Tag Archive: The Priory


“And so Quest 27 sadly draws to a close: Moors, sea & heaven, all spectacular and atop the moors in the sunshine, one could be forgiven for thinking that one was oh so near to heaven, for in reality one actually is. Dartmoor at times was wonderfully moody, wild and desolate and high, high up the rains merged into the clouds. Churches sat alone and serene on top of hilltops reached only by winding lanes. England at it’s best, and when safely tucked up for the night in our converted chapel acommadation, one can only give thanks for this life. Down upon the rocky shores life ebbs & flows with the tides; dreams come true and perceptions change as challenges to reality are met…”

“One is so near the clouds on the top of Dartmoor that one can really get a sense & feeling of being able to reach out & touch the firmament above. Today I felt so incredibly and wonderfully close to it. Reach out & touch the beauty before it is too late.”

Day Five: All Saints Church Okehamton: All too soon Sunday, our last day of this amazing and revealing quest was upon us: the weather was still gorgeous and so we intended to make the most of every moment and as we drove across beautiful moorland we could not help but to be in fine spirits.

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon and it is situated at the northen edge of Dartmoor with a population of 5,922 (2011 census). The town itself was founded by the Saxons; the earliest settlement on record being from 980 AD, known as ‘Ocmundtune’, meaning settlement by the Ockment, a river which runs through the town, which grew because of the medieval wool trade and there are some noteble buildings in the town. The oldest building is the castle which dates back to the Domesday Book and which was once the largest castle in Devon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okehampton

The church itself, up a hill at the edge of town is very secluded, peaceful and pretty and is almost set within a woodland setting and yet is still at the heart of its community. A Church has stood on this hill since Saxon times when the little hilltop village of Ocmundtune was closely grouped around its (probably wooden) Church and surrounded on all sides by dense forests. With the building of Okehampton Castle soon after 1066, present day Okehampton began to develop in the river valley and the little Saxon village was progressively abandoned. The church is a grade two listed building, mostly built in perpendicular style and rebuilt in 1842

https://tickets.twomoorsfestival.co.uk/sales/view-venues/all-saints-church-okehampton

 

Inside the very well-kept church is an array of symbolic artefacts relating to Craft and beyond as shown above: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

The stained-glass windows are also very stunning pieces of art showing much symbolism.

  • Blood line connection: Our lead researcher’s 10 x Great Grandfather, Sir George Clark 1509 – 1580. Born in Holland but registered later in Devon, having connections to Colyton with buisness in Okehampton.

“The oh so peaceful and gorgeous Devon countryside where one can literally hear a pin drop and one gets the reality of being truly in the clouds……”

St Andrews Church Moretonhamstead: We drove through some wonderful and practically isolated countryside where one could actually hear a pin drop, to reach Moretonhamstead (anciently Moreton Hampstead) a pretty market town, parish and ancient manor in Devon, situated on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor, within the Dartmoor National Park. At the 2011 census the population of the parish was 1,703; the parish church is St Andrews.

The  Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as ‘Mortone’; which derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town’s situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 ‘Hampstead’ had been added to the name which simply means “homestead”, The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place. The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and with Moreton as its major settlement.

Wool and (in later years) the manufacture of woollen cloth, formed the basis of the town’s economy for over 700 years. The economy was evidently healthy when Moreton Hampstead established a water-powered fulling mill before the end of the 13th century.Read more in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moretonhampstead

This grade one listed parish church is to be found at the eastern end of the town; it was originally built in 1418 and had heavy restorations in 1856 and 1905. It is quite spacious inside with some nice stained glass windows. It is in a rather lovely position overlooking the countryside as are many of the churches we visit. There’s something really special about a cemetry on a hillside with a wonderful view over the surrouding countryside; it can evoke all sorts of feelings and connections inside of one, but sadly, the sacred energies once attached to the church here long ago, are now departed…

St Andrews Church with an interesting plaque just inside the porch

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101334222-church-of-st-andrew-moretonhampstead#.XT3mJnt7l1s

Interia shots of the church showing some lovely stained glass with some close up detail: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

St Werburgh’s Church Wembury: This amazing 14th century church sits on the cliff edge overlooking the ocean and the enigmatic Mewstone and it really is the jewel in Devon’s crown.

“The Lifes that meets the sea in hidden and mystical Wembury”

Wembury is a village on the south coast of Devon, very close to Plymouth Sound, located south of Plymouth; it is also the name of the peninsular in which the village is situated. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty with a beautiful beach well known for surfing and rock pooling, and basking sharks can be seen in the summer near the Mewstone. The population of the electoral ward was 4,455 in the 2011 census. The name ‘Wembury’ may derive from a place name containing the name ‘Woden’ and noted by a John Mitchell Kemble that it was called ‘Wodnesbeorh’. Saxons colonised south-west Devon during the 7th century founding agricultural settlements in the area and the church is dedicated to the Saxon saint, Saint Werburgh. Of course it is a delight for holiday makers with it’s sandy beaches and crystal clear sea.

The mysterious triangular Mewstone, which is uncannily similar to the rock just off Tintagel, is very visable from the beach. In the past it was inhabited and has been a prison, a private home and a refuge for local smugglers. It’s most infamous resident was Sam Wakeman who avoided transportation to Australia in favour of the cheaper option of transportation to the Mewstone, where he was interned for seven years. After his internment on the island he remained there paying his rent by supplying rabbits for the Manor House table. It is said Sam Wakeman is responsible for carving the rough stone steps to the summit of the Mewstone. The artist Turner has painted the island several times, after sketching it during a sailing trip. However the island does have many secrets and not everything is as it would seem….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wembury

The church, standing as it does on the clifftop overlooking the sea and Mewstone is a firm favourite for couples getting wed.

Inside the church, which was built in the 14th century and visited by mesolithic man, is a stunning array of carvings, both stone and marble quite unlike anything i had seen before, ancient, unusual and intriging, including a rarely seen Serpent Goddess holding the ‘Staff of Wisdom’. She is surrounded by a representation of the angels, yet this time shown in their very dark guise; maybe showing their true selves? This brings to mind the phrase, of the angels masking themselves as demons and the demons as angels themselves within the Light and Dark of the world.

Also displayed in oils and gilt is the Neville shield (the Royal Crest), indicating the strong connection to our deepening bloodline quest. The shield always displays the unicorn and lion, but why, leaving much to think about upon the sphere of time. A genuine knights helmet is displayed up high; kind of hidden in plain sight really…  Also, yet again, another connection revealed here to Lancelot Desposyni, taking us deeper into our bloodline quest, with connection to our future quest in Europe, when we will follow in the footsteps of the Knights of the Round Table. The bible here is open on Romans 9:4, (G-d’s Soverign Choice) which if read may bring revelations to the reader…. There is mention too of the ‘Black Rod’ with further connections to Ely in Cambridgshire; much for the astute student to research and discover.

<please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

 

Watch the video below and find out so much more of the history of the church and surprisingly of its connection to Ely, our area and to see many of the wonderful carvings in real time (starts at 2.00)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU5qmTaCRbs&t=1s

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni (our head researcher’s bloodline) was in this area, this place at around 562 AD, in respect of purpose and spirituality.

“I sat around, but was not found, I took a trip and did not fall,
I saw the moon, but not the sky. When time was tough, I reached up high.
A height in time and trip to thee. For in times telling the mystery.>
For seek to find, and trip to rule I saw the sun, with the sky and all”

 

And so sadly this quest 27, has drawn to a close with much to digest and many revelations swirling around like the tides upon the sands. Much then to take on board, but before we depart, why not chew the cud with us, with memories and thoughts of an amazing and wonderful time in Devon and Cornwall….

Devon & Cornwall: A Mythic Quest

Chewing the cud of a very mythic quest!

But time does certainly not stand still for these ‘Questers’, for in the blink of an eye we will be embarking on Quest 28 with a new name and a new look; all a part of our continued evolution on this earthly plane. Those of you with eyes peeled and ears open may have noticed our many references to King Arthur and his Knights (the true men/energies behind the myths). So we are off to Europe at the end of October to travel in the footsteps of those real knignts – please be with us and follow us all the way!

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” August 2019

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle

St Edmund King & Martyr Church, Kingsbridge: Just a short drive along peaceful country roads bought us to our next scheduled stop which sadly on this occasion was closed to us, so a few shots of the outside will have to suffice. The symbols on the windows looked significant so a shame we could not get in – though we did have a good look aound the town, where there were some amazing charity shops!

The church is an Anglican churched dedicated to St Edmund the Martyr: once a parish church, it is no longer is used for regular worship. St. Edmund’s Church, is mainly in the Perpendicular style and retains some 13th century features including a font, but was enlarged and reconsecrated around 1414. The oldest part of the church is the 13th century crossing tower. The rest of the church is much altered with the addition of a large chapel in 1849. Further rebuilding of the nave was conducted in the late 19th century. There are a few other medieval remains in the south chancel chapel. Parts of the Rood Screen have been used to make the pulpit and the readers desk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Edmund,_King_and_Martyr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsbridge

Hope Cove: So the last port of call for the day, for a bit of ‘down time’ and the best vegan pizza i have ever tasted, was the stunningly beautiful ‘Hope Cove’. Hope Cove is a small seaside village within the civil parish of South Huish in South Hams, Devon. It has tw beaches and is sheltered by the headland of Bolt Tail. The name ‘Hope Cove’ may derive tautologically from the Old Norse word hóp meaning “bay” or “small inlet”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Cove

 

  • Bloodline connections: is that of Thomas Neville of Dartmouth, born 25/02/1810 & died 03/01/1893 & our lead questers 4th Great Grandfather. Originally from Tollesbury in Essex & died in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia & a frequent visitor to the area on Templar Business.
  • V. MacAndrew from the plaque in St Petroc’s Church
  • George Fairlie-Clarke from the memorial in church graveyard
  • Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, depictedvon the church window of St Petrocs.
  • Thomas Neville again, connected also to Kingsbridge and Hope Cove

Join us for part three when we discover more secrets of time at Tintagel!

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ June 2019

So much to embrace & look forward to as The Priory is about to set out upon Quest Twenty-Seven no less! On our journey for truth we will endevour to unravel the hidden histories of these lands, we will set forth into the kingdoms of Devon & Cornwall for our next knightly adventure.

Quest 27: Devon and Cornwall: So our quest was at last upon us and it couldn’t have got here quick enough. On Wednesday May 1st, we made our way to Gunnislake just inside the Cornish border, but wait! Our quest starts right here!

Day One: Princetown: St Michael & All Saints Church.  Princetown is a village in the Dartmoor national park and is the principle settlement of the civil parish of Dartmoor Forest. Princetown is known for being the site of Dartmoor Prison and is around 1,430 feet above sea level; the highest settlement on the moor and one of the highest in the UK and is surrounded by moorland; thereby attracting many hikers and walkers, especially in the summer months.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princetown

It was a typical wet and misty Dartmoor afternoon when we arrived at St Michael & All Saints Church, Princetown; the Archangel St Michael being the patron saint of sick people, the elderly and of people of ‘order’ whom work in the military. Contrary to the ‘official’ write-ups of the church, it is built on an ancient sacred ‘energy’ site, connected to our quests, even though the current building itself is not that old. The church is of a simple design and built between 1812 – 1814 by prisoners captured in the Napoleonic Wars with France, and the War of 1812 with the United States, all of whom were held in Dartmoor prison. The east window contains stained glass of 1910, in memory of the American prisoners who helped to build the church. It is a designated Grade II* listed building but is now sadly a redundant church in the good care of the Churches Consevation Trust.

St Michaels & All Angels Church sitting amidsts the stuningly serene Dartmoor

Inside the church are many interesting artfacts, and as one would expect some poignant military memorabilia too, lest of all a seat saved in the front pews for soldiers unknown, which one can glimpse in the video. Interesting to note that our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, but he married a Mary Ann from Princetown and there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, in this very church! The church had a lovely feel about it and felt much older; the beautiful and intriging wooden carvings around the pulpit, one of which portrays an animal head on a human body, certainly seemed older. The lovely tapestry of St Michael portrays the correct Celtic Cross, with the saint wearing blue, red and gold robes. The beautiful stained-glass window above the altar portrays the life and death of  ‘the Jesus’, from left to right in story-book style. Also on one of the wooden chairs to the left of the altar are some very interesting carvings of a direct Enochian origin, relating and connecting the church firmly to our path…

Inside the church, showing the window, the St Michael tapestry and the Enochian carvings

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Michael,_Princetown

Outside in the graveyard, very noticably separate from the rest of the gravestones is the secluded area where the prisoners have been laid to rest; separated in death as they were in life. Rather ironical really as death makes no distinction; we are all as one in death…

Take a tour around the church & discover our links & bloodline history for yourself

St Michael & All Angels Church Princetown

Day One: Walkhampton: St Mary the Virgin Church. Walkhampton is a village and civil parish on the western side of Dartmoor, in Devon. The village lies on the Black Brook, a tributary of the  River Walkman, about 4.3 miles south-east of Tavistock set amidst beautiful unspoilt countryside.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walkhampton

Walkhampton church, which is a grade one listed building, is situated on an ancient elevated site about half a mile north-west of the village and can be seen for miles. Unlike most churches which face east, it faces north-east, the direction of the rising sun on the longest day. The present building, which is built of granite and has a tower with four prominent pinnacles, dates from the 15th century, with much later alteration, including restoration in 1860–61. For 400 years until 1985 the church had no dedication and was known simply as “Walkhampton Church”, but in that year it was dedicated to St Mary the Virgin. Research has indicated that it may have been originally dedicated to St Dionisius of Walkynton. Sadly the church had already been locked when we arrived so we had to content ourselves with a stroll around the outside. It is a pretty chuch standing amidst some gorgeous countryside, so who knows what we may have found inside…

St Mary the Virgin; a pretty church built on an ancient site in beautiful Devon

And so onto Cornwall, where our digs for the next five nights was to be the converted Ebenezer Chapel, now flats; ours named aptly as ‘Pilgrims Rest’.

Gunnislake is a large pretty village in East Cornwall situated in the Tamar Valley; an extremely beautiful area on the outskirts of Dartmoor in Devon. There is a history of mining in the area, but this is no longer active, but in it’s day was one of the richest mining area of Europe. It has a small railway station which serves the local villages of the area. The geo-magnetics of the area are very powerful and interesting, especially for those using ‘earth-based’ satnav… (something to ponder on)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gunnislake_railway_station

  • Bloodline Connections: Princetown: Our lead researcher’s 6th great uncle, John Neville was stationed here, in the wars of 1812. He was born on the 20th April, 1773 in Birch in Essex, and he married a Mary Ann from Princetown; there is a record of their child Eliza Neville being baptised on the 11th June 1815, inSt Michael & All Angels Church, Princetown.
  • John’s father was Earl Henry Neville, 2nd Earl of Abergavenny; a destination of a previous quest.
  • Walkhampton: Jonh Neville (as above) was stationed, as a soldier, in the area circa 1800’s,  6th great uncle.
  • Gunnislake: connections with the Clarke, Fordham & Neville surnames.

And of course finishing off the day with a gorgeous meal in a wonderful atmospheric local pub and resturant as one must always have balance in life “Reverence & Mirth in equal measures”

Day Two: Buckfastleigh & Buckfast Abbey: We drove across beautiful Dartmoor to reach Buckfast Abbey, with a stop for lunch at this delightful and peaceful beauty spot in Dartmoor, which in the summer months is absolutely teaming with visitors.

Buckfastleigh is a small market town and civil parish in Devon situated at the edge of the Dartmoor National Park.  It is part of Teignbridge and is a centre for tourism, and home to Buckfast Abbey.  The town has grown as a mill town known for it’s woollen mills, corn and paper mills and a tannery supported by the rivers Dart, Mardle and the Dean Burn; water being an essential natural resource used in the manufactoring of wool and other products. Buckfastleigh is medieval in origin and the name Buckfast means stronghold, and Leigh would have been the pastures belonging to Buckfast.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfastleigh

The very beautiful Benedictine monastry at Buckfast, known as Buckfast Abbey, is just near the edge of Dartmoor. After many ups and downs the monks are still there today and live a very peaceful devotional life. The Abbey is self-supporting with a farm, where vegetables are grown and animals are raised and a shop which sells wine, honey and religous items etc. The monastry is most famous for it’s Buckfast Tonic Wine, a delicous fortified wine that the monks have been making since the 1890’s

Buckfast first became home to an abbey in 1018. The first Benedictine abbey was followed by a Savignac (later Cistercian) abbey constructed on the site of the current abbey in 1134. The monastry was surrendered for dissolution in 1539, with the monastic building stripped and left as ruins, before being finally demolished. The former abbey site was used as quarry and later became home to a Gothic Mansion House.

The position of the hands in the above carving is very relevant to the Priory, our path and the truth of our quests; also note the Enochian influenced carvings around the doorway; all of which allude to teachings and truths of our path that are much older than the actual building here.

In 1882 the site was purchased by a group of French Benedictine monks, who refounded a monastery on the site, dedicated to Saint Mart. New monastic buildings and a temporary church were constructed incorporating the existing Gothic house. Work on a new abbey church, which was constructed mostly on the footprint of the former Cistercian abbey, started in 1907. The church was consecrated in 1932 but not completed until 1938. Buckfast was formally reinstated as an Abbey in 1902, and the first abbot of the new institution, Bonniface Natter was blessed in 1903. Despite all this it did feel a very peaceful place with some stunning works of art, windows and artifacts inside.

 

The abbey is full of stunning artworks, many with hidden symbolic messages; there are extra meanings here in several of these photos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckfast_Abbey

https://www.buckfast.org.uk/

Next and without further ado, we made our way to Exmouth Marina and Harbour to embark upon a scheduled boat trip along the Jurasic Coast. Not a part of the quest as such but something that would be informative and fun.

Exmouth itself is a port town, civil parish and seaside resort, sited on the east bank of the mouth of the River Ex, and is 7 miles east of Exeter. The two ecclesiatical parishes, Littleham and Withycombe Raleigh, that make up the town of Exmouth today can be traced to pre-Saxon times. The name of the town derives from its location at the mouth of the River Ex estuary, which ultimately comes from an ancient Celtic word for fish.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exmouth

We had booked to sail with Stuart Line Cruises, leaving from Exmouth Harbour at 2:15 and it was scheduled to be an over three hour trip, along the ancient coast line. This jurasic coast line is a world heritage site, attracting many visitors. It is England’s only natural UNESCO World Heritage Site; the circular cruise sails along the oldest section of the site, known as the Triassic Era.  The cruise certainly did show the age, beauty and importantly, the fragility of our coastlines. Here on the video below one can see the magnificance of the ‘sea stacks’ and hear a spot of the commentary on the video too. It was rather blustery out at sea but lots of snuggly blankets were thankfully provided.

The beauty of England’s Jurasic Coast Line

Englands Jurasic Coast Line & the Beauty of Devon and Cornwall

  • Bloodline connections: Buckfastleigh has connections to the Clarke surname and family link.

“The Keeper of Scrolls” May 2019

email me:  moon.willow@ntlworld.com

The land does not give up it’s secrets easily yet leaves clues hidden within the landscape of time for those whom are willing to decode the riddles…

planets

exsistence

human race

Reality and Truth: have i not always said that truth is never what has been taught; never what you thought it was. Think hard dear freinds and consider the truths of your existence and why you have been lied to. Learn, accept and be free. The Priory has always taught the truths yet it is up to each individual, those whom are truly meant to know and to evolve beyond their human existence, whether they wish to remove their blindfolds or not….

One can make a big noise and launch as many orange balloons over London as one likes but directing ones energy to this mere drop in the ocean, this mere diversion in time, only serves well the purpose of those whom wish to keep you in blindness. Consider then if you will that path laid down for you, and the oportunities presented, for they all have a purpose and it is up tp you whether you go against the flow and rise up against the roar of the crowd or be forever blinded and deafened by the mundane pull of humanities blindness…

While it is important to respect the beliefs and opinions of others, even if they differ from our own, we must do so with open minds; for we are all different. We know instinctively what is right or wrong, yet sadly the truth is obliterated these days by what the main stream media deem us to know; what the so-called religous bodies deem us to know. Yet do either of them know about real truths, for they hide any real truths from us and shower us with a truth they think we deserve to know.

But we must all wake up from our slumbers for we are being manipulated for sure, yet each & everyone of us has the power to make up our own minds, for the truth is there to find and folks willing to share it Dont be manipuated by popular opinions and popular beliefs; rise up above the roar of the crowd, up above the clouds that fog the mind. This can mean standing alone, yet being true to ones self and to those beings whom lit the original flame of life that resides within us all.

‘Ge be Dag ma Dar be Ar’

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2018

When the tides turn
And the cold wind blows,
When the waters of creation
Finally consume the lived.
When the clock shall tick no more
I shall take my rightful place
Amongst my true kin.
The Sanctuary was always there;
Hidden within, in my dreams and desires.
Unknown by the unseeing eyes of humanity,
Whose achievements resonate not
Across the wider universe
With the seekers of human flesh.
Think not in human terms;
Think not of a world of matter.
The threshold has been crossed,
Yet it was never of the physical world;
Perceived of with my human eyes.
Everything is of its time;
The past, future and present
Have always been as one.
Future memories visit;
Perceived time lines merge,
Cycles repeat.
Be served well to remember
What is done cannot be undone,
What is known cannot be unknown;
Oaths taken upon the sphere of time
Cannot be untaken.
Remember well; that which you love the most
Is that which binds you to the mortal realm;
Soul bound to the shores of time,
Blood ties secured by DNA.
I guard the door; steadfast,
Knowing that Heaven will await.
The secrets of the blood
Have been gifted.
I stand firm; protector of my kin
Sword in hand and breastplate shinning.
Lest no one pass this way
Lest they stumble over times fragile threshold.
Without true love’s key
All answers remain hidden,
All secrets lost within man’s folly.
Blindness reigns,
Tethered by the ego of mortality.
Yet to those of faith
The secrets within the blood of life;
That sweet threaded coil
Of man-kinds destiny
Is forever within reach.
Yet to those whom mock
With tongue and heart of stone,
The sweet blood secrets hidden within the sacred chalice of life,
Sipped not by those of human descent.

 

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moon.willow@ntlworld.com: July 2018

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

The oldest story written
Is joy to the listening ear
The blinded eyes will see
As the days of old come clear

On saddled shores, the Watchers
Have waited for mankind’s shift
Yet only a few ever made it
The rest will cease to exist

Mankind always had the chances
To rise above ego and greed
Yet took the easy way out
Never considered the planet’s needs

But everything comes home to haunt one
All misdeeds come home to roost
The Observers can only watch us
Time and tide is the judge of all

A dead planet is no good to no-one
Just look at Mars to agree
To travel afar is an answer
But sadly, only in dreams

We are bound to the truth of our actions
We are tied to this planet of time
Yet new realms beckon and call us
Vibrations calling us home

If you get it, you know where I’m going
If you don’t, well you never will
We can learn to challenge illusion
To escape the earthly veil

We are more than this human vessel
We are more than the mundane world
For it’s all been a great expectation
One that we spectacularly failed

Go dream from an outside perspective
Remember that time is manmade
Step away from the ties that bind you
Say no to religion and power

At the end of the day we are mortal
These skins that we wear will not last
We are trapped in lower vibrations
Never heeded the words of the past

Yet we can live again and can travel
Can be guided by shinning lights
We can journey afar to new realms
Can live without day or night

Another existence is out there
A holder of keys you can be
But first you must unlock this door
To see all you can truly see

As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

 

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  April 2018

Maybe the words were never written in the sands
But hidden in plain sight for all to see
Recorded and enscribed in stone
For future generations to decode

The truths of life have always been displayed
Dealt out to us by that giant hand whom deals our fate
Turn over just one card for destinies big reveal
Or leave the cards face down; fate unknown

The Old Ones have left the clues
Have entrusted truths in safe hands
Secrets kept by those whom walk the path
Yet truth often bound in myth, is never beautiful

The vast libraries of ancient words
Depict a past untold
Foretell of a future unwritten
Words to heed

False trails laid by a false church and crown
Dead ends and smoke screens
Laws and taxation to control the masses
Barbed words and lies become the norm, the truth obscurer

Why then walk in darkness?
Why wear the hoodwink?
Why accept the ropes tied tight?
Why live without honour, why abandon truth?

Mankind, born from darkness and into darkness sinks
Born blind to live blind
The words of The Messenger ring hollow
Truth found at last, revealed in the darkness of the dying breath

It always was a prison planet, god fodder no less
Free-will, free-choice, but an illusion
Ego-derived lives give fuel to the giant illusion
Crushing the giant awakening in its tracks

Yet words can be re-written, the hand of fate slighted
The many become the few, the chains can break
The words are there, the truth is there, hidden under the rock of lies
The candle in the darkness sees all

 

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ April 2018

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The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

QUEST TWENTYFOUR: MARCH 2018. It was a very cold and wintery day as we journeyed over to the Isle of Wight on Quest 24. Amazingly though, and i guess because most folks were house bound and heeding the weather warnings, the journey was swift and without incident. with even the ferry ride being calm. However upon landing on the island the weather set in and snow and ice gave a serene beauty to the already stunning countryside.

 

 

Leaving Plymouth and arriving on the snow-bound Isle of Wight

DAY ONE AND TWO: Timeless snowscenes at Newport Minster, Carisbrooke Priory, St Mary the Virgin Church, Carrisbrooke, the slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle and the United Reformed Church, Shanklin. Today was a day of simply enjoying the stunning views and taking photos; most churches and venues we had planned to visit were shut with folks staying wisely at home apart from those brave souls who were braving the snow covered slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle with sledges in tow! We slithered and slipped our way though the day, braving a few very slippery slopes and icy roads but certainly made the most of it!

Reading on through this quest; some churches were kindly opened to us for a second visit and for that we thank all concerned; more detailed accounts are to be found by scrolling through. However those not opened to us are/were still very much a part of this quest and the reason we are doing them. All churches are part of a metaphysical/physical sacred alignment, all are ‘perfect points in time’: all tell a story of the past, present and future, all are a part of a whole truth and a part of the path we follow…

 

 

Newport Minster; picturesque in the snow

 

 

Serene snow-covered views: Carisbrook Abbey, showing the Neville Sheild and brave sous sledging on Carisbrook Castle slopes <click on all images to enlarge>

 

 

The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrook looking stunning covered in snow.

 

 

The timelessness of a snow covered Carisbrook and an ‘orb’ just outside the church. <click to enlarge>

 

 

The United Reformed Church, Shanklin in a timeless snow covered setting..

DAY THREE: St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrooke: So on our second visit to this church, which sits high on a hilltop with commanding views over the town, we were thankfully able to gain access. The parish of Carisbrooke is one of the largest on the island in both size and population and also one of the oldest. Carisbrooke Church is considered to be ‘the most important ecclesiastical building on the Isle of Wight’. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book and the present nave of the church was built in 1070 as decreed by William Fitz-Osbert who was governor of the island. It was originally attached to the Priory of St Mary the Virgin, which was occupied by monks from the Abbey of Lyra (now Lire) in Normandy. The noble tower, the crowing glory of the church (photos seen above), was erected fifty five years after the dissolution of the monastry. Later still are the two large windows of the north wall which date from the sixteenth century when Bishop Fox  held the see of Winchester. His rebus, a fox is carved on one of the label stops. Much more on the history can be found by following the link below:-

http://carisbrookestmary.org.uk/history/

 

 

Beautiful artworks within the church include a window showing ‘The Lamb of God’ pointing to a strong Templar influence, the Neville shield indicating the bloodline movement, the other two shields, when merged represent ‘Temperence’ and ‘Fortitude’. the statue of the madonna and child by John Skelton in 1969 and some very unusual carvings of a Sumerian nature…

The Bloodline links of interest here are:-

  • Penelope Fordham (1838-1879) Granddaughter of Edward King Fordam of Hertfordshire. She was born in Godshill and died in Godshill

All Saints Church, Godshill: The Church of the Lily Cross…. Where the Four Points Meet: Just as the name would suggest, this is an amazing church, set atop a sacred mound that rises above a very pretty and historic town. The earliest church at Godshill was built in the Saxon period, possible during the reign of Edward the Confessor, but the current church is is almost entirely 15th century and built by the monks of the Sheen Priory. The hill on which the church stands was the site of pagan worship long before christianity reached the Isle of Wight. All Saints is the largest medieval church on the island and one of the most visited and photographed, which is partly due to the treasure, found inside the church, of a 15th century wall painting of Christ crucified on a lily; a very Templar symbol.

 

 

The Lily Cross, or as it was formely known, ‘The Budding Cross’ is to be found painted on the east wall of the south transept and although this areas was locked up i did manage some shots through the bars. Although there are similar depictions in Europe, this is the only ‘Lily Cross’ in Britain and dates from the middle of the 15th century. Sadly during the Reformation the painting was white-washed several times; though we dont know if this was to preserve it or destroy it. t was only rediscovered in the 19th century and carefully cleaned and is now amazingly clear and brightly coloured

 

 

The Lily Cross’ and the entrance to where it is displayed <please click on images to enlarge>

I know that there is much more to the significance and meaning of The Lily Cross, yet it is very hard to find any indepth explanations but this below, together with a christian symbolism of the lily, is the nearest i could get to any thing that had a bite to it. So for the moment Godshill is keeping its secrets…

http://www.paintedchurch.org/godshill.htm

 

For a more detailed tour around the church with an explanation of the importance of the church, it’s symbolism and Templar connections please see our link to our youtube channel.

Godshill Church, the Isle of Wight

Always looking around with eagle-eyes, i was very pleased to see this significant symbol enscribed on the wall of the entrance porch of this ancient church, as it meant a lot to see it there, on The Church of the Lily Cross. Not as commonly thought, the Awen symbol, as significantly older with a deeper meaning; a footprint on the sands of time carved into the fabric of reality….

 

 

 

 

The above photos show the Knight Templar connection, the Judaic connection of two cherub statues, the ‘Gatekeeper’ statue, together with the mother and child that indicate a full Templar layout to the church (relating to Wisdom, Strength and Beauty). Our video explains much more… <click on photos to enlarge>

https://godshillparish.co.uk/history.php

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/HAM/IOW/Godshill

The Bloodline Connections here are:-

  • John Peter Fordham 1810 – 1846 (3 X Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • George Albert Neville 1914 – 1989 (Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • Penelope Amelia Fordham 1838 – 1879 (Granddaughter to Edward King Fordham)
  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Frank Albert Bartram 1883 – 1962 (Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)

 

The Four Major Physical and Metaphysical lines of our quests all come together here at Godshill. So we have the Neville line, the Fordham line, the Clarke line amd the Bartram line ie “Where the Four Points Meet”…

 

You can read much more about the church and its treasures by following the links below:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints’_Church,_Godshill

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/wight/churches/godshill.htm

 

St Lawrence, Vetnor: Being a pilgrim on the earthly plane is what a journey is all about; each step taken with intent and mindfulness, tuning into the physical and the metaphysical. As with our quests, very much of the metaphysical as well as the physical and being pilgrims in time treading the earthly plane…

 

 

A gorgeous and tiny, tiny ancient church, Parish of St Lawrence on the Isle of Wight, on a hilltop as per usual and overlooking a rugged landscape down to the sea.. Still used today and still visited by pilgrims as the two seeking refuge from the cold on this particular day. Small but with some very interesting treasures to be found inside with deep meanings….
I can imagine in days past, pilgrims making their way along a dirt track, with the cold wind blowing their cloaks around them; and this the only shelter for miles around….
Visiting these sites bring history and our past alive and one gets a true sense of walking with our ancestors. I dunno, just being there made me connect like a point on a circuit board and think of these things.

 

 

So tiny, yet very beautiful in a very simplistic yet spiritual way for centuries used by pilgrims and Templars alike; often one and the same…

St Lawrence, which is much older than Ventnor, is a village found on the south side of the Isle of Wight, west of Ventnor which many do consider to be a part of the town. St Lawrence is situated on the undercliff, where it is subject to frequent landslides. In the 19th century, St Lawrence was the subject of am ambitious plan to develope the village as a resort to rival Ventnor by a German developer named William Spindler, a man who had made his fortune as a chemist in Berlin and who lived on the island from 1881 to his ndeath 1889 amd subsequent burial at Whitwell. he did have enormous influence as a developer but most of his projects have now fallen prey to the ravages of time.

The small St Lawrences Church at Ventnor, dates from the 12th century and is one of three churches in St Lawrence and is easily missed and not the church that the tourists make a bee-line for with the Pre-Raphalite windows. This infact is the church that really matters; it is tiny and simple yet exudes it’s history, with some of the artifacts being very special indeed. Before the addition of a chancel in 1830, it was only 25 feet long and 11 feet wide and was considered the smallest church in England. It has a 15th century baptismal font,  a stoup that is about 500 years old and a series of 18th century hat pegs. The piscina niche is almost the same age as the church. The ‘Jesus’ is shown in beautiful red robes and wearing the garnet stone; the significance of which, within various ‘inner’ Craft circles, goes deep and powerful.

 

 

The ‘Jesus’ wearing the significant garnet stone around his neck, the open bible, the Neville shield, the list of past ‘bloodline’ rectors and the ancient wooden carving <click to enlarge>

Bloodline connections here are:

  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Brent R. R. Neville; a rector here in 1902 (ancestor of our head researcher)
  • Edward S. Bartrum; a rector here in 1912 (ancestor of our head researcher)

For a full tour around this wonderful little church in Ventnor and to catch up on a snowy scene from outside Carrisbrooke church, please se our link:-

Carrisbrooke & Ventor on the Isle of Wight

https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101225276-old-church-of-st-lawrence-ventnor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Lawrence,_Isle_of_Wight

 

St Andrew, Chale: It had turned into a wet and rainy day, yet the journey was very worth it as this church proved to be a treasure trove of surprises.This medievil church is in the parish of Chale on the Isle of Wight and was founded by Hugh Gendon in 1114 when it was dedicated to St Andrew, though the present day church dates from the 14th century. Originally it was a Catholic church, but on the reformation it became part of the Church of England where for 900 years services have been held in St Andrew’s and in those years the church has been extended many times, with the tower being added in the 15th century. Read more about the church below:-

https://www.chalebayfarm.co.uk/st-andrews/

 

 

The church’s dedication to St Andrew has been explained in three ways. Firstly, St Andrew was a fisherman and fishing played an important part in this coastal community. Secondly, it could have been named after the man who paid to have it built. Another explanation is that the closest saint’s day to that on which it was dedicated is St Andrew’s. There is no evidence to give any of these explanations greater probability.  St. Andrew’s, although high above the sea, is exposed to the wind. The stonework is dotted with lichens; these are evidence of the purity of the air, which is damp enough to cover some stones very thickly.

 

 

Inside the church are some beautiful artifacts and windows that tell a tale or two of a history not generally know to the public. <click on an image to enlarge>

 

 

The ‘Angelic’ beings around the altar are interesting (all being slightly different) and relating to the ‘four pillars’ A more detail explanation can be found in the video below…

 

 

The stained-glass windows show symbols with meanings that go beyond what is percieved as a ‘christian’ church, especially the window depicting ‘The Scribes’ with the full Enochian symbolism in view, which will once again cause one to pause, to consider the true roots/routes of what we know as ‘christianity….  <click to enlarge>

 

The Bloodline Connections here are:

  • John Wright Neville, 1845 – 1878 (1st cousin 3 x removed to our head researcher)

 

Christ Church, Totland, Alum Bay: This church is in the Isle of Wight Deanery and the Diocese of Portsmouth. It is the western most parish in the Diocese and includes the tourist attractions of Colwell Bay, The Needles, Alum Bay and Tennyson Down.  Although the church is located at the geographical centre of the parish, the heart of the village is nearly half a mile down the hill at the site of the church hall.  It is situated in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the church itself has a beautiful and tranquil burial ground in a very natural and peaceful setting.

 

The parish of Totland Bay was formed in 1875 out of the parish of Freshwater and includes the famous Needles Rocks and Lighthouse. That the legal formalities were carried through satisfactorily was mainly due to the Revd Christopher Bowen, MA, a resident who most generously gave the land necessary for the church, churchyard, vicarage house and school. To him and his friends we are also indebted for “their energy and patient efforts” in connection with “the building and consecration” of the church. In recent years the vicars of Totland Bay have also acted as honorary chaplains to the keepers of the lighthouse. In 1869 a temporary church of wood was erected opposite the present parish church where it stood until the latter, begun in 1874, was finished a year later. It was then re-erected on the beach and for a time served as the village reading room and library. It now belongs to the Totland Bay Hotel and Pier Co, and serves as annexe to the hotel.

Inside, the church is fairly and surpringly spacious, though to be honest, many of the original artifacts are no longer there and sadly the church has lost much of its original ‘energies‘. It does however have some very nice stained glass windows, and on the outside wall before the main entrance, a rather lovely and prominent carving of ‘The Lamb of God‘ (the Agnus Dei)

 

<click on all images to view and enlarge>

Follow the link below to see more photos and to read much more on the history of Christ Church: http://christchurchtotland.org.uk/about-us/

The Bloodline Connections here are:

  • James Fordham 1857 – 1881: Great grandson of Edward King Fordham of Herfordshire (connected to Godshill)

 

  • Due to circumstances beyond our control and the weather; we were unable to visit the following so the bloodline connections are listed below…

Carrisbrooke Castle: Sadly due to the weather, time of year and maintenance occuring we were unable to make to the castle or get near enough to take photos.

  • John Fordham 1835  – 1898 (Grandson of Edward King Fordham of Herforshire and 1st cousin, 6 x removed from our lead researcher)

The Needles: We had hoped for a tour around but again the weather and the time of year were not in our favour.

  • George Albert Neville 1914 – 1989 (Grand Uncle to our lead researcher)

The United Reformed Church, Shanklin: The doors were closed to us on ths very cold day…

  • Frank Albert Bartram 1893 – 1962: (Great Grand Uncle to our lead researcher)

Osborne House: Closed due to the time of year and maintenance.

  • James Neville 1825 – 1856 (Great Grand Uncle of our head researcher)

 

March 2018 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ on behalf of The Priory

email ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

“A perfumed tree, how sweet the smell… But a fruitful tree is far from wells,

Doth carry the roseline from land to air, then once to the four winds as all do stare”

 

 

“Some know… some dont know… many will never know they dont know…” 

All tellings evolve; life evolves, we evolve; we have to in order to move on. I have discovered that some poems and writing of mine keep growing, ever expanding with new inner meanings as my own understandings also change and evolve; my inner visions and wisdom are on a constant spiral of evolution. Pictures that portray a universal truth constantly flash in and out of my open mind’s eye. We seemingly, in respect of inner and outer growth, travel full circle yet arrive round at a point beyond the original starting point; that is true evolution and growth. The cycles of life and becoming, from a personal perspective of an enlightened being, as well as from a universal perspective, come and go also evolving, yet as we follow the spiral round we do not evolve to the same place from that from which we started. Each cycle takes us round to a different place; a different placement on our own circle of life, moving on, life in motion, as it should be.

I recently peered into a shop in a town in the Hartz Mountains and saw a beautiful bag that totally illustrates a poem i had previously written connecting me to the past, present and future on many levels; even to the history of the painting on the bag itself; the ‘me’ as i was in the present at that time, was totally in a peaceful inner place and looking to the future, thinking of those lovely roses on the bag and of what hope, peace and inner, higher level, self acheivement can bring.

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However though, and sad as it may at first seem, this can not be true for everyone and some folks will not evolve, will never climb those heights to greet their true potential but will stay forever in the repeating cycles of the mundane; will always allow the mundane lower realms to hold them firmly fixed in place. As Craft and as teachers we are always here to advise and guide; always here to show the LIGHT to any one who whises to learn; to evolve, but as the old saying goes, the teacher will open the door yet it is up to the pupil to walk through…. It is always sad when a creature of true potential chooses the mundane world, but life is a free choice and one must always choose wisely, whether in favour of a life less lived or the actual bigger picture…

“I am one who will always be smelling those roses in this life or the next ones”

I have been thinking a lot about inner peace of late and have reached the point in my life of acceptance of peace as being of and in the moment; connected to the momement; one must fully embrace each moment for the gift that it truly is. One’s happines IS in each current moment and no where else; YET it is those very moments which create our future happiness.

Maybe it is too late for the planet as a whole yet NOT too late to be enlightened, so to evolve above and beyond the mundane. All ‘traits’ have the potential and ability to be awakened and to use that within them that has aforetime remained dormant…

There are those whom constantly chose to tamper with the Old Ways, for their own ends and means and thus relay false teachings to the world, and thus the teachings do not make sense when thus tampered with; the cycles do not make sense; the teachings become flawed. For the poor ‘old god‘ does not know whether he is living or dieing… What has become known as the ‘wheel of the year’ in many paths, is very much an ‘earthly wheel’ and certainly not a regional one as it is often portrayed. What is important here to remember is the validity of your teachings and your teachers; are they of the universe itself or from a man-made ego based version of the truth?

“As the world turns, we acknowledge the truths of existence”

My own spiral of life resonates within and without me and is a reflection of the deep love & a connection to Craft that effortlessly flows and blends into every aspect of my daily life. Poetry, writing & photography give me further connection and focus and are also very much of the magic woven from my heart, leading me upwards and beyond the unknown mountain paths of time; always consciously being on the spiral.

Hidden among the deep mystery of our land lies the truth; often hidden in plain sight, often hidden within the very fabric of time itself. England is a land of magic & mystery and let non tell you otherwise. Here in these very lands you can discover portals, other realms, ancient magic and gliches in time and encounter others not of our own timeline, not of our realm and if guided discover so very much more of the unexplored metaphysicl realms.

Here at the home of The Priory on the internet, we are as an ever evolving path through time with hopefully many interesting articles, personal accounts, teachings, photographs and the odd secret or two… We follow and evolve along an ancient path of truth, very much for the modern world; we seek & we quest through time, always following our hearts and the cycles of the multiverse.

“Time reveals yet also hides it’s footfalls upon the land”

I recently doscovered this quote from Nicola Teslar on the interent; he is someone who was way before his time yet thankfully is being rediscovered. There is so much hidden in this quote to get one’s head around, we don’t exist in a linear plane of existence, but a dimensional one, the lowest one being us. It is everyone’s wish to experience the higher dimensions and many have been teased with tasters….

earth is a realm

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” October 2017

QUEST TWENTYTHREE: DAY FIVE: JULY 2017

  • St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: 
  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth
  • St Nicholas Church, Bolden

St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: So day five of our wonderful quest to the north of England and Scotland, where we travelled across time to Raby country, came upon us all too soon. On this last day we were sadly unable to gain entry into St Cutberts Church in Darlington and so just a few photos of the exterior and a link for further info will be all I can leave you with on this occasion, yet suffice to say still an important connection on our quests in tracing the Neville lineage.

https://co-curate.ncl.ac.uk/st-cuthberts-church-darlington/

<click on all images here to view & expand>

  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth: When we arrived at St Nicholas Church we also found it to be locked up, but upon making a quick phone call, a very nice lady, married to the vicar, and who coincidently used to lived in our neck of the woods in Cambridge, came to our rescue key in hand and was only too willing to let us in and give us a personal tour around. Obviously thus so, we were not at liberty to make any videos on this occasion, but yet another important link on our quests to tick off.

https://www.southtynesidehistory.co.uk/archive/people/children/625438-st-nicholas-church-hedworth-lane-boldon-colliery

St Nicholas Church, Bolden: Yet again this lovely little church in Bolden, near the quarry, with it’s very interesting graveyard, was not accesable to us. It is in a truly peaceful setting, yet it is the empty tomb near the entry that compells, and draws one in to wonder about it’s untold tale….  But sadly it was not giving up it’s story on this particular day 😉

http://www.boldon.yolasite.com/st-nicholas-church-boldon.php

And so our journey to the north was almost at it’s end; but as way of some downtime, just to chill and relax we spent some wonderful hours exploring; namely wandering around St Pauls Monastry, Yarrow, which is a beautiful world heritage site, with it’s connection to the scribe, the venerable Bede. Interestingly a theme seemed to have presented itself with yet another vacated tomb; surely tales to unfold and discover….  An ancient face looked knowingly down from above.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/st-pauls-monastery-jarrow/history/

And then as evening fell we enjoyed some beautiful beach and sea downtime, sand and shore, at both Southshields and Northshields; heralding a perfect end to a most perfect quest of many discoveries, not neccesarily of the mundane, but with many pieces of a jigsaw puzzle of truth slotting into place.

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2017

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“Let everyone who can hear, listen to what Spirit is saying to the churches; Everyone who is victorious shall eat of the hidden manna, the secret nourishment from heaven, and I will give to each”

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