QUEST TWENTY TWO: YORKSHIRE: For this one-day quest to Yorkshire, we travelled northwards on Thursday 25th May; the day proved to be stunning as we ventured over the mighty Humber Bridge to our first port of call for the day, which was to be Hessle.

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE: The town of Hessle, near Hull is a pretty little town and the bright sunshine made it extremely picturesque. Hessle has a rather lovely town square with many little shops and listed buldings to it’s credit. It is very near by to that marvelous feat of engineering, the Humber Bridge. In the past Hessle has been a thriving centre for shipbuiding and even earlier on, for the building of wooden boats. It was also a centre for chalk quarying; the largest being at the Humberside Bridge Park, now a nature reserve.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessle

The medieval, largely Gothic church itself has been here since the twelth century with modernization in 1884; there are some rather interesting original carvings on dispay to the right of the altar area and more info on them is mentioned in our video; they depict some rather ancient Gaelic symbols together with a representation of a female minatuar. The Neville family shield is on very prominent display here.

Inside All Saints, Hessle showing the Neville Shield & the name of Clarke on the wall plaque; all part of the ‘bloodline’ <click to enlarge images>

http://www.allsaintshessle.karoo.net/History%20-%20All%20Saints%20Church%20Hessle.htm

The ancient relics showing the female minataur & the entry to the church vault upon the floor – blink & you will miss it!

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON: A short car ride away was the next stop of the day, although the church was sadly locked up with the keys being too far away to collect; even so i managed some good shots of the exterior of the church. Preston is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, six miles east of Hull. The parish church of All Saints is a grade one listed building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preston,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=166663

Memorial showing the ‘Fords’ & the ‘Clarks’ <click to enlarge>

 ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE: Tucked away behind some beautiful tall trees amidst a sea of green countryside; Rise Church is easy to miss and drive straight past, which is exactly what we did do! Rise is a village and small parish in East Riding in Yorkshire, in the heart of a very rural area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

This beautiful church is a grade two listed building in Rise: this current version of the church was rebuilt in 1844/45 using some old reclaimed medieval roof timbers. There was a church at Rise by 1221 but years of neglect sadly took their toll. The current church was built by local landowner Richard Bethal to designs by R. D. Chantrel.

Rise Church in it’s very rural setting <click to enlarge>

The beautiful painted ceiling here is very similar to other Templar churches we have visited over the past few months and to that also of the Italian Chapel in the Orkneys, Scotland.

Quite clearly there is a very strong Templar connection here, especially from the aspect of a sacred site and the church is indeed still used by and supported by the local Freemasons of today. There is also a big connection here to the shipbuilding industry of Hull.
Other significant symbols to look out for are the Harp, the tower of Babel with a direct connection to the Unicorns of earlier quests and strong connections to the female Minataur of Hessle, from ealier today. Take note also of the ‘Demons’ wheel; (the Samnu Emua) of the Templar teachings, all of which have strong Priory connections…
The bloodline names are once again the Nevilles, in particular Frederick W. Neville who was christened in this church, but who sadly died at a young age, and also the name of Bethal, the current church warden and estate owners.

See the Harp upon the window, the beautiful and very old bibles and the name of ‘Clark’ upon the gravestone, noted as leaving…

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1083419

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD: After  short journey we arrived at our next destination of the day and after phoning the reverend, she very kindly came with the keys to let us in, as the church was unusually locked for that hour of the day. We were so glad she did, as this is an amazing church with so much to see once inside. Driffield, also known as Great Driffield is a market town and parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A bronze-age mound just outside of Driffield was excavated in the nineteenth century; the findings of which are now in the British Museum.

All Saints, Driffield <please click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driffield

This church has been here since the early part of the twelth century and probably going back to Saxon times even. A church, as is usual practice, has been built over a site of earlier significance. Basically what we have now is a Norman church, without side aisles with remodelling carried out over the centuries. It has a beautiful five hundred year old tower which is very dominant within the landscape; the churches bells of which were restored for the millenium. There are many beautiful and rather delightful gargoyles, grotesques and other little stone creatures all around the outside of the church.

Inside, the Templar influence on the stained glass widows is very evident for all to see, with the symbolism, yet the windows do stand alone in their maginficance, design and above all their colour.

Click to enlarge to see the Templar symbolism of these stunning windows

SKIPSEA CASTLE: It was a beautifull and peaceful evening when we arrived here at this ancient site, in the middle of a very rural landscpe, complete with it’s own grazing herd. The ‘castle’ is situated near the village of Skipsea in the East Riding of Yorkshire. I was unable to make it up to the summit myself, but the walk around the ramparts was stunning in itself. It is said to have been an impressive Norman motte and bailey castle, dating from before 1086 and among the first raised in Yorkshire, with the earthworks of an attendant fortified ‘borough’. The mound itself has recently been shown to date from the Iron Age. This is of course true but the actual site goes back much further still and is a site of one of the UK’s hidden and strategically placed pyramids, of which we are currently tracing and recording.  The energy here does indeed testify to this fact and our video will explain more still and also about the hauntings here too. It is a beautifully peaceful, energetic and picturesque site and well worth a visit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipsea_Castle

Skipsea ‘Castle’, site of a very ancient pyramid <please click to enlarge>

HORNSEA: We did very briefly call in at the seaside resort of Hornsea and had a quick stretch of legs by way of a stroll along the concrete sea-defence wall, which serves as a ‘promenade’ too, sadly though one cannot see the actual sea whilst strolling along. The area where we stopped is rather comercialised and ‘touristy’ which is a shame, hence we never stayed long. The settlement itself dates back to the early medieval period at lest; the town was expanded in Victorian times with the coming of the Hull and Hornsea Railway.

DSC01581

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsea

  • The family bloodline name significant to the whole area of today’s quest; ie the East Riding of Yorkshire is once again that of The Nevilles and are as follows:-
  • Arthur Henry Neville: born 1864, Hull
  • Arthur John Neville: married 1898, Hull
  • Augusta Emma Neville: born 1887, died 1888
  • Edward Neville: born 1908, died 1908
  • Ellen Neville: married 1843, Hull, died 1975, Hull
  • Enid Neville: born 1923, died 1946  (23 years old)
  • Eva Neville: married (Harper) 1951
  • Frederick W. Neville: born Sealcoates 1927, died Hull 1941 (14 years old)
  • Henry Thorpe Neville: born Sealcoates 1857, married Hull 1873
  • Margaret Elizabeth Neville: born Sealcoates 1845, married Hull 1908, died Sealcoates 1918

 

Take a look at the Priory webpage too:
http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’