Tag Archive: Myth and Legend


QUEST TWENTYSIX: IRELAND:

Day Three: The Giants Causeway: Three wonderful days had already passed and time was indeed flying by in Ireland; we had travelled many miles northwards today, two miles from Busmills village in county Antrim, to one of the many stretches of coastline very near to Scotland and to the very mysterious place known as The Giants Causeway; a place of many legends and tales; see links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant%27s_Causeway

The wonderful and beautifully rugged coastline that surrounds the causeway in Northern Ireland is a joy to behold; the day we were there the seas and wind were amazing and certainly were displaying their natural power! This is an energetic and magical place that makes one’s heart sing! The sea roars loudly and one can make no mistake of it’s powers – the greatest giver and taker on the earth; the power and might of the ‘Walvbane’….

 

 

There are many tales of rivalry between the Irish and Scottish giants of long ago, when the world was very different from today; after all for any aspiring giant worth his own tellings, Scotland is only a mere hop, skip & a giants leap away, over to the left in fact! But be well advised to remember that giants (especially baby giants) and history are never ever what they seem to be…..

https://giantscausewaytickets.com/finn-mccool

 

 

Nothing on this planet is ever what it seems, often time is the biggest secret keeper of all; unlock it’s mysteries and time will reveal all.. What beautiful yet strange shapes; natural, manmade or something else? You decide…..

 

 

The Giants Causeway; far from being natural….? <click to enlarge>

Filming at the Giants Causeway, Ireland: see link below. Again another very windy day, so lots of noise and camera wobble as i perched precariously atop these amazingly constructed columns, with my dear tutor hanging on to me while i moved around filming, to prevent me falling!
I walked much further out than i thought i would with my balance probs, and hung on to my camera for dear life!
Look closely at the very precise enginnering of the hexagonal columns and how they all fit together; truths that belong to another time and space within history…..
Scotland is just off to the right – a mere hop and a skip for any reputable giant!

The Hill of Tara & The Giants Causeway

  • Bloodline Connection: Lord of the Isles and tied into Greenland and Iceland

Derry and St Columba’s Church: Derry today (named Londonderry by the British is a million miles away from what it was during the troubles, yet the echoes of those times still remain in areas such as the ‘Free Derry Corner’. Derry is the second-largest city  in Northern Ireland and the fourth-largest city on the island of Ireland. The name Derry is an anglicisation of the Old Irish name Daire (modern Irish: Doire) meaning “oak grove”. In 1613, the city was granted a Royal Charter by King James 1 and gained the “London” prefix to reflect the funding of its construction by the London guilds. While the city is more usually known colloquially as Derry, Londonderry is also commonly used and remains the legal name. Read more about it’s history below;  from the tourist site one can see that the city is a very vibrant and upcoming city to visit and an absolute mecca for the arts!:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry

http://www.visitderry.com/

 

Amazing, yet deeply poignant & meaningful urban street art in Derry, alluding to a time when raw passion and ideals overflowed with a desire for what was righteous. <click to enlarge – well worth it!>

St Columba’s Church: We drove around the church a couple of times before we found our access to it and a parking spot, but once there and insde the sght that grreets one upon enterng is amazing to say the lest.  St Columba’s Church, Long Tower is a Roman Catholic church in the Diocese of Derry and is located in the heart of Derry.

 

 

The outside of St Colunba’s Church, Derry

The present church is built on the site of Roman Catholic worship which goes back as far as the 12th century. The current Long Tower Church began life in 1783 in a much smaller scale than seen today. Father John Lynch, a parish priest in Derry started action to raise funds for building the Long Tower Church and he received finance not just from Roman Catholics but also Protestant people in Derry at the time. The church was opened in 1788.

 

The suptuous wood & marble interior of Derry Church <click to enlarge>

The church was extended and refurbished in 1810 with the introduction of gallery seating, nave and the changing of the Altar to the northern side of the church. The High Altar was constructed with marble and supported by four pillars. The four pillars were first made of wood put proved to be not strong enough to hold the large and heavy marble altar and so the pillars were changed to be made out of marble. The layout of the church from 1810 onwards has remained largely unaltered. However, in 1908 a full refurbishment of the Long Tower took place which included addition of new stained glass windows, statues, shrines, baptismal font and the reposition of the High Altar and the introduction of a new sacristy. The church’s refurbishment was completed in 1909 and the church was then officially opened to the general public.

 

 

The stunning works of art & treasures inside St Columba’s Church, Derry

The current parish population as of December 2015 is 6,761. The church overlooks the Catholic Bogside of Derry which has seen many instances of violence such as Bloody Sunday of 1972 and so would have been at the centre of the troubles, but this church ensures that people find peace and quiet there no matter what is going on outside the church grounds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Columba%27s_Church,_Long_Tower

 

See video for more info: starts at 11.09

Three Irish Churches

  • Bloodline Connection: Takes one to the time of ‘The Troubles’ and links to ‘previous experiences’

GOING BEYOND THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR & MASONIC SYMBOLISM: On our quests around the uk and now in Ireland too, we have come to understand and acknowledge the significance and history of the vast array, and purposefully placed in time, templar and masonic symbolism. The two paths of Templarism and Free Masonry do have some commonalities within history yet are not to be confused for they are two entirely different paths. Understanding the symbols and emblems placed within time by our ancestors, the original inhabitants of this planet, can unlock the secrets to time and space and can bestow hidden knowledge upon those wishing to seek answers. Big clues to the past, present and future have been left all over the Celtic Lands and they are all just waiting to be discovered and decoded.

Here to wet your appetites are just a small selection of the symbols we discovered in Ireland; symbols which go back to our dawn of time and relate to our true ancestors; our creators. There were many Celtic Crosses too, which i have featured in part one. Many of the symbols here are extremely well-know and well-used within Craft Circles, Preceptories, Rites and Teachings etc. Those folk of the Craft path today and especially within the Priory will have the keys to decode and understand these mysterious symbols and emblems that crop up all over our planet; it is indeed a fascinating and elightening pursuit, unravelling these mysteries. A symbol can say a thousand words and can therefore replace a thousand  words, thus  crossing all language and cultural divides. Symbols can and will, when correctly interpreted speak to those of Craft whom truly seek to know.

 

 

<please click to enlarge>

 

The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

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October 2018

 

QUEST TWENTY SIX: IRELAND:

  • PART ONE:
  • Angelsey, Holyhead, Dublin, Ballyonan
  • Navan: The Hill of Tara
  • Cavan: St Patricks Cathedral
  • Blacklion: St Patricks Church
  • Belfast Public Records Office
  • Newcastle & the Mountains of Mourne
  • PART TWO:
  • Newry: Newry Cathedral/St Patricks Church
  • The Giants Causeway
  • Derry: St Columbas Church
  • PART THREE:
  • Dublin: St Andrews Church, Christ Church Cathedral (St Patricks Cathedral)
  • Dundalk: St Nicholas Parish Church
  • Belfast: Belfast Synagogue, Belfast Cathedral, St Thomas Church
  • Dublin, Holyhead and home….

And so it was at the end of September 2018, we began our much anticipated week-long quest to that beautiful and magical island: Ireland. With so many mysterious and exciting places on our itinery we were just aching to get there. We travelled by car on the Sunday to Anglesey in Wales where we stopped briefly over night before catching the Irish Ferry ‘Ulysses’ from Holyhead, which ferried us very safely and comfortably to Dublin in Ireland. From Dublin we drove to County Louth, to a small village alongside a beautiful estuary, called Ballyonan, near Lough Tain – a very hard place to find even on a map!

 

Arriving in Ireland at the Port of Dublin wth dust falling along the estuary as we made it to our digs

So begins Quest Twenty Six; Ireland is a very beautiful, deeply religous and spiritual country, albeit with a very chequered history, as is told within the passions and ideals of it’s peoples, clashing over time, within and without.

 

THE CELTIC CROSS: The Celtic Cross is very much symnominous with Christianity and of course  the Celtic lands; yet the symbols history gos much further back in time with much deeper meanings and do infact connect at different levels of understanding to the teachings of The Priory. In Ireland, the spiritual symbol of the Celtic Cross endures throughout Irish history and remains forever  prominent  in the Irish culture; it is an honour to see the symbol in it’s rightful home, just as it should be…

It is popularly believed that St. Patrick introduced the Celtic Cross in Ireland, during his conversion of the kings from paganism to Christianity. Other beliefs are that it was St. Columba or St. Declan who introduced it and that further the circle stands for the Roman sun-god Invictus, thus giving the name of Celtic Sun Cross, while other beliefs connect it to a reprentation the Celestial Sphere. It is also said to represent the halo of Jesus Christ.  Many beautiful Celtic Crosses adorn graveyards and gravestones throughout Ireland and the UK. It is a symbol used by many different cultures across our planet in religous rites and sacerd spaces; different cultures attributing different names and meanings to the four points.

 

The Celtic Cross photographed across the northen part of Ireland; sometimes in surprising and unacustomed formats…

Day One: The Hill of Tara: The Hill of Tara is located near the River Boyne and is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath and according to tradition  was the seat of the Hight Kings of Ireland, so a very important part of our Templar Quest in researching the bloodline and origins of the ‘Neville’ surname, as those of you who are following us will be well aware of, so therefore ticked quite a few boxes for us on this visit. The Neville ancestory line can be traced right back through history to the Kings of Ireland; those High Kings who would have been crowed here all those many years ago…

Liathdroim (The Hill of Tara) and the Lia Fail (Stone of Destiny) in County Meath, known as the Seat of the High Kings; the place where the true high kings were crowned. According to legend, the stone would scream if a series of challenges were met by the would-be king. At his touch the stone would let out a screech that could be heard all over Ireland. When touched today, one may receive personal visions from the stone…. The Hill of Tara is documented in certain ancient texts but always from a mythological point of view, yet hidden within those old texts, jumping out from the myths and legends, hidden within the very land itself the truth can always be found…

At the summit of the hill, to the north of the ridge, is an oval Iron Age hilltop enclosue measuring 318 metres (1,043 ft) north-south by 264 metres (866 ft) east-west and enclosed by an internal ditch and external bank, known as Ráith na Ríogh (the Fort of the Kings, also known as the Royal Enclosure). The most prominent earthworks within are the two linked enclosures, a bivallate (double-ditched) ring fort and a bivallate ring barrow known as Teach Chormaic or Cormac’s House and the Forradh or Royal Seat. In the middle of the Forradh is the Lia Fail at which the High Kings were crowned. To the north of the hill is a Neolithic passage tomb Dumha na nGial, aptly named ‘The Mound of the Hostage’ with secrets of its own hdden within time and tellings… The Mound of the Hostages was constructed around 3,400 (cal.) BC. Its is the oldest site at the Hill of Tara.

 

Nearby at the site entrance is the Church of St Patrick with St Patrick’s statue overlooking the land. The “Rath of the Synods” has been partly destroyed by its churchyard; the modern church being built in 1822–23 on the site of an earlier one. The earliest evidence of a church at Tara is a charter dating from the 1190s. In 1212, this church was “among the possessions confirmed to the Knights Hospitallers of Saint John of Kilmainham by Pope Innocent 111. Read more about the site from the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hill_of_Tara

 

An important site in respect of the true (now hidden) history of these lands, of our true ancestors (or creators) and from whence the true royal bloodline spread its light across these sacred lands…

Filming atop the Hill of Tara and from the adjacent burial mound: it was so windy up there as you can hear, so no commentatary at this point as i had a job even holding the camera steady. A magical place full of untold history with many hidden conections to the true path as taught by The Priory, and a magnificant view across Ireland

 

The Hill of Tara and The Giants Causeway

 

  • Bloodline Connections: The Neville Line (the Bloodline of the ‘Neville’ surname) “
  • The High Kings List (the Neville line one and the same; )

Cavan: St Patricks Cathedral: The Cathedral of St Patrick and St Felim, also known as Cavan Cathedral, was next on our list for the day. It is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Cavan and is the seat of the Bishop of Kilmore and the mother chrch of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Kilmore. In 1152, the Diocese of Kilmore was formally established by Cardinal Giovanni Paparoni at the synod of Kells. In 1454, Pope Nicholas V gave permission for the ancient church at Kilmore (founded in the sixth century by  Saint Felim to be the catherdral church of Kilmore diocese. It was rebuilt and became to be known in Irish as An Chill Mhór (meaning Great Church) and anglicised as Kilmore, which gave its name to the diocese, a name which has remained ever since.

 

Cavan; an Cabhán, meaning “the hollow”, is the county town of County Cavan and lies in Ulster, near the border with Northern Ireland. Cavan was founded by the King of East Breifne, Giolla Íosa Ruadh O’Reilly, sometime during his lordship between 1300 and his death in 1330. During his lordship, a Franciscan friary was established close to the O’Reilly stronghold at Tullymongan and was at the centre of the settlement close to a crossing over the river and to the town’s marketplace.

We were unable to film inside the cathedral as people were praying which of course we respected, but we did manage to tip toe around and take some photos.

 

The beautiful mosaic flooring of Cavan Catherdral

 

The stunning windows and artwork of Cavan Catherdral

 

Is she actually ‘Mary’ or does she represent somethng else? The ‘Holder of Life for example’? She certainly is cluthching the red and white roses; the symbols and colours of the Neville family

You may read more here:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavan

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavan_Cathedral

 

  • Bloodline connection: Our head researcher’s great granfather x 2 Bernard Fordham was born in Cavan in 1870.
  • The cathedral contains references to the red and white rose (and colours) of the ‘Neville Line’

 

 

Wild dramatic scenery and spectacular weather was encountered as we drove to St Patricks Church, Killinnagh, Blacklion

Killinnagh, Blacklion: St Patrick’s Church: The present Church, dedicated to St. Patrick, was built in 1846. It was a thatched structure at that time, a barn church, and would have been used for communal threshing during the week. It was not big enough to accommodate the congregation so it was decided to put in a gallery in 1889. It had to be raised. Money must have been very scarce at that time because second hand slates were bought to roof it and the timber used to construct the gallery was very poor quality.

 

St Patricks Church & graveyard; a stunning church amidst stunning scenery

A very high standard quality of renovation and improvement was carried out between 1930 and 1932. This was funded by Sir Patrick McGovern, a native of the area, who had been very successful as a contractor in America. A basement was built under a new sacristy and a coal-fired furnace was installed to provide central heating. This would have ranked it among the most modern in the country at that time. This lasted until the 1990’s when it needed major renovation. This was carried out in 1995 and the Church now has all modern facilities.

 

 

The sumptuous interior of St Patrick’s Church where marble has been used extensively throughout. More about the rather interesting windows can be learnt by clicking on the video link below:

 

  • Bloodline connections relate to the Neville and Fordham lines
  • Bernard Fordham was born nearby in Cavan in 1870

A little more about the church here: http://www.glangevlin.com/index.php/parish-churches/75-st-patricks-killinagh-church-blacklion

As i was unable to find anything on the internet in respect of Killinnagh itself, you can read about Blacklion here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blacklion

 

Follow our link to learn more about the three churches we were able to film at:

Cavan Cathedral, St Patrick’s Church & St Columbas Church

 

Day Two: Belfast Public Records Office:  Lovely sunny weather and a steady drive northwards bought us into Belfast and into The Titanic quarter of the city, to visit the public records office where valuble information was obtained;  yet to be fully incorporated into our quests. We did not stay long in Belfast itself but i did snatch some quick photos from the car! Belfast is a very large vibrant city which like most cities one cannot get a true sense of it from the car, but looking at the brochure i picked up in the record office it is a city of many cultural and arts events all year round and we certainly did see many fine artworks whilst driving through.

Belfast is Northern Ireland’s capital. It was the birthplace of the RMS Titanic, which famously struck an iceberg and sunk in 1912. This legacy is recalled in the renovated dockyards’ Titanic Quarter, which includes the Titanic Belfast, an aluminium-clad museum reminiscent of a ship’s hull, as well as shipbuilder Harland & Wolff’s Drawing Offices and the Titanic Slipways, which now host open-air concerts.

 

  • Bloodline Connections confirming Fordham & linking Neville line.
  • Check Ford line from Ireland from 1700’s

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast

 

Newcastle and the Mountains of Mourne: Next we headed south again and to  Newcastle; a magical town nestling right besisde the coast, where the Mountians of Mourne roll down to greet the sea; everywhere one looks is a stunning view, made even more beautiful when the mists roll like tears down the face of the majestic mountains. We stayed a few hours; an afternoon of wandering and chilling and a very tasty meal too! No Craft site as such to visit but checking out the energies and future connections of the land.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newcastle,_County_Down

We drove up high on winding narrow roads to where the mountains met the skies. It felt like being in a time portal for there is no sense of time or space here, just a maginificant sense of presence and peace and of course beauty all around.

The Mountans of Mourne

Newry Cathedral/the Cathedral of Saint Patrick and Saint Colman:  So leaving the mountains and our hearts behind, we made our way to Newry and to the cathedral there. This is a Roman Catholic cathedral which acts as the seat of the Bishop of Dromore, and the head church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Dromore. We did not expect it to be open for it was now late in the day, but still managed some good outside shots, but hoped to return.

Newry Cathedral just before nightfall

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Newry_Cathedral

 

  • Bloodline Connections relate to ‘The Land of the True Knight’

“It was never ours
Yet we deemed to own G-ds land.
The rainbow arc shone in many colours
Yet no-one saw
And the price is always paid
When G-D’s covenant is broken…”

 

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’
October 2018

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER THREE

  • ST MARY’S CHURCH, AKENHAM SUFFOLK

St Mary’s Church situated near Akenham in Suffolk really is right off the beaten track; up the grass track in fact. It winds past Rise Hall (formely Rice Hall); one of the church’s ancient manors and nestles timelessly in the beautifully serene English countryside or so it would seem. For this lovely little almost abandoned church does hold some secrets to a very interesting past. It also has the nickname of ‘St Mary’s in the Fields’, standing on a rise amidst the meadows, over a quarter of a mile from the nearest road and so a challenge in itself to actually locate it in the first place. Once at St Mary’s the vews across the surrounding coutryside are truly stunning. But yet again another church that seemingly no-one wants ‘outsiders’ to find and like Borley Church there are no road signs or direction to it. We ended up having to ask  directions a few times to folks who seemed reticent to give them. So thus St Mary’s here became quest number three…

To read more about the church and it’s history please see the links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary’s_Church,_Akenham

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akenham

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This flint-towered church from the later middle ages lies hidden in the heart of the rural English countryside.

There are several interesting tales about St Mary’s church; stories of  strange ‘happenings’ ocurring; people seeing ‘ghosts’ appearing at the church windows and as was mentioned breifly in the previous clip, the bombings of world war two and reports from the village of the bells ringing for no reason. It has even been said that one can ‘raise the devil’ by walking thirteen times widdershins around the church – well we are going to put all this to the test later.

Obviously the church is clearly not in use and is curently beeing restored to its former glory. What is further interesting is that Queen Mary 1st of England, King Henry 8th’s and Catherine of Aragon’s daughter was quiet heavely envolved in this particular area of the land. It is interesting to note that when we went to Borley Church, Sir Edward Walgrave, who was buried in one of the tombs there, inside of the church, was the chief adviser to Queen Mary 1st and when she had her coronation, it was at this very church, St Mary’s of Akenham pretty much in the middle of nowhere, that there was a major celebraton to mark her coronation on becoming Queen after Henry died. There was also another ‘mystery’, that of a very young child who had died and who was buried not in the graveyard, but on the actual boundary of the church.

The church was actually built, we think in the thirtenth century but there are reports of another church on this site pre the thirteenth century  but we cannot be sure that this is fact. What is more important is that the church was involved under the ‘Burial Reformation Act’ in one of the most major cases of the time in England. This act gave people the right to be buried and it all came about because of a man named Drury who was a a reverend here; he was very devout to his religon and faith and the last of the ‘line’ of reverends who shared the same name.The case is quiet well known and has been documented in many publications over the years.

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The Strange Tale of Little Joseph Ramsey: One of the most interesting stories is the fascinating account of  a young lad called Joseph Ramsey who died when he was only two years old, in according to varying accounts, in quite suspicous circumstances. Because he was classed as what is known as a ‘non conformist’ he was not allowed to be buried within the church and it was agreed between Drury and the other reverend that Joseph could be buried on the outer part of the fences of the church boundary. But something happened for Rev Drury to agree to bury this poor lad in the church but on unsanctified ground. There is a small gravestone to the edge of the church boundary which to all intents and purposes seems to be Joseph’s gravestone and many people of the nineteenth century believed this to be so but in fact this is NOT his stone; his small stone which is said to have been blown down by the wind and was subsequently moved and re-erected is to be found even further out still.

See our Youtube link to discover more about the tale and the mystery of little Joseph Ramsey….

AKEMAN CHURCH & JOSEPH RAMSEY

PART TWO: RAISING THE DEVIL….

  •  ST MARY’S CHURCH AKENHAM

As our ‘willing’ volunteer made his way widdershins (anti-clockwise) around the church we did notice some strange changes in the overall atmosphere of the area and more than one of our party experienced pressures to the forehead occuring round about the 3rd lap. On completing the laps a weird ‘darkness’ had descended and the atmosphere had become decidedly ‘heavy’. So was it the ‘devil’ or something else or maybe just coincidence? Though as anyone knows there is no such thing as coincidence….. Of course one has to keep an open mind and decide for one’s  self.

Follow our Youtube link to see our willing volunteer on his journey to ‘raise the devil’

AKEMAN CHURCH: RAISING THE DEVIL

We were very priviledged to be able to obtain the keys to the church from Jeremy at Rise Hall nearby and thus were able to enter in. It was a fascinating experience as there were several points of ‘energy’ within the church, mainly within the lectern where one could also sense other strong ‘anomalies’ too, at the altar where the energy was very strong yet very calming and from the ‘real’ cross itself, the priests staff which was buzzing with healing energy. The feel and power of the energies at this site were not at all unlike the powerful energies we experienced at Spooks Hill.

Summary of the day and points to ponder on…

  1. Important to note that when our researcher went round on the 6th lap of the church, the black cloud arrived, yet ONLY above the church and the immediate vicinity and thus hail stones happened;  BUT NOT down at Rise Hall or anywhere else!
  2. The distinct vibrations occurred from the Lectern in the church and were strong in sense and being, BUT the main Priest Altar was a calm flowing vibration; this is significant
  3. The Priest Staff had a lot of power to it; oddly it had healing power
  4. Joseph Ramsey’s gravestone was certainly worth the visit to make the connection to previous quests.
  5.  Joseph Ramseys tombstone is of relevance and interesting, as its another link to the past and a certain future
  6. On our researcher’s 6th lap widdershins, our lead researcher had an intense pressure in the front and side of his head and that is also when the black cloud arrived as previously mentioned
  7. We seemed to have two people ‘walking their dogs’ and lurking about nearby when we first arrived; similar to the Borley experience
  8. Speaking with Jeremy Hall, a really nice chap. He gave the true account passed down to him by his past family members and confirmed the issues raised over Joseph’s burial which led to the Burial Reformation Act and was covered in the national newspapers for some 12 months.
  9. Drury when he stormed off from the burial service, actually locked the people in the graveyard by locking the main gate! That piece of information is not recorded anywhere, but clearly true.

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The three areas of the church where the various ‘energies’ were focused; namely the priests altar, the lectern and the priests staff (the REAL cross). The eagle-eyed and astute amongst you, may already have spotted certain connections to our other quests this far and that a ‘pattern’ seems to be emerging to form the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The answers as always are hidden between the lines often in plain sight.

If you are interested in joining us in our quests please leave a message here or email: moon.willow@ntlworld.com

if you are interested in joining The Priory itself please contact us by email or via this webpage

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER TWO

  • BORLEY RECTORY & CHURCH PART ONE: THE FACTS
  • PART TWO: FACES FROM THE PAST

<Click on photos to enlarge>

It was a bright sunny (if not windy) day in March 2016 that we arrived in the small village of Borley in Essex. Anyone with a keen interest in the paranormal or places of unusual events or happenings, cannot fail to have heard of the infamous happenings and hauntings that, over the years, have occured at Borly Rectory and Church. The Rectory was demolished many years ago but the church is still very much here.

For a bit of useful background and historical infomation, the following links are very useful and help to paint the overall picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley_Rectory

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley_Church

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley

 

We wondered what we would find there; listening to other clips and snippets on the internet the signs were not good; the church had been well and truly locked to visitors for years, no one was ever around and lest of all welcoming, the small carpark was always chained across with no where else to park and the villagers activey discouraged visitors and researchers by going to the trouble of removing any sign posts that directed one to the village. So not a very good start then but never the less we remained optimistic and really looking forward to the day.

So imagine our surprise then, when as soon as we arrived at Borley Church, not only was the car park unchained allowing us to pull straight up to the church entrance, but there was also another car already parked there with a guy inside seemingly viewing the expansive country side through binoculars. We got out of the car, as did he and before we knew it and quite unexpectedly, freindly conversation had ensued along with introductions, who we were and our reason for being there; namely research into the Church and Rectory and the strange happenings documented to have occured there.

The next suprise happened almost immedietly when seemingly from out of nowhere two others appeared, also engaging straight away in conversation with us; one of whom was a lady who told us she had been taking a ‘tour’ around the church, yet i could not help wondering where the people on the tour actually were and there was ‘something’ unsettling about her that i could not quiet put my finger on; she seemed to be a bit ‘out of time’. Again all seemingly very interested in what we were doing there; not at all what we were expecting or had been led to believe about the village.

We then made our way around the back of the church where there appeared to be a much older area; less manicured and with much older gravestones but with stunning views across the rolling Essex countryside with light rays shinning on where ‘the bones’ are buried…

  We then made our way along the back of the church to the front again but on coming around the side to what was, only a few minutes ago an empty space, a gardener complete with wheelbarrow plus an array of various gardening tools and equipment was now diligently going about his daily buisness. Pleasantries were of course exchanged, yet curiously while we introduced ourselves, he in fact did not, but he did tell us a little more about the church and its history and its current application for lottery funding in respect of its leaking roof yet also making a big point of telling us that the Old Rectory would have been situated way, way down the road where modern bungelows had now been built upon. The church doors that only minutes before had been tightly locked shut and chained, were now wide open and welcoming and thus on our inquiring he bid us to go inside; telling us that the church is often open to visitors on a weekend, yet this was not a weekend, so very contary to what we had been led to believe and certainly not what we were expecting

.View of the inside of the church showing in detail the tomb and its placement, the  window directly opposite the tomb and a view of the altar.

Once inside the small church one can see that it is certainly very stunning with some beautiful stained glass windows of amazing craftmanship. But one can not help noticing the ‘family’ tomb, rising from floor to ceiling, towards the left hand side of the altar and how elaborate, well preserved and detailed it is, being placed directly opposite one of the stained glass windows. I myself felt nothing untoward inside the church; in fact i would say the very opposite, it felt very natural, almost as if we were ‘meant’ to be there and were placed inside of a (to us) protected enviroment.

At the very back of the church, outside the actual boundaries is a piece of ground very ‘different’ from the surounding area with a type of flora growing there which has been left in a natural state and unattended. This is in actual fact the site of the very original Borley Rectory which lasted up until 1161 yet had been added to and modified since 934 CE, but was subsequently demolished, to make way (i guess) for the now infamous rectory of the ‘hauntings and happenings’.

See the link below for a full account of part one the days happenings

BORLEY CHURCH & RECTORY: PART ONE

(Apologies for poor sound quality; it was a very windy day!)

  • So where is the real rectory?
  • Why were we given a red herring in respect of it?
  • Who was the mystery gardener, ‘tour guide’ and companions?
  • Why were the church doors open and welcoming?
  • Why does all this connect to one of our party?

All is revealed in ‘Faces from the Past’ (part two of our Borley investigation)

FACES FROM THE PAST:

After a full day of research and investigations at Borley Church on March 27th 2016, we certainly came home with plenty to consider and to think about. It had been such a truly amazing day where many anomalies had occurred; all being very unusual to say the lest. While still fresh in our minds; to help with further research we decided to try to record our immediate thoughts on the day’s events, there and then. Our team discussed the events of the day, the people we met and the ‘happenings’ of the day, seemingly not adding up or making sense.

Mulling over the day….

Upon discussing the many ‘oddities’ of our day at Borley we noted from watching numerous YouTube videos that it was apparent that previous researchers always found the chain well and truly across the tiny car park, which can only fit about five or six cars in it anyway. What the videos all say is that the chain is padlocked across the car park entrance making it very difficult to find somewhere to park, but on this day the chain was unlocked and we were able to drive straight in.

We had parked next to a rather elderly couple and thus chatted with them, exchanging pleasantries; the lady from the car advised us that she was from two villages down, a village called ‘Chapel’ (or did she mean the chapel?) She seemed to know a lot about Borley Rectory and Church and said she had been taking a ‘tour’ around the Church; yet they were no one else to be seen there. The gentleman who was driving the vehicle had a pair of binoculars and was generally just looking across the open landscape. But what was most odd was that when a question was asked in respect of Borley Rectory and Church; the lady’s face changed suddenly froze and went quiet stern…

Then almost within a moment’s breath, a little white van turned up and a mature gentleman, maybe in his early fifties gets out and comes over to us; again exchanging pleasantries; he told us his name was Steve and that he often came up to the Church, but was quite adamant in saying that the Church was normally locked and that he, himself could never gain entrance. He also said he had been to Borley Church at night time but had not really seen anything, although to him it has seemed ‘eerie’. We then went on to discuss the location of the Rectory, yet strangely he did not seem to know where it was, though listened avidly to our theories of where we thought it would have been; behind the actual church on the piece of ‘wild ground’ to one side. The next minute he seemed to go on a ‘walk around’ in that very direction but not into the actual Church area. The mystery is that none of us actually saw him arrive in the actual church area  but one of our party, when upon our arrival and initial walk around the church saw ‘Steve’ talking to a ‘gardener’ at the back of the Church as if they knew each other. What was more interesting is that the ‘gardener arrived from nowhere; he was suddenly there trimming a bush!

So to recap; the people there at the site at this time are us (the research team), the elderly couple from the blue car, (the man with the binoculars and the lady who said she was from ‘Chapel’), Steve (in the white van)

When we walked up initially and had a look at the Church there was no gardener in sight. The ‘elderly couple’ did eventually leave in their car, so that just left Steve and us and when we first walked up to the Church to start filming, there was no sign of any gardener, but when two of our party walked around the Church, prior to filming; the door to the Church was suddenly unlocked and wide open, the hedge strimmer attached with extension cable plugged in!  There was also a wheelbarrow and tools all ready and in action yet only minutes before no-one was there and the chain and padlock was well and truly over the locked and shut Church doors! The ‘gardener’ did indeed look as if he had been working on the bush trimming for some time; had been there a lot longer that had appeared yet only two or three minutes had elapsed in real time!

Steve then re-appears and disappears again and so for a place that everyone says is always locked and one cannot gain access to see inside the Church and that there is no one around; at the very moment we arrived it seemed to be a height of activity with people there and a gardener appearing from nowhere cutting a bush! The gardener also had ‘tools’ and ‘electrics’ that were not stored in the Church and neither did he have a vehicle in the car park! So a mystery that needs a lot more research and thinking about or maybe visiting again at another time of day to see what the experience will be. We have four different individuals; the couple, Steve in the white van and the gardener; four people in fact who suddenly arrived from nowhere, yet all the youtube footage tells of no-one ever being around, never anyone from the local village being anywhere near Borley Church but oddly, this day when we were there, it was a hive of activity!

Past and Present Become One: Findings of our Research:

So despite the information we had been given by the ‘gardener’ we subsequently discovered that Borley Rectory, the site of many unusual happenings was not, as we suspected, down the road at the bottom of the hill, but was of course just across the road from Borley Church, which of course makes perfect sense.

real rectorysite

Aerial photo showing the site of the old Rectory and it’s geographical relationship to Borley Church.

The old rectory, which had previously burned down, was as one can see, well within walking distance of the church and right where it needed to be. At the back of the church where we were filming on the day, is the site of the very first rectory, also needing to be near the church. So the ‘gardener’ did actually give us misinformation, as he said the rectory was way down the hill where two bungalows are now built; but why did he say this?

Directly opposite the church there are in fact two bungalows but not built on the old rectory ground itself. The rectory site is grassed over and the original vegetable patch is the only remaining evidence. The vegetable patch is however still used by the first bungalow, which seemed very strange.

This is where events of the day start getting very interesting, for upon coming home and doing avid internet research in respect of all the folks who in the past had a strong connection to the Church and the Rectory at Borley, but yet who are no longer around today; we were in for a great shock and many revelations to say the lest! Even though ‘somethingon the day told us that things were not quite right and events did not seem to add up; especially the folks we met on the day whom we had wondered; were they real people?

They say seeing is believing and this is what we saw….

HARRY PRICE: ghost hunter aka ‘our gardener’

   Harry Price: Ghost Hunter or Harry Price: Gardener?

 As the photos above show, Harry Price was the original investigator at Borley, yet also this is the exact image of our mysterious gardener in the present day. All of our party made the connection and recognised him instantly from the photos!

So the gardener appears to be Harry Price the Ghost Hunter who lived from 17:01:1881 to 29:03:1948. He has been dead for 68 years but seemingly well and truly alive on this particular day!

MOLLIE GOLDNEY: physic researcher aka ‘tour guide’

Mollie Goldney

This photo shows (on the right – looking at it) Mollie Goldney, who was also (or so it appeared) the lady in the second car, that appeared out of nowhere!

On the far left (looking at the picture) the gardener we met on the day, who also appeared out of nowhere. This picture is 1939! Again, we all recognised her as the lady we had met on the day! Mollie Goldney was a Psychic Researcher and died in 1992. She has been dead 24 years! Mollie has/had a wealth of ESP government research papers that she has in trust NOT to be published until the year 2020, this was her direct and strange request.

REVEREND LIONEL FOYSTER: aka ‘Steve’

Also in the photo, next to Mollie is the Reverend Lionel Foyster with his wife Marianne. ‘He’ also said to us that he is often there at the church, which would make total sense if he had been the actual Reverend of the church! So Steve is The Reverend Lionel Foyster who lived from 1878 to 18:04:1945. He has been dead for 71 years!

In the picture also is the Foysters adopted daughter, Adelaide and the Lodger’s son, Frank Junior. Again and independently, we all made the connection here!

LORD MARK KERR-PEARCE: aka the man in the car with Mollie with the binoculars

 MarkKerrpearceLord Mark Kerr-Pearce, was the ‘official observer’ for Harry Price. He  was also the second man in the car we met on the day with Mollie; Lord Mark Kerr-Pearce; a Psychic Researcher who was born in 1818 and who died in 2005, he has been dead 11 years! Again, we all independently made the connection as we instantly recognized him!

BURRYING THE BONES…

Foyers and price

The photo above clearly shows Reverend Foyers (Steve) and Harry Price (the gardener) burying the bones of the murdered lady; exactly where in our video; our head investigator Alek said they were buried, before actually finding this photo! After the bones had been buried here, was when all the ‘happenings’ started to occur in the church. Putting together all our findings, there is certainly a mystery waiting to be solved and one, which we will in due course return to.

See the link below for our personal thoughts on the day….

BORLEY RECTORY: MULLING OVER THE DAY

Joining the dots of the Quest

  • Clearly, the ‘gardener’ was looking out for us as he told us a white lie thus we would not be harmed. It is clear that the entities (ghosts) of today (27th March 2016) all welcomed us, especially inside the church itself, but they did not want us to go to the rectory site across the road.
  • Note to Priory Team: Clearly, we should take note of that warning and not attempt to go to the site.
  • What is of interest here is that our head investigator, discovered on the evening of March 17th 2016, that the wife of Sir Edward Waldegrave (1517-1561) is resting in the actual tomb inside Borley Church next to his wife (our researcher’s relative) Frances Waldegrave, which explains our encounters of the day and why the entities were welcoming for us and how by amazement we were freely able to enter the church.

 Edward: husband of Frances Frances: wife of Edward & relative of Alek.  

 There is a direct connection between Borley Church (built in 984 CE) and the Magnetic Hill at Warboys, if you choose to remain on this Quest, then more shall be discovered.

  • Sir Edward Waldgrave, buried here in Borley Church, was the chief adviser to Queen Mary 1st. When she had her coronation, it was at St Mary’s Church at Akenham that there was a major celebration to mark her coronation on becoming Queen after Henry died.

March 2016

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‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

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