Tag Archive: Lancelot


THE GRAIL QUEST

“The Grail has often been seen as something un-tangible with many different opinions on what it actually is. Is it an ideal, a physical object, something metaphysical, or something else entirely? Does it relate to the philosopher’s stone? Is it a mystical and transformational experience? Is it a link or a key? Is it a blue-print for something? Has it a connection to immortality? Whatever it is, it is very elusive, yet like a magnate draws folks towards it, keeping out of reach to most, but why is it on this earthy plain and why so sought after? King Arthur certainly travelled phyically on a journey to discover it; his Grail Quest. Here we journey in his footsteps trying to find and unravel the clues on our own particular Grail Quest – Quest 28.”

QUEST 28: EAST OF ENGLAND & THE NETHERLANDS

SUNDAY 27TH OCTOBER 2019

This quest was to be the quest of all quests and was to take us around Europe on the trail of King Arthur and his own quest for the holy grail. Indeed five countries awaited us as we expectantly made our way from Cambridge, England across the North Sea to Europe, taking in Holland, Germany, Luexembourg, France and Belguim on this very exciting epic  adventure; a road trip of a lifetime!

map

What an epic journey awaited us!

St Mary’s Church, Holton St Mary: Holton St Mary is a village and civil parish in Suffolk, England. Located on the B1070 around five miles south-west of Ipswich and half a mile from the A12 (which forms the parish’s south-east boundary), it is part of Babergh district. The western end of the parish is part of the Dedham Vale Area of Oustanding Natural Beauty and the Higham meadow nature reserve. The name of the village is probably derived from the Anglow-Saxon ‘Holan Tun’ or ‘Hola’s Farm,’ It may also mean ‘farm in the hollow.’ It is likely that Holton experienced some Roman influence, being so very close to main Roman road north from Colchester, approximately along the route of the present-day A12. Holten is mentioned in the Domesday Book Survey of 1086 as having a population of 19 including 4 slaves.

http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/holtonstm.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holton_St._Mary

St Mary’s Church is a peaceful church, with some lovely energires there; built in a very rural setting amidst open countryside and small villages. There is a connection at this church, to Cornwall, Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, so tying in with the ‘grail’ aspect right away. This church, like so many others is built upon an original pagan, sacred site and thus hidden within the rocks of the tower, built into the north-west buttress there is a large glacial boulder, a ballast used by pagans of the day in rites for sacrificial purposes. Yet even before those pagan times, going back to the so called ‘dark ages’, pilgrims would have visited this site on their wanderings. So more here is about what is below than what is above and of there being a very special sacred reason why churches are built precisely where they are built; it was never random….

The buried sacred glacial stone area, used for ritual purposes, overwhich the font now stands. In the same area we have some interesting symbols including the rose and the fleur de lys, both of which scream templarism.

The church, even though small does contain a great sense of spirituality and spiritual wealth as our video and photos show. There are connections here to Lancelot and his emblem; the lion. There are some very interesting depictions on the windows – not be overlooked, such as two crossed feathers and the rest of the church contains symbols to The Lamb of God, the Alpha to Omega, the Motherland and the Dove of Peace holding an acacia twig and some subtle references to Mary Magdalene via the Flue de Lys and thus to the Knights Templars and to the Fordham line via Lancelot Desposyni. Also seen is the Neville shield and the Merkabah; all of the Templar lineage.

Some of the very subtle images and windows within St Mary’s Church, Holten St Mary that relate to Mary Magdalene, Lancelot Desposyni, the true bloodlines and to Templarism. All a part of a knights journey – a modern day quest. <click on an image to enlarge>

Bloodline Connections:

  • Mary Magdalene.
  • Lancelot Desposyni
  • King Arthur
  • The Fordham line
  • The Neville line

Lancelot Flag

Lancelot’s flag in battle: The Desposyni Line; most of it is worn through but one can still make out his symbol, the design very reminiscent of a knights head.

All Saints Church, Great Oakley: Great Oakley is a village and  civil parish in the Tendring district of Essex. It is a long, narrow parish lying on the top of a low (25 m) ridge south of Ramsey Creek which drains northeast towards  Harwich. The parish extends south to Oakley Creek, a branch of Hamford Water, where stood Great Oakley Dock, now disused. The church, dedicated to All saints, contains some Norman work. The living thereof is in the gift of St  John’s College, Cambridge. The Domesday Survey does not distinguish between Great and Little Oakly, but records two manors there.

The church stands at the west end of the village and consists of a nave and chancel of pebble and flint rubble with limestone dressings, a west tower of septaria and red brick with a weatherboarded upper storey and a pyramidal roof, and a south porch of red brick. The nave is 12th century, lengthened at a later date, the chancel is early 14th century, and the west tower 15th century, rebuilt in 1766. The only Romanesque feature recorded here is the Purbeck font. Again it is set in peaceful rural surroundings with much more on the inside than one would ever guess from the outside appearance. Another small church with some lovely energies and some very meaningful artifacts inside; there are Dutch connections both inside and out, especially in the architecture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Oakley,_Essex

https://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/1501/

A peaceful church with calming energies and straight away, once inside the church we could see from a commemorative war plaque upon the wall mention of one of our ‘bloodline families’ (a Coporal E. Clarke) bold as brass, reiterating the fact that this is indeed a true bloodline quest. Interestingly not that many miles away from where we have previously researched the Fordham & Clarke lines in Hertfordshire. Again some lovely stained-glass windows, but very interestingly this church sports two gold Triquetra (similar to a triskelion) both on a green background; one as the altar cloth and one on the lectern. This symbol is often known as a ‘trinity knot’ when parallel doubled-lines are in the design. The design is used as a religious symbol adapted from ancient Pagan Celtic images by Christianity. It is similar to the  Valnut, a Norse symbol. The symbols here appear to be composed of of three overlapping Vesica piscis symbols. The green here represents Ireland, the colour of Ireland thus connecting us back to the quests and to the bloodlines of to the Kings of Ireland.

The Triquerta symbol, connecting our quest & this church to the Kings of Ireland <click to enlarge>

An intertersting artwork behing the altar depicts ‘The Jesus’ symbolically upon the cross (not actually for he never was crucified) and he is shown with his hands in the sign of the Ninasian salute and with a Templar cross upon his head. To the left side of the altar is a lovely stone carved ‘throne’ within the church walls, where special visiting folks would have sat, around the area are carvings of knights (crusaders) and crowns, albeit very worn in time now, but original and importantly still in place. Again symbolism that connects to the Knight Templars and to Lancelot Desposyni. The intricate metal work across the altar area depicts the red and gold rose, within black scroll work, with fleur de lys and red pillars; the black, red and gold of Craft. To the right of the altar, a stone upon the floor to a fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge, a Reverend John Townson of York; so a few connections here and i ponder upon the ‘trinity’ connection of the altar cloth…

Many connections in this church across the ‘ley lines’ or ‘energy lines’, connecting the physical to the metaphysical and to those beings whom have previously been upon this earthly plain….

See our video to take a tour around these two peaceful churches

St Marys Church & All saints Church, Essex

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • The Forham line
  • The Kings of Ireland
  • Lancelot Desposyni
  • King Arthur
  • L.C. E Clarke

So day one is complete and it is now off to Harwich for an evening pub meal at the Alma Inn, Harwich and then to board the (almost) midnight ferry over to Holland (it was actually 11pm!) The sea was calm but expectations were high; the cabins were warm and cosy though sleep came and went in a flurry of excitement as Eurpope awaited in the morning…..

Day Two: Holland: Monday 28th October 2019

So after a very calm and relaxing overnight ferry crossing we arrived upon the shores of a very busy and bustling Holland. The roads and style of driving there are very different from the UK and not just because of left-hand driving either, they all seem to drive extremely close to one another and very scarily too! Driving straight out of the ferry into this ‘other world’ was indeed a baptism of fire! So thus we drove through Holland to reach our first stop of the day of our exciting adventure – Rotterdam which was about a forty-five minute journey from the ferry.

St Lamburtus Church, Rotterdam, Holland: The neo-gothic Saint-Lambertuskerk stands in Kralingen on the corner of the chic Hoflaan. The church was built between 1875-1878 by Evert Margry, a pupil of the renowned P.J.H. Cuypers. Saint Lambert is the patron saint of Kralingen. During the war the church and its distict of Kralingen suffred damage during the bombing on 14th may 1940 and the Germans took the church bells and removed them to Germany. In 1947 the parishioners from the district donated two church bells to the church.

St Lamburtus Church, Rotterdam, Holland, almost ‘cathedral-like’, with a connection to King Pharamond. <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

A rather stunning church set in a pretty area with lots of trees and cycles, inside is to be found some amazing Craft related windows and a connection to Cambridge. We would have loved to have stayed longer to have a really good look around, but sadly we could not as a ‘lady in charge’ insisted that our visit be cut short and that we leave pronto, due to a funeral shortly taking place. A lovely feel to the actual church (if not her attitude) with a connection to King Pharomond.

A selection of some of the beautiful windows containing such Craft & Templar symbolism such as the All Seeing Eye, the Chiro, the Rose, The Alpha to Omega and the Dove. <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

DSC09271 (1)

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • King Pharamond (50th Great Grandfather to our head researcher) 430-499 Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.
  • King Arthur

We said farewell to Rotterdam as we continued our travels through Holland making our way towards Utrecht, about one hours drive in theory, but with a stop for a delicous meal along the way in a lovely resturant that opened up it’s kitchen for us early- a most welcomed gesture!

DSC09288 (1)

Cathedral of St Martin: Utrecht, Holland: Whilst a beautiful building to look at, both inside and out, sadly this cathedral had lost much of it’s spirituality and it’s artifacts, two things that often go hand in hand for various reasons over time. However at both the front and back entrances were placed over the doorways two rather splendid knights on horseback carvings. Utrecht itself is the fourth largest city and a municipality of the Netherlands, capital and most populous city of the province of Utrecht. The city centre has many ancient buildings and structures dating back to the High Middle Ages and has been a religious centre since the 8th century.

Knights on horseback above the two entrances <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

St. Martin’s Cathedral or Dom Church is a Gothic church dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours, which was the cathedral of the Dioces of Utrechtduring the Middle Ages. It is the country’s only pre-Reformation cathedral, but has been a Protestant church since 1580. It was once the Netherlands’ largest church, but the nave collapsed in a storm in 1674 and has never been rebuilt, leaving the tower isolated from the east end. The building is the one church in the Netherlands that closely resembles the style of classic Gothic architecture as developed in France. All other Gothic churches in the Netherlands belong to one of the many regional variants. Unlike most of its French predecessors, the building has only one tower, the 112-metre-high (367 ft) Dom Tower, which is the hallmark of the city. Architecturally this cathedral was very stunning to look at, with some interesting items inside, it was set in a lovely area with some interesting buildings and symbols around.

Cathedral of St Martin: Utrecht, Holland; beautiful to look upon with a connection to Nascien Desposyni <click on photos to open up & enlarge>

Inside were some wonderful plaques and memorials often featuring skulls and skeletons as was the ‘fashion’ of the times and some significant tomb carvings upon the floor….

Some of the architecture and remaining artifacts still to found inside the cathedral

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Martin%27s_Cathedral,_Utrecht

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Nascien Desposyni; 49th GreatGrandfather. 450-494 Somnant, France & ancestor to Lancelot.
  • King Arthur

The area around the outside of the cathedral was historic with an old gaol house and some interesting sun symbols on the buildings.

There is a deep purpose and meaning to all our quests and if you have been following you will by now, maybe have discovered that it is at these particular points in time that one can discover the sacred energies that run through our lands, energies that have often lain undiscovered for centuries…”

 

‘At Grail Castle with four aligned, Hidden Knowledge for us rewind’

 

Knights of the Red Order December 2019

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

 

 

 

QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle

St Edmund King & Martyr Church, Kingsbridge: Just a short drive along peaceful country roads bought us to our next scheduled stop which sadly on this occasion was closed to us, so a few shots of the outside will have to suffice. The symbols on the windows looked significant so a shame we could not get in – though we did have a good look aound the town, where there were some amazing charity shops!

The church is an Anglican churched dedicated to St Edmund the Martyr: once a parish church, it is no longer is used for regular worship. St. Edmund’s Church, is mainly in the Perpendicular style and retains some 13th century features including a font, but was enlarged and reconsecrated around 1414. The oldest part of the church is the 13th century crossing tower. The rest of the church is much altered with the addition of a large chapel in 1849. Further rebuilding of the nave was conducted in the late 19th century. There are a few other medieval remains in the south chancel chapel. Parts of the Rood Screen have been used to make the pulpit and the readers desk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Edmund,_King_and_Martyr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsbridge

Hope Cove: So the last port of call for the day, for a bit of ‘down time’ and the best vegan pizza i have ever tasted, was the stunningly beautiful ‘Hope Cove’. Hope Cove is a small seaside village within the civil parish of South Huish in South Hams, Devon. It has tw beaches and is sheltered by the headland of Bolt Tail. The name ‘Hope Cove’ may derive tautologically from the Old Norse word hóp meaning “bay” or “small inlet”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Cove

 

  • Bloodline connections: is that of Thomas Neville of Dartmouth, born 25/02/1810 & died 03/01/1893 & our lead questers 4th Great Grandfather. Originally from Tollesbury in Essex & died in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia & a frequent visitor to the area on Templar Business.
  • V. MacAndrew from the plaque in St Petroc’s Church
  • George Fairlie-Clarke from the memorial in church graveyard
  • Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, depictedvon the church window of St Petrocs.
  • Thomas Neville again, connected also to Kingsbridge and Hope Cove

Join us for part three when we discover more secrets of time at Tintagel!

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ June 2019

%d bloggers like this: