Tag Archive: Templar Symbolism


QUEST TWENTYSIX: IRELAND:

Day Three: The Giants Causeway: Three wonderful days had already passed and time was indeed flying by in Ireland; we had travelled many miles northwards today, two miles from Busmills village in county Antrim, to one of the many stretches of coastline very near to Scotland and to the very mysterious place known as The Giants Causeway; a place of many legends and tales; see links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant%27s_Causeway

The wonderful and beautifully rugged coastline that surrounds the causeway in Northern Ireland is a joy to behold; the day we were there the seas and wind were amazing and certainly were displaying their natural power! This is an energetic and magical place that makes one’s heart sing! The sea roars loudly and one can make no mistake of it’s powers – the greatest giver and taker on the earth; the power and might of the ‘Walvbane’….

 

 

There are many tales of rivalry between the Irish and Scottish giants of long ago, when the world was very different from today; after all for any aspiring giant worth his own tellings, Scotland is only a mere hop, skip & a giants leap away, over to the left in fact! But be well advised to remember that giants (especially baby giants) and history are never ever what they seem to be…..

https://giantscausewaytickets.com/finn-mccool

 

 

Nothing on this planet is ever what it seems, often time is the biggest secret keeper of all; unlock it’s mysteries and time will reveal all.. What beautiful yet strange shapes; natural, manmade or something else? You decide…..

 

 

The Giants Causeway; far from being natural….? <click to enlarge>

Filming at the Giants Causeway, Ireland: see link below. Again another very windy day, so lots of noise and camera wobble as i perched precariously atop these amazingly constructed columns, with my dear tutor hanging on to me while i moved around filming, to prevent me falling!
I walked much further out than i thought i would with my balance probs, and hung on to my camera for dear life!
Look closely at the very precise enginnering of the hexagonal columns and how they all fit together; truths that belong to another time and space within history…..
Scotland is just off to the right – a mere hop and a skip for any reputable giant!

The Hill of Tara & The Giants Causeway

  • Bloodline Connection: Lord of the Isles and tied into Greenland and Iceland

Derry and St Columba’s Church: Derry today (named Londonderry by the British is a million miles away from what it was during the troubles, yet the echoes of those times still remain in areas such as the ‘Free Derry Corner’. Derry is the second-largest city  in Northern Ireland and the fourth-largest city on the island of Ireland. The name Derry is an anglicisation of the Old Irish name Daire (modern Irish: Doire) meaning “oak grove”. In 1613, the city was granted a Royal Charter by King James 1 and gained the “London” prefix to reflect the funding of its construction by the London guilds. While the city is more usually known colloquially as Derry, Londonderry is also commonly used and remains the legal name. Read more about it’s history below;  from the tourist site one can see that the city is a very vibrant and upcoming city to visit and an absolute mecca for the arts!:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry

http://www.visitderry.com/

 

Amazing, yet deeply poignant & meaningful urban street art in Derry, alluding to a time when raw passion and ideals overflowed with a desire for what was righteous. <click to enlarge – well worth it!>

St Columba’s Church: We drove around the church a couple of times before we found our access to it and a parking spot, but once there and insde the sght that grreets one upon enterng is amazing to say the lest.  St Columba’s Church, Long Tower is a Roman Catholic church in the Diocese of Derry and is located in the heart of Derry.

 

 

The outside of St Colunba’s Church, Derry

The present church is built on the site of Roman Catholic worship which goes back as far as the 12th century. The current Long Tower Church began life in 1783 in a much smaller scale than seen today. Father John Lynch, a parish priest in Derry started action to raise funds for building the Long Tower Church and he received finance not just from Roman Catholics but also Protestant people in Derry at the time. The church was opened in 1788.

 

The suptuous wood & marble interior of Derry Church <click to enlarge>

The church was extended and refurbished in 1810 with the introduction of gallery seating, nave and the changing of the Altar to the northern side of the church. The High Altar was constructed with marble and supported by four pillars. The four pillars were first made of wood put proved to be not strong enough to hold the large and heavy marble altar and so the pillars were changed to be made out of marble. The layout of the church from 1810 onwards has remained largely unaltered. However, in 1908 a full refurbishment of the Long Tower took place which included addition of new stained glass windows, statues, shrines, baptismal font and the reposition of the High Altar and the introduction of a new sacristy. The church’s refurbishment was completed in 1909 and the church was then officially opened to the general public.

 

 

The stunning works of art & treasures inside St Columba’s Church, Derry

The current parish population as of December 2015 is 6,761. The church overlooks the Catholic Bogside of Derry which has seen many instances of violence such as Bloody Sunday of 1972 and so would have been at the centre of the troubles, but this church ensures that people find peace and quiet there no matter what is going on outside the church grounds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Columba%27s_Church,_Long_Tower

 

See video for more info: starts at 11.09

Three Irish Churches

  • Bloodline Connection: Takes one to the time of ‘The Troubles’ and links to ‘previous experiences’

GOING BEYOND THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR & MASONIC SYMBOLISM: On our quests around the uk and now in Ireland too, we have come to understand and acknowledge the significance and history of the vast array, and purposefully placed in time, templar and masonic symbolism. The two paths of Templarism and Free Masonry do have some commonalities within history yet are not to be confused for they are two entirely different paths. Understanding the symbols and emblems placed within time by our ancestors, the original inhabitants of this planet, can unlock the secrets to time and space and can bestow hidden knowledge upon those wishing to seek answers. Big clues to the past, present and future have been left all over the Celtic Lands and they are all just waiting to be discovered and decoded.

Here to wet your appetites are just a small selection of the symbols we discovered in Ireland; symbols which go back to our dawn of time and relate to our true ancestors; our creators. There were many Celtic Crosses too, which i have featured in part one. Many of the symbols here are extremely well-know and well-used within Craft Circles, Preceptories, Rites and Teachings etc. Those folk of the Craft path today and especially within the Priory will have the keys to decode and understand these mysterious symbols and emblems that crop up all over our planet; it is indeed a fascinating and elightening pursuit, unravelling these mysteries. A symbol can say a thousand words and can therefore replace a thousand  words, thus  crossing all language and cultural divides. Symbols can and will, when correctly interpreted speak to those of Craft whom truly seek to know.

 

 

<please click to enlarge>

 

The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

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October 2018

 

QUEST TWENTY TWO: YORKSHIRE: For this one-day quest to Yorkshire, we travelled northwards on Thursday 25th May; the day proved to be stunning as we ventured over the mighty Humber Bridge to our first port of call for the day, which was to be Hessle.

  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD:
  • SKIPSEA CASTLE:
  • HORNSEA:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE: The town of Hessle, near Hull is a pretty little town and the bright sunshine made it extremely picturesque. Hessle has a rather lovely town square with many little shops and listed buldings to it’s credit. It is very near by to that marvelous feat of engineering, the Humber Bridge. In the past Hessle has been a thriving centre for shipbuiding and even earlier on, for the building of wooden boats. It was also a centre for chalk quarying; the largest being at the Humberside Bridge Park, now a nature reserve.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessle

The medieval, largely Gothic church itself has been here since the twelth century with modernization in 1884; there are some rather interesting original carvings on dispay to the right of the altar area and more info on them is mentioned in our video; they depict some rather ancient Gaelic symbols together with a representation of a female minatuar. The Neville family shield is on very prominent display here.

Inside All Saints, Hessle showing the Neville Shield & the name of Clarke on the wall plaque; all part of the ‘bloodline’ <click to enlarge images>

http://www.allsaintshessle.karoo.net/History%20-%20All%20Saints%20Church%20Hessle.htm

 

The ancient relics showing the female minataur & the entry to the church vault upon the floor – blink & you will miss it!

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON: A short car ride away was the next stop of the day, although the church was sadly locked up with the keys being too far away to collect; even so i managed some good shots of the exterior of the church. Preston is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, six miles east of Hull. The parish church of All Saints is a grade one listed building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preston,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=166663

 

All Saints Church, Preston, showing memorial to the ‘Fords’ & the ‘Clarks’ <click to enlarge>

 ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE: Tucked away behind some beautiful tall trees amidst a sea of green countryside; Rise Church is easy to miss and drive straight past, which is exactly what we did do! Rise is a village and small parish in East Riding in Yorkshire, in the heart of a very rural area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

This beautiful church is a grade two listed building in Rise: this current version of the church was rebuilt in 1844/45 using some old reclaimed medieval roof timbers. There was a church at Rise by 1221 but years of neglect sadly took their toll. The current church was built by local landowner Richard Bethal to designs by R. D. Chantrel.

Rise Church in it’s very rural setting <click to enlarge>

The beautiful painted ceiling here is very similar to other Templar churches we have visited over the past few months and to that also of the Italian Chapel in the Orkneys, Scotland. Quite clearly there is a very strong Templar connection here, especially from the aspect of a sacred site and the church is indeed still used by and supported by the local Freemasons of today. There is also a big connection here to the shipbuilding industry of Hull. Other significant symbols to look out for are the Harp, the tower of Babel with a direct connection to the Unicorns of earlier quests and strong connections to the female Minataur of Hessle, from ealier today. Take note also of the ‘Demons’ wheel; (the Samnu Emua) of the Templar teachings, all of which have strong Priory connections…

The bloodline names are once again the Nevilles, in particular Frederick W. Neville who was christened in this church, but who sadly died at a young age, and also the name of Bethal, the current church warden and estate owners.

See the Harp upon the window, the beautiful and very old bibles and the name of ‘Clark’ upon the gravestone, noted as leaving…

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1083419

 

See our link below for more info on All Saints Church, Rise

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE

 

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD: After  short journey we arrived at our next destination of the day and after phoning the reverend, she very kindly came with the keys to let us in, as the church was unusually locked for that hour of the day. We were so glad she did, as this is an amazing church with so much to see once inside. Driffield, also known as Great Driffield is a market town and parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A bronze-age mound just outside of Driffield was excavated in the nineteenth century; the findings of which are now in the British Museum.

All Saints, Driffield <please click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driffield

This church has been here since the early part of the twelth century and probably going back to Saxon times even. A church, as is usual practice, has been built over a site of earlier significance. Basically what we have now is a Norman church, without side aisles with remodelling carried out over the centuries. It has a beautiful five hundred year old tower which is very dominant within the landscape; the churches bells of which were restored for the millenium. There are many beautiful and rather delightful gargoyles, grotesques and other little stone creatures all around the outside of the church; see below…..

Inside, the Templar influence on the stained glass widows is very evident for all to see, with the symbolism, yet the windows do stand alone in their maginficance, design and above all their colour.

Click to enlarge to see the Templar symbolism of these stunning windows

 

See our link below for the next three sites we visited

ALL SAINTS CHURCHES: HESSLE & DRIFFIELD, & SKIPSEA CASTLE

 

SKIPSEA CASTLE: It was a beautifull and peaceful evening when we arrived here at this ancient site, in the middle of a very rural landscpe, complete with it’s own grazing herd. The ‘castle’ is situated near the village of Skipsea in the East Riding of Yorkshire. I was unable to make it up to the summit myself, but the walk around the ramparts was stunning in itself. It is said to have been an impressive Norman motte and bailey castle, dating from before 1086 and among the first raised in Yorkshire, with the earthworks of an attendant fortified ‘borough’. The mound itself has recently been shown to date from the Iron Age. This is of course true but the actual site goes back much further still and is a site of one of the UK’s hidden and strategically placed pyramids, of which we are currently tracing and recording.  The energy here does indeed testify to this fact and our video will explain more still and also about the hauntings here too. It is a beautifully peaceful, energetic and picturesque site and well worth a visit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipsea_Castle

Skipsea ‘Castle’, site of a very ancient pyramid <please click to enlarge>

HORNSEA: We did very briefly call in at the seaside resort of Hornsea and had a quick stretch of legs by way of a stroll along the concrete sea-defence wall, which serves as a ‘promenade’ too, sadly though one cannot see the actual sea whilst strolling along. The area where we stopped is rather comercialised and ‘touristy’ which is a shame, hence we never stayed long. The settlement itself dates back to the early medieval period at lest; the town was expanded in Victorian times with the coming of the Hull and Hornsea Railway.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsea

  • The family bloodline name significant to the whole area of today’s quest; ie the East Riding of Yorkshire is once again that of The Nevilles and are as follows:-
  • Arthur Henry Neville: born 1864, Hull
  • Arthur John Neville: married 1898, Hull
  • Augusta Emma Neville: born 1887, died 1888
  • Edward Neville: born 1908, died 1908
  • Ellen Neville: married 1843, Hull, died 1975, Hull
  • Enid Neville: born 1923, died 1946  (23 years old)
  • Eva Neville: married (Harper) 1951
  • Frederick W. Neville: born Sealcoates 1927, died Hull 1941 (14 years old)
  • Henry Thorpe Neville: born Sealcoates 1857, married Hull 1873
  • Margaret Elizabeth Neville: born Sealcoates 1845, married Hull 1908, died Sealcoates 1918

 

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER FIVE PART TWO

  • WINTERTON ON SEA
  • SECRETS IN THE SANDS
  • HOLY TRINITY AND ALL SAINTS CHURCH

Our visit to Little Plumstead had been cut short yet the day had by no means drawn to a close for we spent a relaxing few hours on the stunningly beautiful and deserted beach at Winterton on Sea. This is a very interesting stretch of coastline for it is said to hide within its waters the point of emergence in the UK of a well know geographic fault line; the Madrid line. At one point along the beach, and at one point only, certain types of rock usually found underground, such as granite and pyrite could easily be spotted on the shore line, spewed up from beneath the waves by the tides. Other semi-precious stones such as cloudy quartz, milky quartz, moss agate, flint and different types of agate and fossils were in abundance everywhere, yet the granite and pyrite were to be found in just the one spot; suggesting an unstable seam underground. At one point on the beach huge chunks of pyrite have been strategically placed along the sands as a natural form of sea-defence.

 

 

The beautiful coastline with a clear blue sky and a close up of the twinkling pyrite <click to enlarge>

Sadly though the ‘geo-engineers’ were out in full force, as they usually are in this area and the once beautiful clear blue sky became a jigsaw of dull merging toxic chemtrails by tea-time….

The Parish Church of The Holy Trinity & All Saints: The parish church in Winterton  village was the last port of call for the day; with its very tall tower and unusually large size for a small community, it is certainly a very eye catching and impresive sight. Its grand 15th century tower soars to a mighty 132 feet and is the third highest tower in Norfolk dominating the whole of the surrounding landscape. This medieval church is a mixture of styles and dates, having grown and changed over the years, when it almost went into rack and ruin but thankfully to the Victorian Gothic restorers we now have the wonderful church we see today. There is a distinctly nautical feeling about much of the interior and in 1891 on the Sunday evening after christmas, was held the first annual thanksgiving service for the safe arrival of fishermen anf for the Harvest of the Sea; this Fisherman’s Thanksgiving was to continue for many years.

church 1   church 2

Outside and interior showing the very impresive tower and the spacious knave area of Holy Trinity & All Saints, Winterton.

One of the things that did strike me about the altar area of this church was certain similarities of decor to that of Santon Downham Church previously visited. The colours of blue, gold and red around the altar and the design used was certainly in keeping with the Knight Templar and Masonic designs employed at Santon Church, as too was the ‘real’ cross and ‘four corners of the square’ as portrayed on the altar cloth. So much pause for thought here….

Altar.JPG

The ‘four corners’ and the altar cloth displaying the ‘real’ cross….

altar 1   altar2  altar 3

Close up of detail from behind the altar, showing clearly the similarity of colour, style and design to that of Santon Down Church. The style, colour and symbolism once again gives clues to Templar and Masonic connections

Worth noting here is the fact that our lead investigator once again found a personal conection here at the parish church of the Holy Trinity and All Saints. He located a member of his own family bloodline here; a one James Bartam, indicating once again the fact that nothing is ever what it seems and that there is always something more than meets the eye….

J B

  • James William Bartram
  • Connection to the ‘bloodline’ and ‘Guardian of Secrets’
  • and thus our Quests continue….

Please feel welcomed to join our team for more revelations and fun social days out or to join The Priory too…

email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

      ‘Its a quest for a lifetime and beyond’

seal 9

The ‘star’ of the day……

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

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