Tag Archive: History


A day of following a trail to find a knight of renown and connecting to a Lady true. The trail took us to Tintagel, via Boscastle where words were spoken on the breeze to those whom could hear. Bloodlines and energy lines all finally making sense…

QUEST 27 CONTINUES…

Saturday had arrived and wonderfully we were still experiencing the most gorgeous of weather, made even the more enjoyable in the knowledge that it was very wet and cold back home, further north. This part of the quest, day four, took us to Clovelly, Boscastle and Tintagel.

All Saints Church Bideford, Clovelly: This pretty little secluded Norman church, not far from Clovelly village is set in a lovely wooded graveyard and on the day we arrived, bluebells and other springflowers were everywhere. It looked very magical. The church actually stands in the grounds of Clovelly Court, and is bounded by the Court’s walled garden. The church was begun in the 12th century on the site of an earlier timber building. The Norman church was a simple cruciform building, consisting of a nave, chancel, and transepts. As the population of Clovelly grew, more space was needed, and in the 14th century a north aisle was added.  The renovation may have been carried out by William Cary, lord of the manor, who received permission to make the church collegiate in 1387. Cary’s plan was to establish a college of 6 chaplains under a Warden, but the plans were never implemented, and All Saints remained a simple parish church.

 

Clovelly Church set in the grounds of Clovelly Court <please click on an image to enlarge>

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/clovelly.htm

Although there has been a church building at this site from 630 AD, in actual fact there has been a place of actual ‘gathering’ here from the early 500’s AD here. Lancelot Desposyni, who is our lead reseachers x 48 Great Grandfather and of the bloodline we are tracing on our quests, was here in this area around about 530 AD.

We have discovered that the Desposyni line links onto the Fordham line, and the Fordham line links onto the Clark line (with or without an E!). The Clarks and the Fordhams have had a very long association with each other; almost since the dawn of time! References to both lines and the Nevilles too can all be seen in this very church.

See our video for more detail & references, together with explanations on the meanings of church symbolism and so much more. (2nd clip on link at 17.56)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=227s

 

Some of the stunning windows that contain references to Lancelot, the Nevilles, the Fordams and to the Lamb of God (a riddle in itself) See much more in our video above…

Clovelly is a totally unspoilt fishing village in Devon that seems to be lost in time, with no cars or traffic of any kind allowed.  It is privately owened and there is a rather steep charge to enter the village, almost as steep as the way down into the village itself! So thus we did not enter…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovelly

  • Bloodline connections: Lancelot Desposyni (from the Fordham line) Born 520 AD & our head researchers 48 x Great Grand Father)
  • Also references in All Saints Church to the Nevilles, the Clarkes and the Fordhams

Boscastle: For our quest, for Craft and research reasons, this pretty little coastal village and fishing port on the north coast of Cornwall was certainly on our agenda. But for obvious reasons there is a lot of falseness around, but if one can see past all the fake touristy consumer traps, it is a lovely little spot. In cornish the name means Kastel Boterel and it is part of the civil parish of Forrabury and Minister. Its harbour is a natural inlet protected by two stone harbour walls built in 1584 by Sir Richard Grenville and it is the only significant harbour for 20 miles along the coast.  The village extends up the valleys of the River Valency and the River Jorden. Heavy rainfall on 16 August 2004 caused extensive damage to the village and made all the headlines as water raged through the village in a torrent, washing away all in its path. It was a terrifying ordeal for all those who experienced it.

 

The very pretty albeit touristy village of Boscastle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boscastle

One cannot visit Boscastle without a visit to the infamous Musuem of Witchcraft which draws many folks to the area for a multitude of reasons. It is a strange place seemingly stuck firmly in an earthly time warp of a particular era and earthly perception. There were quite a lot of negative vibes there, but i was pleased to see a few items and symbols that alluded to Enochian and Templar magic and thus to ‘real’ Craft. It is difficult to know just how much of these ‘histories’ of old witchcraft and folk magic are actually real or not, or simply came into being at the time wicca was birthed and have been elaborated upon over the years since. Magic like any path should always evolve, as especially too should the practitioner and not get stuck within the realms of ‘myth and magic’.

 

An array of interesting items from the museum, some of which show a connection to Craft and Enochian magic.

After driving from Boscastle to Tintagel, it was time for a welcomed coffee before visiting King Arthur’s Hall; a site of an ancient and sacred underground spring, and thus we found ourselves in a quaint little cafe on the main street – just up our street in fact!

 

Tintagel: Tintagel or Trevena  (Cornish: Tre war Venydh meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall in England. The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena until the Post Office started using ‘Tintagel’ as the name, in the mid-19th century. Until then, ‘Tintagel’ had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish. The population of the parish was 1,820 people (2001 census), but decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with and steeped in the legends of King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. There are many literary and film associations with the village and like Boscastle it attracts more than its fair share of moden-day witches, pagans and role players whom simply fail to see the real truths right under their noses and their swishing capes…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel

King Arthur’s Hall: King Arthurs Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s. It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the “Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table”, behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction, and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell. In 1927, the “Order of the Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table” was formed in Britain by Frederick Thomas Glasscock (a retired London businessman, d. 1934) to promote Christian ideals and Arthurian notions of medieval chivalry. Glasscock was resident at Tintagel (in the house “Eirenicon” which he had built) and responsible for the building of King Arthur’s Hall (an extension of Trevena House which had been John Douglas Cook’s residence and had been built on the site of the former Town Hall and Market Hall). The hall is now used as a Masonic Hall, and is home to four Masonic bodies as the photos below show.

 

Masonic symbolism which always feature on our quests; the meaning of which certainly pre-dates modern-day Freemasonary <click on an image to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Arthur%27s_Hall,_Tintagel

Since 1952, the building has been used as a Masonic Hall and is home to the King Arthur Lodge No. 7134. In 1962 a Royal Arch Chapte was formed by the Lodge, and the building is used by some other lodges to hold their installation meetings. The hall is now as home to four Masonic bodies:

  • King Arthur Lodge No. 7134 which was warranted on 13 November 1951;
  • St Enodoc Lodge No. 9226 which was consecrated on 30 May 1987;
  • King Arthur Royal Arch Chapter No. 7134 which was consecrated on 31 March 1962;
  • Tintagel Castle Lodge of Mark Master Masons No. 1800 which was consecrated on 23 April 1999.

 

It is certainly a stunning building inside, where one gets a real sense of a ‘Grand Hall’, the sort of hall where King Arthur could certainly have conducted his buisness, feasted and ruled from. The masonic influence is everywhere in the building too; it being an amazing and fitting building to hold lodge meetings. The day we went, a ‘Fairy Fayre’ was taking place, bringing together, the psychic, spiritual, witchy and pagan worlds, which meant entry was free on that day, but clear photos of the halls design were out of the question.

The very striking stained glass windows and the emblems associated with them are the work of Veronica Mary Whall (1887–1967) who was an important stained glass artist, painter, and illustrator and part of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She created 73 windows for King Arthurs Hall, Tintagel, that opened in 1933. As of 1997 it is considered to be the largest collection of stained glass panels of  King Arthur made in the 20th century and a great example of Arts and Crafts workmanship. I have tried to include as many as i can here, together with some of the descriptions.

 

Tintagel is steeped in the tales of King Arthur, but few know of the real Lancelot or King Arthur & that they did indeed walk upon these shores: for everywhere we went we were reminded of the ‘knightly virtues’ by which each knight, then and now always endevours to live by. A true knight must always follow the codes of their life and of course importantly their oaths, for an oath taken can never be ‘untaken’ as it resonates on the metaphysical planes as well as the physical.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_Whall

St Materiana’s Church Tintagel: In St Materiana’s Church, Tintagel; a site sacred and profound on so many levels with deep connections to Mary Magdalene and our quests, are some amazing and sacred artefacts, which although themselves do not go back to the actual ‘dawn of time’, they allude to and tell true stories that do. This church is so relatable to this ‘quester’ on a very personal level, both physical and metaphysical, for very profound reasons; important discoveries were truly made here. There are those rare moments in life (in time) where myth and reality collide head on and time seems to stop and one finds one’s self catching ones breath. Out of this comes an understanding so deep that one’s whole life simply falls into place and nothing can ever be the same again. As those whom have gone before, in who’s footsteps I walk, I will continue to guide those whom seek the light…

The parish church of Saint Materiana, stands on a very isolated, yet beautiful location some distance away from the village of Tintagel. Almost on top of the cliff-edge, it’s rocky headland view commands stunning views across the ocean. The church is a Church of England,  grade 1 listed building; the first church on the sight, thought to have been founded in the sixth century, as a daughter church of Minister

 

St Materiana’s Church on the cliff-top is a peaceful and profound sacred site with connections to both Mary Magdalene and Lancelot Desposyni <click to view>

The existing church may have been created in the late 11th or early 12th century. Art historian Nikolaus Pevsner (writing in 1950) suggested that its Norman-era design includes some Saxon features, while the tower may be 13th or 15th century in date. The most significant change in its design was the restoration in 1870 by Piers St Aubyn which included a new roof. Later changes include a number of new stained glass windows: many of these portray saints, including St Materiana, St George and St Piran. There are three modern copies of Old Master paintings, and a Roman milestone bearing the name of the Emperor Licinius (d. 324).

 

The church has connections to both Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, both whom have walked upon these lands and visited this church in times past. Mary traveled from France to England; to Cornwall in fact before the church was even here but never the less it was indeed a sacred mound and Mary would have known this. This site would have been her first port of call, for she would eventually land in Scotland. Inside the church are many artefacts, some with hidden meanings that connect to Templarism and certainly to Mary Magdalene herself, especially in the lower part of the Lady Chapel. Lancelot, also journying from France was here in Cornwall around 538 AD, almost one might say on a pilgrimage, as indeed some of us are doing today.

 

Often hidden histories lie hidden for years but surface at perfect points in time and maybe just for a moment of earthly time they share…

Saint Materiana’s Church Tintagel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Materiana%27s_Church,_Tintagel

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni x 48 Great Grandfather or our head researcher, from the Fordham line. Born 520 Ad in France.

After a busy day, what better end could there be for a beautiful evening, than a short drive to Port Issac to chill out in the Old School House having a lovely meal…

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  July 2016

Angel lost; fell through stone
Blood and clay far from home.
Fell to earth through stormy waters,
Rebirthed in water, Leviathan’s daughter.

A million years, a thousand stars,
Dismissed from heaven at the eleventh hour.
A portal of slaughter or man’s salvation,
Demon hunger, a sacrament waiting.

Blood red flesh
Bound as one.
Blood is truth
Under a sun.

A Messenger spoke of truth or dare
Told the tale to those with no fear.
In chambers deep with no rebirth,
Secrets kept by G-d on earth.

A magic hill,
A golden tomb
Forever hidden,
Mankind’s doom.
Beauty stirred
Within a thought,
A test of time,
Battles fought.
Love was lost,
Grail diluted.
A story done
But never ended.

Time is endless
Existence not.
A waking serpent,
A fire to stoke.
A dark knight waiting,
The church’s curse.

Turn around
Turn around
My little child.
Water is wet
Wind is wild.
Those we shall meet
And meet again,
Brothers, Sisters,
Lovers. Friends.

Within a season
Within a time
A purpose known
Yet living a lie.

Stoke the embers
Raise the flame,
Time has come
And come again.
Cycles repeat
And repeat once more,
We are born to death,
Few reborn.
Dark waters spilled
Under a dome,
Within a thought
Dark beauty sought.

Ice and fire
Carry the key.
A sinking land
Eternally.
Those we have loved,
We will love again
As ‘we’ carry the Flame
Again and again.

 

The Keeper of Scrolls Feb 2019

 

QUEST TWENTY SIX: IRELAND:

  • PART ONE:
  • Angelsey, Holyhead, Dublin, Ballyonan
  • Navan: The Hill of Tara
  • Cavan: St Patricks Cathedral
  • Blacklion: St Patricks Church
  • Belfast Public Records Office
  • Newcastle & the Mountains of Mourne
  • PART TWO:
  • Newry: Newry Cathedral/St Patricks Church
  • The Giants Causeway
  • Derry: St Columbas Church
  • PART THREE:
  • Dublin: St Andrews Church, Christ Church Cathedral (St Patricks Cathedral)
  • Dundalk: St Nicholas Parish Church
  • Belfast: Belfast Synagogue, Belfast Cathedral, St Thomas Church
  • Dublin, Holyhead and home….

And so it was at the end of September 2018, we began our much anticipated week-long quest to that beautiful and magical island: Ireland. With so many mysterious and exciting places on our itinery we were just aching to get there. We travelled by car on the Sunday to Anglesey in Wales where we stopped briefly over night before catching the Irish Ferry ‘Ulysses’ from Holyhead, which ferried us very safely and comfortably to Dublin in Ireland. From Dublin we drove to County Louth, to a small village alongside a beautiful estuary, called Ballyonan, near Lough Tain – a very hard place to find even on a map!

 

Arriving in Ireland at the Port of Dublin wth dust falling along the estuary as we made it to our digs

So begins Quest Twenty Six; Ireland is a very beautiful, deeply religous and spiritual country, albeit with a very chequered history, as is told within the passions and ideals of it’s peoples, clashing over time, within and without.

 

THE CELTIC CROSS: The Celtic Cross is very much symnominous with Christianity and of course  the Celtic lands; yet the symbols history gos much further back in time with much deeper meanings and do infact connect at different levels of understanding to the teachings of The Priory. In Ireland, the spiritual symbol of the Celtic Cross endures throughout Irish history and remains forever  prominent  in the Irish culture; it is an honour to see the symbol in it’s rightful home, just as it should be…

It is popularly believed that St. Patrick introduced the Celtic Cross in Ireland, during his conversion of the kings from paganism to Christianity. Other beliefs are that it was St. Columba or St. Declan who introduced it and that further the circle stands for the Roman sun-god Invictus, thus giving the name of Celtic Sun Cross, while other beliefs connect it to a reprentation the Celestial Sphere. It is also said to represent the halo of Jesus Christ.  Many beautiful Celtic Crosses adorn graveyards and gravestones throughout Ireland and the UK. It is a symbol used by many different cultures across our planet in religous rites and sacerd spaces; different cultures attributing different names and meanings to the four points.

 

The Celtic Cross photographed across the northen part of Ireland; sometimes in surprising and unacustomed formats…

Day One: The Hill of Tara: The Hill of Tara is located near the River Boyne and is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath and according to tradition  was the seat of the Hight Kings of Ireland, so a very important part of our Templar Quest in researching the bloodline and origins of the ‘Neville’ surname, as those of you who are following us will be well aware of, so therefore ticked quite a few boxes for us on this visit. The Neville ancestory line can be traced right back through history to the Kings of Ireland; those High Kings who would have been crowed here all those many years ago…

Liathdroim (The Hill of Tara) and the Lia Fail (Stone of Destiny) in County Meath, known as the Seat of the High Kings; the place where the true high kings were crowned. According to legend, the stone would scream if a series of challenges were met by the would-be king. At his touch the stone would let out a screech that could be heard all over Ireland. When touched today, one may receive personal visions from the stone…. The Hill of Tara is documented in certain ancient texts but always from a mythological point of view, yet hidden within those old texts, jumping out from the myths and legends, hidden within the very land itself the truth can always be found…

At the summit of the hill, to the north of the ridge, is an oval Iron Age hilltop enclosue measuring 318 metres (1,043 ft) north-south by 264 metres (866 ft) east-west and enclosed by an internal ditch and external bank, known as Ráith na Ríogh (the Fort of the Kings, also known as the Royal Enclosure). The most prominent earthworks within are the two linked enclosures, a bivallate (double-ditched) ring fort and a bivallate ring barrow known as Teach Chormaic or Cormac’s House and the Forradh or Royal Seat. In the middle of the Forradh is the Lia Fail at which the High Kings were crowned. To the north of the hill is a Neolithic passage tomb Dumha na nGial, aptly named ‘The Mound of the Hostage’ with secrets of its own hdden within time and tellings… The Mound of the Hostages was constructed around 3,400 (cal.) BC. Its is the oldest site at the Hill of Tara.

 

Nearby at the site entrance is the Church of St Patrick with St Patrick’s statue overlooking the land. The “Rath of the Synods” has been partly destroyed by its churchyard; the modern church being built in 1822–23 on the site of an earlier one. The earliest evidence of a church at Tara is a charter dating from the 1190s. In 1212, this church was “among the possessions confirmed to the Knights Hospitallers of Saint John of Kilmainham by Pope Innocent 111. Read more about the site from the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_of_Tara

 

An important site in respect of the true (now hidden) history of these lands, of our true ancestors (or creators) and from whence the true royal bloodline spread its light across these sacred lands…

Filming atop the Hill of Tara and from the adjacent burial mound: it was so windy up there as you can hear, so no commentatary at this point as i had a job even holding the camera steady. A magical place full of untold history with many hidden conections to the true path as taught by The Priory, and a magnificant view across Ireland

 

The Hill of Tara and The Giants Causeway

 

  • Bloodline Connections: The Neville Line (the Bloodline of the ‘Neville’ surname) “
  • The High Kings List (the Neville line one and the same; )

Cavan: St Patricks Cathedral: The Cathedral of St Patrick and St Felim, also known as Cavan Cathedral, was next on our list for the day. It is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Cavan and is the seat of the Bishop of Kilmore and the mother chrch of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kilmore. In 1152, the Diocese of Kilmore was formally established by Cardinal Giovanni Paparoni at the synod of Kells. In 1454, Pope Nicholas V gave permission for the ancient church at Kilmore (founded in the sixth century by  Saint Felim to be the catherdral church of Kilmore diocese. It was rebuilt and became to be known in Irish as An Chill Mhór (meaning Great Church) and anglicised as Kilmore, which gave its name to the diocese, a name which has remained ever since.

 

Cavan; an Cabhán, meaning “the hollow”, is the county town of County Cavan and lies in Ulster, near the border with Northern Ireland. Cavan was founded by the King of East Breifne, Giolla Íosa Ruadh O’Reilly, sometime during his lordship between 1300 and his death in 1330. During his lordship, a Franciscan friary was established close to the O’Reilly stronghold at Tullymongan and was at the centre of the settlement close to a crossing over the river and to the town’s marketplace.

We were unable to film inside the cathedral as people were praying which of course we respected, but we did manage to tip toe around and take some photos.

 

The beautiful mosaic flooring of Cavan Catherdral

 

The stunning windows and artwork of Cavan Catherdral

 

Is she actually ‘Mary’ or does she represent somethng else? The ‘Holder of Life for example’? She certainly is cluthching the red and white roses; the symbols and colours of the Neville family

You may read more here:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavan_Cathedral

 

  • Bloodline connection: Our head researcher’s great granfather x 2 Bernard Fordham was born in Cavan in 1870.
  • The cathedral contains references to the red and white rose (and colours) of the ‘Neville Line’

 

 

Wild dramatic scenery and spectacular weather was encountered as we drove to St Patricks Church, Killinnagh, Blacklion

Killinnagh, Blacklion: St Patrick’s Church: The present Church, dedicated to St. Patrick, was built in 1846. It was a thatched structure at that time, a barn church, and would have been used for communal threshing during the week. It was not big enough to accommodate the congregation so it was decided to put in a gallery in 1889. It had to be raised. Money must have been very scarce at that time because second hand slates were bought to roof it and the timber used to construct the gallery was very poor quality.

 

St Patricks Church & graveyard; a stunning church amidst stunning scenery

A very high standard quality of renovation and improvement was carried out between 1930 and 1932. This was funded by Sir Patrick McGovern, a native of the area, who had been very successful as a contractor in America. A basement was built under a new sacristy and a coal-fired furnace was installed to provide central heating. This would have ranked it among the most modern in the country at that time. This lasted until the 1990’s when it needed major renovation. This was carried out in 1995 and the Church now has all modern facilities.

 

 

The sumptuous interior of St Patrick’s Church where marble has been used extensively throughout. More about the rather interesting windows can be learnt by clicking on the video link below:

 

  • Bloodline connections relate to the Neville and Fordham lines
  • Bernard Fordham was born nearby in Cavan in 1870

A little more about the church here: http://www.glangevlin.com/index.php/parish-churches/75-st-patricks-killinagh-church-blacklion

As i was unable to find anything on the internet in respect of Killinnagh itself, you can read about Blacklion here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blacklion

 

Follow our link to learn more about the three churches we were able to film at:

Cavan Cathedral, St Patrick’s Church & St Columbas Church

 

Day Two: Belfast Public Records Office:  Lovely sunny weather and a steady drive northwards bought us into Belfast and into The Titanic quarter of the city, to visit the public records office where valuble information was obtained;  yet to be fully incorporated into our quests. We did not stay long in Belfast itself but i did snatch some quick photos from the car! Belfast is a very large vibrant city which like most cities one cannot get a true sense of it from the car, but looking at the brochure i picked up in the record office it is a city of many cultural and arts events all year round and we certainly did see many fine artworks whilst driving through.

Belfast is Northern Ireland’s capital. It was the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, which famously struck an iceberg and sunk in 1912. This legacy is recalled in the renovated dockyards’ Titanic Quarter, which includes the Titanic Belfast, an aluminium-clad museum reminiscent of a ship’s hull, as well as shipbuilder Harland & Wolff’s Drawing Offices and the Titanic Slipways, which now host open-air concerts.

 

  • Bloodline Connections confirming Fordham & linking Neville line.
  • Check Ford line from Ireland from 1700’s

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast

 

Newcastle and the Mountains of Mourne: Next we headed south again and to  Newcastle; a magical town nestling right besisde the coast, where the Mountians of Mourne roll down to greet the sea; everywhere one looks is a stunning view, made even more beautiful when the mists roll like tears down the face of the majestic mountains. We stayed a few hours; an afternoon of wandering and chilling and a very tasty meal too! No Craft site as such to visit but checking out the energies and future connections of the land.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle,_County_Down

We drove up high on winding narrow roads to where the mountains met the skies. It felt like being in a time portal for there is no sense of time or space here, just a maginificant sense of presence and peace and of course beauty all around.

The Mountans of Mourne

Newry Cathedral/the Cathedral of Saint Patrick and Saint Colman:  So leaving the mountains and our hearts behind, we made our way to Newry and to the cathedral there. This is a Roman Catholic cathedral which acts as the seat of the Bishop of Dromore, and the head church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Dromore. We did not expect it to be open for it was now late in the day, but still managed some good outside shots, but hoped to return.

Newry Cathedral just before nightfall

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newry_Cathedral

 

  • Bloodline Connections relate to ‘The Land of the True Knight’

“It was never ours
Yet we deemed to own G-ds land.
The rainbow arc shone in many colours
Yet no-one saw
And the price is always paid
When G-D’s covenant is broken…”

 

DSC06239

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’
October 2018

DAY THREE CONT:

  • HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON
  • HAILES CASTLE
  • HOLY ISLAND

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON: Still in Scotland, day three continued with our next visit which was to be the Holy Trinity Church at Haddington in the diocese of Edinburgh.  Set in a kind of small cul-de-sac off from the main street in a heritage area, both church and grounds are beautifully kept; from the outside the church looks quite small yet upon entering it appears much larger than it looks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haddington,_East_Lothian

With funds raised by the congregation and a very generous donation from the Earl of Wemyss, the first phase of the church building was constructed in 1770 on the site of the original ‘Lamp of Lothian’ which, from the middle of the thirteenth century until 1555, had been the property of the Franciscan Friars. It was built of a local stone known as Rattlebags, a volcanic agglomerate (a complex breccia made of fragments of lavas). An article in the transactions of the Antiquaries of Scotland published in 1792 describes the building as a very elegant chapel. Holy Trinity Church is a Grade B Listed building and is in the Haddington Conservation Area.

 

In 1843 the church was ‘Gothicized’ with the addition of the nave parapet, nave south elevation window surrounds (note the lancet shape), porch and shallow apsidal sanctuary, using a different stone, a finer, pale buff sandstone.  The same year, the committee appointed to report on the state of the building described it as being extremely uniform and homely. Following completion of the reconstruction, a service of dedication to the Holy Trinity and of consecration was perfor med by the Rt Rev Charles Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh, who in 1814 had returned to Scotland to serve as an Incumbent in Haddington.

 

The interior of the church showing ‘The Jesus’ using the now familiar ‘Ninasian Salute’ used by Priory members. Symbols such as the Lamb of God and other Templar symbols are to be discovered throughout the church and a beautiful tapistry on the altar, which is described as three angels, though it could be the ‘Three Marys’.

In 1930, the present Chancel was added to replace the apse and the interior remodelled in neo-Byzantine style by the Scottish architect B N H Orphoot. The Chancel external walls were built of Rattlebags and sandstone but have reinforced concrete detailing such as columns, arches, decorative bands and the corbel course below the gutter.

 

The church also had some interesting detail on its exterior walls <click on all images to enlarge>

Holy Trinity Church had some nice features and details both inside and out; it was a peaceful enough place but i got the feeling that  lot of the older artifacts from the past had been removed or had not stood the test of time and therefore the older ‘energies’ were no longer there

http://holytrinityhaddington.co.uk/

HAILES CASTLE: We paid an unexpected visit to Hailes Castle; one time home to Mary Queen of Scots.The castle is a mainly 14th century castle about a mile and a half south west of East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland and is quite secluded and hidden away. This castle, which has a fine riverside setting, belonged to the Hepburn family during the most important centuries of its existence. The castle was founded as a fortified tower house by Hugo de Gourlay before 1300, making it one of the oldest constructions of its kind in Scotland. The castle has a long and interesting history which one can read more of on the internet and it is certainly worth a visit to look around and explore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailes_Castle

 

This is where Mary Queen of Scots was staying as an adult, for it was deemed to be a safe place for her; secluded and hidden away and she had freinds and allies on her side; however this was not to be and history tells us otherwise…..

Just opposite the castle is a hill fort by the name of ‘Traprain Law‘ that rises in an imposing fashion above the horizon. It has an interesting name, yet was only known as ‘Traprain Law’ from the late 18th century, taking its name from a local hamlet. This is etymologically a Cumbric name cognate with Welsh tref ‘farm’ and either pren ‘tree’ or bryn ‘hill’. Law comes from the Old English word hlāw, meaning a burial mound.

It rises about 221m (724 feet) in elevation and is located 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Haddington. It covered at its maximum extent about 16 ha (40 acres) and must have been a veritable town. Whether it was a seasonal meeting place or permanent settlement is a matter of speculation.  Also speculated is whether the site is the site of an actual pyramid or not….  But it was a burial place by around 1500 BC with evidence of occupation and signs of ramparts after 1000 BC and has been ocupied at various points throughout it’s history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traprain_Law

 

Trapain Law together with Hailes Castle: an interesting area to stop a while to soak up more history…

HOLY ISLAND: The last point of call for day three was to be Holy Island; more of a winding down visit after a very busy day where many miles were covered. We arrived on the off chance knowing that the tides may not be in our favour and this did prove to be true. The evening sunset was amazing, so no better place in which to unwind whilst watching (and dodging) the beautiful incoming tides. When the tide is out one can pass happily back and forth from the main land to Holy Island and Lindisfarne, but when the tide is incoming one literally has to watch ones back and ones parked car as we discovered!

 

What better way to end the day than to watch the tide coming in…. <click on images to enlarge>

https://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumerland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD. It was an important centre of Celtc Christianlty under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindidfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Normsn conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550. Much more can be red about it’s history here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindisfarne

 

“Incoming Tide!!!”

So day three came to an end in a rather beautiful and fun fashion; not much to comment about on ‘The Neville‘ front but suffice to say that the whole area is steeped in ‘Neville’ history and intrigue with a very special day to come on day four…

 

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Aug 2017

 

 

QUEST TWENTY THREE CONT:

  • ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH
  • ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND
  • DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH

ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH: ESCOMBE NEAR BISHOP AUKLAND: Escomb is situated two miles west of Bishop Auckland in the Wear Valley. The church was built around 675AD with stone probably from the Roman Fort at Binchester and is the oldest church in the country. It was originally thought that the church was an offshoot of one of the local monastries at Whitby of Hartlepool, but this s only one of several possibilities as there are no known written records until 990AD.

The church, as one would expect is small and simple, befitting the time in which it was built. It is set amidst a well kept graveyard with some unusual gravestones in the burial ground with an ancient sundial above the porch entrance.

Once inside, one can tell the church is lovingly looked after; it has a beautiful stillness and peace about it and one can still see a few traces of the medieval painting on the archway entrance to the altar area, although some items such as the shield once prominent upon the wall has sadly not stood the test of time, as befalls many original items once prominent in many churches and some of the original paintwork about the church has also fallen prey to the ravages of time.  Thers is also a very ancient cross behind the altar depicting the ‘Fleur De Lys’ which one can barely make out do to age and earthy time… There were beautiful fresh flowers within the church and a tapistry of Celtic design crafted by local people, set in an alcove on the wall. There was a lovely feeling of peace and some very calming energies here. There was also an interesting phenomona of the greenery outside of the church displaying as a beautiful shade of blue through the church windows, which indeed it should be…

 

<click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escomb_Church

Let Alek explain further in this short video below & show you around to explain the connections to the Neville bloodline.

ESCOMBE SAXON CHURCH

 

 The church is well looked after and well loved, which one can most certainly tell.

 

DAY THREE: ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND: Of course everyone is very familiar with Rosslyn Chapel, (formerly known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew) due to it’s inclusion in popular modern fiction and movies. I had visited the chapel previously yet was very much looking forward to visiting it again. The previous time i had visited, the chapel was hidden behind scaffolding; much renevation work was in progress, but as a bonus we did however get to walk around the actual roof of the chapel along the scaffolding itself – an experience not to be missed! So to see the chapel now in all it’s unfettered splendour was to be a treat indeed.

http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

The chapel has strong connections to the Sinclair family, who have been it’s custodians  over the years and also connections, as one would rightly expect, to the Knight Templars, in particular to the ROS and the Scottish Rite. Rosslyn Chapel was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness of the Scoto-Norman Sinclair family. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery. The Neville connection here is that the Sinclairs and the Nevilles have ‘been in bed together’ since the dawn of time!

 

Some fine examples of the beautiful stone work of the chapel <click on an image to enlarge>

Over the years many secrets and tales of intrigue have been associated with Rosslyn Chapel; tales that connect to the Knight Templars, the FreeMasons, Secret Ceremonies and indeed even to the Holy Grail and The Ark of the Covernent; one can only wonder as to the real truths hidden below the surface…. Sadly most of the sacred objects and artifacts of importance and significance have now been removed from the chapel for safe keeping and to this end the chapel has lost it’s very sacred energy and is sadly no more than a library of codes and hidden knowledge. I was glad to have visited Rosslyn before the items where removed, especially certain items of a KT connection that i was very drawn towards and of which i noticed imnediately that they were no longer there; i was glad to have felt those energies that were still there, at that time i visited previously. Interestingly the modern day tours of the Chapel do give out a great deal of  ‘misinformation’ to the public ears, but as we know, those who are meant to know will indeed, in time know.

 

Note that ‘The Jesus’ is saluting with the Ninasian salute as used within The Priory by it’s members. The Fleur de Lys depicted here is the only one to be found on the outside of the chapel, the photo from within the chapel is a representation of the ‘Raised Degree’

Sadly we unable to take photos inside of the chapel due to an ‘incident’ that happened there, but i was able to take many fine shots of the external architecture. I was glad to have been able to take shots of the interior last time i visited. As a footnote i did sneak one photo i was drawn too, see above….. 😉

DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH:  This church is renowned as having been the first collegiate church, in 1342, to have been established in the Lothians. The church was situated on the same site as the present-day parish church, on Queen’s Road just south of Dunbar town centre. The first mention of a church at Dunbar came in 1176 in the Taxatio of Lothian when the church was described as Eclessia de Dunbar. This church, dedicated to St Bega, served the parish as a whole until 1342 and its foundation as a collegiate church. On 21 April 1342, Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar was granted by charter, his right to the proprietorship of the church. The Dunbars were no strangers to the patronage of religious establishments, with the foundation of a house of Trinity friars in 1218, and then amonastery of Carmelite monks in 1263, by the 6th and 7th earls respectively. Dunbar Collegiate continued as decreed until it became forfeit to the crown in 1435. For a while the church was ‘enjoyed’ by the  Duke of Albany during the reign of King James 3rd of Scotland, before returning to the Dunbars. In 1483, it, once again, reverted to the crown and stayed that way until the Protestant reformation in 1560.

Sadly the church was totally closed when we were there but we did get some stunning views across the sea as the church is placed on a very commanding position with some very unusual stones and memorials in the graveyard.

The Neville family connection here is the family memorial, but sadly we were unable to investigate further on this occasion. <click on images to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Dunbar%20Collegiate%20Church

http://www.wow.com/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

Points to Consider:

  • Escombe Church, Raby Castle Chapel and St Andrew’s Church, all have a connection in respect of the Nevilles; they are all tied together.
  • The Sinclairs and the Nevilles have been connectted from time imemorial.
  • Just who really are ‘The Nevilles’, where did they come from, why are they so important and what is the purpose of their bloodline?

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2017

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

DSC02317 (1)

A very profound inscription with a much deeper meaning discovered in the graveyard at Dunbar…..

 

“The mortal must put on immortality”

“Until the day break, and the shadows flee away”

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”

Aug 2017

In blessed darkness will I walk my path with footfalls silent on the earth.

Never alone I wander through an age of eternal night times

Yet fear not my lack of human companionship.

Under heavens starry canopy my becoming of self completes,

For I see the world for what it is

And in acceptance I surrender to the future.

I see the dark and light as one as they become each other,

I see the sun, moon and stars revealed through times illusion

And I see the earth bound in sorrows; secrets forever hidden within the wyrd.

And yet I also see myself; I see my secret beyond the skin,

I feel the truth flowing as blood upon the land

And in truth and being I unravel upon the sands of time.

Those I knew as kin, never were

And those that truly speak come to me through ages past

Whispering the secrets to my existence from their alabaster beds.

I read the signs left hidden by kindred long ago,

I see the glory revealed in echoes of lives that still resonate

Upon the unending shores of time.

Yet is it only I who can truly see their unwritten language of the past,

Who can feel their energy vibrating still with life;

A life which reverberates through my body;

A record left of all times gone and those yet to come?

I tread the path of the guardians, the watchers, the keepers and the Protectors of Light.

I know they watch me; yet leave me be; acceptance.

Yet when the blood finally flows and the rising water cleanses

I too will protect and in my becoming, rise to new heights of understanding.

Watching from the shadows I bide my time

Wearing this cloak of glorious darkness I await my time

When I too will whisper my tale upon  Destiny’s Hill to those whom would sit and listen.

 

 

 

The Keeper of Scrolls

July 2017

Exmore 1

“Beautiful and Wild Exmoor which we all loved so much”

  • St Paul’s Church, Honiton:
  • St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway:
  • St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh:
  • St Michael’s Church, Beer:
  • Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: 
  • All Saint’s Church, Dulverton:
  • St Mary the Virgin, Lynton:
  • Valley of the Rocks, Lynton:
  • St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall:
  • Braddock Church, Churchyard & Fields: Cornwall:

Our next quest was amazingly Quest 21 and so starting out in the direction of Devon and Cornwall, we travelled all day down country to Woodbury in Devon, just outside of Honiton; our base for the next few days. To start off our journey and explanation of the area, here is a taster in the link below of what was to come…

EXETER, DEVON: PLACES OF PEACE & PLACES OF POWER

 

EXETER CATHEDRAL & EXMOOR: OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE COIN: Two totally opposite ends of the spectrum are portrayed in the above video, filmed in the beautiful and largely unspoilt county of Devon.  Exeter Catherdral on the one hand is a vast and amazing building; a wondrous piece of architecture in fact; yet it is sadly a place of strange and very draining energies, experienced by all to one degree or another. I certainly got very zapped and depleted by the energies here, so much so i felt quite unwell upon entering the Cathedral and had to sit down for a few minutes to re-align myself…
Exmoor on the other hand is a beautifully stunning place of natural peace, beauty and tranquility, very reviving, very refreshing and the time we were there the sky was a clear blue with no sign of a chemtrail anyway in sight, with the air being pure and untainted; two sides of coin then. Interestingly too, no sign of any earth curvature on the 360 degree video we filmed up on Exmoor. The one very interesting discovery from inside of the cathedral was the depiction of ‘The Jesus’ from around the front of the pulpit, showing quiet clearly the Ninasian salute; feel free to wonder why ‘The Jesus’ is shown using this sign and just what exactly is ‘The Ninasian Salute’ and from whence did it originate….

The Ninasian Salute shown here <click on all photos to expand & enlarge>

Day One Friday 21st April 2017: St Paul’s Church, Honiton: Honiton is a bustling market town and civil parish in East Devon, close to the River Otter and the home of the once thriving lace making industry. The town grew up along the line of ‘The Fosse Way’, the ancient Roman road which links Exeter to Lincoln, of which Honiton was an important stopping off point with a mention in the Doomsday Book.

Although the heyday of the lace making industry was in the 17th century, Queen Victoria, who herself had many connections to the area, famously used Honiton lace on her wedding gown. The gown can be seen in all it’s fine splendour in the local museum next to the church; the actual dress itself being made in the nearby village of Beer. Lace making was introduced to the area by Flemish migrants in the Elizabethan era and although the lace making industry has greatly declined, there is something of a small resurgence as local people are encouraged to take up the craft once more, for fear of it dying out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honiton

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/honiton-st-pauls.htm

St Paul’s Church: which is right next door to the lace museum, which itself was once an old chapel, is very well kept and obviously loved by the local community but sadly has been much modernised and in the process of which, has lost some of its much older artifacts and items of interest to us upon this quest;  it has sadly lost it’s ‘energies’ too, although intrestingly there may, as mentioned in the video be interesting finds within the very foundations of St. Paul’s Church itself.

Inside and out of Honiton Church in Devon, showing ‘The Ford line’ connection too. Click on individual photos to enlarge.

  • The bloodline connection here is of Henry John Clarke (or variations of the spelling) 1900 – 1982 (Our Alek’s GGF)

See our link below for our account of St Paul’s Church Honiton & St Michael’s Church Farway

ST PAULS CHURCH HONITON & ST MICHAELS CHURCH FARWAY

 

St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway: Hidden away off the beaten track, this beautiful church is well and truly secluded within the Devonshire countryside, and very importantly placed within our quests with the knowledge that those who are meant to find it will indeed do so. The church was built in the Norman period with a west tower added in the 15th century with a north aisle being added in 1682, though the entire church was rebuilt in 1877. ‘The East Devon Way’ long distance footpath runs directly past the church.

Farway Church & Graveyard, near Exmoor

There are many Templar and Freemasonic symbols within this church, which are a delight to discover and the whole church itself has an amazing feeling to it. The symbols significant here include the Rose Cross, the Red Rose, The Red Robes of the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (King of Kings) and the Red Wings of the Archangels; red being the colour of blood, of the rose and of sacrifice and obviously very significant here. Also here we seee the ‘triskelion’ symbol with the daisys and the ‘leaves of hope’, both of which relate to higher Masonic chapters. The video above will show and explain more.

Templar & Masonic influences and symbolism inside of Farway Church

Local tales of interest are of a Humphrey Hutchins who was ploughing the land at the top of the hill when his plough turned up a crock of gold. He gave part of his miraculous treasure to the church to rebuild the north aisle. The field where Hutchins discovered his golden hoard is still known as ‘Money Acre’; sadly no sign of any further hoards while we were there. In the church yard are a pair of old yew trees. The largest of which measures 25 feet around its base and is thought to be 800 years old.

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/farway.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Robert Clark 1773 – 1861 (Our Alek’s 4xGGF) but John Moyne is also an important character to research.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh: Cotleigh is a small, pretty village and civil parish near Honiton in the beating heart of rural Devon; it is the final resting place of the author John Green. Once again another of Devon’s churches to be found well off the beaten track, nestled in the heart of the most delightful and beautiful scenery that one could possibly imagine. People have been praying at this site since 500 BC and in it’s present guise is a traditional old fashioned English church. The church was restored with a rebuilt chancel in 1867 with local stone and flint rubble with Beerstone and some Hamstone detail; the tower is partly plastered with a slate roof and sadly most of the exterior detail has been replaced.

St Michael’s Church Cotleigh showing the Neville Shield, the Lilly Banner and the mystrious hidden vault in the grave yard.

The church boasts some rather unsual and stunning stained glass windows; non more so than those showing the ‘Chi Rho’ symbol in it’s full glory; the very first thing one notices when pulling up outside the shurch, we comment and expand upon further in the video, sharing the “Blood turn Black and Blood turn Blue” aspect that Priory and Craft folk will relate to. The fittings inside the church are not that old, yet some very interesting symbolism on the stained glass windows and an interesting church banner beside the altar depicting a lily, with strong hints to Sumerian connections and to the Alpha and Omega. There is also a modern version of The Neville Sheild hanging just inside the entrance. Outside in the grave yard we came across a rather mysterious hidden vault where in past times there would have been steps leading down to; now hidden by the hand of time and possibly mankind….

The stunningly beautiful and magical windows inside of Cotleigh Church – click on image to enlarge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotleigh

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir William Clark 1804 – 1861 (Aleks 3xGGF) and also Adophus Clark – a past rector.

See our link below for our account of St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh and St Michael’s Church, Beer

ST MICHAELS CHURCH’S: COTLEIGH & BEER

 

St Michael’s Church, Beer: The present church was erected in 1877 but a previous church had exsited on the site since about 1600. An even earlier religous building was thought to have stood here dating back to  1122AD when Beer and Seaton belonged to the Abbey of Sherbourn

St Michael’s Church Beer; in the ‘devils own’ village  (Click on photos to expand)

The village of Beer is traditional and lively with some fine old buildings full of character; it even has a stream running down the side of the main street and through it. Beer is nicknamed ‘The Devils Own Village’ and fascinatingly has many connections from it’s past history to the very devil himself. It is thought very apt then that the Archangel that threw Satan out of heaven should be the patron saint of the church itself and seemingly there are other ‘satanic’ influences inside the church, if one knows what one is looking for and explained further in the video. Again more Masonic influences here and some interesting symbolic windows and artifacts found within and also explained. As always, these churches, as are all the churches we visit, are found on ancients sites of ‘energy alignments‘ puposefully hidden aons ago within our planet.

Stained glass windows at Beer with connections to the ‘Bennu Bird’ and the ‘Wolf in Sheeps Clothing’ (click to expand inages)

http://pastremains.co.uk/stmichaelsbeer.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Edward Clark  1574 – 1623 (Our Alek’s 9xGGF) and Walter George Clark.

Day Two Saturday 22nd April 2017: Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: This huge cathedral in the heart of the bright and busy city of Exeter is properly known as the Cathedral of St Peter at Exeter; being an Anglican cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, Devon. The founding of the cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter dating from 1050 when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107 William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style.

Exeter Cathedral – click to enlarge

The present building was completed by about 1400 and has several noteable features including an early set of misery cords, an astronomical clock and the longest uninterupted vaulted ceiling in England. The catherdral is built in the Norman Romanesque style and the two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls survive the present cathedral. A major rebuild in decorated Gothic style was carried out  between c. 1270 and c. 1350, where the Norman towers were incoporated into this enlarged building as the North and South Transepts. It is a vast magnificant building yet i could not help feeling that when looking up at the ceiling, that i was trapped inside a very large extinct whale…..

The Neville Crest in situ can be seen placed in the right hand side of the catherdral when facing the altar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter_Cathedral

  • The bloodline connection is once again that of ‘The ‘Nevilles’ particularily Garth Neville-Walford, Captain of the Royal Artillery who died 26th April 1915.

 

All Saint’s Church, Dulverton: This pretty little church is once again situated right off the beaten track in a small village in the heart of Devon. It has a timeless peace about the place and is set within the typically traditional English graveyard. This present church has been here since the early 1800, but before that the site had been in use for seemingly aons;  the use of which was a for a very different purpose. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1885 in Pependicular style, with the exception of the plain tower, of moorland character which is said to be or 12th to 13th century origin.

Beautiful Dulverton near Exmoor: Also in the church grounds is a very interesting and ancient way marker which no doubt has many a tale to tell…

There are many very interesting artefacts and histories within the church itself. The ‘bloodline’ connection here is that of the Neville and Cainan connection; the Cainan line which can be traced back to 7000 years ago, which together with some very fascinating archeolological discoveries under the actual church itself, made for a fascinating and worthwhile trip across the stunning moors.  The said discoveries were in the form of excavations beneath the flagstone floor of the northen aisle, which revealed a set of five stone steps observed via a ventilation hole. This set of steps led down to a blocked corridoor, the walls of which were painted white. Directly to the south of the central aisle a concave area of brick work was revealed beneath a row of pews. The curved brick work is very likely to be the top of a vault and if so may have formed the entrance to a crypt which extends across the central part of the nave. It may be that the vault and steps relate to an earlier phase of the church prior to the 1850’s rebuild. As an observation, we have come to realise and recognise that many of the churches visited on our quest do have hidden underground vaults, whether hidden on purpose or within the confines of passing time, i will allow you to decide, but often one need to be eagle eyed and awake to recognise the signs of ‘activities’ now well buried within time itself….

All Saints Church Dulverton

Most of the interior of the church is original and there are some very symbolic stained glass windows here depicting man’s evolution and a rather special statue of St Nikalaus complete, dare i say it, with horns; something that many of you astute readers will find interesting to say the lest. The Lady Chapel is dedicated in this instance to a male species. The tomb there, of the Viscount de Vesci, who died in the Great War, has an amazing amount of energy emanating from it and almost felt alive; in fact the whole area felt qute amazing. In the chapel itself are to be found the Templar Cross and the Fleur de Lyss and there are other artifacts within the church older than the church itself. Once again there is reference here to the ‘Ninasian’ salute and the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (the King of Kings)

The stained glass windows at Dulverton Church

See our link below to find out much more on Dulverton Church

ALL SAINTS CHURCH DULVERTON

  • The bloodline connection is that of The ‘Neville’ and ‘Cainan’ connection

Day Three Saturday 22nd April 2017: St Mary the Virgin, Lynton: Sitting atop of tall craggy cliffs and overlooking, on this particular day, the most crystal clear azure-blue sea, St Mary the Virgin Church could possibly have the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited. We were so lucky when we arrived as we did not expect to be able to enter the church due to the lateness of the hour, yet were delighted to discover that a local meeting taking place was just coming to an end so were able to sneak in and take a few photos but sadly no video out of respect for the gentleman who kindly let us have a quick look around before locking up.

“…the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited”

Lynton itself is a small town on the Exmoor coast, settled atop of the cliffs above the harbour village of Lynmouth, connected to Lynton by the narrow gauge cliff railway. The beautiful church here on its commanding outlook across the bay has been enlarged and altered over the years, most notable in 1741 when the nave was build, yet the tower is mainly 13th century. Much of the rebuilding is broadly medieval in form, yet there is some good Art Nouveau detailing, including some combined with neo-Norman features. Many of the towns buildings were constructed in the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century and befitting a cliff top seaside town, many of the streets up on different levels connected by alleyway and steps going up and down. Evidence of Iron Age activity can be found at the nearby Roborough Castle and the novel Lorna Doone was set in the Lynton area and their are many beautiful coastal walks and paths running nearby. Nearby is the spectacular Valley of the Rocks with it’s stunning views and mysterious tales of the werewolves to just waiting to be divulged and our next port of call. But before moving on we made time to simply stand and stare in peace at this ‘out of the world‘ view….

The interior of St Mary the Virgin Church at Lynton, once again showing the Neville Sheild and some beautiful stained glass windows

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynton

  • The bloodline connection is again that of The ‘Cainan’ connection

Valley of the Rocks, Lynton: Tales of Old Kingdoms and werewolves may seem to have fallen straight out of the pages of Folkelore and Fantasy, but are they? The Valley of the Rocks is a truly magical and wild place where these ancient tales of of old kingdoms and roaming werewolves really do come to life. It is situated just half a mile west of Lynton in Devon and is a vast scenic area of outstanding natural beauty, with coastal views unsurpassed and ferral goats running wild. There have been many reported sightings of werewolf activity up to the 1990’s which we talk about further in the video.

A spectacular sunset over ‘The Valley of the Rocks’ which is not quite as ‘natural’ as one is led to believe….

But most importanly and undocumted, the whole area was once a vast early kingdom for the Irish Kings, of which almost nothing has ever been written about; it was the actual landing place of the first invading kings from Ireland who thus settled here and left many traces upon the land. My first instinctual thoughts when driving into the valley, not knowing anything about it, was ‘wow!’ what an amazing castle; something that took me completely by surprise! When one looks around the area one can indeed see the remains of a large fortress, temples and many other buildings of ancient everyday life of which is explained in the video but of which nothing is written about. One can sense a great power and energy alignment here as the early settlement was built purposefully  on the site of ancient pyramids placed within the land, by by those who came first with intent and design, hence why it is such an important place. The pyramids are there for all to see and ‘feel’ yet hidden carefully within ‘plain sight’ and most folks will never know… One can certainly feel the energies and power here; it is indeed a very sacred site. Interestingly as soon as we started filming, what had been a quiet and deserted scene was now populated by a mixture of ‘listeners’ and ‘watchers’ seemingly intent on diverting us off the track as it were, though patience and stealth prevailed. Listen carefully to the video for further explanation.

Close up detail of the ‘Old Kingdom’ showing where once fine buildings and temples etc would have been

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Rocks

The stunning sunset as we departed reluctantly from this very sacred place & video below with previously untold tellings

THE VALLEY OF THE ROCKS & OVER THE SEA TO ST MICHAELS MOUNT

 

Day Four Sunday 23rd April 2017: St Michael’s Mount: After a beautifully relaxing, yet all too brief journey across the sea to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, we embarked upon the shores of the the beautiful and fairy tale world of St Michael’s Mount. The mount has many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen, secrets not ever documented in the present world of men…. In the meantime enjoy the ride across the waters in the video above. 🙂

St Michael’s Mount & terraced gardens over looking the ocean & a first glimps of the solitary unmarked cross…

St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, linked to the mainland by a man-made causeway of granite, of which much of the actual island is made, and which is passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust; the castle and chapel having been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since about 1650. The earliest buildings on the summit date to the 12th century. The mount’s cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe many more tales that lie hidden within ‘folk memory’. Remains of trees have been seen at low tide following storms on the beach at Perranuthoe and radiocarbon dating has established the submerging of the hazle wood at about 1700BC.

Views from te summit overlooking the battlements & ocean – click to enlarge

Historically, St Michael’s Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, it was given to the Benedictine religous order  by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. There is evidence of people living in the area during the Neolithic period, as important ancient finds such as an arrow-head and flint tools have been unearthed in the gardens on the island.  It is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries and as said Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman Abbey of Mont Saint-Michael. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien house, as a side-effect of the of the war in France by Henry V, when it was given to the Abbess and Convent of Syon at Iselworth, Middlesex in 1424, thus ending its association with Mont St Michael and any connetion with Looe Island, dedicated to the Archangel Michael.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century and in 1275 an earthquake destroyed the original Priory Church, which was subsequently rebuilt in the late 14th century and has thus remained in use. In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake cause a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in ten minutes at St Michaels Mount, ebbing at the same rate and continuing to rise and fall for some five hours and it was reported that a great loss of life and property occurred along this Cornsh coast.

Inside the Abbey & Chapel on the mount – click each image to expand

A local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant names Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack took on this gigantic menace, who had an appetite for cattle and children, and killed him by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

On the quiet terraces of the island that overlook the sea, and not writen about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever but to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant ‘Neville Stronghold’. So for the first time on our quests we have mention now of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands….

Our lasting thoughts of that day would be with that solitary cross, that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound.and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty beyond the mundane…

  • The bloodline connection is of the ‘Solomon Solamh, whos unmarkd cross is seen above’ and again of the enigmatic ‘Nevilles’

Farewell to a magical island

Braddock Church Braddock Cornwall: Churchyard and Fields: So here we were in the dead of night, on a night time quest to a very deserted and lonely church in Cornwall. Braddock Church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin; the earliest parts of the building being Norman with a Norman font inside. This area is the site of the Battle of Braddock Down; a hard fought battle of the civil war which took place on the 19th January 1643. It was a crushing defeat for the parliamentarian army where many souls were lost. It is the site of the Cromwellian Defeat in fact. Braddock (or Broadoak) village itself is a civil parish in Cornwall which is situated about seven miles west of Liskard and five miles south-east of Bodmin. it is rural in character and is well wooded, especially in the north. The earliest parts of the church are Norman but an asle and a tower were added in the 15th century. The font is Norman and there are many good examples of woodcarvings in the church. Obviously it was the dead of night so unable to get in and see for our selves.

There are stories abound here of various manifestations in the churchyard and nearby fields, roaming vampires and connections to the werewolf tales at the Valley of the Rocks. and so we were here to investigate further; to see if there were any truths in the tales.

Although nothing untoward shows in the photos one does get a sense of the desolation & atmosphere here; amazed that anything came out at all…

It was very dark and challenging to film and the sense of forboding and negative energies felt by most of our party is very hard to convey on film, but one can hear the reactions of our party as we venture around the church, especially when we all heard the deep growling warning noise emanating from out of the darkness. One does get a sense of the darkness and desolation of the area too; both of physical and of a metaphysical darkness as the link below treis to convey….

Again not much on film but a very interesting experience at Bradock Church in Cornwall

HAUNTED BRADOCK CHURCH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock,_Cornwallmystery

 

the moors

We loved Devon & Cornwall, the peace, the beauty, the many tales and of course the truths…”

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017 “The Keeper of Scrolls”

THE PRIORY INESTIGATES: TEMPLAR SITES OF SOUTH WALES

 QUEST NUMBER SEVENTEEN: ABERGAVENNY, TREVETHIN AND PONTYPOOL

St Mary’s Priory in Abergavenny: Our first visit of this particular day was to St Mary’s Priory in Abergavenny,  Momouthshire, South Wales; just six miles from the English border and quite a long journey from Cambridge. Abergavenny is a lively market town with strong Roman connections. St Mary’s Priory, originally a Benedictine Priory, is a very peaceful church know locally as the Westminster Abbey of Wales due to it’s large size and number of high status, ancient and intricately carved tombs inside; mostly of Knights Templar and associated heritage. The church also houses a very beautiful, modern window with some interesting ancient symbolism incorporated into the design.

 

Templar symbolism and ‘bloodline’ heritage within the church, and interestingly a sacrificial altar in the church grounds. A big thanks for my collegue for sharing these photos <click on images to enlarge>

Sadly we could not film or comment on the history, interior and full meaning of the church, on this occasion, as it was being set up with amplifyers and mikes for the carol service, but hopefully another time we can do just that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abergavenny

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priory_Church_of_St_Mary,_Abergavenny

St Cadoc’s Church at Trevethin: The second visit was to St Cadoc’s Church at Trevethin, also known as the Mother Church of Pontypool, so we were very suprised to find it well and truly locked up. In fact we nearly did not get to see inside of this fine Templar church at all, had it not been for some fine detective work from Alek our head researcher, so yet again patience and tenacity prevailed and won the day; hence were very lucky to have it unlocked especially for us. The wait was very worthwhile for there were some very fine, important and significant Templar associations and symbolism within the very church. As we were accompanied on this brief but worthwhile visit, it was again not possible to do much filming or explanations; just a quick snippet of footage which sadly was rather too blurred to include here

While were were waiting to go inside the church, we had a good stroll around the large old graveyard. Some areas were completely left wild and very natural; the church is on a hillside and yet is also on a public ‘through’ walkway. One could not help but notice the large number of obelisks in the graveyard and the ‘Egyptian’ feel to the cemetry ornanmentation. One very interesting discovery whilst walking among the stones was an ‘entry to the vault’ sign upon the ground where a tomb should be and then a few yard away, down a grassy track leading away from the main part of the graveyard, the discovery that the ground underneath was distinctly hollow sounding and actually moved up and down when bounced upon; i would not like to comment but more than likely a mysterious hidden underground chamber…