Category: Knight Templar


The Priory Investigates: Quest Twenty Five: It had indeed been a while since our wonderful wintery quest to the Isle of Wight, and here in the heat of the summer, in complete contrast, we ventured literally just down the road and out into the open countryside of the fens, right on our own doorstep! We had five sites/churches planned for this day quest, yet as anyone following our quests will know, things do not always go as planned and we actually managed to get into three of them and took outside photos and videos of the others

  • St Andrews Church Witchford
  • St Andrews Church Sutton
  • St Mary’s Church Mepal
  • St Nicolas Church Manea
  • St Mary the Virgin Church Doddington

St Andrews Church Witchford: Our first visit of the day was only three miles, W.S.W. from Ely, the modern-day capital of the fens and thus took no time at all to arrive. Witchford is a pretty and peaceful village, full of fenland character set amidst an entirely agricultural landscape.

The name of the village means the ‘Ford of the Wych Elms’ (Wych meaning weeping: Weeping Elms-cf Weeping Willows) and refers to the tree Ulnus glabra. Other spellings of the name have been ‘Wycheford’ and ‘Wicceford’. The village was once important enough to give its name to the Anglo-Saxon Government division, the ‘Hundred’. This was the rural district of North Witchford and the Petty-sessional areas of South Witchford. As we have discovered upon many of our quests up and down the length and breadth of the UK, many sites that today appear as unimportant, being no more than small villages, hamlets and churches, way off the beaten track, were in their heyday, places of very high importance, energy and power. Yet over time, the reasons why they were built where they are, have become lost in time, with commercial reasons also changing the shape and meaning of the past.

The church of St Andrew, as appears from the mandate of Bishop Arundell, dated at Downham 4th December 1376, and preserved in the diocesan registry, was consecrated on the 12th December in that year. But an unconfirmed tradition says that a church has stood here since 607. It was originaly Norman, going back to the times of the Norman conquest, and incorporates the materials of the ancient structure, but is chiefly an edifice of stone in the Early English and later styles, consisting of a chancel, nave, north porch and an embattled western tower containing three bells, dated 1671, a possibly Norman font and there is also a memorial window to the Rev, B.M. Lloyd, vicar 1884-1911. Interestingly an entry from the Domesday Book, from the Abbot of Ely’s records, records 8 slaves amongst a listing of possesions of which the total vaue is £10 all told!

Never underestimate the importance in time and space of sleepy fenland villages: more on the symbology and significance of these windows are explained in the video below. As always please click on each image to enlarge and to see all the beautiful detail.

Bloodline Connection: Is that of Rose Eagle 1808-1876 who married Lord Gowler Neville in 1820 in this very church. Lord Gowler travelled all the way from Essex to marry Rose; a very long way in those days. Rose is our lead researchers 5 x G GM.

More about the church and village can be found here:
http://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/438/
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/cambs/vol4/pp176-179
http://www.cambridgeshirehistory.com/cambridgeshire/TownsandVillages/Witchford/index.htm

St Andrews Church Sutton: A very short drive across open fenland scenery bought us to St Andrews Church in Sutton; known rightly as one of the great churches of the fens and like all medieval churches in this corner of the world, it was built on an island; those mounds of land that rose from amidst the damp fens. These isands were safe havens for both fishing folk and wildife alike. Of course those days are long gone and the once miles of waterworld are now some of the best agricultural land in the country. There are some that say, that one day the waters will rise again and once more transform the land. Many will welcome these changes and it is said that much will endure including St Andrews here, which will once again become an island.

Sutton’s island is the same one that Ely sits upon and so it is hardly urprising that St Andrews Church has enjoyed the patronage of the Abbots and then the Bishops throughout history. The present buiding dates from the later half of the fourteenth century, mostly having been built by Bishops Barnet and Arundel. The fine west tower, the final part of the church to be built, can be seen from miles around and is a very familiar landmark for the local folk. The church is surprisingly large for a smallish parish, yet no surprise to learn then that it is also known as the ‘Cathedral of the Fens’ being more significant that the more well-known cathedral at Ely; also worth noting is the strong connection between Scotland and this area of the fens. The village was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, identified as Sudtone. There were then 9 sokemen, 8 villeins (each with 7.5 acres), 15 cotters and 7 serfs. In 1109, the charter 51 of Bishop Hervey included Suttune in the lands recorded as being conferred upon the Cathedral Priory of Ely. According to the Ely Diocesan Register, the Manor of Sutton was established in 1292 and belonged to the Priory. In 1312, Sutton was granted the right to hold a street market each Thursday; this was held on the wider part of the High Street, outside what is now the One Stop Shop.

Once inside the church one gets a sense of the vastness and cathedral-like feel of the building. There are some stunning artifacts, artworks and symbolic carvings here, that we have come to expect from churches connected to the Neville bloodline; and for the eagle-eyed the Neville sheild puts in an appearance too. Outside in the peaceful burial ground is a beautiful old gravestone; a Templar cross, the grave of James Neville in fact.  More can be seen in the video below.

Please click on all images to enlarge

You can read much more on the history of Sutton & St Andrews Church here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sutton-in-the-Isle
>http://www.druidic.org/camchurch/churches/sutton.htm

Bloodline Connection: James Neville 1850-1912 born in Witchford with connections also to Witchford and Sutton, and our lead researchers 3 x G.GF. A small Neville shield can be seen inside the church with Jame’s Templar gravestone peacefully set in a corner of the burial ground.

St Mary’s Church Mepal: After picking up a very ancient key and driving through ripened fields we arrived at St Mary’s Church in Mepal, which nestles just off the beaten track somewhat, in a very beautiful setting. So we turned the key and entered in…

Mepal is a small fenand village, part of the East Cambs district, located just north of the A142 road between Ely and Chatteris. First recorded at the start of the 13th century, Mepal’s history has always been tied up with that of the fens with the village being less than ten metres above sea level. One of the smaller villages of the Isle of Ely, Mepal lies at the western end of the Isle on what was once the shore between the fenland and the higher ground of the Isle. The Old Bedford River and the New Bedford River (also known as the Hundred Foot Drain) run very close on the northwestern side of the village, and the only important bridges of the rivers are found in Mepal. The old and new rivers, originally modified by the Victorians, offer the main drainage route for the Fens and retain a major flood plain between the two river beds. The flood plain typically floods between November and March of each year. A major fire devastated the village in the 19th century, leading to a drop in population from 510 to 397 between 1861 and 1871. There are thus very few remaining buildings dating from before the 19th century. Listed as ‘Mepahala’ at the start of the 13th century, the village’s name means ‘Nook of land of a man called Meapa’

The church of St Mary sits in its own secluded little churchyard with a gate to enter in. It is just on the northern edge of the village, far enough away from the traffic of the main road. The exterior of the tiny building is fairly simple, being built of flint and stone in the Early English style; the building is not much bigger than a chapel really but with a lovely energy both inside and out. There is no tower, just a little bell-cote on the west wall plus nave, south porch and the western turret containing one bell. The chancel was restored by the Rev. Charles S. Harris LL.M. Rector (1876-84), and dates from the early fourteenth century, but successive restorations in 1849, 1876 and 1905 have sadly stripped away almost everything old from the inside. However upon the walls outside are carvings very reminiscent of those seen in Rosslyn Chapel, Scotland. The small graveyard itself would have originaly been a Saxon burial ground.

As said, there is sadly not much left of the orignal artifacts inside the church yet one is drawn to one of them almost instantly;  a beautiful wooden carving of ‘Ave Maria‘ which looks almost life-like. There were some rather beautiful tiles on the floor and an interesting plaque upon the wall with several Templar connections contained within its design and wording and upon the floor under the carpet a tomb of a previous rector with the initials J.F.

Please click all images to enlarge and see our video below to find out much more on the history, Templar symbology and so much more previuosly unpublished knowledge

Bloodline Connection: James Neville 1850-1912 was born in Witchford but involved wth Mepal Church. He was our lead researchers 3 x G.GF

Read more about this tiny church and Mepal itself here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mepal
http://www.druidic.org/camchurch/churches/mepal.htm
http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/CAM/Mepal

St Nicholas Church Manea: Sadly we were unable to gain entry today, but do plan another visit in the near future and have added a few short comments on the video as much as standing outside the front porch allows for. The church has a rather lovely natural woodland burial ground around the back with a public footpath passing through. I would suspect though that the graveyard was not always surrounded by trees and nature in its day, but over time nature has cast a green shroud over the area.

Manea was formerly a parochial chapelry and hamlet of Coveney but it became an ecclesiastical parish in 1883 when a change occurred in the patronage of Coveny. The first building, a ‘Chapel of Ease’, was rebuilt in 1791 and this consisted of a nave, chancel and north porch, all of which were thatched. There was one bell in the turret at the west end, under which stood a small stone font. The bell was given in memory of some of the parishioners, before the turret was built; it hung in an old witch elm tree near the chapel. Interestingly there are no inscriptions inside the chapel, as the dead were buried at the mother church of Coveney. At this time Manea was a hamlet of only 36 dwellings and 14 cottages, yet it held a fair or wake on the Tuesday before Midsummer Day. The village stands near the Old Bedford river, in the middle of the Fens of the Isle of Ely, 6 1/2 miles SE of March. The church, erected in 1875 partly on the site of an earlier building, is a structure of stone in the Early Decorated style.

Even in the 17th century King Charles 1st had a bold plan for the drainage of all the fens, yet more importantly, he envisgaed a new town or rather a city here in the Isle of Manea called Charlemont. The manor which belongs to the Porter family; an incipient strong building, stood on a hillock or small mound, designated Charlemont and was the nucleus of an intended palace, some say a summer palace founded by Charles 1, but was relinquished at an early stage in consequence of his public troubles. The hillock is still to be seen in the centre of the village. Ancient earthen jars and urns containing burnt bones have been frequently found in the parish. However troubles in the country as a whole, and of course Chares 1st’s imprisoment on the Isle of Wight (our previous quest) and untimely end, put an end to his plans and sadly the new fenlnd city never materialised. For a small village Manea does seem to have some very interesting history which you can read more about by clicking on the links below:

The wild woodand burial ground behind Manea church <click on an image to enlarge>

Bloodline Connections: Lord Gowler Neville 1795 – 1864 (5 x G GF to our lead researcher). Lord Gowler was born in Uckfield, Essex yet lived in Manea and was involved with the church. His father was Earl Henry Neville.

St Mary the Virgin Church Doddington: Again another church we sadly coud not get into on this day, but it does have beautifully kept large grounds surrounding it with an almost ‘park-like’ feel about it. So at this particulaer point in time a few photos of the outside of the church and its grounds will need to suffice.

Historically, Doddington was one of the largest parishes in England. The population of the civil parish as of the 2011 census is 2,181. Under the Doddington Rectory Division Act of 1856 it was divided into seven rectories, Benwick, Doddington, Wimblington, Mrch,  Old Town, March St Peter, March St John and March St Mary. In the centre of the village is a clocktower built in 1897 to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Set in Fenland, between Chatteris and March, Doddington has two churches, St Mary’s Parish Church and the Methodist Chapel. The village has almost 1000 dwellings. The Parish of Doddington has existed for almost a thousand years when the manor of Doddington was owned by the monastery at Ely and a short while afterwards a Bishop’s palace was built in Doddington. The Parish included Benwick, Wimblington and March until the 1870s and covered an area of 37,000 acres making it one of the largest parishes in England, and it was one of the richest parishes in the country. It is believed the most famous Rector of Doddington was Christopher Tye, who was a musician to Queen Elizabeth 1st and composed the familiar tune, ‘While Shepherds Watched.’

Inside the church some lovely stained glass panels have been incorporated into the porch screen and were brought from Benwick Church after it was demolished due to subsidence in the 1980s. Some interesting headstones can be found in the Churchyard and the ancient Calvary cross which stands near the lychgate, was found in a field close by where it had been buried for centuries. The Church we see before us today stands on the site of an earlier building and dates back to 1250. This building was mainly completed by the 15th Century and experienced extensive restoration work during the 19th and 20th centuries. The Church has lots of fine features some of which date back to long, long ago and others are more recent. The nave roof displays some beautiful examples of angel carvings. The chancel is in the oldest part of the Church. The windows date back to the 15th century as does the screen which has been extensively restored. The tomb-stone of Sir John Peyton who succeeded Sir Walter Raleigh as Governor of Jersey and Guernsey, and who was granted the manor of Doddington by Queen Elizabeth 1st in 1601 lies in the floor in the sanctuary. On the north side of the chancel and at the end of the choir stall, there is a very small carving of a bloody hand which reflects an incident involving one of the Peyton family who accidently killed his man servant. A recently restored altar frontal hangs on the north wall of the chancel. The east window in the north aisle is an early work by William Morris and Rosetti which was given to the Parish of Doddington in 1923. The Church has a font at the back of the building which dates back to the 13th century and holds a plain octagonal bowl. On the west wall, quite high up, a coat of arms can be seen. The organ was given to the Church in 1938 and stands beneath the tower. Hopefully photos of what sound ike an amazing interior will arrive here shortly!

The extensive park-like grounds of Doddington Church <click to enlarge>

Bloodline Conections: James Neville 1824 – 1861, son of Lord Gowler Neville of Manea whom married Rose Eagle. (Our lead researcher’s 4 x G GF)

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ August 2018

To contact me please email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

Our next quest: Quest 26 is Ireland in September so please stay tuned!

 

 

planets

exsistence

human race

Reality and Truth: have i not always said that truth is never what has been taught; never what you thought it was. Think hard dear freinds and consider the truths of your existence and why you have been lied to. Learn, accept and be free. The Priory has always taught the truths yet it is up to each individual, those whom are truly meant to know and to evolve beyond their human existence, whether they wish to remove their blindfolds or not….

One can make a big noise and launch as many orange balloons over London as one likes but directing ones energy to this mere drop in the ocean, this mere diversion in time, only serves well the purpose of those whom wish to keep you in blindness. Consider then if you will that path laid down for you, and the oportunities presented, for they all have a purpose and it is up tp you whether you go against the flow and rise up against the roar of the crowd or be forever blinded and deafened by the mundane pull of humanities blindness…

While it is important to respect the beliefs and opinions of others, even if they differ from our own, we must do so with open minds; for we are all different. We know instinctively what is right or wrong, yet sadly the truth is obliterated these days by what the main stream media deem us to know; what the so-called religous bodies deem us to know. Yet do either of them know about real truths, for they hide any real truths from us and shower us with a truth they think we deserve to know.

But we must all wake up from our slumbers for we are being manipulated for sure, yet each & everyone of us has the power to make up our own minds, for the truth is there to find and folks willing to share it Dont be manipuated by popular opinions and popular beliefs; rise up above the roar of the crowd, up above the clouds that fog the mind. This can mean standing alone, yet being true to ones self and to those beings whom lit the original flame of life that resides within us all.

‘Ge be Dag ma Dar be Ar’

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2018

When the tides turn
And the cold wind blows,
When the waters of creation
Finally consume the lived.
When the clock shall tick no more
I shall take my rightful place
Amongst my true kin.
The Sanctuary was always there;
Hidden within, in my dreams and desires.
Unknown by the unseeing eyes of humanity,
Whose achievements resonate not
Across the wider universe
With the seekers of human flesh.
Think not in human terms;
Think not of a world of matter.
The threshold has been crossed,
Yet it was never of the physical world;
Perceived of with my human eyes.
Everything is of its time;
The past, future and present
Have always been as one.
Future memories visit;
Perceived time lines merge,
Cycles repeat.
Be served well to remember
What is done cannot be undone,
What is known cannot be unknown;
Oaths taken upon the sphere of time
Cannot be untaken.
Remember well; that which you love the most
Is that which binds you to the mortal realm;
Soul bound to the shores of time,
Blood ties secured by DNA.
I guard the door; steadfast,
Knowing that Heaven will await.
The secrets of the blood
Have been gifted.
I stand firm; protector of my kin
Sword in hand and breastplate shinning.
Lest no one pass this way
Lest they stumble over times fragile threshold.
Without true love’s key
All answers remain hidden,
All secrets lost within man’s folly.
Blindness reigns,
Tethered by the ego of mortality.
Yet to those of faith
The secrets within the blood of life;
That sweet threaded coil
Of man-kinds destiny
Is forever within reach.
Yet to those whom mock
With tongue and heart of stone,
The sweet blood secrets hidden within the sacred chalice of life,
Sipped not by those of human descent.

 

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moon.willow@ntlworld.com: July 2018

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

I often dream of magic and Craft and connected kin
I dream of sisters sitting round a flame
I dream of a world far away
Visited only in my dream-walkings

I wonder why I go there
All so familiar but at the same time unknown
The ladies look to me for guidance
With clear questioning eyes

They gather round with questions
Bringing a new sister to our gathering
I light an extra candle, one flame among many
I ask how it was she came here

She was told of this gathering at another circle
Said she would find her true self here
Ah yes, I nodded, folks there, do gather here
In our inner circle. Be welcome dear sister

We gather in the light of early evening
The day is still warm and the evening is peaceful before the sun goes down
Come sister let me tell you about Craft
About choices, about honour, about roads to take

She looks at me with gentle eyes, waiting for more
Hungry for more
My truths I share, of other lives lived
The sun goes down, the air is perfumed and she is enthralled

I awake suddenly to my mundane world
Trying to analyse my thoughts, to gather up the threads I had woven
No sense could I derive, ready to dismiss my dream world
Then something, a voice, a thought, a feeling made me go back through that still open door

I realised I knew that place, knew those peaceful serene ladies
I knew I belonged there, knew it was home and had travelled there, time and time again
A dimension not far from this one, where I had taught so many times before
But so different

I re-joined my gathering, the waiting ladies expectant
We talked and shared into the night around the spiralling flame
We spoke of honour and of kin, I shared true knowledge as taught to me and of what magic really is
We laughed and we cried and I knew I truly existed within this truth.

 

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As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

The oldest story written
Is joy to the listening ear
The blinded eyes will see
As the days of old come clear

On saddled shores, the Watchers
Have waited for mankind’s shift
Yet only a few ever made it
The rest will cease to exist

Mankind always had the chances
To rise above ego and greed
Yet took the easy way out
Never considered the planet’s needs

But everything comes home to haunt one
All misdeeds come home to roost
The Observers can only watch us
Time and tide is the judge of all

A dead planet is no good to no-one
Just look at Mars to agree
To travel afar is an answer
But sadly, only in dreams

We are bound to the truth of our actions
We are tied to this planet of time
Yet new realms beckon and call us
Vibrations calling us home

If you get it, you know where I’m going
If you don’t, well you never will
We can learn to challenge illusion
To escape the earthly veil

We are more than this human vessel
We are more than the mundane world
For it’s all been a great expectation
One that we spectacularly failed

Go dream from an outside perspective
Remember that time is manmade
Step away from the ties that bind you
Say no to religion and power

At the end of the day we are mortal
These skins that we wear will not last
We are trapped in lower vibrations
Never heeded the words of the past

Yet we can live again and can travel
Can be guided by shinning lights
We can journey afar to new realms
Can live without day or night

Another existence is out there
A holder of keys you can be
But first you must unlock this door
To see all you can truly see

As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

 

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  April 2018

Maybe the words were never written in the sands
But hidden in plain sight for all to see
Recorded and enscribed in stone
For future generations to decode

The truths of life have always been displayed
Dealt out to us by that giant hand whom deals our fate
Turn over just one card for destinies big reveal
Or leave the cards face down; fate unknown

The Old Ones have left the clues
Have entrusted truths in safe hands
Secrets kept by those whom walk the path
Yet truth often bound in myth, is never beautiful

The vast libraries of ancient words
Depict a past untold
Foretell of a future unwritten
Words to heed

False trails laid by a false church and crown
Dead ends and smoke screens
Laws and taxation to control the masses
Barbed words and lies become the norm, the truth obscurer

Why then walk in darkness?
Why wear the hoodwink?
Why accept the ropes tied tight?
Why live without honour, why abandon truth?

Mankind, born from darkness and into darkness sinks
Born blind to live blind
The words of The Messenger ring hollow
Truth found at last, revealed in the darkness of the dying breath

It always was a prison planet, god fodder no less
Free-will, free-choice, but an illusion
Ego-derived lives give fuel to the giant illusion
Crushing the giant awakening in its tracks

Yet words can be re-written, the hand of fate slighted
The many become the few, the chains can break
The words are there, the truth is there, hidden under the rock of lies
The candle in the darkness sees all

 

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ April 2018

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The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

DAY FOUR: The Minster Church of St Thomas Newport: This was our second visit to this church; we had previously arrived in the freezing cold, when the the church was closed and the snow had covered all around in a white shroud, so it was welcoming to see the church in a different ‘LIGHT’. St Thomas Church is a very vibrant church full of energy and life which emanates from the folks in charge, namely The Revd Kevin Arkell and his wife. So it was well worth the wait and also for the very warm and freindly welcome afforded to us. The church is slap bang in the middle of the town in a very surburban setting and ironically (or not) just outside and across the road from a Craft building of another kind…

 

The original late 12th-century church was dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury known as Thomas Becket (1118–1170). Later, under the rule of King Henry V111 of England, (1509–1547), when Becket was declared to have been a traitor, the Canterbury part of the name was dropped. Its name and the ambiguous dedication to St Thomas was thereafter, over time, assumed by many to refer to Thomas the Apostle. From the 18th century its deterioration made any renovation futile, and funds were raised for a new church on its site. The new church was built over the years 1854 and 1855 to a design by the architect S. W. Dawkes of Cheltenam. Reflecting the building’s history, but arguably unusual, the new church was dedicated on the feast of Thomas the Apostle to both him and St Thomas of Canterbury. The tower contains a ring of 12 bells.

Inside the church is a wealth of history and information and the church is actively setting up its own achive and history corner and can boast some amazing and historic artifacts; there is also a wealth of old photographs which are posted here. Revd. Kevin and his wife have an enthusiastic team around them who have some good projects on the go and ideas to draw in the community, children and all; so the very best of luck to them.

 

Sarrui Sarru: St Thomas’s Church has a great deal of history attached to it; it has some amazing stained glass windows that also show a wealth of past history; from the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line and of course the Fluer de Lys, towards the top of the window. Looking to the top we see the cross, a symbol representitive of, or a reminder that there is no such a thing as a ‘king on earth’ or ‘Sarrui Sarru’ from the ancient Sumerian meaning ‘King of Kings’;The Jesus’. A reminder then that throughout all the battles of the civil wars etc, the end result/the end game would alwayd be ‘The Jesus’….

Merkabah: One of the most detailed stained-glass windows in St Thomas’s, Newport is the second window below which shows six triskellian; three to  the left and three to the right, masked in gilted gold but right at the top of the window and clearly shown, is the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, re-inforcing the fact that the cross is a new addition; the Merkabah was/is the symbol used for aeons before the modern-day cross, a new addition to the christian faith, took its hold upon history and also the minds of people. If we go back to grass roots, what people think of as ‘The Star of David’, the Merkabah, is in actual fact the true representation of christianty and for very good reasons too.

 

Window one is representitive of the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line, the Fluer de Lys and the Sarrui Sarru. Window two shows the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity

Museum Section: Within this section of the church are some very beautiful and ancient artifacts; a few of which can be seen here including some amazing archive photos which we were giver permision to photograph. There are also some beautiful old bibles, ancient wooden chests and a wonderful wooden carved depiction of the last supper.

 

 

<click on all images to enlarge>

The Pulpit: The pulpit is from the old church and is carved in wood and thought to be carved by Flemish craftsmen.  It is original and displays some very intricate carvings around its sides, some of which i managed to get some close ups of. It is unique insomuch that the figures carved on it are not biblical at all but are relating to the sciences and philosophies of the time. Also round the top of the pulpit is reference to the ‘trumpet’, as mentioned in the Book of Revelations; some of which have already occured….

 

The Font: There are two fonts here; the later one is shown here with carvings all around that we have become so familiar with over the course of these quests; the older of the two is to the right of the altar. When the church was rebuilt the original font was not returned with the pulpit etc, so the new font was built at the south door. Then someone came knocking on the door to say that the old font had been found in a garden in Newport and had been used as a bird bath for many years! So the church now boasts two fonts; the new one being used for major baptisms.

 

The newer font with its very symbolic and familiar carvings, the descriptions of which can be found on other quests… <click to enlarge>

Taize Service: In the evening of our daytime visit we were most fortunate to be invited back by Revd. Kevin, to a candlelit evening of chanting and meditation, a taize service, something that i had not encountered before. It sounded so lovely that we immedietly said yes. Although it was a taize servive for the christian lent, one can easily adapt it, in one’s own mind, to suit ones own path or spirituality or even to just enjoy the experience and chanting as a whole. It was a small intimate gathering; there was a small choir from the church’s own choristers attending, dressed in formal long red robes and every participant attending was invited to hold a lighted candle throughout the service.

We can all relate to the words below taken from the introduction to the taize service, whatever our faith. In The Priory, in Templarism, we do have an understanding of G-D. but from a different perspective to the christian understanding and we do not actually worship any higher being, yet have an acknowlegement of such. So a perfect end to a perfect day…

“Many trivial things in our lives shift our focus away from God. This evening we worship in the style of Taize style, clear your mind and let the music, prayers and readings help you to focus on God. We ask God to calm our hearts and clear our minds of life’s many distractions as we come to worship”

 

 

….and finally more of the artworks from around St Thomas Church including the Neville Sheild in situ over the entrance just below the organ, more beautiful stained-glass windows, carvings from around the altar, the Ford connection and a glimpe of the wonderful ceiling <please click to enlarge>

You can see more of and read about the history of this church in the links below:-

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • John Thomas Neville 1878 – 1953: directly connected to the church, Great Grandson of Edward King 1878 -1953 amd Great Grand Uncle of our lead researcher)

All Saints Church, Calbourne: A possitive change in the weather bought us to the little church of All Saints in Calbourne, although extensive roof repairs are being carried out we were still able to wander around inside. The church is set atop a ‘hill’ amidst picturesque rolling countryside. The church is medieval with the tower being rebuilt in 1752; its churchyard contains the commonwealth war graves of two British soldiers of World War 1. The church is built with Isle of Wight stone rubble with some flintwork and tiled roofs. The church is grouped with Holy Spirit Church, Newtown.

 

In the middle part of the church extensive roof repairs are being carried out and thus there was scaffolding up inside and out, yet we were still able to gain good access and take some unusual as well as general shots and a good video too.

 

You can hear much more about the church and its metaphysical and Craft connected history and further facts that relate to mythology by linking to our video below…

St Thomas Newport & All Saints Calbourne

 

 

Further shots that relate to the windows, the ‘spinning wheel’ and an unusual plaque tucked on a window ledge to the left of the altar and of course the Neville shield…

 

We were not able to gain access to the graveyard due to the health and safety reasons of the scaffolding being up but one can see an alternative view of the spinning wheel from the outside  <please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • A full Neville connection with McAndrew
  • A full connection to Robert McAndrew 1829 – 1879 (3 x Great Uncle to our head researcher) born in Elgin and died at Calbourne

Read more about the building and its construction here:

 

Holy Trinity Church, Cowes: This church at the popular seaside resort of Cowes has a very commanding position directly overlooking the sea but sadly on this occasion the church was well and truly closed to us, so a quick wander around its perimeter to take some quick shots for the record was all we could muster.

 

The church is situated on the north-east side of the Isle of Wight; the town of Cowes is world famous for its yachting and other sea-side related activities. Holy Trinity Church was conscecrated on midsumers day in 1832 by Bishop Sumner, the Bishop of Winchester as a ‘place of worship on Cowes foreshore for the sailors and seafarers’. The church was built in distintive yellow Isle of Wight brick in the Gothic style. The building was designed by Mr William Bramble of Portsmouth. In 1862 the church was enlarged by the addition of a Chancel and Sanctury. One of the penalties of being so close to the sea is that the land underneath the building tends to move. During the past year extensive works have been carried out to stabilise the buliding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Cowes

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • Maurice Neville: 1915 – 1990 (2 x cousin, twice removed to our head resercher)

 

 

Our intrepid researchers chilling out on the sea-front in Cowes; and yes after all that snow and ice it really was that glorious!

St Mildred’s Church Whippingham: It had turned into a stunningly gorgeous and sunny day when we arrived at Whippingham; who could have guessed that two days earlier the island had been covererd in a blanket of snow and ice and at one point we had to have assistance to get our vehicle up an icy slope! As we drove up to the church it looked a picture in the glorious sunshine set amidst its beautiful grounds.

 

The village of Whippingham and the church are best known for their connection with Queen Victoria. Whippingham was the centre of a royal estate supporting Osborne House and Barton Manor. Queen Victoria always took  close interest in ‘her people’ at Whippingham. This fact is reflected in the many memorials in St Mildred’s Church which commemorate members of the royal family and household. The chancel of the church was built in 1854/55 by the architect Albert Jenkins Humbert, although Prince Albert is thought to have had a guiding hand. The remainder of the church was constructed in 1861/62; a side chapel is dedicated to the Battenberg/Mountbatten family. Sadly the church was shut, so no interior shots but you can discover more in the links below:

However we did manage to see some rather interesting carvings and windows from the outside of the church, indicating very strongly the Craft connection here. The carvings around the entrance porch were particularily fascinating as they point towards an Enochian connection (the root/route of Craft), the windows depict the ten pillars and above the archway a square and compass is very evident, showing ‘one point still in darkness’ telling a tale of masonic and templar connections to this church.

 

<Please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodine Connection here is:

  • Robert Neville: 1907 – 1969 (2 x cousin twice removed to our lead reasearcher)

 

 

At the end of a very busy and revealing day; time to unwind with the sun and the views and all that St Mildred’s Church and the beautiful Isle of Wight has to offer

DAY FIVE: All Saints Church, Ryde and homeward bound…  So our last day on the beautiful Isle of Wight had arrived all too quickly and yet just one final destination before we ventured forth on the ferry and over the seas back to England. All Saints Church is a parish church located in Ryde; not very far away from where we were staying. The building is a landmark of the island; the spire being visable from many points around the island and indeed even from the mainland itself, projecting beyond the very skyline.

 

Although the church has lost a lot of its sacred energies it does still contain some beautiful carvings and artworks, all of which are well worth a look at. The church, which is often referred to as the ‘Cathedral of the Island‘ is a grade two listed building. It was built between 1868 and 1872 by the architect George Gilbert Scott; the spire was an addition in 1881/82 and is climbed early on the Feast of Ascension to sing an Ascension hymn. There are some lovely stained-glass windows here including one dedicated to the memory of Samuel Poole, in the Chapel of the Good Shepherd, but many windows were destroyed in the second world war.

 

The carvings around the font show a merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, a simple carved cross also utilises the merkabah and one can see other artworks here too:

Bloodline Connection is:

  • Alfred Neville (1904 – 1997) 2nd cousin 2 x removed to our head researcher)

 

 

The Isle of Wight proved to be an island of revelations and surprises and provided us with many more dots to connect on our quests for the true bloodlines, but what does that actually means and why….?

Please stay connected with us for our next quest to Ireland, Quest 25, going back to the start….

 

The Keeper of Scrolls March 2018: email me for further info ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

“A perfumed tree, how sweet the smell… But a fruitful tree is far from wells,

Doth carry the roseline from land to air, then once to the four winds as all do stare”

 

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