Category: Knight Templar


What a fantastic day to finally escape into the countyside on Quest 31a, squeezed in unexpectedly as we carefully move out of lockdown. We last quested a whole year ago and due to covid restrictions all the quests have been put on hold, so it was wonderful to finally be out and about in Norfolk on the 31st March 2021!

The main subject of todays quest is the Batram Bloodline: ‘the Brandenburg Batrams’, a line and a name with many mysterious meanings, which will take us back into Europe, to Italy and Gemany in particular, on our Quest for the Grail and it’s meaning upon this earthly plane.

Bartram, Battram, Barthram, are the main surnames associated with the German origin of ‘Bertram’, which means ‘Famous Raven’. The Famous Raven is often referred to as the ‘Phoenix’. Very interesting topics of discusion and research are beginning to reveal themselves here. Brandenburg is just West of Berlin and the origins of this Bartram line.

🌹⚜⚔🌹

QUEST 31a: All Saints Church, Dickleburgh, Diss: It was a gorgeous and sunny spring day and the drive out to Norfolk could not have been better, with green shoots and leaves spurting forth with new growth, and the sound of birdsong all around these quiet country lanes. The Parish of Dickleburgh is found about 6 miles north-east from Diss, close to the Norfolk/Suffolk border. It lies on the old Roman road to Caistor St Edmunds. Dickleburgh is well serviced, with All Saints Church, a busy little village store, a pub, a large playing field and other village type amenities.

The village’s name either means ‘Dicel’s or Dicla’s fortification’, or more specifically could also mean a place-name; Dic-leah, ‘wood/clearing of Diss’ or ‘ditch wood/clearing’. The name is also said to derive from an Irish monk by the name of Dicul who had a brief settlement (burgh) in the area in the late 6th century, nothing of which survives today. Although unconfirmed, this may be the same Dicul monk quoted by the Venerable Bede (673-735) in his “Ecclesiastical History of the Anglian Nation”. He tells the story of the conversion of the South Saxons and mentions the Irish monk, Dicul, who had a small monastery in ‘Boshanhamm’, which today is Bosham in Chichester, West Sussex. Dickleburgh is part of the parish of Dickleburgh and Rushall in the county of Norfolk and District of South Norfolk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dickleburgh

The church is 500 years old and has interestingly been in the patronage of Trinity College, Cambridge since the seventeenth century. It is a grade one listed building, built around 1503 and of course a sacred site was there long before the actual building. It seemed to a very lively church, important to the community, and the folks tending the church and graveyard could not have been more helpful and freindly.

It was the Bartram line we were researching on this day, and straight away the family tombstones revealed themselves to us! <click to enlarge>

The church consists of a chancel, nave, vestry, west tower and south porch. The walls are made of flint and freestone quoins and execpt for the tower, are strengthened with buttresses.

There is a new and impressive looking organ inside and a stunningly beautiful east window containing many musical-intrument playing angels, and a transfiguration of the ascension scene plus other figures from the bible. The octagonal font is of particualar interest, especially to us, for Grail clues are hidden there…. Although what the genreal public sees are the shields of the Holy Trinty, Bury Abbey (with three crowns), the Passion, (with cross, spear, reed with sponge, nails and whip) and the blessed sacrement (with three chalices). Around the base are alternating lions and ‘wildmen’ with clubs.

Upon the ornate entrance to the church are more important and useful symbols for joining more of the dots of our quests.

The church has a lot of its original woodwork, a beautiful east window full of detail and a rather interesting screen at the end of the altar pews, upon the various plaques and lists upon the inside walls are to be found the Batram names,  and of course a very lovely and peaceful energy there. There are a few military references both in and outside the church. So what a good start to the day with much knowledge gained.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Samuel Bartram 1726-1801 (7xGGF)
  • Barnabus Bartram 1795-1878 (5xGGF)
  • Henry Bartram 1826-1909 (4xGGF) Moved to Barnet, Middlesex-thus the start of the ‘London Line’

St John the Baptist Church Bressingham: Our second visit of the day was to the village and civil parish of Bressinham in Norfolk. The name Bressingham is of Anglo-Saxon origin and refers to the homestead of Briosa’s people. This town of Bressingham was given by Osulph le Sire, and the lady Laverine, or Leofrine, his wife, to the abbey of St. Edmund’s in Bury in about 963. By the time of Edward the Confessor, the abbey owned slightly more than half the town; the rest being owned by Almar, the Bishop of Elmham. Almar’s part was also a manor, and held in William the Conquerors time by Roger Bigod, 1st Earl of Norfolk.  The town was then two miles long, and a mile and a half broad, it extended at that time into Shimpling, Fersfield, Shelfhanger and Roydon.

Sadly we were unable to gain access to inside the church, although we could have phoned for private prayer but decided to move on. The link below has a good selection of photos for you and an interesting write up too.

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/bressingham/bressingham.htm

The origins of the church date from around 1286; it being a medieval parish church dating mainly from the 14th and 15th centuries. It has an important set of carved pews, which probably date from he 16th century, act of mercy. The chancel is 13th century with the tower being rebuilt in the 1440s, the nave and aisles in 1480-1527; these may incorporate the 14th century very fine carved nave roof. The chancel roof is 18th century with a 19th century restoration. The important set of pews mentioned, have carved end panels in a 16th century style featuring defaced figures representing acts of mercy and deadly sins. The boxed pews are examples of 17th century woodwork.

Interestingly one of the tombs in the graveyard caught our eyes. For it had a rather Roman style and feel to it, with two pillars at each end that alluded to Boaz and Joachim. In the central area were the ‘four quarters of the sun’ something very rarely mentioned, and yet the design could also be shells – a Fisher King connection maybe and worth some more research. Also in the window of this historic church was to be found the enigmatic ‘Raven Symbol’, almost signposting the way to Germany for us….

The tomb with the Fisher King and Roman Connection <please click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Jonathan Bartram 1699(Billingford) – 1783(Dickleford) with an association to Bressinham (8xGGF)

St Mary the Virgin Church Pulham St Mary: Now at our third church of the day, we were really enjoying being out in the sunshine, and having a lovely sense of freedom after being cooped up because of Covid for so long. However still being very safe with masks and santizers and of course always keeping our distance. Pulham Saint Mary is a small village and civil parish in Norfolk, about 8 miles from Diss. Old maps and documents name the parish or village “Pulham Saint Mary the Virgin”, the latter two words are in modern times dropped, and Saint is typically abbreviated. The earliest recorded spelling is Polleham. Pulham is referenced in the  Domesday Book as a single manor (Pulham St Mary with what is today called Pulham Market) and being part of the Earsham hundred. The name Pulham is thought to mean the farmhouse, homestead or enclosure by the pool, water meadow or stream. There is a ‘beck’ (Norfolk dialect for a small watercourse) that flows by both villages. The Romans may have had a settlement in Pulham St Mary as pieces of Roman tile, coin and oyster shells have been found in the area. In 1912 under conditions of secrecy a large base, RNAS Pulham, was constructed for the operation of airships, given the nickname locally of “Pulham Pigs”. RNAS Pulham operated as a Royal Navy base until 1918 when it was transferred to the new Royal Air Force.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulham_St_Mary

The Domesday book of 1080 mentions an Anglo Saxon church in Pulham, but there is no trace of it today. The church of St Mary the Virgin which gives the village the ‘St Mary’ of its name, is believed to date back from 1253. The parish church is of flint construction with parts that date back to the thirteenth century. It is mainly perpendicular in style, has a square tower with 8 bells, and was restored by Bodley in the late 19th century, although many of the original features still remain. The church registers date back to 1538. The impressive porch, built about 1478, was described by Nikolaus Pevsner as ‘something phenomenal’.  It is decorated with large figures of angels and other images and the pierced parapet is comparable to work at both Blythburgh and Attleborough churches.

We could not get inside the church to see the many interesting features inside, including a 15th/16th century stone font whose decoration was plastered over to prevent mutilation from Cromwell’s men and was only discovered during restoration in the late 19th century. The screen, partly medieval and partly restored, has large painted panels filled with 15th century images of the Apostles. The chancel is the oldest part of the church and contains some very important early English features including a double piscina in the south wall. It is thought to date from the 13th century and is very rare in Norfolk churches. Other notable features include the 15th century benches, a 16th century lectern and some glass dating back to the 14th century, indicating the fine windows that existed from a very early date. There is also evidence of the presence of the old Guild Chapel which once stood on the site of the present vestry. It was rebuilt in the centre of the village in 1401 and is now part of the Pennoyer Centre.

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/pulhamstmary/pulhamstmary.htm

But of the utmost importance and relevance to us of Craft, is the famous and stunning late 15th century porch and the ‘library’ of Craft information around the porch. The tower and porch work together to create a sense of grandeur, with many ‘riddles’ intertwined there in plain sight. The porch is actually magnificent, not least because it hides within its carvings some very important Grail clues. Hidden amongs the ranks of angels on one side holding shields, and angels with musical instruments within their niches on the other, could be hidden some of the most important clues we have yet experienced. The angels on the west side play wind instruments, while those to the east play stringed instruments. Pride of place, in the spandrels of the doorway, is the Annuciation, of the highest artistic quality and in amazing condition. Also aparently the stained glass windows in the porch have clues to the Grail, which sadly i missed on this occasion…

Just look above at this amazing porch and try to unravel all the clues hidden there…. <click to enlarge – you will really want to!>

The Grail is indeed a mystery and it has been so for many centuries; over the years it has been purported to be many things, such as the son of Christ, a chalice, or vessel of some description. But the truth is, the Grail was in fact never meant to be found, so the only person who would ever find the Grail, would be the winner of all space and time! Only time and further quests will tell…. So the Grail Quest continues, not only looking for the Grail itself but for the meaning of the Grail, something that is overlooked by many. What is interesting, at the front of the porch here is a link via the artefacts and engravings, that directly link this church to a church in North-East Italy, which we hope to go to sometime within the next year – coronavirus permitting of course. So a question remains which i will leave with you, is it not so much that people are so busy living full yet shallow lives that they know nothing of the Grail or is this how things are actually meant to be and the Grail is not meant to be found….?

   

A library of info above our heads….

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Erasmus Bartram 1768(Pulham Market) – 1854(Dis, Norfolk) (6xGGF)

St Peter Church Billingford: This is such a very pretty area, very green and lush, very open with lots of winding lanes and small villages and today the area looked stunning, although i imagine it could be harsh in wintertime. Billingford, a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk, about 3 12 miles north of East Dereham. The village is just north of the River Wensum, which forms the southern boundary of the parish. West of the village, between Elmham Road and the River Wensum, is the site of a Romana-British settlement. The site is unusual in having evidence that occupation continued into the early Anglo-Saxon period. Artefacts recovered from the site include a gold amulet. The Domesday Book of 1086 records the toponymas Billinge-forda. An entry for 1212 in the Boof of Fees records it as Billingeford. It is derived from Old English and means “the ford of Billa’s people”.

Lovely sentiment from the churches porch

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billingford,_Breckland

https://www.heritage.norfolk.gov.uk/record-details?TNF168-Billingford-(Breckland)-(Parish-Summary)

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/billingford/billingford2.htm

 

St Peter Church Billingford on an incline yet hidden away in a bend in the road, showing two ‘Clarke’ tomstones in the graveyard <click to enlarge>

The church is very much hidden away, standing on a hill to the north of the village and only presenting itself when almost upon it, in an interesting curve in the road. How lucky we were to find it open and to discover that it is usually always open; how wonderfully refreshing in these times. The earliest part of the church of St Peter is the baptismal font, which is 13th-century, yet the actual origins of the church are around 1300AD, and according to the records on the wall, there was a rector here in 1250, so the church is older than that. The present building is largely 14th-century, built of flint with an octagonal west tower and is a Grade 1 listed building. The tower is one of Norfolks half a dozen or so octagonal towers, with the church being mostly 14th century with a couple of later windows. Tall Victorian benches fill the middle of the nave, which although unusual is not unique, there is no central walkway, creating a different sense of feeling inside, together with the eastward slope.

 

Also unusual and much older than it looks, is the rather wonderful font with its sloping octagonal bowl and sides carved with sets of sixteen double arches. The font is said to be so old that it may even pre-date the church and have come from somewhere else or even from an earlier building on the site. Also wonderfully beautiful is the 16th century giant latten lecturn, depicting an eagle standing on an orb. Norfolk has ten of these and interestingly this is a rare unpolished one, creating a different effect to it. The east window here, showing the transfiguration has replaced a much larger one, which can be seen be the changes in the plasterwork. Sadly though there were many artifacts from the church that have ‘been lost in time’, probably do to rebellions, wars and attacks on the church, which sadly has happened a lot in the past. The whole church is very well preserved and one gets a true sense of the period, of the times, apart sadly from the artworks that have been removed. One cant help but wonder, where in the world today are all these wonderful and meaningful peices of art that have been removed from our churches. I did notice when travelling in Ireland and Europe that the churches there are still full of their wonderful and ancient peices of art that allude to a time of a much different christianity than of today and which display clues to a much deeper and maybe even darker kind of worship. An interesting thought then at why maybe ancient artworks are no longer in our churches….

In respect of the quest bloodlines, there is a ‘Charles Ford’ on the wooden wall plaque near the font; the Fords as we know eventually ended up in London. There is much original woodwork in the church and some very old carvings around the high altar, all in an amazing state of preservation and the video below shows all this up very well. The church name banner hanging at the side of the altar shows the Alpha to Omega, but also the ‘M U’ sign, taking one back to the Sumerian connection. Upon the altar i think we translated the words wrongly and it actually is “My Peace I Give Unto You”- see the photo or video and decide for your selves.

Woodwork and carvings all amazingly presevered and give an essence of ‘past time and place’

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Jonathan Batram 1695(Billingford) – 1783(Dickleburgh) (8xGGF)

Church of St Mary Magdalene Beetly: Beetley is a village and civil parish in the Breckland district of Norfolk and situated four miles north of Toftwood. Beetley was part of the Manor of Elmham, held by William Beaufoe, Bishop of Thetford, with the name deriving from the two Anglo Saxon words betel and bietel, both words applying to a clearing where wooden mallets are made. Beetley was then part of the parish of Bittering Magna, however the Parish divided into Beetley and Gressenhall. Beetley was then combined together with the neighbouring parish of East Bilney in 1935.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beetley

Sadly we could not gain access to the church, even though the Rectory was just next door, so a stroll around the graveyard needed to suffice. The Church is believed to be built on the site mentioned in the Doomsday Book (1087) and is dated to 1320, with it’s origins going back to 1401 AD. It is a grade 1 listed building and like many of these ancient churches, seemingly tucked away off the beaten track. The tower of the church was heightened in the 16th Century, with the north isle being demolished in the 18th century and with windows being installed in the wall. It is built of ashlar and some brick dressings. From the photos online the church looks very simple in decor inside, but apart from that without going inside it is hard to comment. In the graveyard were some tombs within cast-iron railings, one of which was a Templar grave marked by a mysterious and intriging ‘Templar Stone’ The church is said to be set on a interesting ‘Cross-Junction’ of magnetic fields, linking to the Grail and to that of Brandenburg in Germany. Sadly howerver we did not pick up on any energy at all there, so can only assume the particular ‘energy’ that was there, is now no longer so.

The fenced off graves showing the mysterious’Templar Stone…. <click to enlarge>

https://www.derehamanddistrictteam.org.uk/our-churches73257/st-mary-magdalen-beetley/

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/beetley/beetley.htm

Grail Bloodline Connections: The connections here are that of the Grail itself and of the clues today that presented themselves to us, guiding us on our forthcoming journey and quest to Germany and Italy, where can jin some more of those hidden dots…..

 

For more info and footage from the day please see our youtube link 🙂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdbbwNYJQhg

To those of us whom are observant, especially of Craft, feathers can often appear out of nowhere, bringing deep and profound messages from the angelic realms, whom are always watching, always observing…

🌹⚜⚔🌹

April 2021 The Quests continue….

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Quest 31 around the west country of England has proved so far, to have been an amazing quest, despite the very challenging hot weather when we were so thankful for the air conditioning in the car. All the apartments we stayed in have been more than up to scratch, and the places visited and the  knowledge gained has been second to non, life altering and path afirming. One more day then home: lots to write up on, as you see here. I do hope all of you will continue to follow and learn with me as i share knowledge and photos galore. As said, all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time: past, present and future becoming one. Knowledge becomes personal power, when mysteries unravel and ancient codes reveal their truths to the ones whom can truly see….  All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it seems….”

‘BENEATH A ROCK ALIVE’

Day Six Wednesday 5th August: Church of St Mary, Templecombe: We left our lovely apartment in Plymouth to travel to pastures new and more adventures. It was to be a long day of traveling through counties galore it seemed! Intercepted by a lovely visit to Simouth Old Fore Street for lunch and retail therapy and then traveling onwards to the Templar church at Templecombe, which yet again was very sadly shut; such a shame as it is a very interesting church with a particular important artifact to be seen inside. Even more of a shame given the church’s Templar history (see below). It has to be said, that yet again G-ds doors were shut to true pilgrims on a sacred journey, something that is becoming all too familiar. No wonder G-d has abandoned this planet! Sacred sites with no access – it makes one wonder! One wonders how the christian church can survive in these times, for they are seemingly still in the ‘dark ages’ and need to move with the times and find ways of inspiring people to attend – which they certainly won’t do with all their doors locked! Mosques for example, are open 24/7 and are full of attendees!

Old Fore Street and Coastline, Sidmouth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth

Templecombe is a village in Somerset five miles south of Wincaton, 12 miles east of Yeovil and 30 miles west of Salisbury with a population of 1,560, forming along with Combe Throop, the parish of Abbas and Templecombe. Templecombe derives its name from Combe Templariorum, after the Knights Templar who established Templecoombe Preceptory in the village in 1185. After they were suppressed in 1312 it was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem who held it until the Dissolution of the Monastries after which it was acquired by Richard Duke of Otterton, Devon. An attempt to discover ‘the village of the templars’ was made by the ‘Time Team’ television series, in a programme first shown in 1996. Late in the investigation, an old tithe map revealed the location of the Templar site, and an old stone boundary wall was found to be still standing seven feet high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templecombe

Photos from outside of St Mary’s Templecombe; showing what could have been if we were allowed inside… <click to enlarge>

The Anglican Church of St Mary at Templecombe, Somerset was built in the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building. The parish is part of the benefice of Abbas and Templecombe, Henstridge and Horsington. The church was probably established during the period when the manor was held by Shaftesbury Abbey, but granted to the Knights Templar while it was held by his descendant Serlo FitzOdo, who established a preceptory in the village in 1185. The preceptory served as an administrative centre for the lands held by the Templars in the south west of England and Cornwall. It may also have been used to train men and horses for the Crusades. After the Knights Templar were suppressed following the 1307 order by Pope Clement IV, it was granted to the Knights of St John, who held it until the dissolution of the monastries. Parts of the original 12th-century church remain, the foundations being Saxon, but it underwent a major Victorian restoration in the 19th century, including a rebuilding of the chancel plus a new  vestry.

In the church is a painting on wooden boards of a head, (see photos above) which was discovered in the roof of an outhouse of a local building in 1945. The painting is thought to be from the 13th century, with a connection to the Templecoombe Preceptory (or Combe Templariorum) which was established in the village in 1185. It was given to the church in 1956. For many years the head has been believed to be that of Christ without the halo which was the norm in religious iconography at the time. The Knights Templar were suppressed partly because of their use of the image of Christ without the halo. There has been speculation linking the image to the Shroud of Turin and other suggestions link to the image being of John the Baptist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Mary,_Abbas_and_Templecombe

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Desposyni (520-593) France. 48 x GGF of the Fordham Line.

After an interesting day of visits and travel we arrived at our cosy flat in the suburbs of Southampton, not far from the docks and our home for the next three nights!

‘OF BATTLES DRAWN’

Day Seven Thursday 6th August: St Mary’s Church, Southampton: It was already a sweltering hot morning when we arrived at St Mary’s Church, Southhampton, so we were very pleased to find the doors open and a welcoming coolness greeting us inside. Sadly due to ‘Miss Rona’ and our churches being habitually shut to pilgrims, we are always delighted when we are able to find welcoming open doors, and so it was with St Marys; a chuch full of life and vigor and being part of the modern times with a very forward thinking attitude. A vibrant church totally living in the times with much going on and an increasing attendance, all down to Adam the facillitator of the site whom has bought his enthusiasm and possitive vibes to the church! A huge lesson to be learned by many of those whom are connected to churches on many levels.

Southampton is a city in Hampshire, 70 miles south-west of London and 15 miles west of Portsmouth A major port close to the New Forest, it lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water, at the confluence of the River Test and Itchen with the River Hamble joining to the south. The history of the area has always been influenced by the sea and rivers. Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

St. Mary’s Church, is a Church of England parish church, and the largest church in the port city of Southampton. This is the mother church to this former county town with its forerunners spanning back to the first Saxon settlements of the 7th century, including a major collegiate church of the European Middle Ages dedicated to the same patron saint. Parts of the church date to the 1880s. Interestingly, in 1914 the sound of its church bells inspired the song, ‘The Bells of St Mary’s’, originally recorded in 1919 by Frances Alda and later sung by Bing Crosby in a film of the same name. The church has listed building status expressly due to its church tower and spire being local landmarks. The interior and walls were gutted in World War II and rebuilt in 1954-6 save for the tower, which was architect designed. There have been up to six other churches on the site, with records entered in the Domesday ook.

The interior is very well looked after with one of the largest organs in South-East England. The church is full of some very interesting artifacts and has a collection of some stunning windows full of meaning, that tell an ancient tale or two.. We were shown around by Adam, a lovely guy, whom considers himself as a facilitator and certainly has his finger on the pulse as far as having a very modern approach, and thus increasing the congregation in leaps and bounds.

Many seafaring references are to be found within the church with an interesting plaque dedicated to the memory of the musicians whom perished on the Titanic, one of whom was of the Craft bloodlines we are documenting; especially poignant to our own head researcher, for this was his own relative on board the Titancic on that fateful night….

Some of the often poignant seafaring references to be found in St Mary’s Church, Southampton <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Mary%27s_Church,_Southampton

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • James Fordham (1697) Ware, Herts  9 x GGF of the Fordham line

Christchurch Priory Christchurch:  A lovely treat as this was not on our official list for today! It was an extremely hot day and we both struggled in the heat, and once again we were very thankful for the air-con in the car. So yes this church was a treat indeed, not on our list but very much a part of our quest and lovely to find it open. A wonderful experience here with so much amazing symbology within the building, telling tales of past truths, still relevant in today’s world; some stunning windows too which were so so full of meaning. Very nice too, to see clear documented reference to the Neville line – the main bloodline of our quests and an extremely important bloodline within history.

Christchurch is a town and civil parish in Dorset which adjoins Bournemouth to the west, with the new Forest to the east. Founded in the seventh century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour, which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the Priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port, and was later fortified. During the 18th and 19th centuries it had a colourful history with smuggling! The town’s harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch,_Dorset

Christchurch Priory is an ecclesiastical parish and former priory church in Christchurch in Dorset. It is one of the longest parish churches in the country and is larger than many English Anglican Cathedrals. The story of Christchurch Priory goes back to at least the middle of the 11th century, as the Domesday Book of 1086 says there was a priory of 24 secular canons here in the reign of Edward the Confessor. The Priory is on the site of an earlier church dating from 800AD. In 1094 a chief minister of William II, Ranulf Flambard, began the building of a church. Local legend has it that Flambard originally intended the church to be built on top of St Catherines Hill, but during the night all the building materials were mysteriously transported to the site of the present priory. By about 1150 there was a basic Norman church consisting of a nave, a central tower and a quire extending eastwards from the crossing. It was during this period that another legend originated, that of the miraculous beam. The legend of the miraculous beam dates to the early 12th century. The story is that a beam was found to have been cut too short when it was hoisted into place. This would have been embarrassing for the carpenters since the wood was expensive and would be difficult to replace. There was however a mysterious carpenter who had worked and eaten alone. The following day the carpenters returned and found the beam was now fitted in place. The unknown carpenter was never seen again, and the story came to be that it was Jesus Christ who had intervened. The church became Christ’s Church in commemoration of the event. The miraculous beam can be seen today and is located in the Priory’s ambulatory.

The church is full of interesting artifacts including a framed family tree chart mentioning Cicily Neville <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch_Priory

Some of the many stunning windows inside the church <click to enlarge>

   

‘OF  KINGS ATTUNED’

St James Church Poole: After a welcomed lunch alongside the river at Christchurch we felt refreshed and cooled down but sadly the next port of call on this very hot day, St Jame’s Church in Poole was closed to us, so just a few photos from outside was all we managed.

Poole is a large coastal town and seaport in Dorset, 21 miles east of Dorchester and adjoining Bournemouth to the east. Human settlement in the area dates back to before the Iron Age. The earliest recorded use of the town’s name being in the 12th century when the town began to emerge as an important port, prospering with the introduction of the wool trade, later becoming one of the busiest ports in Britain. In the Second World War, Poole was one of the main departing points for the Normandy landings. Poole is a busy tourist resort with it’s large natural harbour and beautiful beaches. The town is a commercial port with both freight and passenger ferry services, connecting to Jersey, Guernsey, as well as to Saint-Malo in Brittany, where we had visited on Quest 28. The town’s name derives from a corruption of the Celtic word bol and the Old English word pool meaning a place near a pool or creek. The area around modern Poole has been inhabited for the past 2,500 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poole

St James is a Church of England parish church in Poole on the south coast of Dorset, originally built in 1142. The church is located in the historic quarter of the town, near Poole Quay. It is the parish church for the St James sub district of Poole. The church has long been associated with the local fishing trade and is known locally as ‘the fishermen’s church’. The church has an unusual weather vane fashioned in the shape of a fish. The church was mostly rebuilt around 1820, in Georgian style. The church is seen as a good example of English Georgian religious architecture and it is designated it a Grade II listed building. But without gaining access there is not really much else to mention.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James%27_Church,_Poole

https://stjameschurchpoole.weebly.com/history.html

Grail Bloodline Connections: 

  • Lieut. Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

Before leaving Poole we spent a lovely time relaxing by the historic quayside; it was like a south of France day!

SOLDIERS WARS’

Nothe Fort Barrack Weymouth: Although the fort was closed by the time we arrived, the grounds around the outside overlooking the sea were just stunning, so it was enjoyable wandering around and relaxing there, despite the heat. Located at the entrance to Weymouth Harbour and overlooking Portland Harbour, the Nothe Fort was built between 1860-1872 to protect the Naval Harbour at Portland.

Weymouth is a seaside town in Dorset, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel.  The town is 7 miles south of Dorchester 5 miles north of the Isle of Portland. Weymouth is a tourist resort, situated halfway along the Jurassic Coast; a World Heritage Site important for its geology and landforms. The stunning harbour has cross-channel ferries, and is home to both pleasure boats and private yachts. The history of the borough stretches back to the 12th century, including it’s involvement in the spread of the Black Death, it was also a major departure point for the Normandy Landings. King Henry VIII had two Device Forts built to protect the south Dorset coast from invasion in the 1530s: Sandsfoot Castle in Wyke Regis and Portland Castle in Castletown. Parts of Sandsfoot have fallen into the sea due to coastal erosion. During the English Civil War, around 250 people were killed in the local Crabchurch Conspiracy in February 1645.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weymouth,_Dorset

Situated at the end of the Nothe Peninsula, jutting eastwards from the town of Weymouth and Weymoth Harbour; the coastal defence at the site was built between 1860 and 1872 by 26 Company of the Royal Engineers, to protect Portland and Weymouth Harbours, with Portland becoming an important Royal Navy base. Shaped like the letter D, the fort was built with bomb-proof casemates and deep magazines. Work began on the Nothe Fort in 1860 and the first soldiers to be staioned there were No 2 Battery Royal Artillery (Tatton-Browns) The fort was abandoned in 1956 as it was no longer required as a coastal defence and then used by the Royal Navy as stores, before being purchased by the local council in 1961. It is now a museum and remains one of the best-preserved forts of its kind in the country. The fort and its outer gateway have been Grade II listed since 1974. It’s fusee steps, located in Nothe Gardens, have been Grade II listed since 2000; constructed for hauling trolleys transporting ammunition, spares and stores from the quay to Nothe Fort. In 1978, the Nothe Fort, tramway and searchlight battery at The Nothe, also became scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

https://nothefort.org.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothe_Fort

See our video below of the Fort and beautiful surrounding scenery!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-3JA2vuILY

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • William Henry Fordham (1832) Lewes, Sussex  3 x GGF

AND KNIGHTS THAT FALL’

Day Eight Friday 7th August: St Pauls Church Ringwood: Today was to prove to be an overwhelmingly hot August Day; a bit too much for me in fact, yet we made our way towards our first destination of the day. Sadly again the church was shut, so a stroll around the outside had to suffice with some interesting roof-dwelling creatures looking down upon us!  The church stands in the market place and is an important landmark, the tower being visible from the top of the hill at picket post on the A31 some three miles east of Ringwood, as well as from high ground at Ibsley Common in the Forest.

Ringwood is a bustling market town in south-west Hampshire, located on the River Avon, close to the New Forest, northeast of Bournemouth and southwest of Southampton. It was founded by the Anglo-Saxons, and a weekly market has been held there since theMiddle Ages. Ringwood is recorded in a charter of 961, in which King Edgar gave 22 hides of land in Rimecuda to Abingdon Abbey. The name is also recorded in the 10th century as Runcwuda and Rimucwuda. The second element Wuda means a ‘wood’, Rimuc may be derived from Rima meaning ‘border’, hence ‘border wood.’ The name may also refer to Ringwood’s position on the fringe of the New Forest, or on the border of Hampshire.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringwood

The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 of 1086. It was rebuilt in the 13th century and survived until 1853, when it was completely knocked down and rebuilt. We could not get inside to discover it’s history or find much on the internet apart from a few bits as bobs, such as the church containing a 15th-century monumental brass of John Prophete, Dean of Hereford and York. The church was built of rough dressed squared Swanage stone, limestone dressings with a plain tile roof and is of a cruciform plan. It is a tall restrained church in late Early English/early Decorated style.  Interestingly, according to the internet, the patron of the parish church of St Peter & St Paul is the Dean of King’s college, Cambridge.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

TO MOTHER’S WOMB’

St Marys Church Ringwood: A deceptively simple looking grade I listed building set way back at the end of a wide spacious bricked pathway, but with the unusual feature of a large blue sundial set above the entrance to the church, which looked uncannily like a pyramid! The church, which is actually in the small village of Ellingham, west of the New Forest, has a very pretty garden graveyard around the back and some very attractive brickwork on the building itself. Ellingham is most famous for the story of Alice Lisle, who’s tomb can be found inside the church, and whom was executed by the infamous Judge Jeffreys in 1685, on the charge of harbouring fugitives after the defeat of the Monmouth Rebellion. Ellingham church was built in the 13th century. It is thought that there was an earlier, probably Saxon, church on the site. It is described in early charters as the church of St Mary or as the church of All Saints with the chapel of St Mary. It was added to in the 15th century, and the red-brick west wall was rebuilt in 1746. The church was restored in 1869-90 by Thomas Graham Jackson It has a large blue sundial located over the porch of the church.

St Mary’s Church Ringwood, showing it’s wonderful sundial/pyramid, its pretty graveyard and attractive brickwork <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellingham,_Hampshire

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

‘IN SALISBURY A WIND DID FALL’

St Marks Church Salisbury: Sadly once again the church was closed, so we had to make do with a walk around the outside of the building. Salisbury is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, at the confluence of the rivers Avon, Nadder and Bourne. The city is approximately 20 miles from Southampton and 30 miles from Bath; both of which we have visited on this quest. Salisbury is in the southeast of Wiltshire, near the edge of  Salisbury Plain. Of course the area is very well-known for Stonehenge, which has no Craft significance at all, but there are a lot of history and archaeological findings connected the whole area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury

The church is in quite a built up area on a junction with roads traversing around, yet it nevertheless has a spacious and pretty garden graveyard. Even though it was closed, the church is said to be an active church in Sailsbury. It was built in 1892–94 to the designs of Joseph A. Reeve and has been a Grade II listed building since 1974. St Mark’s was built to serve the northern region of Salisbury, which at a time was undergoing much residential expansion; the foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rev. Edward White Benson, on 27 April 1892, accompanied by the Bishops of Salisbury, St Asaph and Truro. St Mark’s exterior is faced with stone from the Hurdcott Quarries, with dressings and window tracery in Doulting stone. Around the exterior of the building are some interesting additions to the architecture, so although we could not gain access we still managed some interesting photos.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mark%27s_Church,_Salisbury

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Sir John H Fordham (1432) Kelshall, Hertfordshire  18 x GGF

THE ROMANS HAD THEIR WAY’

Day Nine Saturday 8th August: St Mary the Virgin Church Gosport: Due to the very intense heat of the last two days, i was too poorly to participate in this day’s agenda, so we changed some of our planned visits and thus my dear Craft brother ventured out on his own. This church turned out to be very relevant to him and he took some great photos too. There is hardly anything on the internet on this church apart from it being an ancient, Grade I-listed church of Rowner, considerably extended twice in the late 20th century, in the 1960’s and again in the 1990’s, to considerable acclaim from architectural writers. It is a Norman church and the oldest building left standing in Gosport. it was extended in the Early English style with Victorian additions added after restoration. There are apparently some fine monuments in the church, including a rare limestone Sepulchre altar tomb to John Brune dated 1559.

Gosport is a town in Hampshire on the south coast of England, situated on a peninsula on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour, opposite the city of Portsmouth, linked by the Gosport Ferry. Until the last quarter of the 20th century, Gosport was a major naval town associated with the defence and supply infrastructure of Her Majesty’s Naval Base Portsmouth. There is a great sea-faring and naval tradition in the whole area, much of which is reflected in the churches and cathedrals, especially in the stained-glass windows. The name Gosport, is purported to derive its name from ‘goose’, but  an alternative etymology of ‘gorse’ is not supported by the regional name for this plant, “furze”. A third theory, claiming a derivation from “God’s Port” is believed to be a 19th-century invention, and yet this is the slogan of Gosport as seeen upon its emblem. The Rowner area of the peninsula was settled by the Anglo Saxons and is mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle as Rughenor (rough bank or slope). Both Rowner and Alverstoke, the name coming from the point where the River Alver entered the Solent at Stokes Bay, were included in the Domesday Book. Rowner was the earliest known settlement of the peninsula, with many Mesolithic finds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosport

 

St Mary the Virgin Church with gravestones relating to the Clarke bloodline…

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Baron George Neville (1440) Aberga 14 x GGF

All in all a marvelous quest-listen to Karl sharing the bloodlines and chewing the cud!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_k8KuzYV2s&t=5s

“So thus this marvelous and amazing quest has come to an end, and because of the infamous ‘Miss Rona’ we will be enforced to take a sabbatical from roaming for the time being. Memories are very sweet and long lasting though, and will more than treasured over the winter months with so much to mull over and to continue to digest and learn from, in some cases until the end of time.

During my time as Craft i have given up all my past beliefs. It has been very freeing, they were nothing but manmade chains around my soul. Religions are all a form of control. One can still enjoy all the many myths as good old stories, for hidden within them one can still find the truth if one has faith and looks hard enough, just as in life too, one can, if loyal and steadfast and with faith discover the truth and the Grail….

and so the Grail Quest continues…..”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

AKA Reverend Janis

AKA ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

December 2nd 2020

QUEST 29: MARCH 2020

It is always so exciting to go on a surprise quest and Quest 29 into Suffolk was most certainly that! It was March 29th and a gorgeous springtime day, a bit chilly but the sky was blue and clear; it was also just before ‘lockdown’ in the UK and so upon looking back i was doubly glad we were able to get out and about when we did. Suffolk is a beautiful area of East Anglia with many pretty, unspoilt villages and beautiful old churches too, with many surpises when it comes to our quests. The churches we visited were of course all Knight Templar related, all a part of, and with connections to our grail quest; the whole area being part of a large Roman encapement in its day.

  • All Saints Church Icklingham
  • Saint James Church Icklinham
  • All Saints Church Wordwell
  • Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish

 

All Saints Church Icklington: The church is set in a pretty landscaped area with wide views across the countryside. All Saints Church is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. It is of Norman and English Gothic architectural style built in the fourteenth century. The church stands in the highest point in the village, adjacent to the A1101 road between Mildenhall and Bury St Edmunds; this was formerly the ancient trackway of the Roman Empire, the Icknield Way, in 120AD. The church was almost completely rebuilt in the 14th century with a south porch added in the 15th century. Sadly the church has been unused for over 100 years, being declared redundant in the 1970s. The roof has been re-thatched in the traditional manner with the rest of the church being constructed in flint rubble with freestone dressing. Read more about the church below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints%27_Church,_Icklingham

The church has a wonderful feel to it when one enters, no surprise as Icklingham has a important connection to our previous quest to Autun in France. Obviously there was a huge Roman presence in Autun too, which you will know if you have read our previous quest, Icklingham would have been a pathway into East Anglia for the Romans. The whole area here was a very large Roman encampment with thousands and thousands of troops being present in 124 AD, reaching all the way up to Wordwell. It was not only an invasion, but a transformation of the whole area too.

 

The interior of All Saints Church Icklingham <click to enlarge>

There are some stunning medieval tyles on the floor, with very well peserved Templar Symbolism, some with ‘the flowers and the petals of life’ connecting to the Knight Templars, whom would certainly have used this church. We are looking at the year 1314 here, when Jaques de Molay was burnt at the stake; yet the Templars did flee from France to survive in other areas, and Icklingham was one such area where they recieved some kind of unofficial Sanctuary. The tiles on the floor are original and of course we did not walk on them, but they were amazing to see, one that caught our eye, had a great depth of detail on it, which can be seen in our video and photos.

 

The original floor tyles with Templar symbology

The church is still in an original, natural state and has not been ‘victorianised’ at all. It still has most of its original features from the thatched roof, the pulpit, the original spiral stairs (now leading nowhere) and even an old original wrought iron funeral cart with original wheels and spokes, still in working order. One can certainly imaging the pall-bearers pushing it along with its coffin on board, entering the service, with the noise of the iron wheels reverberating upon the stone floors, echoing throughout the chambers of the church. Nearby is a wonderful church organ by W. Howlett and Son, an item any musical person would simply love. Even though it could have done with a very good clean it did add to the ascetics of the church, rather than being of any functionality. The pews of course are original complete with by-gone graffitti, from a time when folks would have sat there in the church listening to the sermons of Reverend, one can well imagine bored tots sittng there and picking away at the wood. So much history here; so many stories to be told.

The recently thatched roof is beautifully crafted allowing straw to fall naturally to the ground, just as it would have all those many years ago. There is a fairly modern, yet lovely stained-glass window depicting two of the saints, with many theories abounding in the area as to who they actually are; our understanding is that they are James and Peter – James to the left and Peter to the right. Almost under the window is an original wooden built up pew, which one enters by a hinged and brackets door in order to be able to sit down, and with its high bible-rest in front, it is almost like being in the dock! The stone pulpit (or font) is also original and in good condition, save for a bit of wear and tear. We were unable to find the stone carvings we were interested in, neither on the inside or outside of the church, so sadly maybe they never survived the test of time. A very interesting church with lots of references to the Templars, the Roman Empire, but very importantly, let us not forget King Arthur himself. Our Templar history informs us that Lancelot Desposyni was in this area on his travels, journeying through the area, visiting St James Church. King Arthur and Lancelot, when one separates them from the ‘myths and legends‘, did not just travel to one area, they moved around, changing things, transforming things during the times that we know as the ‘Dark Ages’. An amazing church with many untold stories to tell…. This would have been the most ‘energetic’ church of the day.

DSC01193

Standing in front of the old funeral carts

See our video below to take a stroll inside the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH ICKLINGHAM

Saint James Church Icklinham: Sadly when we arrived at this church it appeared to be well and truly locked up and maybe closed for health and safety reasons , so just a quick write up with a few shots from outside. It looked a peaceful church on the outside with some important items for us to see inside, but in a fairly built up area and a shame it was closed.

 

 I am including a link which contains several photos of the interior of the church which we did not get to see: http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/icklingj.html

In brief, it is a Medieval Church, which has been restored, in an area where there would have been a Roman encampment on land occupied by the Romans in 120 AD. It would have been a Knights Templar preceptory in times past, 1066-1539 AD, even more reason to have been able to go inside. The Knights Templars did exist beyond the burning at the stake of Jaques de Molay in 1314. The namesake of the church St James, was the first disciple of Jesus and the patron saint of Spain, he was sadly executed by sword in 44 AD at Judea, Jerusalem and importantly was linked to Lancelot of Valencia, Spain.

All Saints Church Wordwell: After going slightly off course through the countryside and down a small lane, to end up at a completely different church, we finally arrived at this still out of the way church at Wordwell. All Saints is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage list for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conversation Trust. It was established in 1129 AD, prior to a Roman Empire encapement. The present church is a tiny Norman church, restored in the Victorian period and containing some superb medieval and Norman carvings.

‘Wordwell’ is an interesting name, with various meanings just crying out for some further research. All Saints Church at Wordwell still has its original construction; it was established at the time of the Templars, being used frequently by the Knights of the area at the time, and further going forwards into the midpoint of the thirteen hundreds, it was used as Sanctuary for the Templars, as they fled from Europe during the time of their demise, thus the church has so much history attached to it.

The church had a very nice feel to it, good energies were present. There were some interesting windows; one showed a triskellian and upon looking closer a pyramid within a petaled flower, shown in the form of a triangular pyramid ascending within a petaled flower, which is unusual. At first gance this could be seen as very masonic, but one must ask, which came first, the chicken or the egg? As we have learnt previously, the Freemasons were formed after the Knights Templars, lest we forget.

The old original church organ, here in the church with its big square paddles, is now being used as a table for leaflets, but it looks like it may be in good working order. However nearby and just above the organ, is indeed the prize catch of this church in every way, shape or form, in the form of a wonderful oiginal wall carving, which could almost be mistaken for being Sumerian, in style, being very reminiscent of the clay tablets. The people shown in the carving are of quite a short build; the carving having been viewed differently by different people over time; some folks thinking it is of St Catherine or the other saints, but it is non of them; there being other reasons for it being what it is. What is interesting is that the figures are both male, not as in male and female as often thought. One figure is holding a ring which is being given to the other male, but not in a context of marriage, more of in a binding ceremony, a binding with G-d context. A very interesting find indeed, of which one does not often get to see in an English church in this day and age. One cannot help but wonder why it is there and the full story behind it.

The interior of the church, showing the very unusual carving <please click to enlarge>

Moving around, the wooden pews are all beautifully carved with animals and folaige, and have aged wonderfully over the years. The atmosphere of the church, its age and how it has been set out certainly brings to mind that famous Knight Templar painting entitled ‘The Acolade’. The scene here before us, is very reminiscent of that particular painting with the steps acending as the Templar comes forward, to bow and drop three times before reaching the altar (thrice the times). The church is very well looked after and has very well preserved tyles on the floor, with many Galic symbols represented. One can see represented in the tyles;  earth, air, fire and water, with the most important symbols being fire and water, (south and west)  (the water and the fire), which gives us ‘pure light’. We know from history that the south-western quadrant is always the most important; in Masonic terms a candidate is asked ‘Why did you leave the west to travel east?‘ and later on on ‘Why did you leave the east to travel west?‘ The response would be ‘In search of Light in Craft’, however when they reach the west they dont find the Light in Craft because then, in the west, the candidates are later on informed in their degrees (from the 42nd degree upwards), that they need to head south to find the Light in Craft. They have to then journey from the east to the west, and thence instructed to go south, (south-west), which is most important, as it is the ‘pure-light’ of the compass-points.

There are some interesting restored artworks on the other window with a cow emblem at the top, albeit a very intricate stylised design, but i saw it clearly, although some may not see it at all. Also there is the ‘fan-fare‘ wheel in the window and a ‘triklesite’ aspect to the right and to the left. On the high altar is a lovely red and gold altar cloth with some nice old guilding from around the 1900’s, probably replaced at some point, but lovely non the less. At the back of the altar on the wall carvings, one can see the ‘flowers of life’, being the daisy and the tulip, there are other schools of thought on this subject, but this is correct. There are some wonderful quotes upon the wall behind the altar, one in particular from Exodus, see the photo below for the full quote.

Truth and religion in the UK today, has become a very flexible subject and often open to many interpretations, yet for those whom profess to follow the faith and the path; it says very clearly here, that thou shall have non other gods but me, no other gods, apart from G-d; we know already that there are angels and djinn, but no other gods which is very important to not forget. For a small church there is a lot going on here, a lot of history; this church being on a par I noticed, with the one we visited in Mepal recently on our Fenland Quest, the same level and size etc. Much to take away with us from this visit, much to pause and think about. This was probably the best church of the day from a conservation viewpoint, the most enigmatic church.

See our video below to take a stroll around the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH WORDWELL

Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish: This was the last church of the day, in the pretty village of Cavandish. St Mary the Virgin Chirch is a grade 1 listed parish church in  Cavandish, Suffolk. It was built in the 1300’s, thus only 700 years old, yet built on much earlier foundations over earlier buildings, earlier temples etc. This church is mostly 14th-century, with building dating from about 1300 to about 1485, with some 19th-century additions and alterations. The oldest parts of the church, dating from about 1300, are the Tower, the Porch and the lower parts of the walls of the aisles. In 1350 the South aisle walls were rebuilt to their present height and new windows were inserted. The exterior of the church is dressed in flint, as are many of the churches and buildings of the area. While we were there extensive renovations were being carried out and much of the church, including the tower were hidden under scaffolding; we were lucky it was actually open to us. Some beautiful artworks are in the church and although it has been modernised over its 700 years of time, this does not distract from its interest and it is kept beautifully clean and tidy. What we noticed straight away upon entering, was the baptismal roles for folks of the area on the wall, showing a Lynne Clarke baptised in 1964, (so could be still alive). Clarke is one of the blood-lines we are tracing, so an interesting find, and on another listing , on the roll of honour from the Cypress Regiment dated 1956, a Cuthbert H. Clark, so maybe her grandfather?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary_the_Virgin%27s_Church,_Cavendishhttp://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/cavendish.htm

The Knights Templar had a preceptory here in Cavandish from 1308-1312, just before the demise of the Templars;  just before the Papal Bull was released from Rome, but they were here for only  a short period of time. The reason being is that they would have been in transit and moving artifacts along ‘upstream’ as it were, up through the country. The church would have been used as a holding place for the movement of treasures and various artifacts.

The church contains an amazingly beautiful piece of carved artwork showing the Knight Templar ‘two swords’ with an inverted challace; the pyramid, the ship, the sea, the ocean are all included.  ‘Pure Light‘ as mentioned before is represented here by the sword (fire) in the water. (Fire in the Water to make Pure Light) The ‘Jesus’ here has sadly lost a finger but would have been showing the ‘Ninasian Salute‘ (the salute of Ninasu)

There is so much Templar symbolism to be discovered in the above artwork <click to see in detail>

There is a small Lady Chapel area to the left hand side, with curtains above its altar, and interestingly, nothing at all behind them which is unusual as normally the curtains are open with a painting or something on display. A window on the right-hand side of the church contains many clues and symbolism to the fact that the knights were indeed here; non more so than the red cross of the Nevilles (our main research blood-line) with the rose in the middle of the Neville cross clearly defined. The window also shows the ‘Flower of Life‘ and moving upwards we see the ‘Lamb of God’ (Agnus Dei), all beautifully depicted, and very much of standard Knight Templar symbolism.  However on moving across to the next panel, we see imagery that is far removed from standard, in the form of what appears to be a bull with wings, amazingly depicted. We also have the cow, the ram and the stag symbolised here in the window, with interestingly a symbolic circle reference to the ‘Fisher King’, which on closer inspection could be a shell, again referencing The Fisher King. In the earlier writings of the Fisher King ‘the winged animals’ are referenced, but suprisingly, not the infamous unicorn of myth and legend as one would expect. Also adjacent on another window we can clearly see the Chi-Rho, a ‘star’ which we are now refering to as ‘The Pyramid of Intergration’, a translation from an earlier language; this symbol has had many names over the years, and is probably best known as ‘The Star of David’, which is not relevant here; also shown is the ‘IHS’ symbol. Moving down the window one can see various other symbols, such as ‘The Jesus’ showing the Ninasian Salute, and also shown with his hands ‘open to all’. At the side of the altar, behind blue curtains, just in front of the vestry, are to be found some very historic paintings, portraits and photographs upon the walls, some of the choir, some of old scenes from outside the church.

The windows contains a language of symbols relating to the Knights Templars and the true history of this earthly plane – just waiting to be de-coded! <click to enlarge>

See our link below to take a stroll around the church:

ST MARY THE VIRGIN’S CHURCH CAVENDISH

Quest 30 in May 2020 would have been another exciting European trip but due to the outbreak of the corona virus, we have had to cancel and put everything on hold for a while. Hopefull in the spring of 2021 we can get on the road again, but in the meantime,watch this space, as they say!

 

acolade

The Acolade by Lord Leighton

The Knights of the Red Order

Author ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

April 17th 2020

 

 

THE GRAIL QUEST

” Even in our modern times, the Grail still represents hope to people, yet still remains something unattainable, something still very much an enigma. Many of the tales trace it, as a vessel, back to Joseph of Arimathea, whom it was said collected Jesus’s blood from the cross and whom was said to have bought it to England. Yet as already stated, the lineage of the grail goes back to much earlier times,  and as we already know, we can discount the tales of a challice collecting blood from the cross, for we know the crucifixion tales to be untrue. Yet if Joseph was of the ‘pure bloodline’, which Templar knowledge indicates he was, the tales take on another meaning, Over time many and various churches and religions have claimed different successions and connections to the Grail and there are claimed to be many ‘resting places’ for the Grail, some believable, some not, but of course that does depend on what the Grail actually is. It could be resting/hiding within Time itself (within a ‘cloak of time’), maybe hidden in secret underground chambers of sacred buildings, kept watch over by guardians. Some say it found its way to Scotland and has a connection to the enigmatic Neville family whom may have guarded over it themselves.  Mary too, is said to be connected to it, in her own right and through her relationship with Jesus, and she too found her own way to Scotland. Lots of accounts refer to the blood of Christ or the flesh/DNA of Christ as being of pure blood, of being the Grail, and Christ certainly knew and kept the secrets to his grave.  So, did Christ possess the Grail or was it the ‘knowledge’ of the Grail he possessed? If Lucifer’s secret is the Holy Grail, that would certainly mean that Christ/Jesus/Lucifer knew the secret; that unattainable secret of the Holy Grail.”

QUEST 28: FRANCE, DUNKIRK & BELGUIM

12TH  NOVEMBER 2019

After three great days in La Boussac, our amazing trip was almost over and we left France to begin our journey towards Belguim via Dunkirk. Luckily yet again the sun was shining and it was a gorgeous Autumn day when we set forth. We journeyed all the way from the south of France up to Dunkirk and i managed to take some quite good shots on the way.  The drive was interesting and very scenic and the weather was good.  It was a long journey, of gorgeous autumn colours, dramatic skies and an amazingly huge suspension bridge that crossed a wide, wide estuary somewhere along the route. It was very windy and high up so not all lanes were open. The nearer we got to England though, the more horrid the weather became, settling down later.

Our last big road trip of the quest taking us out of France, towards Belguim, Dunkirk and back to good old Blighty! That bridge was so high and scary in the windy conditions – much higher than it looks! <click to enlarge>

Catholique Collegiale Notre-Dame-de-la-Crypte a Cassel: Cassel France: Quite late in the day we arrived here at Cassel, France. It had become quite chilly now and was getting dark, but there were shops still open and folks around, so we had a nice stroll and bought in supplies for when we reached our digs.

Cassel, from the Dutch meaning Kassel is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. Built on a prominent hill overlooking French Flanders, the town has existed since Roman times. It was developed by the Romans into an important urban centre and was the focus of a network of roads, which are still in use today, that converge on the hill. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Cassel became an important fortified stronghold for the rulers of Flanders which was repeatedly fought over before finally being annexed to France in the 17th century. It was the headquarters of Marshal Ferdinand Foch during part of the First World War. In 1940, during the German invasion of France, Cassel was the scene of a fierce three-day battle between British forces and German forces which resulted in much of the town being destroyed. Today the town, which was rebuilt following the war, is a popular destination for visitors to French Flanders.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassel,_Nord

As the hour was late and the skies darkening, we half expected the church to be closed and spent dilligent time wandering around the seemingly closed building until at last we found a way in via the big stiff old wooden doors! Our efforts were well worth it as the church is beautiful inside and like a lot of these seemingly plain on the outside churches, what greets one inside is often amazing!

Sadly i could not find much on the internet in English about the churches history apart from a few lines from the above link, so most of my comments are from pure observation. The Collégiale Notre-Dame de la Crypte is Cassel’s main church, built in brick. Parts date from the 11th century but the main part is a 16th-century  Gothic structure of a design known as a hallekerk or hall-church, peculiar to Flanders and Artois. It comprises a huge rectangular space with three gables, three aisles, three apses and a square tower over the transept.

Many interesting symbols inside the church & the  ‘All Seeing Eye’ is prominent, together with relevant heraldry & shields. Some beautiful windows are here too & ornate artworks. A nice feel to the church connecting to the Desposyni bloodline.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Galains Desposyni (48th GGF) 480-551, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.
  • Nascien Desposyni(49th GGF) 450-494, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.

The hour was late, dark and very wet when we arrived in Dunkirk and visability in respect of driving was very confusing. We were staying right in the middle of Dunkirk, near the river, in a very built up area with  lots of traffic lights, bus lanes and one way systems. It took us several tries to find a way out of the one-way system in order to reach our apartment – which we could see but not actually get too! Well done to my dear driver though for his persistence and patience! Tomorrow we are venturing into Belgium.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne, Belgium: So the day had arrived – Friday 8th November and the last day of this amazing quest and fabulous road trip. We found the church fairly easily and it looked quite inviting and very well maintained from the outside with planted flowers and a nod to it’s fishing history by way of the historic fishing vessel outside. However once we gained access and got inside through the main doorway, it was dissapointing to find a vast and very locked glass screen acoss the entrance barring any access into the rest of the church. So sadly the only photos i have are of the outside and taken through the glass screen. A shame as there were very relevant artefacts and info to be seen there. Based on a design by the Veurne-based architect Joseph Vinck, this aisled neo-Gothic hall church in yellow brick was built in 1891, at a time when De Panne was still a fishing hamlet of Adinkerke and a chapel built circa 1878 stood on this site. The tower was added in 1936, by which time the church was no longer located in the centre of town due to the construction of the Dumont Quarter.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne showing the historic fishing vessel <click to enlarge>

De Panne is the westernmost Belgian coastal town, sharing a border with France. It has a population of almost 10.800 people. Its history is closely linked with Adinkerke, nowadays a small village, situated about 3 kilometres from the sea.  The situation used to be reversed, for during the late 18th century, De Panne was part of the larger parish and municipality of Adinkerke. Because of the growing importance of coastal tourism from the late 19th century on, De Panne eventually transformed into a larger town than Adinkerke, beoming independent in 1911.  Originally De Panne was primarily a fishing place, founded in 1783. The fisheries, especially the small herring fisheries close to the coast, in De Panne flourished from the middle of the 19th century, and the fishing community steadily grew. Around the turn of the century, a number of shipyards were active in De Panne, while several small fish smoke houses were also present in the village. By courtesy of the local history and heritage club ‘De Panneboot P1′, the town possesses one of the last traditional inshore fishing vessel of the Flemish coast, also named the ‘Panneboot P1’. The vessel is an example of a ‘pannekotter’, the smaller successor of the famous ‘pannepot’, now on display in front of the Saint Peter’s Church of De Panne. On occasion, the ‘Panneboot P1’ still sails and from time to time, the ship is used for educational purposes

http://www.coastalwiki.org/wiki/Fisheries_in_De_Panne

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Panne

Very selective views through the huge secured glass panel

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

Sadly, our very last day of this wonderful experience has come upon us all too soon. Lots of pieces of a very large puzzle to ponder over and put together but it will all be revealed in time, as they say. We have visited amazing places and met many folks – some friendly, some not, sadly often ‘church’ folks were not welcoming, but that’s for another day.

Saint Bavo Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium: When we arrived in Ghent it was certainly a lovely day and the city was full of life with lots of hustle, bustle and energy; trams and buses busily swung around the narrow city streets. Ghent is a city and a  municipality in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is the capital and largest city of the East Flanders province, and the third largest in the country, exceeded in size by Brussels and Antwerp. The city originally started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Leie and in the Late Middle Ages became one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe, with some 50,000 people in 1300. It is a port and university city. Around 650, Sain Amand founded two abbeya in Ghent: St Peter’s and St Bavo’s. Around 800,  Louis the Pious, of   Charleymagne, appointed Finhard, the biographer of Charlemagne, as abbot of both.  The city grew from several nuclei, the abbeys and a commercial centre. However, both in 851 and 879, the city was plundered by the Vikings. Within the protection of the County of Flanders, the city recovered and flourished from the 11th century, growing to become a small city-state By the 13th century, Ghent was the biggest city in Europe north of the Alps after Paris, bigger than Cologne or Moscow. Within the city walls lived up to 65,000 people.  Lots about Ghent in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghent

 The main city square of Ghent; full of life with lots of shops and resturants nearby!

The Saint Bavo Cathedral, also known as Sint-Baafs Cathedral, an 89-meter-tall Catholic Gothic Cathedral is the seat of the dioces of Ghent, is named for Saint bavo of Ghent and contains the well-known Ghent Altarpiece. It is built on the site of the former Chapel of St. John the Baptist, a primarily wooden construction that was consecrated in 942 by Transmarus,  Bishop of Tournai and Noyon. Traces of a later Romanesque structure can be found in the cathedral’s crypt. Construction of the Gothic church began around 1274. Continuous expansion, in he Gothic style were carried out from the 14th through 16th centuries. In 1539, as a result of the rebellion against Charles V, who was baptized in the church, the old Abbey of St. Bavo was dissolved. Its abbot and monks went on to become canons in a Chapter that was attached to what then became the Church of Saint Bavo. When the Diocese of Ghent was founded in 1559, the church became its Cathedral and construction was considered complete June 7, 1569. Sadly in the summer of 1566, bands of Calvinist iconoclasts visited Catholic churches in the Netherlands, shattering stained-glass windows, smashing statues, and destroying paintings and other artworks they perceived as idolatrous. However, the altarpiece by the Van Eycks was saved. It was a beautiful looking cathedral but sadly yet again had lost much of its ‘energy’, not helped by the negative attitude of one of its human ‘religous’ helpers, trying to bar me from taking a photo of a sheild relevant to our quest. A beautiful building with many stunning works of art, but sadly with no actual spirituality…

There were some stunning marble memorial carvings that made good use of the skull imagery. There were some beautiful oil paintings, along with relevant Craft/Quest related heraldry and sheilds <click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Bavo%27s_Cathedral,_Ghent

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Bloodline connection associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

All that remained now was just one more view from our apartment window aside the river in Dunkirk before setting out on the road again in the morning and back home to the UK via the channel tunnel!

“On this epic journey we experienced the different energies of many lands as we followed in the footsteps of King Arthur around Europe and found out that churches are not what they seem;  I also found an amazing light inside me that I never want to dim. Putting aside the spiritual aspect of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind-expanding in itself; an experience that I fully embraced. So that was it; an amazing quest fullfilled and I for one cannot wait until our next adventure.

Many of you have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in-depth write-ups on these pages, so have a good idea of what the quests are all about and why. It is always from a physical, spiritual and more importantly a metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests and now we have bought ‘the grail’ into the mix.

The buildings we visit are built on very sacred sites, yet it is not the buildings as such, as to why we are there. The sites are of sacred, pyramid energy; the buildings atop have come and gone over the centuries, leaving no clues in the buildings since, as to their purpose and real reason within the rhyme of time; except of course to those whom can decode the symbols. The churches could be describes as ‘markers’ in time and space.

The quest, the King Arthur quest, traces his journey to these sites, it was his quest then, just as it is our important quest now; a journey of learning sacred knowledge, that has often been hidden within very time and the landscape itself. But yet most importantly never told of in history, yet the links are now appearing, like the colours of a magic painting book when the water is added, for when knowledge and understanding is added to our life, magically the truth appears.

We have visited many pyramid sites, some where the earth magnetis were so strong, that the so-called ‘sat-nav’ (which works via earth-based communications anyway), was caused to spin around in circles; going crazy due to the pyramid energy. The energy can often be overwhelming causing one to lose balance and feel a bit ‘woozy’ at times until one tunes into it and finds one’s balance. There is always so much more to space and time than meets the eye.”

DSC09853

“The Keeper of Scrolls” March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

The Knights of the Red Order

THE GRAIL QUEST

“Consider then, this special DNA thread, can it be awakened and utilised through Craft knowledge? The word ‘Templar’ relates to time, as in temporal, so the Grail with its history of connections to the knights and the apostles upon the earthly plane could also relate to time or even dimensions? So with that knowledge in mind is ‘The Universal Templar Complex’ fact or fiction? If humanity actually found the Grail, (were allowed to find it) what one wonders would they do with it? Giving humanities track record I don’t think they are ever destined to find it, for they could never ever be trusted with the knowledge of it and could do unfortold damage. If it was found, as in Craft quests of today or as the Knights of the Round Table quests of old or the Apostles, then once found, the knight usually passes over, (although not always) for there is no longer a purpose for living (in this world). So could the Grail be the answer to everything and the passport to heaven? Sadly though, not everyone whom sought the Grail would/wil