Tag Archive: History


DAY THREE CONT:

  • HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON
  • HAILES CASTLE
  • HOLY ISLAND

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON: Still in Scotland, day three continued with our next visit which was to be the Holy Trinity Church at Haddington in the diocese of Edinburgh.  Set in a kind of small cul-de-sac off from the main street in a heritage area, both church and grounds are beautifully kept; from the outside the church looks quite small yet upon entering it appears much larger than it looks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haddington,_East_Lothian

With funds raised by the congregation and a very generous donation from the Earl of Wemyss, the first phase of the church building was constructed in 1770 on the site of the original ‘Lamp of Lothian’ which, from the middle of the thirteenth century until 1555, had been the property of the Franciscan Friars. It was built of a local stone known as Rattlebags, a volcanic agglomerate (a complex breccia made of fragments of lavas). An article in the transactions of the Antiquaries of Scotland published in 1792 describes the building as a very elegant chapel. Holy Trinity Church is a Grade B Listed building and is in the Haddington Conservation Area.

 

In 1843 the church was ‘Gothicized’ with the addition of the nave parapet, nave south elevation window surrounds (note the lancet shape), porch and shallow apsidal sanctuary, using a different stone, a finer, pale buff sandstone.  The same year, the committee appointed to report on the state of the building described it as being extremely uniform and homely. Following completion of the reconstruction, a service of dedication to the Holy Trinity and of consecration was perfor med by the Rt Rev Charles Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh, who in 1814 had returned to Scotland to serve as an Incumbent in Haddington.

 

The interior of the church showing ‘The Jesus’ using the now familiar ‘Ninasian Salute’ used by Priory members. Symbols such as the Lamb of God and other Templar symbols are to be discovered throughout the church and a beautiful tapistry on the altar, which is described as three angels, though it could be the ‘Three Marys’.

In 1930, the present Chancel was added to replace the apse and the interior remodelled in neo-Byzantine style by the Scottish architect B N H Orphoot. The Chancel external walls were built of Rattlebags and sandstone but have reinforced concrete detailing such as columns, arches, decorative bands and the corbel course below the gutter.

 

The church also had some interesting detail on its exterior walls <click on all images to enlarge>

Holy Trinity Church had some nice features and details both inside and out; it was a peaceful enough place but i got the feeling that  lot of the older artifacts from the past had been removed or had not stood the test of time and therefore the older ‘energies’ were no longer there

http://holytrinityhaddington.co.uk/

HAILES CASTLE: We paid an unexpected visit to Hailes Castle; one time home to Mary Queen of Scots.The castle is a mainly 14th century castle about a mile and a half south west of East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland and is quite secluded and hidden away. This castle, which has a fine riverside setting, belonged to the Hepburn family during the most important centuries of its existence. The castle was founded as a fortified tower house by Hugo de Gourlay before 1300, making it one of the oldest constructions of its kind in Scotland. The castle has a long and interesting history which one can read more of on the internet and it is certainly worth a visit to look around and explore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailes_Castle

 

This is where Mary Queen of Scots was staying as an adult, for it was deemed to be a safe place for her; secluded and hidden away and she had freinds and allies on her side; however this was not to be and history tells us otherwise…..

Just opposite the castle is a hill fort by the name of ‘Traprain Law‘ that rises in an imposing fashion above the horizon. It has an interesting name, yet was only known as ‘Traprain Law’ from the late 18th century, taking its name from a local hamlet. This is etymologically a Cumbric name cognate with Welsh tref ‘farm’ and either pren ‘tree’ or bryn ‘hill’. Law comes from the Old English word hlāw, meaning a burial mound.

It rises about 221m (724 feet) in elevation and is located 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Haddington. It covered at its maximum extent about 16 ha (40 acres) and must have been a veritable town. Whether it was a seasonal meeting place or permanent settlement is a matter of speculation.  Also speculated is whether the site is the site of an actual pyramid or not….  But it was a burial place by around 1500 BC with evidence of occupation and signs of ramparts after 1000 BC and has been ocupied at various points throughout it’s history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traprain_Law

 

Trapain Law together with Hailes Castle: an interesting area to stop a while to soak up more history…

HOLY ISLAND: The last point of call for day three was to be Holy Island; more of a winding down visit after a very busy day where many miles were covered. We arrived on the off chance knowing that the tides may not be in our favour and this did prove to be true. The evening sunset was amazing, so no better place in which to unwind whilst watching (and dodging) the beautiful incoming tides. When the tide is out one can pass happily back and forth from the main land to Holy Island and Lindisfarne, but when the tide is incoming one literally has to watch ones back and ones parked car as we discovered!

 

What better way to end the day than to watch the tide coming in…. <click on images to enlarge>

https://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumerland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD. It was an important centre of Celtc Christianlty under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindidfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Normsn conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550. Much more can be red about it’s history here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindisfarne

 

“Incoming Tide!!!”

So day three came to an end in a rather beautiful and fun fashion; not much to comment about on ‘The Neville‘ front but suffice to say that the whole area is steeped in ‘Neville’ history and intrigue with a very special day to come on day four…

 

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Aug 2017

 

 

QUEST TWENTY THREE CONT:

  • ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH
  • ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND
  • DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH

ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH: ESCOMBE NEAR BISHOP AUKLAND: Escomb is situated two miles west of Bishop Auckland in the Wear Valley. The church was built around 675AD with stone probably from the Roman Fort at Binchester and is the oldest church in the country. It was originally thought that the church was an offshoot of one of the local monastries at Whitby of Hartlepool, but this s only one of several possibilities as there are no known written records until 990AD.

The church, as one would expect is small and simple, befitting the time in which it was built. It is set amidst a well kept graveyard with some unusual gravestones in the burial ground with an ancient sundial above the porch entrance.

Once inside, one can tell the church is lovingly looked after; it has a beautiful stillness and peace about it and one can still see a few traces of the medieval painting on the archway entrance to the altar area, although some items such as the shield once prominent upon the wall has sadly not stood the test of time, as befalls many original items once prominent in many churches and some of the original paintwork about the church has also fallen prey to the ravages of time.  Thers is also a very ancient cross behind the altar depicting the ‘Fleur De Lys’ which one can barely make out do to age and earthy time… There were beautiful fresh flowers within the church and a tapistry of Celtic design crafted by local people, set in an alcove on the wall. There was a lovely feeling of peace and some very calming energies here. There was also an interesting phenomona of the greenery outside of the church displaying as a beautiful shade of blue through the church windows, which indeed it should be…

 

<click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escomb_Church

Let Alek explain further in this short video below & show you around to explain the connections to the Neville bloodline.

ESCOMBE SAXON CHURCH

 

 The church is well looked after and well loved, which one can most certainly tell.

 

DAY THREE: ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND: Of course everyone is very familiar with Rosslyn Chapel, (formerly known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew) due to it’s inclusion in popular modern fiction and movies. I had visited the chapel previously yet was very much looking forward to visiting it again. The previous time i had visited, the chapel was hidden behind scaffolding; much renevation work was in progress, but as a bonus we did however get to walk around the actual roof of the chapel along the scaffolding itself – an experience not to be missed! So to see the chapel now in all it’s unfettered splendour was to be a treat indeed.

http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

The chapel has strong connections to the Sinclair family, who have been it’s custodians  over the years and also connections, as one would rightly expect, to the Knight Templars, in particular to the ROS and the Scottish Rite. Rosslyn Chapel was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness of the Scoto-Norman Sinclair family. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery. The Neville connection here is that the Sinclairs and the Nevilles have ‘been in bed together’ since the dawn of time!

 

Some fine examples of the beautiful stone work of the chapel <click on an image to enlarge>

Over the years many secrets and tales of intrigue have been associated with Rosslyn Chapel; tales that connect to the Knight Templars, the FreeMasons, Secret Ceremonies and indeed even to the Holy Grail and The Ark of the Covernent; one can only wonder as to the real truths hidden below the surface…. Sadly most of the sacred objects and artifacts of importance and significance have now been removed from the chapel for safe keeping and to this end the chapel has lost it’s very sacred energy and is sadly no more than a library of codes and hidden knowledge. I was glad to have visited Rosslyn before the items where removed, especially certain items of a KT connection that i was very drawn towards and of which i noticed imnediately that they were no longer there; i was glad to have felt those energies that were still there, at that time i visited previously. Interestingly the modern day tours of the Chapel do give out a great deal of  ‘misinformation’ to the public ears, but as we know, those who are meant to know will indeed, in time know.

 

Note that ‘The Jesus’ is saluting with the Ninasian salute as used within The Priory by it’s members. The Fleur de Lys depicted here is the only one to be found on the outside of the chapel, the photo from within the chapel is a representation of the ‘Raised Degree’

Sadly we unable to take photos inside of the chapel due to an ‘incident’ that happened there, but i was able to take many fine shots of the external architecture. I was glad to have been able to take shots of the interior last time i visited. As a footnote i did sneak one photo i was drawn too, see above….. 😉

DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH:  This church is renowned as having been the first collegiate church, in 1342, to have been established in the Lothians. The church was situated on the same site as the present-day parish church, on Queen’s Road just south of Dunbar town centre. The first mention of a church at Dunbar came in 1176 in the Taxatio of Lothian when the church was described as Eclessia de Dunbar. This church, dedicated to St Bega, served the parish as a whole until 1342 and its foundation as a collegiate church. On 21 April 1342, Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar was granted by charter, his right to the proprietorship of the church. The Dunbars were no strangers to the patronage of religious establishments, with the foundation of a house of Trinity friars in 1218, and then amonastery of Carmelite monks in 1263, by the 6th and 7th earls respectively. Dunbar Collegiate continued as decreed until it became forfeit to the crown in 1435. For a while the church was ‘enjoyed’ by the  Duke of Albany during the reign of King James 3rd of Scotland, before returning to the Dunbars. In 1483, it, once again, reverted to the crown and stayed that way until the Protestant reformation in 1560.

Sadly the church was totally closed when we were there but we did get some stunning views across the sea as the church is placed on a very commanding position with some very unusual stones and memorials in the graveyard.

The Neville family connection here is the family memorial, but sadly we were unable to investigate further on this occasion. <click on images to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Dunbar%20Collegiate%20Church

http://www.wow.com/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

Points to Consider:

  • Escombe Church, Raby Castle Chapel and St Andrew’s Church, all have a connection in respect of the Nevilles; they are all tied together.
  • The Sinclairs and the Nevilles have been connectted from time imemorial.
  • Just who really are ‘The Nevilles’, where did they come from, why are they so important and what is the purpose of their bloodline?

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2017

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

DSC02317 (1)

A very profound inscription with a much deeper meaning discovered in the graveyard at Dunbar…..

 

“The mortal must put on immortality”

“Until the day break, and the shadows flee away”

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”

Aug 2017

In blessed darkness will I walk my path with footfalls silent on the earth.

Never alone I wander through an age of eternal night times

Yet fear not my lack of human companionship.

Under heavens starry canopy my becoming of self completes,

For I see the world for what it is

And in acceptance I surrender to the future.

I see the dark and light as one as they become each other,

I see the sun, moon and stars revealed through times illusion

And I see the earth bound in sorrows; secrets forever hidden within the wyrd.

And yet I also see myself; I see my secret beyond the skin,

I feel the truth flowing as blood upon the land

And in truth and being I unravel upon the sands of time.

Those I knew as kin, never were

And those that truly speak come to me through ages past

Whispering the secrets to my existence from their alabaster beds.

I read the signs left hidden by kindred long ago,

I see the glory revealed in echoes of lives that still resonate

Upon the unending shores of time.

Yet is it only I who can truly see their unwritten language of the past,

Who can feel their energy vibrating still with life;

A life which reverberates through my body;

A record left of all times gone and those yet to come?

I tread the path of the guardians, the watchers, the keepers and the Protectors of Light.

I know they watch me; yet leave me be; acceptance.

Yet when the blood finally flows and the rising water cleanses

I too will protect and in my becoming, rise to new heights of understanding.

Watching from the shadows I bide my time

Wearing this cloak of glorious darkness I await my time

When I too will whisper my tale upon  Destiny’s Hill to those whom would sit and listen.

 

 

The Keeper of Scrolls

July 2017

Exmore 1

“Beautiful and Wild Exmoor which we all loved so much”

  • St Paul’s Church, Honiton:
  • St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway:
  • St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh:
  • St Michael’s Church, Beer:
  • Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: 
  • All Saint’s Church, Dulverton:
  • St Mary the Virgin, Lynton:
  • Valley of the Rocks, Lynton:
  • St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall:
  • Braddock Church, Churchyard & Fields: Cornwall:

Our next quest was amazingly Quest 21 and so starting out in the direction of Devon and Cornwall, we travelled all day down country to Woodbury in Devon, just outside of Honiton; our base for the next few days. To start off our journey and explanation of the area, here is a taster in the link below of what was to come…

EXETER, DEVON: PLACES OF PEACE & PLACES OF POWER

 

EXETER CATHEDRAL & EXMOOR: OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE COIN: Two totally opposite ends of the spectrum are portrayed in the above video, filmed in the beautiful and largely unspoilt county of Devon.  Exeter Catherdral on the one hand is a vast and amazing building; a wondrous piece of architecture in fact; yet it is sadly a place of strange and very draining energies, experienced by all to one degree or another. I certainly got very zapped and depleted by the energies here, so much so i felt quite unwell upon entering the Cathedral and had to sit down for a few minutes to re-align myself…
Exmoor on the other hand is a beautifully stunning place of natural peace, beauty and tranquility, very reviving, very refreshing and the time we were there the sky was a clear blue with no sign of a chemtrail anyway in sight, with the air being pure and untainted; two sides of coin then. Interestingly too, no sign of any earth curvature on the 360 degree video we filmed up on Exmoor. The one very interesting discovery from inside of the cathedral was the depiction of ‘The Jesus’ from around the front of the pulpit, showing quiet clearly the Ninasian salute; feel free to wonder why ‘The Jesus’ is shown using this sign and just what exactly is ‘The Ninasian Salute’ and from whence did it originate….

The Ninasian Salute shown here <click on all photos to expand & enlarge>

Day One Friday 21st April 2017: St Paul’s Church, Honiton: Honiton is a bustling market town and civil parish in East Devon, close to the River Otter and the home of the once thriving lace making industry. The town grew up along the line of ‘The Fosse Way’, the ancient Roman road which links Exeter to Lincoln, of which Honiton was an important stopping off point with a mention in the Doomsday Book.

Although the heyday of the lace making industry was in the 17th century, Queen Victoria, who herself had many connections to the area, famously used Honiton lace on her wedding gown. The gown can be seen in all it’s fine splendour in the local museum next to the church; the actual dress itself being made in the nearby village of Beer. Lace making was introduced to the area by Flemish migrants in the Elizabethan era and although the lace making industry has greatly declined, there is something of a small resurgence as local people are encouraged to take up the craft once more, for fear of it dying out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honiton

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/honiton-st-pauls.htm

St Paul’s Church: which is right next door to the lace museum, which itself was once an old chapel, is very well kept and obviously loved by the local community but sadly has been much modernised and in the process of which, has lost some of its much older artifacts and items of interest to us upon this quest;  it has sadly lost it’s ‘energies’ too, although intrestingly there may, as mentioned in the video be interesting finds within the very foundations of St. Paul’s Church itself.

Inside and out of Honiton Church in Devon, showing ‘The Ford line’ connection too. Click on individual photos to enlarge.

  • The bloodline connection here is of Henry John Clarke (or variations of the spelling) 1900 – 1982 (Our Alek’s GGF)

See our link below for our account of St Paul’s Church Honiton & St Michael’s Church Farway

ST PAULS CHURCH HONITON & ST MICHAELS CHURCH FARWAY

 

St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway: Hidden away off the beaten track, this beautiful church is well and truly secluded within the Devonshire countryside, and very importantly placed within our quests with the knowledge that those who are meant to find it will indeed do so. The church was built in the Norman period with a west tower added in the 15th century with a north aisle being added in 1682, though the entire church was rebuilt in 1877. ‘The East Devon Way’ long distance footpath runs directly past the church.

Farway Church & Graveyard, near Exmoor

There are many Templar and Freemasonic symbols within this church, which are a delight to discover and the whole church itself has an amazing feeling to it. The symbols significant here include the Rose Cross, the Red Rose, The Red Robes of the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (King of Kings) and the Red Wings of the Archangels; red being the colour of blood, of the rose and of sacrifice and obviously very significant here. Also here we seee the ‘triskelion’ symbol with the daisys and the ‘leaves of hope’, both of which relate to higher Masonic chapters. The video above will show and explain more.

Templar & Masonic influences and symbolism inside of Farway Church

Local tales of interest are of a Humphrey Hutchins who was ploughing the land at the top of the hill when his plough turned up a crock of gold. He gave part of his miraculous treasure to the church to rebuild the north aisle. The field where Hutchins discovered his golden hoard is still known as ‘Money Acre’; sadly no sign of any further hoards while we were there. In the church yard are a pair of old yew trees. The largest of which measures 25 feet around its base and is thought to be 800 years old.

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/farway.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Robert Clark 1773 – 1861 (Our Alek’s 4xGGF) but John Moyne is also an important character to research.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh: Cotleigh is a small, pretty village and civil parish near Honiton in the beating heart of rural Devon; it is the final resting place of the author John Green. Once again another of Devon’s churches to be found well off the beaten track, nestled in the heart of the most delightful and beautiful scenery that one could possibly imagine. People have been praying at this site since 500 BC and in it’s present guise is a traditional old fashioned English church. The church was restored with a rebuilt chancel in 1867 with local stone and flint rubble with Beerstone and some Hamstone detail; the tower is partly plastered with a slate roof and sadly most of the exterior detail has been replaced.

St Michael’s Church Cotleigh showing the Neville Shield, the Lilly Banner and the mystrious hidden vault in the grave yard.

The church boasts some rather unsual and stunning stained glass windows; non more so than those showing the ‘Chi Rho’ symbol in it’s full glory; the very first thing one notices when pulling up outside the shurch, we comment and expand upon further in the video, sharing the “Blood turn Black and Blood turn Blue” aspect that Priory and Craft folk will relate to. The fittings inside the church are not that old, yet some very interesting symbolism on the stained glass windows and an interesting church banner beside the altar depicting a lily, with strong hints to Sumerian connections and to the Alpha and Omega. There is also a modern version of The Neville Sheild hanging just inside the entrance. Outside in the grave yard we came across a rather mysterious hidden vault where in past times there would have been steps leading down to; now hidden by the hand of time and possibly mankind….

The stunningly beautiful and magical windows inside of Cotleigh Church – click on image to enlarge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotleigh

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir William Clark 1804 – 1861 (Aleks 3xGGF) and also Adophus Clark – a past rector.

See our link below for our account of St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh and St Michael’s Church, Beer

ST MICHAELS CHURCH’S: COTLEIGH & BEER

 

St Michael’s Church, Beer: The present church was erected in 1877 but a previous church had exsited on the site since about 1600. An even earlier religous building was thought to have stood here dating back to  1122AD when Beer and Seaton belonged to the Abbey of Sherbourn

St Michael’s Church Beer; in the ‘devils own’ village  (Click on photos to expand)

The village of Beer is traditional and lively with some fine old buildings full of character; it even has a stream running down the side of the main street and through it. Beer is nicknamed ‘The Devils Own Village’ and fascinatingly has many connections from it’s past history to the very devil himself. It is thought very apt then that the Archangel that threw Satan out of heaven should be the patron saint of the church itself and seemingly there are other ‘satanic’ influences inside the church, if one knows what one is looking for and explained further in the video. Again more Masonic influences here and some interesting symbolic windows and artifacts found within and also explained. As always, these churches, as are all the churches we visit, are found on ancients sites of ‘energy alignments‘ puposefully hidden aons ago within our planet.

Stained glass windows at Beer with connections to the ‘Bennu Bird’ and the ‘Wolf in Sheeps Clothing’ (click to expand inages)

http://pastremains.co.uk/stmichaelsbeer.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Edward Clark  1574 – 1623 (Our Alek’s 9xGGF) and Walter George Clark.

Day Two Saturday 22nd April 2017: Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: This huge cathedral in the heart of the bright and busy city of Exeter is properly known as the Cathedral of St Peter at Exeter; being an Anglican cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, Devon. The founding of the cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter dating from 1050 when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107 William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style.

Exeter Cathedral – click to enlarge

The present building was completed by about 1400 and has several noteable features including an early set of misery cords, an astronomical clock and the longest uninterupted vaulted ceiling in England. The catherdral is built in the Norman Romanesque style and the two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls survive the present cathedral. A major rebuild in decorated Gothic style was carried out  between c. 1270 and c. 1350, where the Norman towers were incoporated into this enlarged building as the North and South Transepts. It is a vast magnificant building yet i could not help feeling that when looking up at the ceiling, that i was trapped inside a very large extinct whale…..

The Neville Crest in situ can be seen placed in the right hand side of the catherdral when facing the altar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter_Cathedral

  • The bloodline connection is once again that of ‘The ‘Nevilles’ particularily Garth Neville-Walford, Captain of the Royal Artillery who died 26th April 1915.

 

All Saint’s Church, Dulverton: This pretty little church is once again situated right off the beaten track in a small village in the heart of Devon. It has a timeless peace about the place and is set within the typically traditional English graveyard. This present church has been here since the early 1800, but before that the site had been in use for seemingly aons;  the use of which was a for a very different purpose. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1885 in Pependicular style, with the exception of the plain tower, of moorland character which is said to be or 12th to 13th century origin.

Beautiful Dulverton near Exmoor: Also in the church grounds is a very interesting and ancient way marker which no doubt has many a tale to tell…

There are many very interesting artefacts and histories within the church itself. The ‘bloodline’ connection here is that of the Neville and Cainan connection; the Cainan line which can be traced back to 7000 years ago, which together with some very fascinating archeolological discoveries under the actual church itself, made for a fascinating and worthwhile trip across the stunning moors.  The said discoveries were in the form of excavations beneath the flagstone floor of the northen aisle, which revealed a set of five stone steps observed via a ventilation hole. This set of steps led down to a blocked corridoor, the walls of which were painted white. Directly to the south of the central aisle a concave area of brick work was revealed beneath a row of pews. The curved brick work is very likely to be the top of a vault and if so may have formed the entrance to a crypt which extends across the central part of the nave. It may be that the vault and steps relate to an earlier phase of the church prior to the 1850’s rebuild. As an observation, we have come to realise and recognise that many of the churches visited on our quest do have hidden underground vaults, whether hidden on purpose or within the confines of passing time, i will allow you to decide, but often one need to be eagle eyed and awake to recognise the signs of ‘activities’ now well buried within time itself….

All Saints Church Dulverton

Most of the interior of the church is original and there are some very symbolic stained glass windows here depicting man’s evolution and a rather special statue of St Nikalaus complete, dare i say it, with horns; something that many of you astute readers will find interesting to say the lest. The Lady Chapel is dedicated in this instance to a male species. The tomb there, of the Viscount de Vesci, who died in the Great War, has an amazing amount of energy emanating from it and almost felt alive; in fact the whole area felt qute amazing. In the chapel itself are to be found the Templar Cross and the Fleur de Lyss and there are other artifacts within the church older than the church itself. Once again there is reference here to the ‘Ninasian’ salute and the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (the King of Kings)

The stained glass windows at Dulverton Church

See our link below to find out much more on Dulverton Church

ALL SAINTS CHURCH DULVERTON

  • The bloodline connection is that of The ‘Neville’ and ‘Cainan’ connection

Day Three Saturday 22nd April 2017: St Mary the Virgin, Lynton: Sitting atop of tall craggy cliffs and overlooking, on this particular day, the most crystal clear azure-blue sea, St Mary the Virgin Church could possibly have the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited. We were so lucky when we arrived as we did not expect to be able to enter the church due to the lateness of the hour, yet were delighted to discover that a local meeting taking place was just coming to an end so were able to sneak in and take a few photos but sadly no video out of respect for the gentleman who kindly let us have a quick look around before locking up.

“…the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited”

Lynton itself is a small town on the Exmoor coast, settled atop of the cliffs above the harbour village of Lynmouth, connected to Lynton by the narrow gauge cliff railway. The beautiful church here on its commanding outlook across the bay has been enlarged and altered over the years, most notable in 1741 when the nave was build, yet the tower is mainly 13th century. Much of the rebuilding is broadly medieval in form, yet there is some good Art Nouveau detailing, including some combined with neo-Norman features. Many of the towns buildings were constructed in the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century and befitting a cliff top seaside town, many of the streets up on different levels connected by alleyway and steps going up and down. Evidence of Iron Age activity can be found at the nearby Roborough Castle and the novel Lorna Doone was set in the Lynton area and their are many beautiful coastal walks and paths running nearby. Nearby is the spectacular Valley of the Rocks with it’s stunning views and mysterious tales of the werewolves to just waiting to be divulged and our next port of call. But before moving on we made time to simply stand and stare in peace at this ‘out of the world‘ view….

The interior of St Mary the Virgin Church at Lynton, once again showing the Neville Sheild and some beautiful stained glass windows

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynton

  • The bloodline connection is again that of The ‘Cainan’ connection

Valley of the Rocks, Lynton: Tales of Old Kingdoms and werewolves may seem to have fallen straight out of the pages of Folkelore and Fantasy, but are they? The Valley of the Rocks is a truly magical and wild place where these ancient tales of of old kingdoms and roaming werewolves really do come to life. It is situated just half a mile west of Lynton in Devon and is a vast scenic area of outstanding natural beauty, with coastal views unsurpassed and ferral goats running wild. There have been many reported sightings of werewolf activity up to the 1990’s which we talk about further in the video.

A spectacular sunset over ‘The Valley of the Rocks’ which is not quite as ‘natural’ as one is led to believe….

But most importanly and undocumted, the whole area was once a vast early kingdom for the Irish Kings, of which almost nothing has ever been written about; it was the actual landing place of the first invading kings from Ireland who thus settled here and left many traces upon the land. My first instinctual thoughts when driving into the valley, not knowing anything about it, was ‘wow!’ what an amazing castle; something that took me completely by surprise! When one looks around the area one can indeed see the remains of a large fortress, temples and many other buildings of ancient everyday life of which is explained in the video but of which nothing is written about. One can sense a great power and energy alignment here as the early settlement was built purposefully  on the site of ancient pyramids placed within the land, by by those who came first with intent and design, hence why it is such an important place. The pyramids are there for all to see and ‘feel’ yet hidden carefully within ‘plain sight’ and most folks will never know… One can certainly feel the energies and power here; it is indeed a very sacred site. Interestingly as soon as we started filming, what had been a quiet and deserted scene was now populated by a mixture of ‘listeners’ and ‘watchers’ seemingly intent on diverting us off the track as it were, though patience and stealth prevailed. Listen carefully to the video for further explanation.

Close up detail of the ‘Old Kingdom’ showing where once fine buildings and temples etc would have been

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Rocks

The stunning sunset as we departed reluctantly from this very sacred place & video below with previously untold tellings

THE VALLEY OF THE ROCKS & OVER THE SEA TO ST MICHAELS MOUNT

 

Day Four Sunday 23rd April 2017: St Michael’s Mount: After a beautifully relaxing, yet all too brief journey across the sea to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, we embarked upon the shores of the the beautiful and fairy tale world of St Michael’s Mount. The mount has many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen, secrets not ever documented in the present world of men…. In the meantime enjoy the ride across the waters in the video above. 🙂

St Michael’s Mount & terraced gardens over looking the ocean & a first glimps of the solitary unmarked cross…

St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, linked to the mainland by a man-made causeway of granite, of which much of the actual island is made, and which is passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust; the castle and chapel having been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since about 1650. The earliest buildings on the summit date to the 12th century. The mount’s cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe many more tales that lie hidden within ‘folk memory’. Remains of trees have been seen at low tide following storms on the beach at Perranuthoe and radiocarbon dating has established the submerging of the hazle wood at about 1700BC.

Views from te summit overlooking the battlements & ocean – click to enlarge

Historically, St Michael’s Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, it was given to the Benedictine religous order  by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. There is evidence of people living in the area during the Neolithic period, as important ancient finds such as an arrow-head and flint tools have been unearthed in the gardens on the island.  It is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries and as said Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman Abbey of Mont Saint-Michael. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien house, as a side-effect of the of the war in France by Henry V, when it was given to the Abbess and Convent of Syon at Iselworth, Middlesex in 1424, thus ending its association with Mont St Michael and any connetion with Looe Island, dedicated to the Archangel Michael.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century and in 1275 an earthquake destroyed the original Priory Church, which was subsequently rebuilt in the late 14th century and has thus remained in use. In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake cause a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in ten minutes at St Michaels Mount, ebbing at the same rate and continuing to rise and fall for some five hours and it was reported that a great loss of life and property occurred along this Cornsh coast.

Inside the Abbey & Chapel on the mount – click each image to expand

A local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant names Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack took on this gigantic menace, who had an appetite for cattle and children, and killed him by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

On the quiet terraces of the island that overlook the sea, and not writen about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever but to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant ‘Neville Stronghold’. So for the first time on our quests we have mention now of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands….

Our lasting thoughts of that day would be with that solitary cross, that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound.and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty beyond the mundane…

  • The bloodline connection is of the ‘Solomon Solamh, whos unmarkd cross is seen above’ and again of the enigmatic ‘Nevilles’

Farewell to a magical island

Braddock Church Braddock Cornwall: Churchyard and Fields: So here we were in the dead of night, on a night time quest to a very deserted and lonely church in Cornwall. Braddock Church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin; the earliest parts of the building being Norman with a Norman font inside. This area is the site of the Battle of Braddock Down; a hard fought battle of the civil war which took place on the 19th January 1643. It was a crushing defeat for the parliamentarian army where many souls were lost. It is the site of the Cromwellian Defeat in fact. Braddock (or Broadoak) village itself is a civil parish in Cornwall which is situated about seven miles west of Liskard and five miles south-east of Bodmin. it is rural in character and is well wooded, especially in the north. The earliest parts of the church are Norman but an asle and a tower were added in the 15th century. The font is Norman and there are many good examples of woodcarvings in the church. Obviously it was the dead of night so unable to get in and see for our selves.

There are stories abound here of various manifestations in the churchyard and nearby fields, roaming vampires and connections to the werewolf tales at the Valley of the Rocks. and so we were here to investigate further; to see if there were any truths in the tales.

Although nothing untoward shows in the photos one does get a sense of the desolation & atmosphere here; amazed that anything came out at all…

It was very dark and challenging to film and the sense of forboding and negative energies felt by most of our party is very hard to convey on film, but one can hear the reactions of our party as we venture around the church, especially when we all heard the deep growling warning noise emanating from out of the darkness. One does get a sense of the darkness and desolation of the area too; both of physical and of a metaphysical darkness as the link below treis to convey….

Again not much on film but a very interesting experience at Bradock Church in Cornwall

HAUNTED BRADOCK CHURCH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock,_Cornwallmystery

 

the moors

We loved Devon & Cornwall, the peace, the beauty, the many tales and of course the truths…”

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017 “The Keeper of Scrolls”

THE PRIORY INESTIGATES: TEMPLAR SITES OF SOUTH WALES

 QUEST NUMBER SEVENTEEN: ABERGAVENNY, TREVETHIN AND PONTYPOOL

St Mary’s Priory in Abergavenny: Our first visit of this particular day was to St Mary’s Priory in Abergavenny,  Momouthshire, South Wales; just six miles from the English border and quite a long journey from Cambridge. Abergavenny is a lively market town with strong Roman connections. St Mary’s Priory, originally a Benedictine Priory, is a very peaceful church know locally as the Westminster Abbey of Wales due to it’s large size and number of high status, ancient and intricately carved tombs inside; mostly of Knights Templar and associated heritage. The church also houses a very beautiful, modern window with some interesting ancient symbolism incorporated into the design.

Templar symbolism and ‘bloodline’ heritage within the church, and interestingly a sacrificial altar in the church grounds. A big thanks for my collegue for sharing these photos <click on images to enlarge>

Sadly we could not film or comment on the history, interior and full meaning of the church, on this occasion, as it was being set up with amplifyers and mikes for the carol service, but hopefully another time we can do just that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abergavenny

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Priory_Church_of_St_Mary,_Abergavenny

St Cadoc’s Church at Trevethin: The second visit was to St Cadoc’s Church at Trevethin, also known as the Mother Church of Pontypool, so we were very suprised to find it well and truly locked up. In fact we nearly did not get to see inside of this fine Templar church at all, had it not been for some fine detective work from Alek our head researcher, so yet again patience and tenacity prevailed and won the day; hence were very lucky to have it unlocked especially for us. The wait was very worthwhile for there were some very fine, important and significant Templar associations and symbolism within the very church. As we were accompanied on this brief but worthwhile visit, it was again not possible to do much filming or explanations; just a quick snippet of footage which sadly was rather too blurred to include here

While were were waiting to go inside the church, we had a good stroll around the large old graveyard. Some areas were completely left wild and very natural; the church is on a hillside and yet is also on a public ‘through’ walkway. One could not help but notice the large number of obelisks in the graveyard and the ‘Egyptian’ feel to the cemetry ornanmentation. One very interesting discovery whilst walking among the stones was an ‘entry to the vault’ sign upon the ground where a tomb should be and then a few yard away, down a grassy track leading away from the main part of the graveyard, the discovery that the ground underneath was distinctly hollow sounding and actually moved up and down when bounced upon; i would not like to comment but more than likely a mysterious hidden underground chamber…

The site of another underground vault and the ‘hollow’ walkway where the earth literally moved up and down! Thanks again for my collegue for the photos 🙂

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevethin

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trevethin

Hanbury Arms in Pontypool: As night fell and darkness descended we next visited the very ‘haunted’ (it is said), Hanbury Arms in Pontypool and the Masonic Hall a few yards away across the road, all very worthwhile visits and places of ‘hidden energies’.

We had planned to have a meal in the Hanbury Arms to soak up the atmosphere, but as new owners were just settling in, food was not yet being served there, but we did have a gorgeous meal at the Unicorn Pub just a few yards up the road. Many tales revolve around the hauntings at the Hanbury Arms; even the builders working there were so freaked out they could no longer carry on with their work as the the link below explains.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/haunted-pub-hanbury-arms-spirits-1303279

Llwyncelyn Cemetery and Sacred Templar Mound:  We also filmed outside another Knight Templar sacred site; a burial mound and ritual site, now a cemetery (Llwyncelyn cemetery) where we managed a little more footage, although now dark it was a very worthwhile experience, especially on the burial mound where the energies were amazing; as was our journey getting there eventually, which was a tale to be told in itself! Our video when you watch it will explain all….

There is not a lot known about the fact that this site was a sacred Templar mound and i was unable to discover anything on line about it, so as our footage explains, this fact of history, like so much more on our quests, is not known in the modern world at all.

Click on our video to see the video of South Wales

THE TEMPLAR SITES OF SOUTH WALES

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-15106491

All four sites visited are very significant to the questers involved, and relate to the earthly bloodline of those whom are very important in past, present and future times, yet always remain hidden figures in our history. The sites also relate to the hidden pyramids of our ancient lands; the earth magnetics (geo magnetcis) hence the amazing energies experienced at most of the sites. The bloodline (the questers bloodline) and the pyramids are very much connected and as always we shall continue to seek out the real history; the history never told, yet often hidden within plain sight…

Take a look at the new Priory webpage too:

http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

 

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ December 2016

QUEST NUMBER SIXTEEN:

Where we were supposed to have been…

  • RAF KIRTON IN LINDSEY, NEAR GAINSBOROUGH, LINCOLNSHIRE
  • TATTERSHALL ABANDONED RAILWAY STATION, LINCOLNSHIRE

Where we actually ended up in a unique ‘twist of fate’…

  • TATTERSHALL CASTLE AND CHURCH GRAVEYARD

All that i am about to tell you is true; i have changed nothing and although there were five of us present, the feelings and tellings are  mine. I have been doing these quests long enough now to know that nothing is ever what it seems and other forces are around that distort the truth for both the good and the bad, but further more to guide and protect. We live on a many dimensional plane and often the dimensions will merge, or chinks in reality will ocurr.  Many folks do tune into to this and have the ability to ‘see’ or to ‘feel’ the other existences and dimensions

We know that there are ‘places of power’ caused by the hidden ‘Geo Magnetics’ of this earth (the hidden pyramids) which act an a kind of ‘energy conductor’ and this is one of the purpose of our quests, to investigate these sites. We know that these earth magnetics can retain ‘echoes‘ or ‘imprints’ of both past and future lives. Why both past and future lives? Well the answer is simple; there is no such thing as ‘time’ as it is percieved here on earth. Time is merely a manmade constraint another form of ‘control‘, for example how often do we hear the phrase ‘slave to time’ repeated? So because of these quests and the interesting facts that they are throwing up, we now know of course, that many of the so called ‘christian’ churches are built on top of these hidden ‘places of power’ simply to keep the facts hidden. What better way of hiding something in plain sight than to build something else over the top of it.

We now know that manifested aparitions; call them ‘ghosts’, ‘spirits’,djinn’, do not manisfest in our world as a kind of ethereal ‘woo woo wooing‘ aparition formed of white mists floating in time and space. Indeed they are far more real and often totally three-dimensional and solid; for all intents and purposes exactly like you and me; yet they uncannily always turn up when needed for a reason, to guide, to warn or to inform. They appear as if out of nowhere and when the message has been delivered they vanish just as quickly. People with dogs innocently manouvering through our space are quite a common example. People who are there at the right place and the right time to guide us to where we need to be are another example. Of course one can always speculate and put all this down to coincidence, but in fact there is no such thing as coincidence and everything happens for a reason and a purpose.

So then just a brief discription of where we had planned to be:

RAF KIRTON IN LINDSEY, NEAR GAINSBOROUGH, LINCOLNSHIRE It took a good few hours of traveling to drive to Lincolnshire in the cold dark of night; so after feasting on the way we were raring to go and good for anything! The Lincolnshire landscape is mostly flat and vast and a lot colder than down south; yet there are gradual undulations in the structure of the land and even some cliff-like terraces that the road crawls snake-like atop of. There seems to be a pervading sense of ‘unfinished buisness’ in the atmosphere of the land here; stories untold that maybe never will be told. The ‘spirits’ of the land seem to be holding on to something which maybe they never will give up.

RAF Kirton in Lincolnshire, which was opened on this new site in the 1940’s is built atop of an ancient burial ground on the site of the pyramid grid that we are investigating, so it was with great excitement and expectation that we ventured forward on what was to be Quest Number Sixteen! After many years of use however, it was announced that in 2013 that the RAF were to dispose of the site, yet according to many ‘urban explorers’ who regularly visit the site, many interesting ‘artifacts’, various equipment etc and even vehicals are still to be found on site. In it’s heyday the site was passed from RAF control to the US Air Force, then on to the British Army and finally back again to RAF control. It’s final years saw it used as a technical park and it provided housing for another nearby base, where the site was administered from. So now sadly abandoned and another case of wondering why all these perfectly good buildings are allowed to go to rack and ruin, when we have a housing shortage in this country…

We found the site very easily, yet were dissapointed to find a strong and high security fence all around the whole perimiter with not one single access point in. We drove carefully around just to make sure, but on this occasion had to admit defeat. We know the ‘urban explorers’ do get in and i would not like to speculate how, but we are not urban explorers, simply researchers doing our thing and working within the confines of not tresspasing.  There are various hauntings said to have occured here but as we were unable to gain access we could not get a ‘feel’ for the place to form our own opinions; though suffice to say it is on an ‘energy’ site and is part of the ‘pyramid grid’ of the UK.

Read more about RAF Kirton here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Kirton_in_Lindsey

TATTERSHALL ABANDONED RAILWAY STATION, LINCOLNSHIRE So a short drive away, along the twisty Lincolnshire byways that seemingly defey any logic of direction, we found ourselves in the village of Tattershall on the look out for it’s abandoned railway station. The station was closed on the 17th June 1953, to both passengers and goods but during the 1970’s and 1980’s the Tattershall Air Museum was to be found located in the station goods yard. The station is now in private occuption but it does house ‘The Tattershall Station Gallery’ in the booking office, selling paintings and pottery with public access along part of the up platform. There are tales of a young girl who reportedly wanders the platform but again as we never actually located the site in the dark i cannot comment further; also a site of ‘energy’…

Interesting photos and info here:

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/t/tattershall/

The other reason why we never actually found the old railway site was because we were not meant to; for we thus saw the signposts to Tattershall Castle, which looked stangely compelling in the dark, so following our instincts we turned down a very dark and narrow lane; it was almost midnight….

TATTERSHALL CASTLE AND CHURCH GRAVEYARD: The very narow lane ended in the very dark public car park of the castle; we could see nothing and no one was around; it was almost midnight and not a soul stirred. So bearing in mind that we had no inklng that we were going to be there, at that place and at that time, and that it had been a split second decision to visit the castle, imagine our suprise then to find that another car had come out of nowhere and was following us into the carpark! This other car and was now parking a short way from us; slightly unerving to say the least. What was the chance of that randomly happening at that unearthly hour? While we explored the layout of the carpark with our torches to find the exit (yes it really was that dark!), two guys alighted from the other vehical and dissapeared along a grassy track in another direction.

Upon following we discovered the track to be  a path into a then, unknown to us, church graveyard and so for a moment we recognized the familiar territory of a graveyard; even though something did not feel quite right. We surveyed the scene for a few moments to get our bearings, then proceeded to follow the pathway around the side of the church. Obviously at that very late hour everything was shrouded in darkness and it was hard to see, apart from the help of our trusted torches. Upon coming around the corner of the church, we made our way across open ground towards a tourist map of the castle and surrounding area, which we proceeded to study or to ‘pretend’ to study, for upon looking back we could clearly see two very mysterious figures with their backs to us, strangely highlighted by their own torch lights.

My feelings at that moment were that of being totally compelled to look, wanting to look yet unsure of if i should; unsure of interupting others privacy. And yet, yet there was something totally compelling and completely ‘out of time’ about those two figures; almost as if two time lines were converging. The weirdest thing was that they acknowledged no recognition of us whatsoever, not a nod, a smile, an embarassed shuffle; not even a ‘sod off’! We moved around towards the castle to see if we could gain access but all boundary fences were well and truly locked. Yet on making our way back the two figures were still there exactly the same, seemingly not moved. I still tried to look and yet not look; they seemed to be dressed not of our era at all, but apeared to be wearing cloaks or mantles with leggings or gaters, maybe a bit Goth-like or so it looked in the distorted shadows and light of their torches. They certainly did not look like the folks in the carpark only minutes before and although very compelling a feeling of unease had decended upon us all and we knew it was time to depart.

However, upon walking around to where the grassy path left the churchyard back into the carpark, a bent-over huddled figure suddenly instantanously appeared from nowhere, seemingly with a mission well and truly in mind. He rushed past us, again not looking up at all, or in any way being aware of our prescence there. No ‘good eveing’ or ‘lovely night’ or any comment that led one to believe that he had any conception of us being there. He appeared to rush down a leafy pathway and that was that or so it seemed…

Two of our party, intrigued and wanting to investigate further and not believng their eyes, made their way along the leafy pathway to see where the huddlesd figure had gone to. Yet again though, that feeling of uneasiness pervaded upon all of us; a feeling that we should not be lingering there a moment longer. The path the figure had scurried down had led to nowhere, just a complete dark dead end in fact, the path went nowhere…

We took no time in leaving lest our welcome be outstayed. Once back inside the car and upon driving out of the carpark two of us happened to glance in the direction of the path that lead to the church, only to see two more figures at the end of the path, walking towards us…

SO TO CONCLUDE:

  • Nothing is ever a coincidence.
  • Nothing is ever a random act.
  • Everything is meant to be.
  • Timing is everything.
  • ‘Energy’ and ‘echoes’ from other timelines exist.
  • All ‘energy’ affects other energy.
  • We were obviously meant to be there at the ‘perfect point in time’
  • THIS was the site we were REALLY meant to be at, at that place and time
  • No random act or coincidence bought us to that place and at that time, at that ungodly hour; unexpected, unanouced, not knowing it ourselves until we turned into that dark castle lane at  midnight to discover five other figures, not all of this dimension,  in that small out of the way churchyard….
  • Allways follow your instinct and be prepared to change plans at the very last moment
  • Nothing ever happens by chance as we on these quests, well and truly know.

 

For more info of the mundane kind please see here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattershall

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

Leave a message here and we will get back to you:

 

See The Priory: http://priory7.wix.com/priory

 “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

November 2016 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER NINE

  • St Marys Church: Therfield
  • St Faith’s Church: Kelshall
  • Minsden Chapel: Chaplefoot
  • All Saints Church: Little Munden
  • St John The Baptist Church: Royston

Therfield Church

ST MARYS CHURCH THERFFIELD: This was to be our first port of call of the day, for Quest Number Nine; for what was to prove to be a very busy and fascinating quest. Upon arriving at Therfield Church one cannot fail to notice the proliferation of Templar and Masonic gravestones covering the burial ground, adorned with much  ‘Old Craft’ symbolism that we have now grown to expect.

<click to enlarge images>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therfield

An interesting church which was funded directly by the Fordham Family (one of our lead researchers, Alek’s pedigree lines). It is said that Edward King Fordham, (1750-1847) is the protector here (i.e. the Guardian of Secrets). There have been reports of his hauntings and of his ghostly apparitions here since 1853,  yet oddly they only started 6 years after his death.

A nice church, but a wee bit of a red herring for us and our quest…. Interesting though that the Vicar, Richard came over and took our head researcher Alek directly  to the grave of John Henry Fordham, who of course had connections to the masonic lineage, which is no surprise. Such a shame we did not have a chance to record here, as who knows what potential for EVP could have occured.

St Faiths Church

ST FAITH’S CHURCH KELSHALL: Situated in a very quiet corner of Hertfordshire, one hundred metres above sea level on the chalky Chiltern ridge, where the parish land sweeps northwards down to the well known Icknield Way. As is usual nothing can be seen of an earlier church building, but a late 14th century preaching cross still stands in the churchyard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelshall

GK sheild

This is a ‘Key’ area of the Fordham Line, with major signs and placards very evident in the Church itself, to the Fordams. What was more interesting: The  K.e.y Line of Alek (the Neville Line) which tracks back to Noah and beyond; i.e. the beautiful and inspiring ‘Grail Kingship Shield’ (shown here) hangs proud and high just within this church over the entrance. Built on top of a Saxon Church, but more importantly; encompassed by Pyramid Energy, also with great potential for EVP.

Note: Edward King Fordham is Aek’s 5 x Great Grandfather from the Fordham Line.

 

Please see our Youtube link to take a tour around the church to learn more about the Fordham line and the symbolism within the church:

KELSHALL: THE FORDHAM LINE

 

MINSDEN CHAPEL CHAPLEFORD:  So our next destination was right off the beaten track, literally in the middle of nowhere, where a bridle way is the only indication that something might be hiding in the woods. It was quite an uphill trek and a worthy battle with nettles and brambles; for this small chapel with a very fascinating history sits within a copse, atop of a mound overlooking the Hertfordshire countryside. From looking at other video clips of the chapel it is now a lot more innaccesable than it has been in previous years and very difficult to get to and even to see properly through the overgrowth of vegetation. It is now very difficult to see much of the chapel walls as leafy bushes and trees have now sprung up everywhere, obscurring the view.

First of all, it was interesting to note that the pub we had enjoyed a lovely late lunch in and which had been renamed, was the pointer we were indeed looking for and yet could not find; the Chapelfoot Farmhouse itself ! Now known as The Rusty Gun; not easily recognizable these days as areas look so different as the seasons move on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minsden_Chapel

Minsden Chapel was built in 1368, yet the mound (Hill) is more sacred and powerful than even Stonehenge… Reginald Hine, an historian from Baldock born 25th September 1883, knew of its significance and was burdened with the duty of sealing the area to stop evil spreading out. Signs of witchcraft and sacrifice are evident here today, so not a spot for the faint-hearted! There is a memorial stone somewhere on the chapel site for Reginald but i guess the ground covering was so dense it was not easy to find and we missed it. A site personally ticked off by Alek whom vows NEVER to re-visit and firmly believes that it is best to be forgotten; for when the oceans rise it shall be returned to the sea from whence it came… A clear and definite presence was cetainly felt here with many tales of whispers unfolding and an atmosphere which gradually became denser, so much so that members of our team reported pressures on the front of their heads and headaches….

Important to note the ‘odd sign’ of warning of which Reginald wrote, upon receiving his lifetime lease from the Diocese:

 

TRESPASSER AND SACRILEGIOUS PERSONS TAKE WARNING,

FOR I WILL PROCEED AGAINST THEM WITH THE UTMOST RIGOUR OF THE LAW,

AND, AFTER MY DEATH AND BURIAL, I WILL ENDEAVOUR, IN ALL GHOSTLY WAYS,

TO PROTECT AND HAUNT ITS HALLOWED WALLS


How interesting too, considering that over and above the circular portal entrance is the out-mould of a strange human face forever staring down and keeping watch…

Take a look around the Chapel via our link below nd learn of some of its mysterious history first hand:

SACRED MINSDEN CHAPEL

 

As an interesting footnote, which goes along with not being welcomed by ‘The Guardian’ of the site, and the fact that the site is well and truly hidden under trees and is not mentioned anywhere as a place to visit…. while we were in a nearby carpark assessing how to find Minsden Chapel, a couple seemed to appear from a leafy footpath over the road that seemed to go nowhere in particular, yet complete with map in hand. They professed to know where we needed to go but strangely the directions they gave were not where the chapel actually was……

 

ALL SAINTS CHURCH LITTLE MUNDEN: After travelling across pretty countryside we next found ourselves at All Saints Church, Little Munden. We expected it to be closed as the hours of opening had passed by, so a search around the burial ground was all we were expecting but never the less we were in for a few suprises…

Little Munden 1

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/herts/vol3/pp129-135#h3-0007

It is an interesting church, and although as said it was locked upon our arrival (given the time of evening at 7:30 at night), enough was experienced to confirm the placement of a ‘tablet’. We all heard noises and a voice from the lower chambers, just right of the church porch, together with a cold, very dark feeling energising fear, emanating from the bottom of the steep and crumbling stone steps. At the bottom of the steps and to the left where there was pitch blackness, one could just make out the shape of the iron bars of a (cell?) door and upon peering through them, there was total darkness and a strong sense of an utter foreboding; an all encompassing void, the nature of which can only be described as ‘not nice’ in any way and a wind above that blew in three different directions at the same time. Built in 1385, though the older structure was built in the year 897.

There are reports of  ghostly apparitions of Ralph Fordham; the protector, the Guardian of Secrets; see the link below…

LITTLE MUNSDEN: GHOSTLY HAPPENINGS

 

ST JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH ROYSTON:

Upon arriving at this church it was easy to see how it differed from the ‘out of the way’ villages we had previously visited on our quests. The church takes pride of place in this busy and well known tourist town;  it is set amidst stunning gardens and immaculate manicured lawns. The town itself is also well know for having two ancient thoroughfares that cross each other here; the previously mentioned Icknield Way and Ermine Street, also very well known. Most famously, it is known for The Royston Cave; which is said to have Knight Templar connections.

http://roystonparishchurch.org.uk/index.php/about-us/church-history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royston,_Hertfordshire

http://www.roystoncave.co.uk/

There is a connection here at this church to Elias Fordham (1762 – 1838), who is said to roam the grounds of this quite plain yet, interesting church.  What was of great interest to us was that William Henry Clarke whom we expected to be mentioned at the Church memorial in Shipdham, Norfolk, was in fact mentioned here at Royston, on the Great War (1914 – 1918) memorial just outside the Church…. This makes a direct connection between the Clarke and Fordham Lines that originate as such: the Fordham Line from Limerick Ireland and the Clarke Line from Plympton in Devon. No great surprise as Limerick to Plympton is not a major distance at all – just across the water in fact!

ROYSTON: ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, PEELING BELLS

 

 Royston War Memorial showing the Clarke family name and the church itself showing the very prominent ‘Entwined Serpent’ symbol (The emblem of the ‘Serpent Priesthood). Very interestingly displayed on a ‘christian’ church….

To join us in our future quests: especially if you love history, if you love a mystery, if you see beyond the mundane or simply if you love a good day out, please contact us via this webpage or email me here:  ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

To join The Priory itself: where we go much deeper on many aspects of life, creation, the true history of the planet and the future times to come; please see here:- http://priory7.wix.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is merely seasons in front. So be it that all those whom disbelieve shall cease to remain”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER EIGHT

  • ST MARY’S CHURCH SNETTISHAM
  • CASTLE RISING KINGS LYNN
  • GYSPSY CORNER MOULTEN

 

ST MARY’S CHURCH SNETTISHAM: One cannot help but wonder what these three seemingly separate sites have in common with each other; yet there is a connection, a thread running through which connects to our quests so far. So here we were in Norfolk once again, starting out on Quest Number Eight, at the stunningly beautiful Templar church; known as St Mary’s Church, Snettisham. This church which in reality is more like a catherdral is mentioned in the Domesday Book compiled in 1066; but most of the ‘present’ day church dates to the period of 1300 – 1340, although there would have been a church on this site which dates back to a much earlier time in history. The spire; one of only five in Norfolk, is second only to that of Norwich Cathedral in height and is, along with the rest of the church, testiment to a much wealthier time in the history of Snettisham, when the wool trade and textile industry kept the hands of the village weavers far from idle!

TK C

Snettisham itself is a very pretty little village situated near the west coast of Norfolk, just five miles south of Hunstanton. It has a beautiful unspoiled beach where many semi-precious gemstones can be found and an abundance of wildlife. Snettisham has a complex entry in the Domesday Book, where it is divided in ownership between Wiilliam de Warenne and the Bishop of Bayeux. It is also know for the Snettisham Horde; a series of discoveries of Iron Age precious metals.

To read more see here:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snettisham

But we were here to visit St Mary’s Church with it’s strong Templar influences that go beyond even that; connections that go deep into our unrecorded British history. We had tried to gain access to the church on a previous occasion but due to safety aspects of roof repair work being carried out, St Mary’s church was locked to us on that occasion. However we did make an introductory video to mark the occasion of our first vist. Strangely while we were lingering on the church porch inquiring over the phone, about access, another couple arrived whom informed us, had driven all the way from London to visit, and who also eagerly listened to our phone conversation. This was a strange yet not unusual happening for us as ‘co-incidences’ do tend to follow us around – see why in the video 🙂

Follow the link below to our Youtube channel and let our lead researcher give you an introduction and glimpse into this very special church’s history:

SNETTISHAM: THE KING OF TIR & A TEMPLAR CHURCH

The architecture, decorations and fittings of the church are truely amazing and do hark back to times that simply do not relate to christianity at all, but hint to many other ancient paths as you will see in this next video. The true Celtic cross with the Fleur de Lys, that connects to the King of Tir is evident for all to see in the main part of the church; a huge chandelier Merkaba (star of David) decorated with more Fleur de Lys hangs prominently in the vestry, as does a family crest relating to the ‘Neviile’ family; one of the bloodlines we are tracing. Yet most stunningly of all is the stained glass window, to the right of the vestry and along one side of the church which is under repair, is the very rare image of the King of Tir (the original Green Man) So once again we can see very many Knight Templar and Masonic symbolism here and even beyond that. Within the vestry itself i for one can attest to the fact that the magnetic energy is so powerful there, it almost knocks one off one’s feet; i was not alone in feeling this amazing power.

Photos above which show beautifully all the amazing symology and imagery in this stunning Templar church… <click to enlarge imags>

CASTLE RISING: After a brief but enjoyable visit to Snettisham beach, our next port of call was to be Castle Rising; the home of many tales, many families and royal intrigue. This castle is one of the most important twelth century castles in England. The stone keep has particularly fine arcading and embellishments on the fore building and was built around 1140 by William D’Albini to show his increased importance on his marriage to Alice of Louvian, widow of Henry 1st. The most infamous piece of history here stems from when the castle was the home (prison?) to Queen Isabella, the mother of Edward 3rd, who had a hand in the murder of her husband Edward 2nd. The records show that she was visited at the castle several times by her son Edward  3rd. Some say she went mad, some say she was in exile there, some say she is still there… Listen to what our lead researcher has to say in the next video on Castle Rising’s history and it’s tales of mystery…

Click through to our Youtube channel…

CASTLE RISING: A MURDERING QUEEN…

The keep of Castle Rising presents a dramatic and formidable sight, set against the vast East Anglian skies.

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A GYPSY BOY’S GRAVE:  Most folks local to the village of Moulton near Newmarket in Suffolk, know of ‘Gypsy Corner’ and can tell the sad tale of the young gypsy lad who is burried there; some may know of the gypsy curse attached to the grave site while others may not. But the mystery surounding the small burial site doe not end there and goes way deeper.

Our head researcher  will explain when you follow the link to our Youtube channel.

GYPSY CORNER NR NEWMARKET

Apologies for the many ‘cuts, stops & starts’ in the video due to a very busy road & noisy traffic!

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Conclusions of Quest Eight:

  • St Mary’s Church, Snettisham

Leading on from the previous visit; amazing to actually get inside courtessy of Peter Murray. He is an interesting chap in himself, having much hidden knowledge contained. After a conversation about burial or cremation, Peter assured that ‘we will make sure that this happens for you’. He was certainly more than just an organist.

The Vestry holds the key of the Hamilton surname linked with the Neville surname, with more important aspects of Judaism embedded within this timeless building. The lighting in the vestry is made from wood and the Hexagram ‘Star of David’, with trails around the hexagram of the Fleurs de Lys, gives tales of Judaism enshrined with Templarism. So the world at large would believe that it is the English Christian faith which guided the Templars. Clearly not correct, it was Judaism that over-stood all other beliefs and faiths.

The Celtic connection is contained within this church, spanning over 1,000 years tales to be deciphered, if only some were able to decipher such encryption.

  • Castle Rising

Evidence of Ghostly presence contained within the acoustic room within the castle itself. There is most definitely a regional hub of energy transmitting and being received at this point. Hardly surprising with Pyramid energy gathering at all crossings through this vibrant land of Castle Rising.

Particular attention must be given to the Norman Chapel which contains a sealed entrance to the underground tunnels that will reveal more to those whom seek to find.

It is of no surprise that our visit was enlightened with the presence of a protector, a Guardian of Secrets that brisked through and around us within the acoustic chamber.

  • The Gypsy Boy’s Grave

Of course most know the tale of the young man whom fell asleep and lost one of his sheep, no more than myth, where one is able to clearly identify the myth with that of ‘The Lamb of God’. The boy’s real name is Elias F born in 1828 and subsequently passed in 1841, some 13 years old. But was this boy a Gypsy and was he really guiding sheep? We must look to the meaning behind the name ‘Elias’ as this is where the Quest and the Clues originate. ‘Elias’ means ‘The Lord is my God’. It does not make reference to a God, it clearly refers to a Lord. So whom is the Lord? The Lord is connected to Snettisham Church and to that of Castle Rising. What we are permitted to reveal is that this boy has a direct connection to a Hertfordshire Banker in 1833.

To join us in our future quests or to join The Priory; especially if you love history and have a desire to see beyond the mundane…

please contact us via this webpage or email me here:-

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

THE PRIORY INVESTIGTES: QUEST NO SEVEN

  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH SHIPDHAM
  • FURTHER CHURCH HAUNTINGS
  • REVEALING THE LINEAGE

So for quest number six we once again made our way into the beautiful county of Norfolk, where so many unusual tales and ghostly stories abide. All Saints Church is situated in a busy parish and the church itself  is the beating heart of the community and very active.  Shipdham is not far from Dereham and the church is on a quite a busy highway that cuts its way through the village and around the church and graveyard; which are surrounded by a high wall. Upon looking over the wall one can see that the tower of the church is crowned by what must be one of the mosr ornate spire crownings in the county. This late medieval tower is surmounted by a great wood and lead fleche, pointing heavenwards. It is completely out of character with the rest of the church and is almost eastern looking in design and could have been designed purposefully that way. This church is certainly imposing and has a great presence about it; a great energy to be precise.  

 

 All Saint’s Church Shipdham, showing the unusual ornate spire crown and the statue of the ‘walvebane’ above the entrance porch, also revealing one of the ‘Nevilles’ of our quest, whose memorial is a beautiful Celtic Cross placed just outside the main porch entrance to the church. What is fascinating is that that Celtic Cross has a crown prominitely placed at its centre; indicating a connection to the crown. <click on image to enlarge>

Such a beautifully ornate church would not look out of place in a big prosperous market town and one wonders why a church of such granduer is situated in a village in Norfolk. The church can trace its history back to the 12th/13th century and the top mof the spire is said to have been added in the 17th century.

To read more:  http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/shipdham/shipdham.htm

 

         The stunning windows and beautifully ornate heraldry tapistry inside the church that indicate a time in the past of great wealth and strong connection to the crown.

Once again let our lead researcher explain about the about the mysteries (hauntings) that happen at these sites and most importantly why and what they really are. He will go on to explain more about our quest and our reasons for being here; in particular the connection between the ‘Nevilles’ and the ‘Clarkes’ to Royalty and to the Duke of Norfolk himself. Click on our link below.

ALL SAINT’S SHIPDEN: NORFOLK

The funny thing is that a gentleman with a dog did appear at the church doorway while we were filming there, which was an uncanny coincdence to say the least. When questioned about the Nevilles he semed somewhat confused and was unable to help, although he did know other details about the church.

 

The Duke of Norfolk

Portrait of the Duke of Norfolk who has a strong connection to this site and to our quest

 

 

 Some examples of the ‘symbolism’ to be found within churches, especially prolific at the sites our team are investigating; symbols that should now be familiar to those of you following our quests. These symbols are certainly very interesting and not what they seem; having double or hidden meanings which relate to Craft, the Knight Templars or even further back and which are very far removed from being christian in origin. This all makes one wonder just who were the architects and designers of these churches…

Conclusions of the day:

  • Ghosts are not what we are led to believe; they are simply ‘echos of the past’ that ‘exist’ in a timeless enviroment.
  • Yet another church built over a site of immense energy and power
  • Another ‘Guardian of Secrets’ is connected to the site
  • Royalty once again also has a connection here, suggesting that they were ‘in on the secrets’
  • The symbolism within churches has nothing whatsoever to do with ‘christianity’; very far removed from it in fact.
  • Many churches are built upon ‘sites’ that have been purposefully hidden from the masses.
  • Churches are libraries of information; often hidden information.
  • The bloodlines and linaige of two members of our team are now revealed as part of our quest.

Intrigued in finding out more or joining us?

Please do get in touch with us via this webpage or email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

JC 1

‘Clarke’ another link to the Quest; another piece of the puzzle..

June 2016

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: BLACK SHUCK AND THE PHANTOM TRAIN

  • QUEST NUMBER SIX PART TWO

Black Shuck

  • St Martin’s Church Overstrand
  • The ‘Phantom’ Train
  • Black Shuck
  • Queen Boudica
  • Richard III

The next port of call on this particular day, after the very interesting time spent at St Andrew Church at Quidenham, where many revelations made themselves known to us, was to be St Martins Church at Overstrand on the North Norfolk coast, not far from Cromer. The main legend that prevails at this church is of a seemingly phantom train that is said to ‘whoosh’ through the very church itself…. but is it an actual train or something else? There was never an actual train line here so why would there be a ‘ghost train’ here? Well we hoped to find out.

Overstrand Church

The church is set in a beautiful churchyard with many shrubs and plantings and a seperately laid out area as a cremation memorial garden and also some beautiful carvings on the outside walls. The church does have an amazing history of survival, for the original medieval church probably fell into th sea, for in 1399 a patent was granted to build a church on the site. In the 18th century the aisleless church fell on hard times and after the roof collasped it was decided that a smaller church would best fit the needs of the parish. But by 1859 this smaller church no longer filled the needs of a growing community and popular holiday destination, so the old church was abandoned in favour of a new one built in the west of the same churchyard. The old church still survives but is now overgrown with ivy.

  Carvings from the outside of the church, the newer interior, plus a Richard 3rd       and a Boudica connection.

Further rebuilding ocuured in 1911 but this time using as much of the older original materials and artifacts from the old church which were still laying in the grass. Some of the older parts of the church such as the remains of the north porch were re-positioned and incorporated into the new design. The church does have a very ‘modern’ feel about it and is much plainer in decor than some of the other churches we have visited, yet the eagle eyed can easily spot the more ancient aspects of the church which date back to a much older time in history long before the present day church was built.

On the floor of the church, at the top of the main aisle are some very interesting carvings upon ancient stone slabs, which i am guessing may have come from the old church remains. Whether they mark the tomb of someone of prominience i do not know but the style of carvings on them are of a much older time, much much older than the present church and there are certain strong clues here that suggest  that one could even relate to Queen Boudica herself. The slab just below it is even more worn and again is probably from the original building. Even though it is very worn there is a strong suggestion that it is definitely connected to King Richard 3rd himself.

Let our lead researcher explain some more about the history of the church, the legend of the ghost train and Black Shuck and most importantly the connection to Queen Boudica, the Crown and to the sites previously visited – click on our link

OVERSTRAND: Black beasts & phantom trains

High up upon the church wall are to be found plaques to Richard 3rd and his wife Lady Ann Neville; not original as such but still very relevant.

     Looking through the original church doorway into the newer part of the building. Also shown is what is know as the ‘water mark’ from whence the priest would have obtained their holy water used for their blessings; their ‘water mark’.

Conclusions of the days visits: As always nothing is ever what it seems and one always has to dig deeper for the truths; there are those truths that we are able to know and those truths that are specifically hidden.

  • The resting place and chambers of Queen Boudicia, who she really was and her bloodline, are firmly hidden from the general public; one wonders why?
  • Even today much is still hidden within the vast areas of the English landscape, which no one normally knows about.
  • The ‘real’ and original monarchy of these lands had a purpose not written about in history books.
  • All the sites so far visted are connected and had ‘Guardians’ – why?
  • Why is Knight Templar and Masonic symbolism  found in all  these ancient churches and where did it really come from? What was the Templars influence in those days of old?
  • Sir Thomas Holland was obviously highly esteemed and yet his resting place has been ‘preserved’ out of sight with no record of him – why?
  • Once again we find that ‘secrets’ of the past are often hidden by building over the top of them. What are these secrets and why are they hidden?
  • A pattern is emerging of the connection between the prominent characters buried at all of these sites; a family bloodline is revealing itself….
  • Richard the Third played a very important role and is a big part of the developing jigsaw puzzle.
  • The old churches indeed have a tale or two to tell, but one has to look from a completely different angle for the tales to reveal themselves; often far removed from what the history books tell us…

celtic cross

We can not say for sure,  but this beautifully aged and worn Celtic Cross hiding in a far corner of the churchyard, could possibly mark the resting place of a member of the ‘bloodline’ we are researching….

Please feel welcome to join our team or contact us re The Priory, as the ‘secrets’ are revealed and it is a very fun and social day out too 🙂

email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

‘Seek and ye shall find’

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