Category: Knight Templar


QUEST 29: MARCH 2020

It is always so exciting to go on a surprise quest and Quest 29 into Suffolk was most certainly that! It was March 29th and a gorgeous springtime day, a bit chilly but the sky was blue and clear; it was also just before ‘lockdown’ in the UK and so upon looking back i was doubly glad we were able to get out and about when we did. Suffolk is a beautiful area of East Anglia with many pretty, unspoilt villages and beautiful old churches too, with many surpises when it comes to our quests. The churches we visited were of course all Knight Templar related, all a part of, and with connections to our grail quest; the whole area being part of a large Roman encapement in its day.

  • All Saints Church Icklingham
  • Saint James Church Icklinham
  • All Saints Church Wordwell
  • Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish

 

All Saints Church Icklington: The church is set in a pretty landscaped area with wide views across the countryside. All Saints Church is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. It is of Norman and English Gothic architectural style built in the fourteenth century. The church stands in the highest point in the village, adjacent to the A1101 road between Mildenhall and Bury St Edmunds; this was formerly the ancient trackway of the Roman Empire, the Icknield Way, in 120AD. The church was almost completely rebuilt in the 14th century with a south porch added in the 15th century. Sadly the church has been unused for over 100 years, being declared redundant in the 1970s. The roof has been re-thatched in the traditional manner with the rest of the church being constructed in flint rubble with freestone dressing. Read more about the church below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints%27_Church,_Icklingham

The church has a wonderful feel to it when one enters, no surprise as Icklingham has a important connection to our previous quest to Autun in France. Obviously there was a huge Roman presence in Autun too, which you will know if you have read our previous quest, Icklingham would have been a pathway into East Anglia for the Romans. The whole area here was a very large Roman encampment with thousands and thousands of troops being present in 124 AD, reaching all the way up to Wordwell. It was not only an invasion, but a transformation of the whole area too.

 

The interior of All Saints Church Icklingham <click to enlarge>

There are some stunning medieval tyles on the floor, with very well peserved Templar Symbolism, some with ‘the flowers and the petals of life’ connecting to the Knight Templars, whom would certainly have used this church. We are looking at the year 1314 here, when Jaques de Molay was burnt at the stake; yet the Templars did flee from France to survive in other areas, and Icklingham was one such area where they recieved some kind of unofficial Sanctuary. The tiles on the floor are original and of course we did not walk on them, but they were amazing to see, one that caught our eye, had a great depth of detail on it, which can be seen in our video and photos.

 

The original floor tyles with Templar symbology

The church is still in an original, natural state and has not been ‘victorianised’ at all. It still has most of its original features from the thatched roof, the pulpit, the original spiral stairs (now leading nowhere) and even an old original wrought iron funeral cart with original wheels and spokes, still in working order. One can certainly imaging the pall-bearers pushing it along with its coffin on board, entering the service, with the noise of the iron wheels reverberating upon the stone floors, echoing throughout the chambers of the church. Nearby is a wonderful church organ by W. Howlett and Son, an item any musical person would simply love. Even though it could have done with a very good clean it did add to the ascetics of the church, rather than being of any functionality. The pews of course are original complete with by-gone graffitti, from a time when folks would have sat there in the church listening to the sermons of Reverend, one can well imagine bored tots sittng there and picking away at the wood. So much history here; so many stories to be told.

The recently thatched roof is beautifully crafted allowing straw to fall naturally to the ground, just as it would have all those many years ago. There is a fairly modern, yet lovely stained-glass window depicting two of the saints, with many theories abounding in the area as to who they actually are; our understanding is that they are James and Peter – James to the left and Peter to the right. Almost under the window is an original wooden built up pew, which one enters by a hinged and brackets door in order to be able to sit down, and with its high bible-rest in front, it is almost like being in the dock! The stone pulpit (or font) is also original and in good condition, save for a bit of wear and tear. We were unable to find the stone carvings we were interested in, neither on the inside or outside of the church, so sadly maybe they never survived the test of time. A very interesting church with lots of references to the Templars, the Roman Empire, but very importantly, let us not forget King Arthur himself. Our Templar history informs us that Lancelot Desposyni was in this area on his travels, journeying through the area, visiting St James Church. King Arthur and Lancelot, when one separates them from the ‘myths and legends‘, did not just travel to one area, they moved around, changing things, transforming things during the times that we know as the ‘Dark Ages’. An amazing church with many untold stories to tell…. This would have been the most ‘energetic’ church of the day.

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Standing in front of the old funeral carts

See our video below to take a stroll inside the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH ICKLINGHAM

Saint James Church Icklinham: Sadly when we arrived at this church it appeared to be well and truly locked up and maybe closed for health and safety reasons , so just a quick write up with a few shots from outside. It looked a peaceful church on the outside with some important items for us to see inside, but in a fairly built up area and a shame it was closed.

 

 I am including a link which contains several photos of the interior of the church which we did not get to see: http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/icklingj.html

In brief, it is a Medieval Church, which has been restored, in an area where there would have been a Roman encampment on land occupied by the Romans in 120 AD. It would have been a Knights Templar preceptory in times past, 1066-1539 AD, even more reason to have been able to go inside. The Knights Templars did exist beyond the burning at the stake of Jaques de Molay in 1314. The namesake of the church St James, was the first disciple of Jesus and the patron saint of Spain, he was sadly executed by sword in 44 AD at Judea, Jerusalem and importantly was linked to Lancelot of Valencia, Spain.

All Saints Church Wordwell: After going slightly off course through the countryside and down a small lane, to end up at a completely different church, we finally arrived at this still out of the way church at Wordwell. All Saints is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage list for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conversation Trust. It was established in 1129 AD, prior to a Roman Empire encapement. The present church is a tiny Norman church, restored in the Victorian period and containing some superb medieval and Norman carvings.

‘Wordwell’ is an interesting name, with various meanings just crying out for some further research. All Saints Church at Wordwell still has its original construction; it was established at the time of the Templars, being used frequently by the Knights of the area at the time, and further going forwards into the midpoint of the thirteen hundreds, it was used as Sanctuary for the Templars, as they fled from Europe during the time of their demise, thus the church has so much history attached to it.

The church had a very nice feel to it, good energies were present. There were some interesting windows; one showed a triskellian and upon looking closer a pyramid within a petaled flower, shown in the form of a triangular pyramid ascending within a petaled flower, which is unusual. At first gance this could be seen as very masonic, but one must ask, which came first, the chicken or the egg? As we have learnt previously, the Freemasons were formed after the Knights Templars, lest we forget.

The old original church organ, here in the church with its big square paddles, is now being used as a table for leaflets, but it looks like it may be in good working order. However nearby and just above the organ, is indeed the prize catch of this church in every way, shape or form, in the form of a wonderful oiginal wall carving, which could almost be mistaken for being Sumerian, in style, being very reminiscent of the clay tablets. The people shown in the carving are of quite a short build; the carving having been viewed differently by different people over time; some folks thinking it is of St Catherine or the other saints, but it is non of them; there being other reasons for it being what it is. What is interesting is that the figures are both male, not as in male and female as often thought. One figure is holding a ring which is being given to the other male, but not in a context of marriage, more of in a binding ceremony, a binding with G-d context. A very interesting find indeed, of which one does not often get to see in an English church in this day and age. One cannot help but wonder why it is there and the full story behind it.

The interior of the church, showing the very unusual carving <please click to enlarge>

Moving around, the wooden pews are all beautifully carved with animals and folaige, and have aged wonderfully over the years. The atmosphere of the church, its age and how it has been set out certainly brings to mind that famous Knight Templar painting entitled ‘The Acolade’. The scene here before us, is very reminiscent of that particular painting with the steps acending as the Templar comes forward, to bow and drop three times before reaching the altar (thrice the times). The church is very well looked after and has very well preserved tyles on the floor, with many Galic symbols represented. One can see represented in the tyles;  earth, air, fire and water, with the most important symbols being fire and water, (south and west)  (the water and the fire), which gives us ‘pure light’. We know from history that the south-western quadrant is always the most important; in Masonic terms a candidate is asked ‘Why did you leave the west to travel east?‘ and later on on ‘Why did you leave the east to travel west?‘ The response would be ‘In search of Light in Craft’, however when they reach the west they dont find the Light in Craft because then, in the west, the candidates are later on informed in their degrees (from the 42nd degree upwards), that they need to head south to find the Light in Craft. They have to then journey from the east to the west, and thence instructed to go south, (south-west), which is most important, as it is the ‘pure-light’ of the compass-points.

There are some interesting restored artworks on the other window with a cow emblem at the top, albeit a very intricate stylised design, but i saw it clearly, although some may not see it at all. Also there is the ‘fan-fare‘ wheel in the window and a ‘triklesite’ aspect to the right and to the left. On the high altar is a lovely red and gold altar cloth with some nice old guilding from around the 1900’s, probably replaced at some point, but lovely non the less. At the back of the altar on the wall carvings, one can see the ‘flowers of life’, being the daisy and the tulip, there are other schools of thought on this subject, but this is correct. There are some wonderful quotes upon the wall behind the altar, one in particular from Exodus, see the photo below for the full quote.

Truth and religion in the UK today, has become a very flexible subject and often open to many interpretations, yet for those whom profess to follow the faith and the path; it says very clearly here, that thou shall have non other gods but me, no other gods, apart from G-d; we know already that there are angels and djinn, but no other gods which is very important to not forget. For a small church there is a lot going on here, a lot of history; this church being on a par I noticed, with the one we visited in Mepal recently on our Fenland Quest, the same level and size etc. Much to take away with us from this visit, much to pause and think about. This was probably the best church of the day from a conservation viewpoint, the most enigmatic church.

See our video below to take a stroll around the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH WORDWELL

Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish: This was the last church of the day, in the pretty village of Cavandish. St Mary the Virgin Chirch is a grade 1 listed parish church in  Cavandish, Suffolk. It was built in the 1300’s, thus only 700 years old, yet built on much earlier foundations over earlier buildings, earlier temples etc. This church is mostly 14th-century, with building dating from about 1300 to about 1485, with some 19th-century additions and alterations. The oldest parts of the church, dating from about 1300, are the Tower, the Porch and the lower parts of the walls of the aisles. In 1350 the South aisle walls were rebuilt to their present height and new windows were inserted. The exterior of the church is dressed in flint, as are many of the churches and buildings of the area. While we were there extensive renovations were being carried out and much of the church, including the tower were hidden under scaffolding; we were lucky it was actually open to us. Some beautiful artworks are in the church and although it has been modernised over its 700 years of time, this does not distract from its interest and it is kept beautifully clean and tidy. What we noticed straight away upon entering, was the baptismal roles for folks of the area on the wall, showing a Lynne Clarke baptised in 1964, (so could be still alive). Clarke is one of the blood-lines we are tracing, so an interesting find, and on another listing , on the roll of honour from the Cypress Regiment dated 1956, a Cuthbert H. Clark, so maybe her grandfather?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary_the_Virgin%27s_Church,_Cavendishhttp://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/cavendish.htm

The Knights Templar had a preceptory here in Cavandish from 1308-1312, just before the demise of the Templars;  just before the Papal Bull was released from Rome, but they were here for only  a short period of time. The reason being is that they would have been in transit and moving artifacts along ‘upstream’ as it were, up through the country. The church would have been used as a holding place for the movement of treasures and various artifacts.

The church contains an amazingly beautiful piece of carved artwork showing the Knight Templar ‘two swords’ with an inverted challace; the pyramid, the ship, the sea, the ocean are all included.  ‘Pure Light‘ as mentioned before is represented here by the sword (fire) in the water. (Fire in the Water to make Pure Light) The ‘Jesus’ here has sadly lost a finger but would have been showing the ‘Ninasian Salute‘ (the salute of Ninasu)

There is so much Templar symbolism to be discovered in the above artwork <click to see in detail>

There is a small Lady Chapel area to the left hand side, with curtains above its altar, and interestingly, nothing at all behind them which is unusual as normally the curtains are open with a painting or something on display. A window on the right-hand side of the church contains many clues and symbolism to the fact that the knights were indeed here; non more so than the red cross of the Nevilles (our main research blood-line) with the rose in the middle of the Neville cross clearly defined. The window also shows the ‘Flower of Life‘ and moving upwards we see the ‘Lamb of God’ (Agnus Dei), all beautifully depicted, and very much of standard Knight Templar symbolism.  However on moving across to the next panel, we see imagery that is far removed from standard, in the form of what appears to be a bull with wings, amazingly depicted. We also have the cow, the ram and the stag symbolised here in the window, with interestingly a symbolic circle reference to the ‘Fisher King’, which on closer inspection could be a shell, again referencing The Fisher King. In the earlier writings of the Fisher King ‘the winged animals’ are referenced, but suprisingly, not the infamous unicorn of myth and legend as one would expect. Also adjacent on another window we can clearly see the Chi-Rho, a ‘star’ which we are now refering to as ‘The Pyramid of Intergration’, a translation from an earlier language; this symbol has had many names over the years, and is probably best known as ‘The Star of David’, which is not relevant here; also shown is the ‘IHS’ symbol. Moving down the window one can see various other symbols, such as ‘The Jesus’ showing the Ninasian Salute, and also shown with his hands ‘open to all’. At the side of the altar, behind blue curtains, just in front of the vestry, are to be found some very historic paintings, portraits and photographs upon the walls, some of the choir, some of old scenes from outside the church.

The windows contains a language of symbols relating to the Knights Templars and the true history of this earthly plane – just waiting to be de-coded! <click to enlarge>

See our link below to take a stroll around the church:

ST MARY THE VIRGIN’S CHURCH CAVENDISH

Quest 30 in May 2020 would have been another exciting European trip but due to the outbreak of the corona virus, we have had to cancel and put everything on hold for a while. Hopefull in the spring of 2021 we can get on the road again, but in the meantime,watch this space, as they say!

 

acolade

The Acolade by Lord Leighton

The Knights of the Red Order

Author ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

April 17th 2020

 

 

THE GRAIL QUEST

” Even in our modern times, the Grail still represents hope to people, yet still remains something unattainable, something still very much an enigma. Many of the tales trace it, as a vessel, back to Joseph of Arimathea, whom it was said collected Jesus’s blood from the cross and whom was said to have bought it to England. Yet as already stated, the lineage of the grail goes back to much earlier times,  and as we already know, we can discount the tales of a challice collecting blood from the cross, for we know the crucifixion tales to be untrue. Yet if Joseph was of the ‘pure bloodline’, which Templar knowledge indicates he was, the tales take on another meaning, Over time many and various churches and religions have claimed different successions and connections to the Grail and there are claimed to be many ‘resting places’ for the Grail, some believable, some not, but of course that does depend on what the Grail actually is. It could be resting/hiding within Time itself (within a ‘cloak of time’), maybe hidden in secret underground chambers of sacred buildings, kept watch over by guardians. Some say it found its way to Scotland and has a connection to the enigmatic Neville family whom may have guarded over it themselves.  Mary too, is said to be connected to it, in her own right and through her relationship with Jesus, and she too found her own way to Scotland. Lots of accounts refer to the blood of Christ or the flesh/DNA of Christ as being of pure blood, of being the Grail, and Christ certainly knew and kept the secrets to his grave.  So, did Christ possess the Grail or was it the ‘knowledge’ of the Grail he possessed? If Lucifer’s secret is the Holy Grail, that would certainly mean that Christ/Jesus/Lucifer knew the secret; that unattainable secret of the Holy Grail.”

QUEST 28: FRANCE, DUNKIRK & BELGUIM

12TH  NOVEMBER 2019

After three great days in La Boussac, our amazing trip was almost over and we left France to begin our journey towards Belguim via Dunkirk. Luckily yet again the sun was shining and it was a gorgeous Autumn day when we set forth. We journeyed all the way from the south of France up to Dunkirk and i managed to take some quite good shots on the way.  The drive was interesting and very scenic and the weather was good.  It was a long journey, of gorgeous autumn colours, dramatic skies and an amazingly huge suspension bridge that crossed a wide, wide estuary somewhere along the route. It was very windy and high up so not all lanes were open. The nearer we got to England though, the more horrid the weather became, settling down later.

Our last big road trip of the quest taking us out of France, towards Belguim, Dunkirk and back to good old Blighty! That bridge was so high and scary in the windy conditions – much higher than it looks! <click to enlarge>

Catholique Collegiale Notre-Dame-de-la-Crypte a Cassel: Cassel France: Quite late in the day we arrived here at Cassel, France. It had become quite chilly now and was getting dark, but there were shops still open and folks around, so we had a nice stroll and bought in supplies for when we reached our digs.

Cassel, from the Dutch meaning Kassel is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. Built on a prominent hill overlooking French Flanders, the town has existed since Roman times. It was developed by the Romans into an important urban centre and was the focus of a network of roads, which are still in use today, that converge on the hill. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Cassel became an important fortified stronghold for the rulers of Flanders which was repeatedly fought over before finally being annexed to France in the 17th century. It was the headquarters of Marshal Ferdinand Foch during part of the First World War. In 1940, during the German invasion of France, Cassel was the scene of a fierce three-day battle between British forces and German forces which resulted in much of the town being destroyed. Today the town, which was rebuilt following the war, is a popular destination for visitors to French Flanders.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassel,_Nord

As the hour was late and the skies darkening, we half expected the church to be closed and spent dilligent time wandering around the seemingly closed building until at last we found a way in via the big stiff old wooden doors! Our efforts were well worth it as the church is beautiful inside and like a lot of these seemingly plain on the outside churches, what greets one inside is often amazing!

Sadly i could not find much on the internet in English about the churches history apart from a few lines from the above link, so most of my comments are from pure observation. The Collégiale Notre-Dame de la Crypte is Cassel’s main church, built in brick. Parts date from the 11th century but the main part is a 16th-century  Gothic structure of a design known as a hallekerk or hall-church, peculiar to Flanders and Artois. It comprises a huge rectangular space with three gables, three aisles, three apses and a square tower over the transept.

Many interesting symbols inside the church & the  ‘All Seeing Eye’ is prominent, together with relevant heraldry & shields. Some beautiful windows are here too & ornate artworks. A nice feel to the church connecting to the Desposyni bloodline.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Galains Desposyni (48th GGF) 480-551, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.
  • Nascien Desposyni(49th GGF) 450-494, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.

The hour was late, dark and very wet when we arrived in Dunkirk and visability in respect of driving was very confusing. We were staying right in the middle of Dunkirk, near the river, in a very built up area with  lots of traffic lights, bus lanes and one way systems. It took us several tries to find a way out of the one-way system in order to reach our apartment – which we could see but not actually get too! Well done to my dear driver though for his persistence and patience! Tomorrow we are venturing into Belgium.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne, Belgium: So the day had arrived – Friday 8th November and the last day of this amazing quest and fabulous road trip. We found the church fairly easily and it looked quite inviting and very well maintained from the outside with planted flowers and a nod to it’s fishing history by way of the historic fishing vessel outside. However once we gained access and got inside through the main doorway, it was dissapointing to find a vast and very locked glass screen acoss the entrance barring any access into the rest of the church. So sadly the only photos i have are of the outside and taken through the glass screen. A shame as there were very relevant artefacts and info to be seen there. Based on a design by the Veurne-based architect Joseph Vinck, this aisled neo-Gothic hall church in yellow brick was built in 1891, at a time when De Panne was still a fishing hamlet of Adinkerke and a chapel built circa 1878 stood on this site. The tower was added in 1936, by which time the church was no longer located in the centre of town due to the construction of the Dumont Quarter.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne showing the historic fishing vessel <click to enlarge>

De Panne is the westernmost Belgian coastal town, sharing a border with France. It has a population of almost 10.800 people. Its history is closely linked with Adinkerke, nowadays a small village, situated about 3 kilometres from the sea.  The situation used to be reversed, for during the late 18th century, De Panne was part of the larger parish and municipality of Adinkerke. Because of the growing importance of coastal tourism from the late 19th century on, De Panne eventually transformed into a larger town than Adinkerke, beoming independent in 1911.  Originally De Panne was primarily a fishing place, founded in 1783. The fisheries, especially the small herring fisheries close to the coast, in De Panne flourished from the middle of the 19th century, and the fishing community steadily grew. Around the turn of the century, a number of shipyards were active in De Panne, while several small fish smoke houses were also present in the village. By courtesy of the local history and heritage club ‘De Panneboot P1′, the town possesses one of the last traditional inshore fishing vessel of the Flemish coast, also named the ‘Panneboot P1’. The vessel is an example of a ‘pannekotter’, the smaller successor of the famous ‘pannepot’, now on display in front of the Saint Peter’s Church of De Panne. On occasion, the ‘Panneboot P1’ still sails and from time to time, the ship is used for educational purposes

http://www.coastalwiki.org/wiki/Fisheries_in_De_Panne

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Panne

Very selective views through the huge secured glass panel

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

Sadly, our very last day of this wonderful experience has come upon us all too soon. Lots of pieces of a very large puzzle to ponder over and put together but it will all be revealed in time, as they say. We have visited amazing places and met many folks – some friendly, some not, sadly often ‘church’ folks were not welcoming, but that’s for another day.

Saint Bavo Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium: When we arrived in Ghent it was certainly a lovely day and the city was full of life with lots of hustle, bustle and energy; trams and buses busily swung around the narrow city streets. Ghent is a city and a  municipality in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is the capital and largest city of the East Flanders province, and the third largest in the country, exceeded in size by Brussels and Antwerp. The city originally started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Leie and in the Late Middle Ages became one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe, with some 50,000 people in 1300. It is a port and university city. Around 650, Sain Amand founded two abbeya in Ghent: St Peter’s and St Bavo’s. Around 800,  Louis the Pious, of   Charleymagne, appointed Finhard, the biographer of Charlemagne, as abbot of both.  The city grew from several nuclei, the abbeys and a commercial centre. However, both in 851 and 879, the city was plundered by the Vikings. Within the protection of the County of Flanders, the city recovered and flourished from the 11th century, growing to become a small city-state By the 13th century, Ghent was the biggest city in Europe north of the Alps after Paris, bigger than Cologne or Moscow. Within the city walls lived up to 65,000 people.  Lots about Ghent in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghent

 The main city square of Ghent; full of life with lots of shops and resturants nearby!

The Saint Bavo Cathedral, also known as Sint-Baafs Cathedral, an 89-meter-tall Catholic Gothic Cathedral is the seat of the dioces of Ghent, is named for Saint bavo of Ghent and contains the well-known Ghent Altarpiece. It is built on the site of the former Chapel of St. John the Baptist, a primarily wooden construction that was consecrated in 942 by Transmarus,  Bishop of Tournai and Noyon. Traces of a later Romanesque structure can be found in the cathedral’s crypt. Construction of the Gothic church began around 1274. Continuous expansion, in he Gothic style were carried out from the 14th through 16th centuries. In 1539, as a result of the rebellion against Charles V, who was baptized in the church, the old Abbey of St. Bavo was dissolved. Its abbot and monks went on to become canons in a Chapter that was attached to what then became the Church of Saint Bavo. When the Diocese of Ghent was founded in 1559, the church became its Cathedral and construction was considered complete June 7, 1569. Sadly in the summer of 1566, bands of Calvinist iconoclasts visited Catholic churches in the Netherlands, shattering stained-glass windows, smashing statues, and destroying paintings and other artworks they perceived as idolatrous. However, the altarpiece by the Van Eycks was saved. It was a beautiful looking cathedral but sadly yet again had lost much of its ‘energy’, not helped by the negative attitude of one of its human ‘religous’ helpers, trying to bar me from taking a photo of a sheild relevant to our quest. A beautiful building with many stunning works of art, but sadly with no actual spirituality…

There were some stunning marble memorial carvings that made good use of the skull imagery. There were some beautiful oil paintings, along with relevant Craft/Quest related heraldry and sheilds <click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Bavo%27s_Cathedral,_Ghent

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Bloodline connection associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

All that remained now was just one more view from our apartment window aside the river in Dunkirk before setting out on the road again in the morning and back home to the UK via the channel tunnel!

“On this epic journey we experienced the different energies of many lands as we followed in the footsteps of King Arthur around Europe and found out that churches are not what they seem;  I also found an amazing light inside me that I never want to dim. Putting aside the spiritual aspect of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind-expanding in itself; an experience that I fully embraced. So that was it; an amazing quest fullfilled and I for one cannot wait until our next adventure.

Many of you have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in-depth write-ups on these pages, so have a good idea of what the quests are all about and why. It is always from a physical, spiritual and more importantly a metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests and now we have bought ‘the grail’ into the mix.

The buildings we visit are built on very sacred sites, yet it is not the buildings as such, as to why we are there. The sites are of sacred, pyramid energy; the buildings atop have come and gone over the centuries, leaving no clues in the buildings since, as to their purpose and real reason within the rhyme of time; except of course to those whom can decode the symbols. The churches could be describes as ‘markers’ in time and space.

The quest, the King Arthur quest, traces his journey to these sites, it was his quest then, just as it is our important quest now; a journey of learning sacred knowledge, that has often been hidden within very time and the landscape itself. But yet most importantly never told of in history, yet the links are now appearing, like the colours of a magic painting book when the water is added, for when knowledge and understanding is added to our life, magically the truth appears.

We have visited many pyramid sites, some where the earth magnetis were so strong, that the so-called ‘sat-nav’ (which works via earth-based communications anyway), was caused to spin around in circles; going crazy due to the pyramid energy. The energy can often be overwhelming causing one to lose balance and feel a bit ‘woozy’ at times until one tunes into it and finds one’s balance. There is always so much more to space and time than meets the eye.”

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“The Keeper of Scrolls” March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

The Knights of the Red Order

THE GRAIL QUEST

“Consider then, this special DNA thread, can it be awakened and utilised through Craft knowledge? The word ‘Templar’ relates to time, as in temporal, so the Grail with its history of connections to the knights and the apostles upon the earthly plane could also relate to time or even dimensions? So with that knowledge in mind is ‘The Universal Templar Complex’ fact or fiction? If humanity actually found the Grail, (were allowed to find it) what one wonders would they do with it? Giving humanities track record I don’t think they are ever destined to find it, for they could never ever be trusted with the knowledge of it and could do unfortold damage. If it was found, as in Craft quests of today or as the Knights of the Round Table quests of old or the Apostles, then once found, the knight usually passes over, (although not always) for there is no longer a purpose for living (in this world). So could the Grail be the answer to everything and the passport to heaven? Sadly though, not everyone whom sought the Grail would/will use it’s divine powers for good; hence why humans (i dont mean Craft) are never, ever destined to find it”.

QUEST 28: NORMANDY: FRANCE

4TH NOVEMBER 2019

Mont Saint-Michel: Today we set off on a two hour journey to reach Mont Saint-Michel in lower Normandy; i was very excited about this trip, having already been to the English counterpart Mount Saint Michael in Cornwall. The actual town, rather than the abbey is located about 0.6 miles off the country’s northwestern coast, at the mouth of the Couesnon River near Avranches and is 17 acres in area. As of 2015, the island has a population of 50. The commune’s position, on an island just a few hundred metres from land, made it accessible at low tide to the many pilgrims to its abbey, but defensible as an incoming tide stranded, drove off, or drowned would-be assailants. The island remained unconquered during the Hundred Years War; a small garrison fended off a full attack by the English in 1433. Louis XI recognised the reverse benefits of its natural defence and turned it into a prison. The abbey was used regularly as a prison during the Ancien Regime. Mont Saint-Michel and its bay are on the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. It is visited by more than 3 million people each year. Over 60 buildings within the commune are protected in France as monumental historiques. Now a rocky tidal island, yet the Mont occupied dry land in prehistoric times.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont-Saint-Michel

The original site was founded by an Irish hermit, who gathered a following from the local community. Mont-Saint-Michel was used in the sixth and seventh centuries as an Armorican stronghold of Gallo-Roman culture and power until it was ransacked by the Franks thus ending the trans-channel culture that had stood since the departure of the Romans in 460. Before the construction of the first monastic establishment in the 8th century, the island was called Mont Tombe (Latin: tumba). According to legend, the archangel Michel appeared in 708 AD to Aubert of Avranches, the then bishop, and instructed him to build a church on the rocky islet.

The Church at the base of the ‘Mont’ and its treasures <click to view>

The abbey is an essential part of the structural composition of the town the feudal society constructed. At the very top, God, the abbey, and the monastery; below this, the Great halls, then stores and housing, and at the very bottom (outside the walls), fishermen’s and farmers’ housing. The abbey has been protected since 1862. Since 1979, the site as a whole; the Mont and its bay has been a UNESCO world heritage site. The monks there durung first century of their institution, venerated the archangel Michael. The Mont became a place of prayer and study, but the stability period, during the reign of  Charlemagne ended when he died.  At first, pilgrims kept coming to the Mont but after the Vikings captured the Mont in 847, the monks departed. But, as an island, it offered some protection for the local population and thus never stayed empty. The abbey has had a rich and varied history (see link below) and starting in 1922, Christian worship was again practiced in the abbey. In 1966, with the celebration of the abbey’s first millennium, a few Benedictine monastries sent monks to spend the summer there. At the end of the summer a few stayed, but they slowly started to leave after 1979.

The steep walk up to the top & its magnificant views <click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mont-Saint-Michel_Abbey

A fabulous place, a community of its own merit and accord. Not as easy to get access to, as its namesake, St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, as one cannot walk across the low waters, needing to wait for a shuttle bus, of which there was standing room only on the lovely autumn day that we visited. Once alighted from the shuttle there was still a good walk across a boardwalk to get to the mount. It is very, very high with winding streets full of resturants, a church and shops, taking one up to the foot of the actual mount. Old stone steep steps take one to the very top, but believe me it is a long old way and one (unless a super hero) has to take many a rest along the way – indeed i felt like a hero simply for making it to the top. Once however at the top the views are stunning and the abbey complex is much bigger than one would imagine with many facets to it. In times past one can easily imagine what an isolated life the monks and visiting knights here, would have led… However sadly all the sacred ‘energies‘ that would have been there at one point it time are now no more; probably eroded away by mankinds unspiritual interactions; interactions that are as much about ‘giving back’ as ‘receiving’ (taking) upon the shores of time, which most folks fail to realise for time and tide wait for no man and energies dissipate and move as and when they need to…  There is so much more to this world than folks realise….

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Associated with Knight Alain De Bretagne (42nd GGF) 660-740

Back on the road again after a lovely few hours browsing, lunching and participating in Knights Templar retail therapy at Mont Sain-Michel, we had a forty minute drive to our next destination.

 

Eglise Notre-Dam des Champs Avranches: The time was getting on so we were pleasantly surprised to find the church here open. It is in quiet a busy built up area, in the middle of a busy town and we needed to cross a well used bus lane to get to the church.

Avranches is a commune  in the Manche department in the Normandy region in northwestern France. Avranches is situated at the southern end of the Cotentin Peninsula on the road connecting Saint-Lo with Brittany.  The town was founded on high ground overlooking the dunes and coastal marshes along the bay forming the corner between the peninsulas of the Cotentin and Brittany. From Avranches, it is possible to see the Mont Saint-Michel, where we had travelled from, which was founded by Saint Aubert, Bishop of Avranches in the 8th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avranches

Although i was unable to find out much info, in English, to share we did mange to gain access to the church and take plenty of photos. Formerly located outside the city, the  church Notre-Dame des Champs dates from the end of the 17th century. The major church Notre Dame des Champs was constructed in Gothic Revival style in the 19th century to restore the religious life of the town after the destruction of the cathedral. Very simple, it was completely redone in the second half of the 19th century because it became too narrow. Severely damaged by the bombings of 1944, it was reopened to the public in the early 1960s.  I found this interesting quote on Trip Adviser “Despite its neo-gothic style this was a special visit because the church introduced us to what the town experienced during the liberation of Normandy in 1944. There was a painting of the church in flames from Allied bombs. And suddenly we were made aware that we had crossed into Normandy. The Nazi occupation and subsequent liberation are very much a part of this region whether or not you are looking for it”

 

Again, as seems the norm in this part of the world, the ‘All Seeing Eye’ is very prominent, and an alternative ‘Lamb of God’ here too.  Note the interestng inscription upon a lintel ‘De Movie 1677’ translated as “I moved”  <click to enlarge>

The Craft/Quest connection here would be Alan Fitzflaald 1078-1124, whom did leave the area and sailed to Lanarkshire in Scotland with his young son Simon. However it is said that he took ‘important items’ to Scotland with him; so whar were these important items he took with him when he travelled to Scotland?

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Alan Fitzflaald (31st GGF) 1078-1124
  • Flaald Fitzalon (32nd GGF) 1043-1086

As a footnote it is interesting to note that in many of these French churches and cathedrals, the ‘All Seeing Eye’, a symbol that many folks recognise today as a pagan symbol is very prominent. This begs the question as to how much the old form of christianity differs from what is known as christianity today. It would seem that the old ways of christianity are very much more ‘pagan’ and of ‘magic’ than todays modern pagan paths. Old christian knowledge it seems has been well-hidden in todays pagan paths, but if we keep seeking we shall find all the ture meanings for what they fully are….

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

DSC00098 (2).JPG 1

THE GRAIL QUEST

“Our scriptures hint at the fact that the Grail is associated with the Holy or ‘pure’ blood lineages, such as that of the Ninasians, or the Nevilles, as in coming from heaven and that the Grail Kingship, the Holy Knights, ‘the’ Jesus, the Apostles, The Templars, all had an understanding of the Grail; a connection within time and space. The Templar Knights are often known as the Grail custodians or guardians, so would that make the Knights of the Round Table and Jesus and his disciples guardians of it too? The Grail is said to equal purity and relates to DNA, so could the Grail be within the DNA that relates to specific bloodlines? DNA does not neccesarily follow a linear path line, it is metaphysical, and can (and will) jump in and out of bloodlines of specific peoples (traits) such as those being of certain bloodlines; the Mary Magdalene line and the Jesus line. These people (traits) of these lines are often the ‘keepers of the secrets’. It is important to stop thinking in linear, mundane earthly terms and to start thinking in metaphysical/dimensional terms.”

QUEST 28: BRITTANY: FRANCE

MONDAY 4TH NOVEMBER 2019

Monday 4th Nov: Chartres Cathedral: So after a truly lovely stay in Autun, full of revelations, surprises and more dots to join on our Grail Quest, we sadly left our lovely chateau for an early start on a four hour drive to Chartres Cathedral, hoping to arrive at about 12pm. The weather was divine and the drive enjoyable and we arrived to see the catherdral bathed in bright sunlight, with time enough for a well deserved lunch before visiting the cathedral. The cathedral has a wonderfully comanding view over its surrounding and looked stunning bathed in sunlight.

This cathedral, shown above, is also known as Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres and is actually the ‘real’ Notre Dame; the real ‘our lady’. Chartres is a commune and capital of the Eure-et-Loir department in France. It is located about 90 km (56 mi) southwest of Paris and is famous world-wide for its  cathedral. Mostly constructed between 1193 and 1250, the Gothic cathedral is in an exceptional state of preservation.  Much of the old town, including the library associated with the School of Chartres, was destroyed by bombs in 1944. Chartres has an interesting history, read more in the link below, and was one of the principal towns in Gaul of the Carnutes, a Celti . In the Gallo-Roman period, it was called Autricum, name derived from the river Autura (Eure), and afterwards civitas Carnutum, “city of the Carnutes”, from which Chartres got its name. The city was burned by the Normans in 858, and unsuccessfully besieged by them in 911.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartres

Chartres and its stunning cathedral

The Cathedral is very famous for its rose windows and of course it’s labyrinth, which was sadly covered with chairs the day we visited, only being removed on certain occasions. However the outside and in of this magnificant building is covered with much beauty. The cathedral is well-preserved for its age: the majority of the original stained-glass windows survive intact, while the architecture has seen only minor changes since the early 13th century. The building’s exterior is dominated by heavy flying buttresses which allowed the architects to increase the window size significantly, while the west end is dominated by two contrasting spires; a 105-metre (349 ft) plain pyramid completed around 1160 and a 113-metre (377 ft) early 16th-century Flamboyant spire on top of an older tower. Equally notable are the three great façades, each adorned with hundreds of sculpted figures illustrating key theological themes and narratives.  Since at least the 12th century the cathedral has been an important destination for travellers. It remains so to the present, attracting large numbers of Christian pilgrims, many of whom come to venerate its famous relic, the Sancta Camisa, said to be the tunic worn by the Virgin Mary at Christ’s birth, as well as large numbers of secular tourists who come to admire the cathedral’s architecture and historical merit.

At least five cathedrals have stood on this site, (read much more in the link below) each replacing an earlier building damaged by war or fire. The first church dated from no later than the 4th century and was located at the base of a Gallo-Roman wall; this was put to the torch in 743 on the orders of the Duke of Aquitaine. The second church on the site was set on fire by Danish Pirates in 858. This was then reconstructed and enlarged by Bishop Gislebert, but was itself destroyed by fire in 1020. A vestige of this church, now known as Saint Lubin Chapel, remains, underneath the apse of the present cathedral. It took its name from Lubinus, the mid-6th-century Bishop of Chartres. It is lower than the rest of the crypt and may have been the shrine of a local saint, prior to the church’s re-dedication to the Virgin Mary.

The Grail Clues of Chatres Cathedral

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartres_Cathedral

As far as our Quest goes there is a connection to Johanns Desposyni here (47th GGF) (505-590). There are three paintings of a particular interest here to us and importantly two important clues in our Grail Quest. The rose window is stunning; the rose being very important to the Templars and Craft folks; connecting to ‘Life’ on many deep and symbolic levels. Sadly though the cathedral itself has lost most of the energy that it would once have had, dissipated over time by human interaction, i would guess, but never the less i was thrilled and honoured to have seen the grail clues for myself, although only a part of the bigger picture; i was humbled to take my stand amongst rising clouds and gleaming chalices….

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Johanns Desposyni here (47th GGF) (505-590)

We left Chatres after a lovely few hours and some well deserved retail therapy and headed off on the road again to Boussac, Bretagne. Four hours later we arrived at our next charming destination in Boussac, a rather lovely flat right next to the local church; our home for the next three nights.

Redon Abbey, Redon: After a fairly leisurly start to the day we journeyed in the sunshine for about an hour and a half to reach Reddon to visit Reddon Abbey. Redon is a  commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in Brittany in northwestern France. It borders the Morbihan and Loire-Atlantique departments. It is situated at the junction of the Oust and Vilaine rivers and  Nantes-Brest canal, which makes it well known for its autumn and winter floods. Very little information exists about this area before 832, however it would seem that there was a parish by the name of Riedones which gave the town its name. In 832, Conwoion, a Breton monk with the help of the Carolingian Emperor Loues le Pieux founded the abbey of Saint-Sauveur de Redon. Today, documents relating to the life of the abbey still exist. In the Middle Ages, Redon benefited from maritime commerce due to its location on the Vilaine. It is a very lively and interesting looking town with lots to see and do with some lovely old shopping streets. Even at the time of year we were there, the town was alive with plenty of tourists, and i would imagine the streets to be really buzzing and packed in the summer months.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redon,_Ille-et-Vilaine

Redon Abbey, or Abbey of Saint-Sauveur, Redon (‘Abbey of the Holy Saviour’) is a former Benedictine abbey founded in 832 by Saint Conwoion, at the point where the Oust into the  Vilaine, on the border between Nesstria and Brittany. The abbey reached its height during the late 11th century and the 12th century, when it governed 27 priories and 12 parishes throughout Brittany, and was a popular pilgrimage destination. The monastery consisted of a dormitory, gatehouse, guesthouse, an infirmary and a garden, where Saint Condeloc worked: among other things he dismissed a plague of caterpillars by an appeal to the Holy Trinity. The former chapter house is now a separate chapel. The crossing tower and parts of the porch are Romanesque, of the 11th century. The nave, with an octagonal cupola, was extended in the 12th century in the Gothic style, and the transept and the cloister were also added then.  A fire in 1780 damaged the nave, and it was rebuilt shorter than it had been previously. During restorations in 1950 medieval frescos were revealed.

Beautiful artworks and grail secrets hidden within the peace of Redon Abbey

From a Craft/Templar perspective the abbey had an amazing ‘feel’ to it and I always think that abbeys do have a different feel to them than churches, a different vibe. See our video below for a lovely tour around with some beautiful chanting in the background; one gets a true sense of days gone by when the monks would have been around. In the pas,t the the whole area would have been under the Roman command and later on under the Knights Templar command. There are many beautifully stunning, and i would guess priceless artworks in the abbey.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redon_Abbey

The third clue to the Grail is here, making this a very special place indeed and also another dot to join up. From Chartres Catherdral to Redon Abbey, grail secrets revealed… There are also some rather suprising ‘finds’ here, if one knows where to look; a shield with an inverted cross that connects to an apostle which has nothing to do with satanism, or the anti-christ as portrayed in the movies, for they are all red herrings within time. We were lucky today, within the abbey for we timed it well, lots of school trips were bustling about outside waiting to enter, yet we managed to find a lovely peaceful slot in time. When one walks around there are lots of little altars and chapels, often to our lady, and various saints, all giving thanks. We filmed a wonderful painting (see above in the photos) of clouds descending from heaven, with ‘Magdalene’ (?) passing the child to one of the ‘wise men’ as it were; a wonderful representation of certain aspects of how things were.

Redon Abbey & the view from St Michaels Mount

Before leaving we had a splendid lunch in a rather swish resturant followed by a stroll around the lovely old streets of Redon. A good day…..

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Connects to the Fordham Line
  • Adalrad was born here (37th GGF) 840-904

Saint Malo Church, Dinan: After another short drive of just over an hour, we arrived at Saint Malo Church in the lively town of Dinan; a walled Breton town and a commune in the Cotes-d’Armor department in northwestern France. The town has an exceptional setting upon the hillside overlooking the river Rance. The area alongside the River Rance is known as the port of Dinan and is connected to the town by the steep streets Rue Jerzual and its continuation outside the walls, the Rue de Petit Fort.  It is a lovely medieval town on the hilltop, and has many fine old buildings, some of which date from the 13th century. The town retains a large section of the city walls, part of which can be walked round.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinan

There is not much about this large, almost cathedral-like church on the internet but i managed to source a few  details. The church of Saint Malo in Dinan was built in 1490 on land located inside the ramparts of the town to replace a more exposed church outside the walls that had been destroyed. The choir, apse and transept were built during the 15th century in a flamboyant Gothic style. By the end of the 16th century, the nave was still incomplete and hard to imagine, the church had a simple thatched roof.

The architecture inside & out Saint Malo Church is stunning and would rival any cathedral

During the French Revolution almost all the original furnishing and religious works of art were destroyed, burned or sold and the church was amazingly converted into a stable and forge. During this period the nave and the tower were destroyed by a fire. The church eventually fell into ruin but it was re-consecrated in 1803 and reconstruction and restoration work began in 1808. and eventually completion in 1885. But we did have a good stroll around, there are some amazing windows here; one in particular. A beautiful building with some amazing artworks, although not directly seen as clues on our grail quest, but the Templar symbology is undeniable.

Many wonderful treasure are to be inside the church with some stunning stained-glass windows

https://loirevalleyexperiences.blogspot.com/2014/11/church-on-sunday-saint-malo-dinan.html

The town is abundant with interesting and tempting shops selling much fine Breton produce and of course gifts galore. We stayed awhile here and enjoyed a nice coffee,  some wonderful retail therapy buying local produce and goods. It had turned out to be a rater wet day, causing the whole town to glisten in the rain!

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Has associations with Knight Alain De Bretagne (42nd GGF) 680-740, whom lived at Dinan and was born in Ilk-et-Villaine.

Church of Saint Michael, Saint Malo: We had a short night-time drive right out to the coast at Saint Malo, Bretan; an historic sea port in Brittany on the Channel coast. It is a walled city with a long history of piracy (interesting) earning much wealth from local extortion and overseas adventures. In 1944, the Allies heavly bombarded Saint Malo, which was garrisoned by German troops. Today it is a popular tourist centre, with a ferry terminal serving Portsmouth, Jersey, Guernsey and Poole.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Malo

Sadly it was quiet late and very dark when we arrived so we kind of had to play it by ear a bit to get our bearings. We found our way to the beach but it was very cold, very dark and extremely windy, but spectacular non-the-less, so worth a stop to admire the view. We eventually found the cathedral of the town, down some small side streets, but expectedly it was closed, yet i managed a few night-time shots. Even though I was glad we found it, i am not actually sure whether this was where we were actually meant to be or not. It was cold and very dark so not a time for exploring; it was an adventure anyway!

On looking further at our info the Church of Saint Michel de Rotheneuf was also listed on our agenda; just slightly along the coast, so if ever we go back in daylight we can decide,   but on the other hand they say that everything is meant to be, everything happens for a reson and maybe we were meant to be where we were after all…..

https://www.airbnb.co.uk/things-to-do/places/1283414?s=4&_set_bev_on_new_domain=1584215706_jkP4EzkNuRUEKRRO

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Has associations with Knight Alain De Bretagne (42nd GGF) 680-740.

 

“In time and space a story told
A shining challice from ages old
A kingly quest; a pot of gold
Yet only a few will forever hold”

 

challice

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

“Within Craft teachings many acronyms are used for the purpose of the Craft Journey, thus keeping infomation secure and safe for those whom are meant to ‘know’ and ‘see’,  and those whom are meant to truly do. Of course, the word G.R.A.I.L. could be interpreted as such, as an acronym, which would make sense in respect of our teachings and codes. The original meaning in Latin, (which of course could be a giant red herring if the word is an acronym) means cup or vessel, but not necessarily a cup or vessel as we know it, but in a metaphorical sense, adding meaning to any story. It is portrayed as a chalice type of vessel for story-telling purposes, but a vessel can refer to a living vessel too…”

QUEST 28: INTO FRANCE: DIJON & AUTUN

2ND NOVEMBER 2019

So on Saturday the 2nd Nov we made an early start as we bade farewell to Luxembourg and its lovely old churches and very wet weather! One last look from our very modern apartment window and we were off on the road again on a very long journey; a four hour drive this time, yet exciting non the less! We were on our way to Dijon, France!

Saint Michael’s Church, Dijon, France: As soon as we arrived in the old part of Dijon and parked outside of St Michael’s Church, i knew i would love it here. Dijon is the capital city of the historical Burgundy region in eastern France and one of the country’s principal wine-making areas. It is known for its traditional mustard, vineyard tours, autumn gastronomic fair and building styles ranging from Gothic to art deco. Most folks would know of Dijon because of the mustard made in the region and of course one could not visit without sampling and buying some of the lovely mustards sold there, which we certainly did; both traditional and more modern varieties. The buildings are old and traditional and no attempts are made to modernise them; they just blend effortlessly into the landscape as if they have always been there. The earliest archaeological finds within the city limits of Dijon date to the Neolithic and later Dijon became a Roman settlement named Divio, located on the road from Lyon to Paris. The province was home to the Dukes of Burgandy from the early 11th until the late 15th centuries when Dijon was a place of tremendous wealth and power, one of the great European centres of art, learning and science. It now holds an International and Gastronomic Fair every year in the autumn.

I felt very at home in the quaint old streets of Djion <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dijon

This church is a very imposing building in an Gothic/Renaissance architectural style with an amazing frontage. The first building on the site of the Church of Saint-Michel was a chapel, dedicated to the Archangel Michael. It’s first mention was found in urban Chronicles dating back to the IX century and was built of wood, being located in the cemetery. In the beginning of XI century, the chapel already had the status of a parish church, yet could not accommodate all the parishioners in the hours of worship. It was therefore decided to build a more spacious building, it was consecrated in the year 1020 by the Bishop of Dijon. The majestic façade of this flamboyant Gothic style church was completed at the peak of the Renaissance period and reflects the three classical styles. On the tympanum of the main doorway is the Last Judgement by the Flemish painter, Nicolas de la Cour.

From a Craft point of view there was very strong ‘pyramid energy’ there with connected symbolism within the church; it was also very interesting to see a knights memoriam from 1573, that has a direct connection to the Fordham surname; (the Fordham line) which was an amazing find, and of course connections once again to our ‘Quest for the Grail’. Also lots of emphasis here to the ‘All Seeing Eye’, proving that christianity as we know it today, is quite different from what it used to be a few centuries back in the past. Christianity has certainly evolved but one can not help but think – has it evolved for the better…?

Some of the symbolic artifacts in St Michaels Church, Djion, with emphasis to the ‘All Seeing Eye’ and a Knights Memorial connecting to the Fordham Line. <click to enlarge>

http://worldtourisminfo.com/france/3349-The-Church-of-StMichel-photo-description-Eglise-SaintMichel-de-Dijon.html

http://dijoon.free.fr/bestof/stmichel.htm

Stopping off at Djion on our long journey from Luxembourg to Autun in France proved to be a lovely and very interesting stop; after the church we wandered around the old town, browsed in old shops, bought some mustard and other treats, and even saw a little bookshop that seemingly could have come straight out of the movie ‘The Ninth Gate,’ and had lunch in a very funky bar in the new part of Djion 😉

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his info here on his Grail Quest.
  • Fordham line connection re knights memoriam from 1573

Sunday 3rd Nov: Autun, Bourgogne: Back on the road again, we made our way, driving for several hours through France to the large (as once was) Roman stronghold of Autun, which would have been thriving back in the day. When we arrived at our accomodation we could not have been more pleased ansd amazed for it was like a mini chateau with beautiful views from the inside windows.

Our beautiful chateau in Autun France; as beautiful inside as out 🙂

Autun is a  commune in the Saone-et-Loire department, France. Located in the Boudgogne-Franche-Comte region, it was founded during the Principate era of the early Roman Empire by Emperor Augustus as ‘Augustodunum to give a Roman capital to the Gallic people. In Roman times the city may have been home to 30,000 to 100,000 people, according to different estimates. Nowadays, Autun has a population of about 15,000. Yet back in the day, Autun was a huge transient community, with blocks and blocks of Roman soldiers, businesses and trades passing continually through; an extra 70 thousand people; phenomenal really. Augustodunum was a planned foundation replacing the original oppidum Bibracte, located some 25 km (16 miles) away. Several elements of Roman architecture such as walls, gates, and a Roman theater are still visible in the town.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autun

The Temple of Janus: On the agenda today was to be the Roman temple of Janus (Nergal), only just up the road from where we were staying,and very imposing and dominent upon the landscape with a great feeling of power with human sacrifices being made here. Janus is usually shown with two faces, looking into both the past and the present: The god of doorways, new beginings, new transitions and gates; hence in Roman mythology; the Gatekeeper and Nergal. Janus was able to assist folks on their journey (from a spiritual point of view), unlike the more modern St Christopher whom assisted upon the physical journey. A stautue of the Gatekeeper (usually holding keys) is to be found in many churches far and wide; usually on the left hand side of the church or in the north/east quadrant, guarding the entrance. Interestingly, England takes one of it’s months, January from the cult of Janus; very appropriate for the first month of the year.

The very impresive Janus Temple <click to enlarge>

The  temple, a Romano-Celtic religious structure lies in the center of a vast sanctuary, whose extent and complexity was revealed by excavations conducted between 2013 and 2016. The site’s history dates back to Neolithic times and underwent an important phase of monumental construction in the 1st century CE. The temple was abandoned at the onset of the Early Middle Ages, and its structures were later reused in the fashioning of a Medieval defensive work. The temple has retained two sides of its square cella at a height of over 20 meters, as well as vestiges of its ambulatory and side structure foundations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_of_Janus_(Autun)

The Roman Ampitheatre: The next port of call was the very well preserved Roman ampitheatre where great public events would have been staged in past times and if one were to close one’s eye today and listen carfefully, one can almost here the roar of the crowds and the rumbling wheels of the racing chariots! The semi-circle of stepped seating is very well preserved and one can see underground ‘caves’ presumably for holding animals and gladiaters (maybe poor slaves too) Discovered a few years back by accident, concerts and gigs are now held here and nearby is the House of the Warden of the Roman Theatre. The link below contains a lot of extra info to the theatre and to the whole area, so well worth a look.

https://www.romeartlover.it/Autun.html

The Roman Ampitheatre and Wardens House <click to enlarge>

The Pyramid of Couhard: The pyramids of the area, which we visited next, two more being nearby of which there is not much written about, hold great energy and power within the landcape, obviously from a templar point of view, one reason why we are questing here and one reason why Arthur, on his own Grail Quest would have also been here in the area. The pyramid we visited is different to the ones we have aforetime visited, and unlike the ones found in Egypt either, for this one had funerary connections. When the land was being excavated and being prepared for farming, thousands and thousands of cremated ashes were found in urns, all dotted around the area. When further excavations were carried out, a big pillar/marker was found dating from about 100 AD. This turned out to be the marker post of a memorial garden, similar to todays modern rose memorial gardens; a very fascinating place with more than a hidden secret or two…. The views from atop the pyramid area is amazing, one can see the cathedral in the distance and of course the mystery more pyramids in the landscape.

http://worldtourisminfo.com/france/2994-The-pyramid-PierredeKuhar-photos-description-Pyramide-de-Couhard.html

The Pyramids and views <click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Arthur (real name-Lucius Artorius Castus from the family Artoria) passed through Autun, as part of the Roman army and as a military commander
  • Nascien Desposyni; our head researcher’s 49th GGF (480-551)

Next a total delight, not part of our quest as such but a rare find indeed, because of it’s mystery, history and heritage, this little church just in the vicinity of the pyramid at Couhard, just drew us inside. Ancient and full of amazing energy, it harks back to a time when christianity was more magical and ‘pagan’ than modern day paganism and the rites performed were so very different from todays christianity.

There were symbols here that connected to magic, the enochian ways, the All Seeing Eye, the Alpha to Omega in true magical context, proving that what is be refered to as ‘the occult’ in many circles is certainly deep Craft or old christian knowledge, waiting to be dicsovered here; but hidden within plain sight and never actually ‘seen’…

Please click on each image to fully reveal the symbolism here

We stopped at a lovely town for a lunchbreak and a spot of food shopping, but i have completly forgotten where!

Eglisse, Church of Saint Ferreol, Le Bourge, Curgy: After lunch and another short journey, still remaining very much in the area we found ourselves at what was without a shadow of a doubt, a true Templar church. Geographically one of the most prominent places in the area, this church was originally built and owned by the Knights Templar, as the surroundings and building would indicate and one of the most truest templar builds that one could see in one’s lifetime. The Templars would have operated from out of this religous building until the year 1369, until it all suddenly came to a halt due to the Papal Bull and the subsequent arrest of the Knights Templars. Moving forward in time Pope Clement VII (1478-1534) performed a marriage ceremony for Catherine de Medici (1519-1589) (his niece) to King Henry II of France. The wedding took place here, in this church, on 28th Oct 1533. What an honour and how wonderful to actually go inside where kings, lords, ladys etc had been to what was certainly a major wedding of that time.

Sadly not much on the internet, especially in English that i can share but did find a mention to the series of statues, the very wooden polychrome of the XVIIth century and in the cul-de-four of the apse, and to the splendid wall painting of the XIIth century of the Christ in glory in a mandorle, above the altar, surrounded with the tétramorphe, the four evangelists represented by the symbols of the book of Ezéchiel and of the Apocalypse.

A wonderful church, steeped in Knights Templar history and most certainly a place, at the left side of the main altar, where knights would have received their ‘accolade’, would have been made knights; very much like the famous painting entitiled ‘The Accolade’ but for real here. See our video below for much more detail. At the other side of the altar, hidden behing a curtain, is an original painted fresco featuring the Archangel Raphael with a sun disk above and very much worn away, an ascending Benu Bird. On the way out we stopped near a modern representation of the Maddona or Ava Maria or Mary Magdalen or the Black Maddona, to ponder upon the many names used for this Lady within time and space, yet all one and the same within history.

Thje Templar & Roman sites of Autun

 

 

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  1. Desposyni connections to the area, both Nascien (450-494) and Galains (480-551) (48th GGF)

 

Putting aside the spiritual side of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind expanding in itself; an experience that i fully embraced and will never forget. A sense of being ‘on the road’ is mind expanding, a great and can be likened to Life’s Great Journey – a true gift indeed. Many friends and followers have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in depth write-ups, so have a good idea of what the quests are about. It is always from a physical, spiritual and metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests, which deepen with every new journey.

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”  March 2020

Knights of the Red Order

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

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