in the fire. The two fought ferociously until King Arthur cut the Giant between his eyebrows. Blinded by blood the Giant thrashed about with his club and eventually caught Arthur’s arm. The King wrestled free and after exchanging blade against wood, the King thrust his sword under the Giant’s crocodile skin armor and killed him. He then called for assistance from Sir Kay to behead the enormous man, and prove to the locals that the Giant had been slain.

Who is Saint Michel? Angels have always been with us upon this earth, whether we wish to admit it or not, they have been here in many guises over many centuries and have been known by other names including The Watchers. Angels are able to cross the boundaries of time and space in all dimensions. St Michael is associated with this earth, with the energy of the earth, with leylines in particular, especially the famous line named after him. His name appears time and time again, upon this earth, especially where churches named after him are concerned. He is the angel that is seen to be fighting for good and is seen to be victorious over evil and is known as Prince of the Heavenly Host. He is the angel whom will fight the dragon, the ancient serpent, known as the devil or satan. Many paintings and statues of him are to be found at the sites that bear his name; the sites upon The St Michel Ley Line.

St Michael from Brentnor Church on The St Michael Ley Line

The St Michel/Apollo Ley Lines: Ley lines are electro-magnetic energy lines that run through our earth. Both St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall and Mont St Michel in Normandy have these ley lines running through them. The Appollo line runs through Normandy and The St Michael Line runs through Cornwall; the point of connection between the two lines is at St Michaels Mount, where the cross over, the intersection forms a Templar Cross. Ley Lines are part of the grid of energy that covers the surface of the earth, connecting many ancient spiritual sites. (Much more on Ley Lines and accurate mappings can be found in the excellent new book ‘Finding Camelot’ by Karl Neville). The lines do have special significance upon this earth and what is clear is that they have a special significance within the riddles of the Grail Quests too. The St Michael Alignment runs through the southern part of England and many sites upon it’s 350 mile course do bear the name of St Michael. The St Michael Ley Line is an important aspect of the island in Cornwall, having been under the sea on the ocean bed for many a good year and the ‘energies’ there draw folks to it time and time again in the hope of discovering something more to life. At the side of the ancient church of St Michael, the very rock is said to grant ‘romantic wishes’ for anyone whom touches the rock and asks for their wishes to be granted.  Much of this of course has to do with the energy of the Mount connecting with the person’s ‘power of though’, something that Craft/Templar folks will know a lot about. This thus enables them to put across a more convincing reason and understanding to their loved one. Whatever you think you know already about the St Michael’s Line, you will probably be wrong, for the line embeds, diverts and repeats itself in ‘mirror-images’ throughout the earth with ease, and through time and space. It is likely to alter it’s ‘projections’ in the near future too, for as the earth changes, so do the lines.

 

The Appollo Line amd the St Michael Line intersect at St Michael’s Mount

So these two magnificant sites both named after St Michael have been very significant within time and space, especially earthly time and space, both with tellings of battles fought and giants slain, also battles fought for good over evil. St Michael, so it is said has appeared at both sites and is a part of the energy alignment there, part of the energy alignment of the earth which bear his name. Of course the many sacred sites on the lines (and the leylines themselves) go back much further than modern day pagans believe, although the folks of old whom were in tune to these alignments, being guided to be so, did create (under guidance) the ‘waymarkers’ in time upon the sites, but they were not the ‘pagan’ folks we are lead to believe they were.

Let us then stop and consider for one moment. We know that throughout time and space, the same ‘energy line’ will have different names upon this earth, as the quest tales, my writings and stories bear witness to, time and time again. So let us consider then, is St Michael, actually Azazel? For the St Michael energy line lies within the earth, Azazel too has ‘earthly’ connections, for ‘he’ was/is buried for many centuries deep within the earth…. and as we know there is no such thing as coincidence….

‘Never underestimate an Angel for they may not be whom you think they are’

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ May 2021

AKA <moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

Sources: Previous Quest posts and teachings, ‘Finding Camelot’ by Karl Neville – available now on Amazon!

 

On Cornwall’s Moor

Written from my true experiences….

 

Whispers within the landscape
A pulse vibrating
A breath
The hidden heart
On Cornwall’s moor
A needed sanctuary
When knights a travelling came
Lost in time
Out of time
Three lions roared
To leave their mark
The Dove hovers above
A blood red cross
Dimension’s change
Tis neither the beginning nor the end
Suspended forever in its own time
Tales unfold
Entwined within old ash roots
Never told
The land keeping its own counsel
Ancient eyes watch from the shadows
In recognition
Traveling pilgrims in modern dress
Also acknowledge
All gone before
Seeing within the green of the land
The sanctity of a bloodline
Secrets forever carved in stone
Spell the unspoken word
Tell an untold tale
Energies exchanged
Footprints left
Forever upon the moors

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

May 2021

“The truths have always been protected over the years, within this very shallow world of men; truths hidden behind tales of misadventure, tales of misdoings and tales of misdirecton, thus keeping that which needs protecting, forever secret, yet hidden totally within plain sight…”.

QUEST 31 CONT: “So here we are on Tuesday 4th August, day 5 of our epic quest through the magical west country of England; a land known for its many myths and tales. As hinted previously all was not lost when we found the doors of St Edward’s Church, Eggbuckland closed to us on the previous day. A quick freindly phone call enabled us to have access, thanks to the kind and friendly reverend of the church, whose name i have sadly forgotten, but what a friendly man with an amazing mental hord of local knowledge. The extra photos taken are below, turning the day into something very worthwhile and maybe a taster of what was to come. So just goes to show, always have faith and never give up…”

St Edwards Church: Buckland Plymouth:

A traditional setting for a church and graveyard, all looking fresh and verdant after the rains, with bee hives around the back behind the trees, just follow the path into the bushes.

It was well-worth waiting and going back, for St Edwards Church, Buckland was full of many traditional treasures and artworks relating to Craft. Some lovely symbology here especially on the old wall hanging; symbology that relates to Templarism, King Arthur and The Grail. Always a pleasure to see such amazing peices.<please click to enlarge>

 

“…OF KINDRED NAMES”

Tuesday 4th August: St Pauls Church. Charlestown. St Austell.

Sadly another church that was shut to us on this day, whether due to ‘Miss Rona’ again or whether due to the Clergy being ‘otherwise engaged’ elsewhere i do not know, so not much to say about it really. We did walk around the outside of the church and graveyard, where they were some lovely memorials, so outside only photos will need to suffice on this occasion. It is said that this church is an active church, yet obviously not on the day we were there! It was built in 1849-51 and has been Grade II listed since 1999. St Paul’s is built of granite stone, sourced from a quarry near Stenalees with slate roofs, in the Early English style, built with a cruciform plan made up of nave, north and south aisles, transepts, chancel, vestry and porch. The original pulpit and reading desk of carved oak was gifted by local residents, and the granite font gifted by T. G. Vawdrey.

Charlestown became its own parish separate from St Austell in 1846, at a time when the village was experiencing an increase in its population due to local industrial activity. With services initially held in a room licensed for public worship near the Pier House Hotel with funds for a permanent church being raised by public subscription. In 1848, a plot of land was donated by the proprietors of Charlestown, while various other grants were also received. The foundation stone of St Paul’s was laid on 27 November 1849 by Charles Graves-Sawle of Penrice. It was built by Messrs William Kitt and William Drew of St Austell to the designs of Christopher Eales of London  The church was consecrated by the Bishop of Exeter, the Right Rev. Henry Phillpotts, on 30 May 1851.

A stroll around the outside of St Paul’s Church was all we could manage on this occasion <please click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Church,_Charlestown

We were hoping for a nice lunch in Charlestown but due to ‘Miss Rona’ again, who would be following us around everywhere we went on this quest, numbers where limited in all the resturants and bars, so we had to make do with a relaxing walk around the pretty harbour and a wee bit of retail therapy! This quest was certainly proving to be one where adaptability was the order of the day! Charlestown (Porth Meur) means ‘Great Cove’ and is a pretty looking village and port on the south coast of Cornwall in the civil parish of St Austell bay, about 2 miles south east of St Austell town centre. The port at Charlestown, developed in the late-18th century from the fishing village of West Polmear Charlestown, grew out of the small fishing village of West Polmear (or West Porthmear), which consisted of a few cottages and three cellars, in which the catch of pilchards were processed, and over the years it has remained relatively unchanged.

Charlestown looking like it has been unchanged for decades… <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlestown,_Cornwall

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Sir John H Fordam (1423 Kelshall Hertfordshire) 18 x GGF

 

 “FORDHAM HILLS”

St Saviours Church. Trevone. Pastow:

We drove onwards to Trevone, Padstow only to end up in a carpark near the sea that had no relevance to our next destination whatsoever! Thank you ‘satnav’! However the destination did prove to be elusive and take a bit of finding, but we are not ones to give up, and we eventually found it quietly sitting in an elevated postition overlooking the sea. Sadly though after all that trouble; yet another church well and truly locked up, which is a great shame on this occasion, for looking on the internet there would have been some relevant ‘Craft’ artifacts to see. Trevone itself (Treavon in Cornish means river farm) is a seaside village and bay near Padstowe, Cornwall; in Cornish ‘Porth Musyn’ meaning Musun Cove or Mother Sun Cove).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevone

 

St Saviour’s Church, Trevone

The stone used for the exterior walls is a fine textured sandstone from the local Middle Devonian and was quarried at Tredinnick on St. Columb Downs. The roof is a well cleaved slate from the Upper Devonian at Delabole. The floor, window sills, terrace and steps together with the stones surrounding the West Window (depicting “The Stilling of the Storm”) and the two small windows beneath are slightly cleaved slate also from Delabole.There is a Foundation Stone of dark grey uncleaved slate from the Tremadoc slates at Portmadoc, in North Wales at the west and to the south of the main church door. It reads: “Edmund ninth Bishop of Truro laid this stone on the 30th April, 1958″. Buried beneath the stone is a daily newspaper, coins of the realm, a bible and a 1662 Prayer Book. One can read more about the church on the link above. It was such a shame we could not get in considering that the bloodline connection was that of Great Uncle, so finding relevance here in modern times….

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Rev Benjamin Clarke: (1899-1976 Devon/Tevone) Great Uncle
  • Victor Ford: (1955-1973) MA, MSE (18 years)

 

‘A TRUE LAST WORD’

Temple Church, Temple, Bodmin:

Most definitely the highlight of the day, being the most important and sacred site of the day (even this quest) in relation to our Grail Bloodline Quest. This church is truly hidden away from the eyes of the world, hidden within a dip in the landscape with no views from the roads that cross the moor. It seemed to be totally lost in time, or maybe just out of time, totally isolated yet open to all true pilgrims who came that way. It was lovingly looked after, very welcoming and with an amazing ‘energy’ in a true ‘Craft’ sense. Full of Knight Templar history and interestingly our lead researcher’s Great Grandfather (46 x GGF) traveled here, and was involved for a short time within this area, enough to place his mark; that Great Grandfather was of course Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, so a very personal quest.

The beautiful and peaceful Temple Church on Bodmin Moor <please click to enlarge>

The Church of St Catherine as it is also known as, is a Grade II listed building in the small hamlet of Temple not far from the busy A30 but far enough away not to be affected by the traffic noise, yet it could be a million miles away in another century. This peaceful, almost ‘pocket’ of timelessness feels as if it has been suspended in time. The church itself has no electricity, just beautiful and very fitting candlelight. The church was founded in the 12th century by the (said) mysterious and secretive medieval Order of the Knights Templar, after they procured a large parcel of land on Bodmin Moor, which then was was nothing but wild, open moorland, to the unititiated eyes. From that gift a religious community grew and a church was built, but as the centuries passed it is said (maybe as misdirection) that Temple became synonymous with lawless, some might even say ungodly, behaviour. In an area not entirely unfamiliar to strange goings on, Temple Church too became infamous. Irregular practices (it is alledged) continued until in the late 18th century when the church again became subject to normal diocsean discipline.

It was the duty of the Order to protect and provide hospitality to journeying pilgrims and it is believed that they established a chapel on the site as a refuge for those pilgrims en route to Santiago de Compostela, Rome and of course the Holy Land itself. The pilgrims journeyed from Wales and Ireland and took the land route across Cornwall, perhaps first stopping over at Little Petherick, reaching the port of Fowey and continuing across the seas to the continent. Sailing around the treacherous waters off Land’s End was to be avoided at all costs.

A sanctury for journeying pilgrims and travelers alike

The hamlet of Temple was very isolated in the Middle Ages, even more so than today. From the time of the Reformation, when the Order of Saint John was dissolved, Temple Church fell outside the jurisdiction of the bishop and gained a reputation as the place to go, if you needed to be married fast, under the cover of darkness and without the necessary permissions, which seeings how isolated and hidden it is, this would be very easy to imagine. Weddings would be performed here without the reading of the banns or the need for a licence, and the parsons were happy to receive the couple’s ‘grateful donations’. It was not only illicit marriages that were undertaken, according to John Norton, Temple Church also allowed anyone who had taken their own life to be buried in the churchyard.

By 1777 it was reported that the fabric of the building had descended into a ruinous state and services were having to be held in neighbouring parishes. From then on no services were held at Temple Church for more than 100 years. During the Victorian era there was a trend for restoring and renovating churches across England, not all of them sympathetic, but enough money was raised to have Temple Church restored by the Cornish architect Silvanus Trevail. Trevail began work in 1882 following the original ancient foundations. The Knights Templar (it is said) often built circular churches but there is no evidence that their Cornish version was anything other than its present day shape.

During the rebuilding an old Ash tree had to be removed from within the ruined walls. When the tree was cut down it’s roots were found to be entwined around the bones of a human skeleton. Whoever it was, they must have had a certain status to have been buried beneath the floor of the original church. There is no record as to where Trevail had the bones reinterned, so a mystery remains of whom the bones belonged too and where they are now….

The church is full of Knight Templar symbolism both old and new, giving many clues as to the sacred history of the site. As in all our quests nothing can be overlooked , as it is often the tiniest detail that is the most important <click to enlarge>

The ‘new’ church was officially opened in June 1883 and a tea party was held in the graveyard after the first sermon had been given and celebratory hymns sung. The only remnants of the original building constructed by the knights are a few pieces of decorated stonework which can be seen just outside the church door in the wall of a small inconspicuous outbuilding. All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building or the like, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it may seem, so a small out-building around the back can remain un-noticed for decades, cenuries even. It is the same thing with tales, mythologies and ‘so called’ histories; it is not that on the surface which is important, but that which has lain hidden beneath, for centuries. One has to keep digging deep to find the truth and answers and yet only those whom have knowledge of the KEYS, will ever be able to dig deep enough. Yet that is the way, the way it has always been, the way the truths have always been protected over the years, within this very shallow world of men; truths hidden behind tales of misadventure, tales of misdoings and tales of misdirecton, thus keeping that which needs protecting, forever secret, yet hidden totally within plain sight….

An old out-building around the back looked very intriging….
Take a tour around Temple Church with us now…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple,_Cornwall

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Deposyni (520-593) France 46 X GGF

   

“He prayeth well who loveth well
Both man and bird and beast”

“And so our time in this area was coming to a close, with lots of new experiences undertaken and certainly lots to think about and much to digest in the coming weeks; knowledge and discoveries that would continue to have a profound effect upon my life, for example, for many years to come as i continue on my search to unravel the mysteries of the Grail Quest”

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2020

<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

Next Stop: Southhampton….

 

QUEST 31 CONT: “Even when we find the church doors closed all is not lost, for being in different parts of the country one is able to pick up on the different energies of the land; pick up on the ‘vibes’ as it were, the ‘lie of the land’, which certainly do change from area to area. Even when travelling around Europe as in Quest 28, going from country to country one can certainly feel the different energies and i am sure as we walk in Arthur’s footsteps he would have felt the same energies also, the energies that guided him to where he needed to be on his quest for the Grail, as they are indeed guiding us today”

“A SON LOST”

DAY FOUR: MONDAY 3RD AUGUST: ST EDWARDS CHURCH. EGGBUCKLAND PLYMOUTH. 

Eggbuckland is a suburb of the city of Plymouth in Devon, which before the second world war was a small village, a few miles north of Plymouth.  ‘Bocheland’ is of Saxon origin and means “Royal land held by charter”. The Domesday Book of 1086 recorded that this manor was held by King William of Normandy but was granted to the Saxon Heche or Ecca, thus the land was known as Heche or Ecca’s Bocheland. This was the site of a Saxon church which was replaced by the present church of St Edward in 1470. The village was held by the Royalist Cavaliers during the Civil War against the Parlimentarian Roundheads and was badly damaged. During the 19th century the area was host to new Palmerston Forts built as part of a northern defense line around Plymouth. Much of the structures remain but are privately owned and used for differing purposes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggbuckland

Sadly today the doors of St Edwards Church were shut, but it was early in the morning and early on in our quest so maybe all is not lost. It is thought that a church has stood on the current location since Saxon times and the present building dates from the fifteenth century (1420-30). Sir Walter Swyft, the church vicar from January 1349, is believed to have fallen victim to the Black Death, so only holding the vicariate for a short three months. There was only one bell in the church tower when first built, but others were installed in 1682 and 1768. These were melted down in 1882 and the metal used to cast the current peal of six. In 1653 the Plymouth Puritans wreaked revenge on Eggbuckland, destroying many religious artifacts and turning out the 80 year old vicar. A Governor was appointed in 1819 to administer the five Parish work houses situated at the north of the church. The pinnacles of the church were rebuilt in 1864 and the church was enlarged with the building of the north aisle and chancel. The clock was installed in 1901 in memory of Charles Turner who had been Vicar for 40 years. In 1906 the new church vestries were completed, including a new organ chamber and other improvements. 1914 saw the Consecration of the new church at Laira (St Mary the Virgin), replacing the Crabtree Mission Church (which had opened in November 1874). The new building was a daughter church of St Edward’s and stayed within the parish until 1931(when the city boundaries were redrawn).

A brief wander around the outside of St Edwards Church, Eggbuckland <click to enlarge>

http://www.eggbucklandhistory.co.uk/church.php

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTION: 

  • Lord George Neville: Wrotham Kent 1659 (8 x GGF) ‘a son lost’

“INTO THE NIGHT”

ST MICHAEL’S CHURCH: BRENTNOR TAVISTOCK.

After a short journey following the route towards Dartmoor and driving up and up, we arrived as near as we could to the amazing St Michaels Church on top of Brent Tor, which from a distance looks as if it is going to be an epic climb! But fear not, for as we wound our way up onto the moors the road too climbed and climbed to offer a very walkable trek. Still quiet a walk, but steadably doable. Brent Tor is on the western edge of Dartmoor, approximately four miles (6.5 km) north of Tavistock, rising to 1100 ft (330m) above sea level. The Tor is surmounted by the Church of St Michael, the parish church of the village of Brentor, which lies below the Tor. Around the Tor are iron Age earthworks and the remnants of a Hill Fort. Unusually, the fortifications are at the base of the Tor, rather than the summit as is more normal. No serious archaeological work has been carried out on this sacred site upon the St Michael Ley Line, which maybe is a good thing….

Beautiful views climbing up to Brent Tor and from the summit <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brent_Tor

St Michaels Church is also known as  (St Michael of the Rock) and it has been likened to St Michaels on Glastonbury Tor and is a stunning example of a church on a height. There are magnificent views from the churchyard in clear weather, across Dartmoor, Plymouth Sound, Whitsand Bay, the Tamar Valley and Bodmin Moor and even the heights of Exmoor is just visible in clear weather. Even when the thick moorland fogs descend, this is an eerily beautiful place, as the wind whips shreds of cloud past the hill. The church stands 1,110 feet above sea level on an ancient, extinct, volcanic cone. It is an ancient site situated upon St Michaels Ley line and is a site of amazing and powerful energies.

Inside St Michaels Church the decor is very simple, yet simple in a very sacred way; we certainly felt the energies while we were there. The church is thirty-seven feet (11.3m) long, and fourteen feet six inches (4.4m) wide; it is the fourth smallest complete parish church in England. It consists of a nave, chancel (not developed), north porch, and a low, unbuttressed tower thirty two feet (9.8m) high, probably built in the fourteenth century and raised to its present height and embattled a century later. There are doorways in both north and south walls, which is unusual in so small a building, although the porch is slightly more recent. They are similar in design and are probably fourteenth century. The stunning stained glass window in the east wall depicts St. Michael holding the sword of and the scales of justice. This window was damaged in 2002, but has since been restored.

Inside the church and the stunning window dedicated to St Michael <click to view>

In 1995 the church was struck by lightning, and significant damage was done to the Tower. This was repaired, and four new lightning conductors installed to prevent future recurrence. The font is an octagonal granite basin standing on a pedestal of the same shape. The remains of the iron fastening for securing the cover may be seen in the rim of the bowl. In the Middle Ages fonts were ordered to be kept locked in case the hallowed water was stolen and used for black magic! The font is the only furnishing of the church that dates from before the restoration of 1890. There are five bells in the tower, two from the fourteenth or fifteenth century, one seventeenth and two from the early twentieth century; although all were re-cast in 1909. Two bear the medieval inscription Gallus vocor ego, solus per omne sono (I am called the cock, and I alone sound above all); and two “TPI Colling W Nichol H Davis Wardens 1668”. The heaviest of them only weighs six hundredweight (305kg). There is a stone sundial on the south side of the tower, one of the oldest in south Devon. At the top of the dial is a strange figure, half imp, half angel, wearing a flat cap and with outstretched wings. The name Walter Batten is at the foot of the dial, which is dated 1694.The churchyard has never been closed for burials, but owing to a lack of earth and the presence of rabbits it is considered by modern standards unsuitable as a burial ground. A granite path was made around the church in 1980 with the assistance of the Dartmoor National Park Authority.

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: Newton Somerset 1551 (11 x GGF) ‘into the night’

“OF PRECIOUS STONES”

ST LUKES CHURCH: TIDEFORD SALTASH.

After a lovely lunch we made our way to Tideford, a small village in east Cornwall which is is twinned with Plouguerneau in Brittany, France. Its name derives from its location on the River Tiddy, literally meaning “Ford on the River Tiddy”. Tideford is not listed in the Domesday Book but the earliest settlement is thought to have been around 1100AD. The bridge over the River Tiddy at the bottom of Bridge Road dates from the 14th century and this is the earliest surviving structure. Tideford grew in the eighteenth century as the nearby Port Eliot country estate built a number of houses in the village.

   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tideford

St Luke’s Church was very sadly shut for us today, but we had a quick wander around, but access was difficult; we do try and make contact with those connected, but often to no avail. To be truthful there was not much outside that we could see, to take photos of apart from a general shot of the church and the separate bell tower. The Victorian church of St Luke was designed by renowned architect George Wightwick. The building was originally erected as a chapel-of-ease in St Germans parish and was consecrated on 31 July 1845, 175 years ago. It consists of nave and chancel and the east window with its nativity theme was given by a former incumbent, the Rev’d Edward Glanville in memory of his daughter. For safety reasons the bell cot which housed two bells was removed from the roof. To-day there is just one bell now at shoulder level by the south door. I did find by chance, a video on youtube of the church and it looked looked quite bare inside, the walls especially, so maybe over time it has lost its artifacts….

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron William Neville: Wrotham 1701 (7 x GGF) ‘of precious stones’

“ON EASTERN SHORES THE LAND WAS”

TALLAND CHURCH: TALLAND BAY. LOO.

Travelling further into the rural countryside of Cornwall, the views were astounding and driving along the coast, over hill and down dale, our eyes were given a true feast. Many folks never see this side of England and rush towards other countries for their leisure but belive you me, there can be no more spectacular place on this planet than right under our feet here in England. There are beautiful walks around the area, which are part of the Cornish Celtic Way; a pilgrimage walk of 125 miles from St German to St Michael’s Mount, that passes right by the door of Talland Church. The path includes The Saints Way, St Michaels Way and 60 miles of the South-West Coastal Footpath, so sacred indeed with St Michaels Ley Line running through the site. Sadly though, yet again we found G-d’s doors well and truly closed, but the energies there were lovely, the views astounding from the cliff tops and most important some Craft pointers relating to our bloodines were discovered under the little porchway in the cut.

The stunning view from Talland Church, that overlooks Talland Bay and forms part of a 125 mile pilgrimage walk <click to view>

Set beside the South West Coast footpath, between Looe & Polperro, Talland Church is a place of peace & tranquility, the church as we see it today was not built to serve a large community but to maintain a holy site where the Christian faith had been established some 1500 years ago. The church is a grade 1 listed building located on the cliff-top at Talland near Looe, Cornwall, it is dedicated to St Tallanus and was built by Augustinian monks from Launceston. ‘Tal-Lan’ means holy place on a hill, in the Cornish and indeed it is, for the  altar of the present-day church is situated on the site of the original Celtic altar. The altar of the church is said to date from the time of Tallan and was built at the junction of ley lines. However, St Tallanus’s existence is disputed and the ley lines cannot be proved to exist either (some say). Yet to those of Craft and to those whom follow the old original teachings of the planet, know that the church is in fact built upon the St. Michael Ley Line, and also acknowledged are the geomagnetics of this planet (see all our quests so far)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallanus

St Talland Church on the cliff-top – the Cornish Celtic Way footpath goes right past the front door <click to enlarge>

The church celebrated its 500th anniversary in 1990. Part of the nave and the first stage of the tower probably remain from a 13th-century church: the remainder must be late 15th century and is in typical Cornish Perpendicular style. Unusually it has a detached bell-tower on the south side which was only joined to the main body of the church in the 15th century. Looking on the internet there are some interesting sculptures and carvings in the church, so such a shame it was locked.

Hidden within the beams of the porchway under the cut, are symbols relating to our quest and bloodlines <click to view>

Snuggling up close to the windows i was able to get some interia shots of the church thanks to the wonders of digital photography!

<click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Tallanus%27_Church,_Talland

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: 1551 Newton Somerset (11 x GGF) ‘on Eastern shore the land was’

All journeys and travelling should be fun and all part of the experience and our journeys certainly are always loads of fun! We rounded off this day of knowledge and enjoyment with time spent at the historic fishing village of Polperro before continuing back to Plymouth for the night. Tomorow we travel to St Austell, Padstow and Bodmin.

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

 

 

“And so Quest 27 sadly draws to a close: Moors, sea & heaven, all spectacular and atop the moors in the sunshine, one could be forgiven for thinking that one was oh so near to heaven, for in reality one actually is. Dartmoor at times was wonderfully moody, wild and desolate and high, high up the rains merged into the clouds. Churches sat alone and serene on top of hilltops reached only by winding lanes. England at it’s best, and when safely tucked up for the night in our converted chapel acommadation, one can only give thanks for this life. Down upon the rocky shores life ebbs & flows with the tides; dreams come true and perceptions change as challenges to reality are met…”

“One is so near the clouds on the top of Dartmoor that one can really get a sense & feeling of being able to reach out & touch the firmament above. Today I felt so incredibly and wonderfully close to it. Reach out & touch the beauty before it is too late.”

Day Five: All Saints Church Okehamton: All too soon Sunday, our last day of this amazing and revealing quest was upon us: the weather was still gorgeous and so we intended to make the most of every moment and as we drove across beautiful moorland we could not help but to be in fine spirits.

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon and it is situated at the northen edge of Dartmoor with a population of 5,922 (2011 census). The town itself was founded by the Saxons; the earliest settlement on record being from 980 AD, known as ‘Ocmundtune’, meaning settlement by the Ockment, a river which runs through the town, which grew because of the medieval wool trade and there are some noteble buildings in the town. The oldest building is the castle which dates back to the Domesday Book and which was once the largest castle in Devon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okehampton

The church itself, up a hill at the edge of town is very secluded, peaceful and pretty and is almost set within a woodland setting and yet is still at the heart of its community. A Church has stood on this hill since Saxon times when the little hilltop village of Ocmundtune was closely grouped around its (probably wooden) Church and surrounded on all sides by dense forests. With the building of Okehampton Castle soon after 1066, present day Okehampton began to develop in the river valley and the little Saxon village was progressively abandoned. The church is a grade two listed building, mostly built in perpendicular style and rebuilt in 1842

https://tickets.twomoorsfestival.co.uk/sales/view-venues/all-saints-church-okehampton

 

Inside the very well-kept church is an array of symbolic artefacts relating to Craft and beyond as shown above: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

The stained-glass windows are also very stunning pieces of art showing much symbolism.

  • Blood line connection: Our lead researcher’s 10 x Great Grandfather, Sir George Clark 1509 – 1580. Born in Holland but registered later in Devon, having connections to Colyton with buisness in Okehampton.

“The oh so peaceful and gorgeous Devon countryside where one can literally hear a pin drop and one gets the reality of being truly in the clouds……”

St Andrews Church Moretonhamstead: We drove through some wonderful and practically isolated countryside where one could actually hear a pin drop, to reach Moretonhamstead (anciently Moreton Hampstead) a pretty market town, parish and ancient manor in Devon, situated on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor, within the Dartmoor National Park. At the 2011 census the population of the parish was 1,703; the parish church is St Andrews.

The  Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as ‘Mortone’; which derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town’s situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 ‘Hampstead’ had been added to the name which simply means “homestead”, The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place. The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and with Moreton as its major settlement.

Wool and (in later years) the manufacture of woollen cloth, formed the basis of the town’s economy for over 700 years. The economy was evidently healthy when Moreton Hampstead established a water-powered fulling mill before the end of the 13th century.Read more in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moretonhampstead

This grade one listed parish church is to be found at the eastern end of the town; it was originally built in 1418 and had heavy restorations in 1856 and 1905. It is quite spacious inside with some nice stained glass windows. It is in a rather lovely position overlooking the countryside as are many of the churches we visit. There’s something really special about a cemetry on a hillside with a wonderful view over the surrouding countryside; it can evoke all sorts of feelings and connections inside of one, but sadly, the sacred energies once attached to the church here long ago, are now departed…

St Andrews Church with an interesting plaque just inside the porch

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101334222-church-of-st-andrew-moretonhampstead#.XT3mJnt7l1s

Interia shots of the church showing some lovely stained glass with some close up detail: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

St Werburgh’s Church Wembury: This amazing 14th century church sits on the cliff edge overlooking the ocean and the enigmatic Mewstone and it really is the jewel in Devon’s crown.

“The Lifes that meets the sea in hidden and mystical Wembury”

Wembury is a village on the south coast of Devon, very close to Plymouth Sound, located south of Plymouth; it is also the name of the peninsular in which the village is situated. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty with a beautiful beach well known for surfing and rock pooling, and basking sharks can be seen in the summer near the Mewstone. The population of the electoral ward was 4,455 in the 2011 census. The name ‘Wembury’ may derive from a place name containing the name ‘Woden’ and noted by a John Mitchell Kemble that it was called ‘Wodnesbeorh’. Saxons colonised south-west Devon during the 7th century founding agricultural settlements in the area and the church is dedicated to the Saxon saint, Saint Werburgh. Of course it is a delight for holiday makers with it’s sandy beaches and crystal clear sea.

The mysterious triangular Mewstone, which is uncannily similar to the rock just off Tintagel, is very visable from the beach. In the past it was inhabited and has been a prison, a private home and a refuge for local smugglers. It’s most infamous resident was Sam Wakeman who avoided transportation to Australia in favour of the cheaper option of transportation to the Mewstone, where he was interned for seven years. After his internment on the island he remained there paying his rent by supplying rabbits for the Manor House table. It is said Sam Wakeman is responsible for carving the rough stone steps to the summit of the Mewstone. The artist Turner has painted the island several times, after sketching it during a sailing trip. However the island does have many secrets and not everything is as it would seem….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wembury

The church, standing as it does on the clifftop overlooking the sea and Mewstone is a firm favourite for couples getting wed.

Inside the church, which was built in the 14th century and visited by mesolithic man, is a stunning array of carvings, both stone and marble quite unlike anything i had seen before, ancient, unusual and intriging, including a rarely seen Serpent Goddess holding the ‘Staff of Wisdom’. She is surrounded by a representation of the angels, yet this time shown in their very dark guise; maybe showing their true selves? This brings to mind the phrase, of the angels masking themselves as demons and the demons as angels themselves within the Light and Dark of the world.

Also displayed in oils and gilt is the Neville shield (the Royal Crest), indicating the strong connection to our deepening bloodline quest. The shield always displays the unicorn and lion, but why, leaving much to think about upon the sphere of time. A genuine knights helmet is displayed up high; kind of hidden in plain sight really…  Also, yet again, another connection revealed here to Lancelot Desposyni, taking us deeper into our bloodline quest, with connection to our future quest in Europe, when we will follow in the footsteps of the Knights of the Round Table. The bible here is open on Romans 9:4, (G-d’s Soverign Choice) which if read may bring revelations to the reader…. There is mention too of the ‘Black Rod’ with further connections to Ely in Cambridgshire; much for the astute student to research and discover.

<please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

 

Watch the video below and find out so much more of the history of the church and surprisingly of its connection to Ely, our area and to see many of the wonderful carvings in real time (starts at 2.00)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU5qmTaCRbs&t=1s

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni (our head researcher’s bloodline) was in this area, this place at around 562 AD, in respect of purpose and spirituality.

“I sat around, but was not found, I took a trip and did not fall,
I saw the moon, but not the sky. When time was tough, I reached up high.
A height in time and trip to thee. For in times telling the mystery.>
For seek to find, and trip to rule I saw the sun, with the sky and all”

 

And so sadly this quest 27, has drawn to a close with much to digest and many revelations swirling around like the tides upon the sands. Much then to take on board, but before we depart, why not chew the cud with us, with memories and thoughts of an amazing and wonderful time in Devon and Cornwall….

Devon & Cornwall: A Mythic Quest

Chewing the cud of a very mythic quest!

But time does certainly not stand still for these ‘Questers’, for in the blink of an eye we will be embarking on Quest 28 with a new name and a new look; all a part of our continued evolution on this earthly plane. Those of you with eyes peeled and ears open may have noticed our many references to King Arthur and his Knights (the true men/energies behind the myths). So we are off to Europe at the end of October to travel in the footsteps of those real knignts – please be with us and follow us all the way!

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” August 2019

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

A day of following a trail to find a knight of renown and connecting to a Lady true. The trail took us to Tintagel, via Boscastle where words were spoken on the breeze to those whom could hear. Bloodlines and energy lines all finally making sense…

QUEST 27 CONTINUES…

Saturday had arrived and wonderfully we were still experiencing the most gorgeous of weather, made even the more enjoyable in the knowledge that it was very wet and cold back home, further north. This part of the quest, day four, took us to Clovelly, Boscastle and Tintagel.

All Saints Church Bideford, Clovelly: This pretty little secluded Norman church, not far from Clovelly village is set in a lovely wooded graveyard and on the day we arrived, bluebells and other springflowers were everywhere. It looked very magical. The church actually stands in the grounds of Clovelly Court, and is bounded by the Court’s walled garden. The church was begun in the 12th century on the site of an earlier timber building. The Norman church was a simple cruciform building, consisting of a nave, chancel, and transepts. As the population of Clovelly grew, more space was needed, and in the 14th century a north aisle was added.  The renovation may have been carried out by William Cary, lord of the manor, who received permission to make the church collegiate in 1387. Cary’s plan was to establish a college of 6 chaplains under a Warden, but the plans were never implemented, and All Saints remained a simple parish church.

 

Clovelly Church set in the grounds of Clovelly Court <please click on an image to enlarge>

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/clovelly.htm

Although there has been a church building at this site from 630 AD, in actual fact there has been a place of actual ‘gathering’ here from the early 500’s AD here. Lancelot Desposyni, who is our lead reseachers x 48 Great Grandfather and of the bloodline we are tracing on our quests, was here in this area around about 530 AD.

We have discovered that the Desposyni line links onto the Fordham line, and the Fordham line links onto the Clark line (with or without an E!). The Clarks and the Fordhams have had a very long association with each other; almost since the dawn of time! References to both lines and the Nevilles too can all be seen in this very church.

See our video for more detail & references, together with explanations on the meanings of church symbolism and so much more. (2nd clip on link at 17.56)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=227s

 

Some of the stunning windows that contain references to Lancelot, the Nevilles, the Fordams and to the Lamb of God (a riddle in itself) See much more in our video above…

Clovelly is a totally unspoilt fishing village in Devon that seems to be lost in time, with no cars or traffic of any kind allowed.  It is privately owened and there is a rather steep charge to enter the village, almost as steep as the way down into the village itself! So thus we did not enter…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovelly

  • Bloodline connections: Lancelot Desposyni (from the Fordham line) Born 520 AD & our head researchers 48 x Great Grand Father)
  • Also references in All Saints Church to the Nevilles, the Clarkes and the Fordhams

Boscastle: For our quest, for Craft and research reasons, this pretty little coastal village and fishing port on the north coast of Cornwall was certainly on our agenda. But for obvious reasons there is a lot of falseness around, but if one can see past all the fake touristy consumer traps, it is a lovely little spot. In cornish the name means Kastel Boterel and it is part of the civil parish of Forrabury and Minister. Its harbour is a natural inlet protected by two stone harbour walls built in 1584 by Sir Richard Grenville and it is the only significant harbour for 20 miles along the coast.  The village extends up the valleys of the River Valency and the River Jorden. Heavy rainfall on 16 August 2004 caused extensive damage to the village and made all the headlines as water raged through the village in a torrent, washing away all in its path. It was a terrifying ordeal for all those who experienced it.

 

The very pretty albeit touristy village of Boscastle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boscastle

One cannot visit Boscastle without a visit to the infamous Musuem of Witchcraft which draws many folks to the area for a multitude of reasons. It is a strange place seemingly stuck firmly in an earthly time warp of a particular era and earthly perception. There were quite a lot of negative vibes there, but i was pleased to see a few items and symbols that alluded to Enochian and Templar magic and thus to ‘real’ Craft. It is difficult to know just how much of these ‘histories’ of old witchcraft and folk magic are actually real or not, or simply came into being at the time wicca was birthed and have been elaborated upon over the years since. Magic like any path should always evolve, as especially too should the practitioner and not get stuck within the realms of ‘myth and magic’.

 

An array of interesting items from the museum, some of which show a connection to Craft and Enochian magic.

After driving from Boscastle to Tintagel, it was time for a welcomed coffee before visiting King Arthur’s Hall; a site of an ancient and sacred underground spring, and thus we found ourselves in a quaint little cafe on the main street – just up our street in fact!

 

Tintagel: Tintagel or Trevena  (Cornish: Tre war Venydh meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall in England. The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena until the Post Office started using ‘Tintagel’ as the name, in the mid-19th century. Until then, ‘Tintagel’ had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish. The population of the parish was 1,820 people (2001 census), but decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with and steeped in the legends of King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. There are many literary and film associations with the village and like Boscastle it attracts more than its fair share of moden-day witches, pagans and role players whom simply fail to see the real truths right under their noses and their swishing capes…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel

King Arthur’s Hall: King Arthurs Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s. It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the “Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table”, behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction, and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell. In 1927, the “Order of the Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table” was formed in Britain by Frederick Thomas Glasscock (a retired London businessman, d. 1934) to promote Christian ideals and Arthurian notions of medieval chivalry. Glasscock was resident at Tintagel (in the house “Eirenicon” which he had built) and responsible for the building of King Arthur’s Hall (an extension of Trevena House which had been John Douglas Cook’s residence and had been built on the site of the former Town Hall and Market Hall). The hall is now used as a Masonic Hall, and is home to four Masonic bodies as the photos below show.

 

Masonic symbolism which always feature on our quests; the meaning of which certainly pre-dates modern-day Freemasonary <click on an image to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Arthur%27s_Hall,_Tintagel

Since 1952, the building has been used as a Masonic Hall and is home to the King Arthur Lodge No. 7134. In 1962 a Royal Arch Chapte was formed by the Lodge, and the building is used by some other lodges to hold their installation meetings. The hall is now as home to four Masonic bodies:

  • King Arthur Lodge No. 7134 which was warranted on 13 November 1951;
  • St Enodoc Lodge No. 9226 which was consecrated on 30 May 1987;
  • King Arthur Royal Arch Chapter No. 7134 which was consecrated on 31 March 1962;
  • Tintagel Castle Lodge of Mark Master Masons No. 1800 which was consecrated on 23 April 1999.

 

It is certainly a stunning building inside, where one gets a real sense of a ‘Grand Hall’, the sort of hall where King Arthur could certainly have conducted his buisness, feasted and ruled from. The masonic influence is everywhere in the building too; it being an amazing and fitting building to hold lodge meetings. The day we went, a ‘Fairy Fayre’ was taking place, bringing together, the psychic, spiritual, witchy and pagan worlds, which meant entry was free on that day, but clear photos of the halls design were out of the question.

The very striking stained glass windows and the emblems associated with them are the work of Veronica Mary Whall (1887–1967) who was an important stained glass artist, painter, and illustrator and part of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She created 73 windows for King Arthurs Hall, Tintagel, that opened in 1933. As of 1997 it is considered to be the largest collection of stained glass panels of  King Arthur made in the 20th century and a great example of Arts and Crafts workmanship. I have tried to include as many as i can here, together with some of the descriptions.

 

Tintagel is steeped in the tales of King Arthur, but few know of the real Lancelot or King Arthur & that they did indeed walk upon these shores: for everywhere we went we were reminded of the ‘knightly virtues’ by which each knight, then and now always endevours to live by. A true knight must always follow the codes of their life and of course importantly their oaths, for an oath taken can never be ‘untaken’ as it resonates on the metaphysical planes as well as the physical.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_Whall

St Materiana’s Church Tintagel: In St Materiana’s Church, Tintagel; a site sacred and profound on so many levels with deep connections to Mary Magdalene and our quests, are some amazing and sacred artefacts, which although themselves do not go back to the actual ‘dawn of time’, they allude to and tell true stories that do. This church is so relatable to this ‘quester’ on a very personal level, both physical and metaphysical, for very profound reasons; important discoveries were truly made here. There are those rare moments in life (in time) where myth and reality collide head on and time seems to stop and one finds one’s self catching ones breath. Out of this comes an understanding so deep that one’s whole life simply falls into place and nothing can ever be the same again. As those whom have gone before, in who’s footsteps I walk, I will continue to guide those whom seek the light…

The parish church of Saint Materiana, stands on a very isolated, yet beautiful location some distance away from the village of Tintagel. Almost on top of the cliff-edge, it’s rocky headland view commands stunning views across the ocean. The church is a Church of England,  grade 1 listed building; the first church on the sight, thought to have been founded in the sixth century, as a daughter church of Minister

 

St Materiana’s Church on the cliff-top is a peaceful and profound sacred site with connections to both Mary Magdalene and Lancelot Desposyni <click to view>

The existing church may have been created in the late 11th or early 12th century. Art historian Nikolaus Pevsner (writing in 1950) suggested that its Norman-era design includes some Saxon features, while the tower may be 13th or 15th century in date. The most significant change in its design was the restoration in 1870 by Piers St Aubyn which included a new roof. Later changes include a number of new stained glass windows: many of these portray saints, including St Materiana, St George and St Piran. There are three modern copies of Old Master paintings, and a Roman milestone bearing the name of the Emperor Licinius (d. 324).

 

The church has connections to both Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, both whom have walked upon these lands and visited this church in times past. Mary traveled from France to England; to Cornwall in fact before the church was even here but never the less it was indeed a sacred mound and Mary would have known this. This site would have been her first port of call, for she would eventually land in Scotland. Inside the church are many artefacts, some with hidden meanings that connect to Templarism and certainly to Mary Magdalene herself, especially in the lower part of the Lady Chapel. Lancelot, also journying from France was here in Cornwall around 538 AD, almost one might say on a pilgrimage, as indeed some of us are doing today.

 

Often hidden histories lie hidden for years but surface at perfect points in time and maybe just for a moment of earthly time they share…

Saint Materiana’s Church Tintagel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Materiana%27s_Church,_Tintagel

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni x 48 Great Grandfather or our head researcher, from the Fordham line. Born 520 Ad in France.

For one of our party this quest and indeed St Materianna’s Church with knowledge of Mary Magdalene herself proved to be a revelation of profound importance and significance…

“On sadled shores in time of hands, A riddle for one in all the land, A time to know and a time to learn, A time to sew and a time to burn. That burning sensation of all inside, as one reaches the top of Tintagels perfect site… But what of space and time and fate?”

After a busy day, what better end could there be for a beautiful evening, than a short drive to Port Issac to chill out in the Old School House having a lovely meal…

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  July 2016

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

So much to embrace & look forward to as The Priory is about to set out upon Quest Twenty-Seven no less! On our journey for truth we will endevour to unravel the hidden histories of these lands, we will set forth into the kingdoms of Devon & Cornwall for our next knightly adventure.

Quest 27: Devon and Cornwall: So our quest was at last upon us and it couldn’t have got here quick enough. On Wednesday May 1st, we made our way to Gunnislake just inside the Cornish border, but wait! Our quest starts right here!

Day One: Princetown: St Michael & All Saints Church.  Princetown is a village in the Dartmoor national park and is the principle settlement of the civil parish of Dartmoor Forest. Princetown is known for being the site of Dartmoor Prison and is around 1,430 feet above sea level; the highest settlement on the moor and one of the highest in the UK and is surrounded by moorland; thereby attracting many hikers and walkers, especially in the summer months.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princetown

It was a typical wet and misty Dartmoor afternoon when we arrived at St Michael & All Saints Church, Princetown; the Archangel St Michael being the patron saint of sick people, the elderly and of people of ‘order’ whom work in the military. Contrary to the ‘official’ write-ups of the church, it is built on an ancient sacred ‘energy’ site, connected to our quests, even though the current building itself is not that old. The church is of a simple design and built between 1812 – 1814 by prisoners captured in the Napoleonic Wars with France, and the War of 1812 with the United States, all of whom were held in Dartmoor prison. The east window contains stained glass of 1910, in memory of the American prisoners who helped to build the church. It is a designated Grade II* listed building but is now sadly a redundant church in the good care of the Churches Consevation Trust.

St Michaels & All Angels Church sitting amidsts the stuningly serene Dartmoor

Inside the church are many interesting artfacts, and as one would expect some poignant military memorabilia too, lest of all a seat saved in the front pews for soldiers unknown, which one can glimpse in the video. Interesting to note that our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, but he married a Mary Ann from Princetown and there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, in this very church! The church had a lovely feel about it and felt much older; the beautiful and intriging wooden carvings around the pulpit, one of which portrays an animal head on a human body, certainly seemed older. The lovely tapestry of St Michael portrays the correct Celtic Cross, with the saint wearing blue, red and gold robes. The beautiful stained-glass window above the altar portrays the life and death of  ‘the Jesus’, from left to right in story-book style. Also on one of the wooden chairs to the left of the altar are some very interesting carvings of a direct Enochian origin, relating and connecting the church firmly to our path…

Inside the church, showing the window, the St Michael tapestry and the Enochian carvings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Michael,_Princetown

Outside in the graveyard, very noticably separate from the rest of the gravestones is the secluded area where the prisoners have been laid to rest; separated in death as they were in life. Rather ironical really as death makes no distinction; we are all as one in death…

Take a tour around the church & discover our links & bloodline history for yourself

St Michael & All Angels Church Princetown

Day One: Walkhampton: St Mary the Virgin Church. Walkhampton is a village and civil parish on the western side of Dartmoor, in Devon. The village lies on the Black Brook, a tributary of the  River Walkman, about 4.3 miles south-east of Tavistock set amidst beautiful unspoilt countryside.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walkhampton

Walkhampton church, which is a grade one listed building, is situated on an ancient elevated site about half a mile north-west of the village and can be seen for miles. Unlike most churches which face east, it faces north-east, the direction of the rising sun on the longest day. The present building, which is built of granite and has a tower with four prominent pinnacles, dates from the 15th century, with much later alteration, including restoration in 1860–61. For 400 years until 1985 the church had no dedication and was known simply as “Walkhampton Church”, but in that year it was dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. Research has indicated that it may have been originally dedicated to St Dionisius of Walkynton. Sadly the church had already been locked when we arrived so we had to content ourselves with a stroll around the outside. It is a pretty chuch standing amidst some gorgeous countryside, so who knows what we may have found inside…

St Mary the Virgin; a pretty church built on an ancient site in beautiful Devon

And so onto Cornwall, where our digs for the next five nights was to be the converted Ebenezer Chapel, now flats; ours named aptly as ‘Pilgrims Rest’.

Gunnislake is a large pretty village in East Cornwall situated in the Tamar Valley; an extremely beautiful area on the outskirts of Dartmoor in Devon. There is a history of mining in the area, but this is no longer active, but in it’s day was one of the richest mining area of Europe. It has a small railway station which serves the local villages of the area. The geo-magnetics of the area are very powerful and interesting, especially for those using ‘earth-based’ satnav… (something to ponder on)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake_railway_station

  • Bloodline Connections: Princetown: Our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, and he married a Mary Ann from Princetown; there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, inSt Michael & All Angels Church, Princetown.
  • John’s father was Earl Henry Neville, 2nd Earl of Abergavenny; a destination of a previous quest.
  • Walkhampton: Jonh Neville (as above) was stationed, as a soldier, in the area circa 1800’s,  6th great uncle.
  • Gunnislake: connections with the Clarke, Fordham & Neville surnames.

And of course finishing off the day with a gorgeous meal in a wonderful atmospheric local pub and resturant as one must always have balance in life “Reverence & Mirth in equal measures”

Day Two: Buckfastleigh & Buckfast Abbey: We drove across beautiful Dartmoor to reach Buckfast Abbey, with a stop for lunch at this delightful and peaceful beauty spot in Dartmoor, which in the summer months is absolutely teaming with visitors.

Buckfastleigh is a small market town and civil parish in Devon situated at the edge of the Dartmoor National Park.  It is part of Teignbridge and is a centre for tourism, and home to Buckfast Abbey.  The town has grown as a mill town known for it’s woollen mills, corn and paper mills and a tannery supported by the rivers Dart, Mardle and the Dean Burn; water being an essential natural resource used in the manufactoring of wool and other products. Buckfastleigh is medieval in origin and the name Buckfast means stronghold, and Leigh would have been the pastures belonging to Buckfast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfastleigh

The very beautiful Benedictine monastry at Buckfast, known as Buckfast Abbey, is just near the edge of Dartmoor. After many ups and downs the monks are still there today and live a very peaceful devotional life. The Abbey is self-supporting with a farm, where vegetables are grown and animals are raised and a shop which sells wine, honey and religous items etc. The monastry is most famous for it’s Buckfast Tonic Wine, a delicous fortified wine that the monks have been making since the 1890’s

Buckfast first became home to an abbey in 1018. The first Benedictine abbey was followed by a Savignac (later Cistercian) abbey constructed on the site of the current abbey in 1134. The monastry was surrendered for dissolution in 1539, with the monastic building stripped and left as ruins, before being finally demolished. The former abbey site was used as quarry and later became home to a Gothic Mansion House.

The position of the hands in the above carving is very relevant to the Priory, our path and the truth of our quests; also note the Enochian influenced carvings around the doorway; all of which allude to teachings and truths of our path that are much older than the actual building here.

In 1882 the site was purchased by a group of French Benedictine monks, who refounded a monastery on the site, dedicated to Saint Mart. New monastic buildings and a temporary church were constructed incorporating the existing Gothic house. Work on a new abbey church, which was constructed mostly on the footprint of the former Cistercian abbey, started in 1907. The church was consecrated in 1932 but not completed until 1938. Buckfast was formally reinstated as an Abbey in 1902, and the first abbot of the new institution, Bonniface Natter was blessed in 1903. Despite all this it did feel a very peaceful place with some stunning works of art, windows and artifacts inside.