Tag Archive: Truth


‘The next day, day six was a beautiful sunny day as the photos will testify and it was just a ten mile drive from Clonakilty, Cork where we were staying for the next 4 nights, to Rosscarberry and our first port of call for the day’

Day Six: 17th September: St Fachtna’s Cathedral. Rosscarberry: (Irish: Ros Ó gCairbre, meaning ‘Cairbre’s wood’) is a town in County Cork that sits on a shallow estuary, opening onto Rosscarbery Bay. The area has been occupied since at least the Neolithis period, as evidenced by several Neolithic sites such as portal dolmens. The area is also home to a number of Bronze Age remains, including stone circles, ring forts and holy wells. Due to its popularity as a centre of pilgrimage it was also known as Ros Ailithir (“Wood of the Pilgrims”). The hereditary chieftains of the area, or tuath, were the O’Leary’s, known as Uí Laoghaire Ruis Ó gCairbre, until it passed to Norman control in the early thirteenth century. In March 1921, during the Irish War of Independance, Tom Barry’s 3rd Cork IRA Brigade attacked and destroyed the Royal Irish Constabulary barracks in Rosscarbery. Two RIC officers were killed in the attack, and nine others were injured. There is a plaque on the site of the former barracks, beside the current Garda station, commemorating the event. In the 20 years between the 1991 and 2011 census, the population of Rosscarbery grew by approximately 17%, to 534 people. As of the 2016 census, the population of the town was then 490. Although it looked an interesting place to explore, it was the catherdral which was our focus of attention and we spent an interesting time there.

A gorgeous day to visit St Fachtna’s Cathedral, one of the keystone churches <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosscarbery

Although at first the cathedral appeared to be locked, a quick phone call was all it took for us to be let in by a very chatty and obliging guy, attached to the church of course. He of course turned out to be the very kind Rector Chris, whom shared his history and knowledge with us. He certainly knew his history of the cathedral and the area, so we were treated to a personal guided tour. It was so important to be able have access to St Fachtna’s Catherdral today, as it is a Keystone Church, an energy point and it is said that there are some very important remains hidden within it’s walls… This cathedral is one of the smallest in Ireland, yet lovingly looked after and beautiful inside and out. St. Fachtna’s Cathedral, also known as the Cathedral Church of St Faughan, has been a place of Christian worship for over 1400 years and is one of the most significant religous sites in Ireland. The current cathedral dates from the 1600’s, and was extensively restored in the 19th century. It is the smallest cathedral in Ireland, being the size of a small parish church. It is also the only cathedral in Ireland in which the bellringers can be seen from inside the building. There are a fine set of six bells here, in the key of G, and they are regularly rung.

 

The interior was immaculate and beautifully cared for <click to enlarge>

Here St. Fachtna founded a monastic school in AD 590. Pilgrims and scholars came from near and far and gained for Ross the title “Ross Ailithir”: the wooded headland of the pilgrims. The ruins of a church erected by St Faughnan still exist on the southern slope of the land on which Rosscarbery is built . A church or cathedral has occupied the site since at least the tenth century, and after Bishop John Edmund de Courcy resigned in 1517, Pope Leo X ordered an inquiry into the state of the diocese, and it was noted that by then a cathedral stood on the site. It was known at that time as Tiompal mor Feachtna, or “Feachtna’s big temple”

Such wonderful carvings to see, and very much a part of our Grail Quest, with subtle clues for the keen and learned of eye <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fachtna_of_Rosscarbery

The first reference to a Cathedral on this site is in the 12th. century. The present building dates from 1612 and was extensively rebuilt following the Rebellion of 1641. Significant developments occurred within the building in the nineteenth century. The spire of the original building was removed in either 1785, 1793, or 1795, with the current spire being added in 1806. The walls of the church were freestone, but what remained of the old walls were plastered and dashed in 1880. Storms have blown the top of the spire over on two occasions, once in the winter of 1886, and then again in February 1923. Between 2002 and 2005, major restorations were carried out on the cathedral, including rebuilding the organ and restoring the bells. In 2012, an additional bell was added to the tower.

A joy to see so many treaured artifacts still in place <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_Church_of_St._Fachtna

 

Many stunning windows and plaques tell the history of the cathedral <click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • A Keystone church and energy point

Drombeg Stone Circle Co Cork: Just a very short drive away was this very impresive stone circle, a small axial stone circle, also known as ‘The Druid’s Altar’. Luckily it was quiet when we arrived even though a very popular place to visit. The stone circle originally consisted of seventeen closely spaced stones, made of local sandstone, of which 13 survive. The circle spans 31 ft in diameter. As an axial or “Cork–Kerry” stone circle, it contains two taller entrance stones placed opposite a recumbent axial stone. Its axis is orientated south west towards the setting sun. The most westerly stone is the long recumbent and has two egg shaped cup marks, one with a ring around it. An axial stone circle, also known as a “Cork–Kerry type” stone circle, it is flanked by a pair of high axial portal stones, which mark the entrance to the stone circle, and face the recumbent altar stone. This arrangement creates a south-west axis, and orients the monument in the direction of the setting sun during the midwinter solstice.

Drombeg Stone Circle: an amazing site with powerful energies, interesting features and of course Craft/Grail quest connections hdden within the land. Old stories, from the physical and the metaphysical realms never fail to delight….  <click to enlarge>

Near the stone circle, approximately 40m to the west, are two round stone-walled prehistoric huts and a fulacht fiadh which evidence suggests was in use until approximately the 5th century AD. Of the two huts, the largest had a timber roof supported by timber posts. The smaller hut contains the remains of a cooking sport on its eastern side. A causeway leads from the huts to the fulacht fiadh, which has a hearth, well and a water trough.

The domestic areas, although some parts allude to a more sinister past (as the energies testify) especially as bones have been recovered here…<click to enlarge>

Following a number of surveys in the early 1900s, the site was excavated and restored in 1957. Radio Carbon Dating of samples taken from the site suggest that it was active c. 1100 – 800 BC. An inverted pot, found in the centre of the circle, contained the cremated remains of a young adolescent wrapped with thick cloth. The pot was found close to the centre of the circle and was found alongside smashed sherds and a collection of sweepings from a pyrle, so one could hazard a gues that it was a place of sacrifice too…. Parts of the site are still to be excavated, so who knows what will be discovered there.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drombeg_stone_circle

A riddle from Mr Karl Neville to make you think about the secrets of the stones & what they may have witnessed…

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • King Niall Mac Echdach. King of Ireland (53rd GGF) 311 – 378 (67)

Mizen Head: Not a part of our quest but this stunning area was recommended to us by some fellow travellers and as we were in the area it proved to be well worth a vist, for the views of the coastline are simply out of this world! It is a stop on the ‘Wild Atlantic Way’, a route that takes in all the wild and ancient places. Ireland truly is the land of dreams…. 

It was a stunning drive to reach it too. Mizen Head is one of the extreme points of Irealand and is a major tourist attraction, noted for its dramatic cliff scenery. One of the main transatlantic shipping routes passes close by to the south, and Mizen Head was, for many seafarers, the first (or last) sight of Europe. The tip of the peninsula is almost an island, cut off by a deep chasm, now spanned by a bridge; this gives access to an old signal station and a lighthouse. The signal station, once permanently staffed, is now a museum housing displays relating to the site’s strategic significance for transatlantic shipping and communications, including the pioneering efforts of Guglielmo Marconi. The “99 steps” which formed part of the original access route have been supplemented by a series of paths and viewing platforms, and a full range of visitor facilities is available at the entrance to the site, however it is not for the faint-hearted or for those challenged by walking, for there are lots of steps and very steep slopes to navigate up and down the rocky cliffs.

Mizen Head: A most stunning place, one of the most stunning on the planet! <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mizen_Head

Day Seven: 18th September: Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral. Cork: It was another gorgeous day as we left our digs in Shannonvale, Clonakilty for a very full day ahaead but not before we espied the welcome sign over the door!

The city of Cork: (Irish: ‘Corcaigh’ from ‘corach’ meaning “marsh) is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and is  located in the south-west of Ireland, in the province of Munster, in 2019 it’s population was 210,000. The city centre is an island positioned between two channels of the River Lee which meet downstream at the eastern end of the city centre, where the quays and docks along the river lead outwards to one of the largest natural harbours in the world.  Cork was originally a monastic settlement, reputedly founded by Saint Finbarr in the 6th century and became (more) urbanised some point between 915 and 922 when Norsemen settlers founded a trading port. The ecclesiastical settlement continued alongside the Viking longphort, with the two developing a type of symbiotic relationship; the Norsemen providing otherwise unobtainable trade goods for the monastery, and perhaps also military aid.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cork_(city)

 

Views of Cork from the car <click to view>

This cathedral is stunning both inside and out and we spent quite a long time there, as there was so much to see. It is full of symbolism, beautifully represented in astounding pieces of artwork. We met some really kind and freindly people there and took part in a little personal service too. Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral (Irish: Ardeaglais Naomh Fionnbarrra) is a Gothic Revival three-spired Church of Ireland on the River Lee, dedicated to Finbarr of Cork, the patron saint of the city. The Christian use of the site dates back to the 7th century, when according to local lore, Finbarr founded a monastry there, which survived until the 12th century, when it fell into disuse, or was destroyed during the Norman invasion.

The stunning architecture of Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral <click to view>

Around 1536, during the Protestant Reformation, the cathedral became part of the Church of Ireland, but the previous building constructed in the 1730’s was regarded as plain and featureless, so a demolition and rebuild was commisioned and work began in 1863; a project for Victorian archetect William Burges who designed most of the archetecture, stained glass and interior features etc, including the beautiful angel on the roof. Saint Fin Barre’s foundation stone was laid in 1865 and the cathedral consecrated in 1870 and the limestone spires completed by October 1879.

So many amazing artworks and treasure inside the cathedral, it is hard to know where to look; and maybe some grail clues too… <click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Fin_Barre%27s_Cathedral

Because we had a personal tour kindly given by one of the guys connected to the cathedral, we were shown a few things that many visitors would just pass by, and thus learned some interesting infomation about te cathedral too, such as seeing the original artworks and designs of the cathedral. They were right at the back of the building, so easily missed. We were also shown a simply amazing register of some of the fallen of the parish, hand written and guilded as of times of old.

The original designs for the cathedral <click to view>

“A grand cathedral yes, but hidden amongst all the ‘pomp and circumstance’ of that which stands in for spirituality these days, one can still feel the energies of an older site, an older place, older energies of that which went before, and that which we seek both in the metaphysical and physical can surely be found within the subtle clues that are all around us and that which is hidden can be revealed…..”

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Earl Gospatrick Mac Maldred (26th GGF) 1042-1082

Christ Church: Rath-Healy, Fermoy, County Cork: So the last location of the day, on what had been a very busy and interesting day. Sadly though as it turned out this church was closed and looked to be it really in much use, although i still took some lovelt photos! Fermoy(Irish: Mainistir Fhear Maí, meaning ‘monastery of the Men of the Plain’) is a town on the River Blackwater in east County Cork. As of the 2016 census, the town and environs had a population of approximately 6,500 people. The town’s name comes from the Irish and refers to a Cistercian abbey founded in Fermoy, in the 13th century. At the dissolution of the monastries during the Tudor period, the abbey and its lands passed through various dynasties. However, the site could hardly have been regarded as a town and, by the late 18th century, was little more than a few cabins and an inn.

Mick Davis’s powerful sculptures from 2001 reference the Cistercian monks in Fermoy and they stand as guardians outside Christ Church. <click to enlage>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermoy

Christ Church, Fermoy was designed by Abraham Hargrave the Elder, and consecrated in 1809. The land on which it is sited was donated by the Baylor Family, whose descendants worship in Christ Church to this day. The majority of the building costs were paid by John Anderson, Founder of the town of Fermoy, and John Hyde of Castlehyde. There is not a lot  on the internet about this particualar church and many visitors whom like us, could not get in, seem to think it is closed premantly, which is a shame. It is a classical town-church by Abraham Hargrave, 1805-1810 with a  south transept added by Welland and a north transept not built, but with a vestry by Arthur Hill, 1890.

Sadly closed but it still felt nice to be there with the flowers and guardians watching over…. <click to enlarge>

A broach spire and transepts in the Hiberno-Romanesque style were added in the late nineteenth century. The attenuated neo-classical proportion of the windows are typical of County Cork, while the east window case, which incorporates ionic columns and robust scroll brackets, is the most interesting feature of the building.

http://www.blackwater.ie/fermoy/ferpchr.htm

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lord Robert De Neville (21st GGF) 1237-1271

And finally some words to share…

“Truth within
And truth without
Through many realms
Through many years
I tell my tale
For i have known
An older truth
Not often told
Maybe a song upon the wind
Maybe a wave on mankind’s shore
Maybe a hand that offered love
For i have come this way before
And so within
As is without
I’ll keep my truth
And all who doubt….”
 
The Keeper of Scrolls” February 2022
<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>
 

 

 

The Grove…..

A different poem for this time of year as memories manifest….

I remember that time of year
When the darkness lingered longer

And the shadows came out of hiding to drape themselves lovingly across the land.
I remember dressing in all black, in readiness, waiting
I remember a time before the modern world earased the old times from the memories of mankind
A time before the world of men was filled with the chatter and clatter of a manufactured reality
I remember the moon shinning upon the grove
And the ladies waiting there
I remember the energies of the night
That night
I remember the purpose and the point
Although no one had ever taught me
But the truth, the blood, the energy was inside me, living
I remember pulling my black lace shawl tightly around my shoulders as i made my way towards the moon grove
I knew the wolves would be watching on this night
Watching, waiting, testing
My old blood, the bloodline of my forefathers i knew would keep me strong and see me through
We had great things to achieve on this the darkest day and longest night
A prophecy to fulfill, a blood challice raised, a divine point in time to invoke and preserve, not only blood memories, but to acknowledge the ‘ladies of the line’ both past and present.
I remember on that long dark night, when the cold seeped into our very bones, i remember us all being as one, yet separated upon the points of time.
The old ways preserved within ‘the ladies of time’, the ladies of the grove.
Now as then, connecting
Blood ties held safely within under the protection and magic of our grove.
Keeping faith, preserving truths, a world apart.
I remember that night of unending darkness
That longest night when realms collided
When the Old Ones shared and dared to reveal themselves
Under the moon
In a grove
Hidden forever
Within the memories of time
‘The Keeper of Scrolls’
December 21st 2021
<moon.willow@ntlworld.com>

 

 

 

“It was day nine and we were on the road again. We travel many hundreds of miles on these quests, through many counties (even countries). Through changing scenery and variable weather – yet it all delights the senses and i have perfected the knack of taking photos on the move! So leaving the beauty of County Meath behind us; it was an early start for an epic journey and adventure. We travelled through misty mountains and rugged terrain, a landscape that has inspired inunarable poets and writers over the years. But our part in the annuals of the earthly plain was just begining, in respect of this part of our quest. For we were journying toward the magical and mysterious Achill Island, where time and tide really do keep their own council”

On the road through Ireland to Achill Island. An amazing adventure….

Day Nine: 7th July 2021: Achill Island (Co Mayo) (Irish: Acaill, Oileán Acla) is the largest and most magical (for many reasons) of the Irish isles and is situated off the west coast. It has a population of 2,594 covering an area of 57 sq miles). Achill is attached to the mainland by the Michael Davitt Bridge between the villages of Gob an Choire (Achill Sound) and Poll Raithní (Polranny). A bridge was first completed here in 1887. Other centres of population include the villages of Keel, Dooagh, Dumha Éige (Dooega), Dún Ibhir (Dooiver), and Duggort. Early human settlements are believed to have been established on Achill around 3000 BC. The parish of Achill consists of Achill Island, Achillbeg, Inishbiggle and the Corraun Penninsular. Roughly half of the island, including the villages of Achill Sound and Bunacurry are in the Gaeltacht (traditional Irish-speaking region) of Ireland, although the vast majority of the island’s population speaks  English as their daily language. It is believed that at the end of the Neolithic Period (around 4000 BC), Achill had a population of 500-1,000 people. The island would have been mostly forest until the Neolithic people began crop cultivation. Settlements increased during the Iron Age and the dispersal of small promontory around the coast indicate the warlike nature of the times. Megalithic tombs and forts can be seen at Slievemore, along the Atlantic Drive and on Achillbeg. Although the population has increased, Achill Island is still a very wild and rugged island with much of it’s very early history forever lost in time and legend…
St Dympna’s Church and Holy Well: Achill Island. When one enters into this graveyard by the shoreline, one can not help but notice the ‘energies’, for it feels almost ‘otherworldly’, dreamlike, between the worlds and with very good reason too…
The sense of ‘otherwordliness’ is extremely strong here; a feeling of being between the worlds permeates. Could it be the most profound and magical place in the world…?
St Dympna’s 17th century church is built on the south-east coast of Achill Island. An early church was founded here by St Dympna in the 7th century. The placename is derived from ‘Cill Damhnait’ meaning ‘ Church of Davnet (Dympna)’. After crossing the bridge from the Irish mainland onto Achill island, a most magical drive awaits you, as the forgotton history of these lands seeps into one’s veins. The roofless church is situated in Kildownet cemetery, about 250 metres north of Kilavnet Castle. Kildownet old cemetery is located near the southern tip of Achill Island, and about a quarter mile from Grace O’Malley’s 15th century castle. The Old Cemetery extends from the edge of the main road to the shore of the bay and encompasses the partially restored ruins of St Dympna’s Church, originally founded in the 7th century.There is a T-shaped altar at the eastern end of the church and an aumbry can be found in the north-east corner. Scattered around the graveyard are a number of medieval stone crosses, two of which have been cemented into the cemetery gate-posts. St Dympna’s Holy Well sits on the shoreline to the east of the church.In the graveyard are also some of the ‘famine graves’, very poingnant and sad to see, an echo of hard times once lived (and died) through. There is also a memorial to the thirty-two young people who died in the 1894 Clew Bay drowning tragedy, and buried in the cemetery, They had been heading across Clew Bay for the Steamer in Westport that was to take them to Scotland for potato picking, when their boat capsized in a sudden gust of wind. The tragedy is remembered in the song ‘Hills of Mayo’.
There are energies of a different kind here at St Dympna’s <click to enlarge>
Of course this is a Craft site and part of our quest,  so hence why we are here, but the energies here are very special; almost of another dimension, one gets a feeling of being outside of time here, not of the current timeline at all. It felt like looking through a mirror into the outside world, time moved at a slower, different pace in that graveyard. On a personal note, i also had some revelations there; experiences of a very metaphysical nature, peronal to me…
A sense of time and tide and ‘other lands’coming to the surface…. <click to enlarge>
Grail Bloodline Connection:
  • John Fordham 1823-1895 (Collooney, Sligo) Had a particular interest here (4 x GGF)

 

Achill Henge: Keel East: It was with a lot of sadness that i left St Dympna’s behind for i could have stayed and soaked those beautiful energies up all day…. but time and tide wait for no man (or lady), and so it was, into the car again and off on the road to find a modern-day henge. We drove along the shore line, but all the time, going up and up the high cliffs, almost tottering over the edge in some places – but the veiws were magificant! We eventually reached a point where we could drive no further, so walking up the boggy mountainside was the only option. It was hard going and my feet were saturated, frequently dissapearing into the boggy ground. Goodness only knows how the sculptor managed to get his henge up there!

What beautiful views over ancient lands that time and history have somehow lost sight of, maybe some of our ancient legends can provide answers…? <click to enlarge>

 

Achill-henge is a concrete modern structure on Achill Island off the northwest coast of Co Mayo. Achill-henge is over 4 metres (13 ft) high and 100 metres (330 ft) in circumference. It consists of a circle of 30 concrete columns topped by a ring of stone. It’s not a replica of any ancient structure and does not pretend to be. It does not pretend to be anything other than what it is and love it or hate it, it is certainly impresive and is a scuptoral huge feat. Achill-henge was constructed over a weekend in November 2011 by Joe McNamara, a property developer and convicted criminal. A team of workers hauled the large concrete slabs up the hill and sank them in the bog. Mayo County Council requested a court order to force McNamara to remove the edifice as it had been built without planning permission. McNamara claimed that the structure was exempt from planning rules as an “ornamental garden”. Theresa McDonald, Director of the Achill Archaeological Field School, also raised objections on the grounds that the structure may be less than 500 m (1,600 ft) from a Bronze-Age archaeological site. The High Court required McNamara to cease further work on the site, and, as he was found to be in breach of this, he was jailed for three days for contemp of court. The Court referred the planning decision toAn Bord Pleanala, which in July 2012 upheld the Council’s decision. Some local people have expressed admiration for the work as a feat of engineering, and a newspaper poll found a majority of locals in support of keeping the structure. On 8 January 2012, it was featured as part of the Prime Time programme on RTE 1 in Ireland.

Achill Henge is still standing as of August 2021.

A shame the henge wasn’t being very well looked after and is now covered in graffitti, a sad sign of our times. Of course it had been a place of power, of immense energy (pyramid energy) and even had a connection to the metaphysical realms; hence why we were there…

As always on these quests, it is what lies beneath that is important

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achill-henge

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • John Fordham (1823 – 1895) (Collooney. Sligo) Had a particular interest (4 x GGF)

 

Dooega: Dumha Éige (anglicised Dooega) is an old fishing village in the south west of Achill Island on the west coast of Ireland in County Mayo. It is in the Gaeltacht and is the home of  Colaiste Acla. The scenic area is part of the Achill Atlantic Drive. Dumha Éige/Dooega has a Blue Flag beach, a church, a pub and a guest house. We were there to round off the day and to relax before our long drive to our next digs. Dooega Beach is a small and sheltered beach set in a small coastal inlet at the south west tip of the Minnaun cliffs, located on the south side of Achill Island and is perfect for summer sunbathing due to its south facing location. It is within the Keel Machair/Minaun cliffs Special Area of Conservation. The beach and surrounding area is habitat rich in birds, plants and insects and is a special area for protection and conservation. The beach backs onto low grasslands and the old fishing village of Dooega, one of the last native language speaking villages on Achill; its a lovely bay with a very ‘old fashioned’ feel to it. Going way back in time it was home to one of the very first settlements of mankind on this planet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dooega

Chilling out before our big drive to our next digs, but sad to leave this special island, forever wondering as to what could be under those waves…

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • John Fordham (1823 – 1895) (Collooney. Sligo) He had a particular interest (4 x GGF)

 

Day Ten: 8th July: Galway Cathedral. Galway: (or it’s rather lovely full name of Cathedral of Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and St Nicholas, Galway). (Irish language: Ard-Eaglais Mhaighdean na Deastógála agus Naomh Nioclás), commonly known as Galway Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic cathedral and one of the largest and most impressive buildings in the city of Galway, although in the past not always liked by everyone.

Galway is a very vibrant lively city, full of street art, resturants, pubs and lots of old interesting streets – and of course the magificant cathedral. It is in the West of Ireland in the province of Connacht. It lies on the River Corrib between Lough Corrib and Galway bay, with a population at the 2016 Census of 79,934. Located near an earlier settlement, Galway grew around a fortification built by the King of Connacht in 1124. A municipal charter, received in 1484, allowed for the citizens of the then walled city to form a council and mayoralty. Controlled largely by a group of merchant families, the Tribes of Galway, the city grew into a trading port. Following a period of decline, as of the 21st century, the city is a tourist destination and is known for hosting numerous festivals, celebrations and events.

The city’s name comes from the Irish name Gaillimh, which formed the western boundary of the earliest settlement, Dún Gaillimhe “Fort Gaillimh”. (Mythical and alternative derivations of the name are given in History of Galway. Historically, the name was Anglicised as Galliv or Gallive, closer to the Irish pronunciation. The city’s name in Latin is Galvia. Residents of the city are referred to as Galwegians. The city also bears the nickname “City of the Tribes” (Irish: Cathair na dTreabh) because of the fourteen merchant families called the “tribes of Galway”who led the city in its Hiberno-Norman period.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galway

Construction of the cathedral began in 1958 on the site of the old city prison. It was completed in 1965, making it the last great stone cathedral to be built in Europe. It was dedicated, jointly, to Our Lady Assumed into Heaven and to St Nicholas. A very modern cathedral then, it was opened on 15 August 1965. The architect of the cathedral was John J. Robinson who had previously designed many churches in Dublin and around the country. The architecture of the cathedral draws on many influences. The dome and pillars reflect a Renaissance style. Other features, including the rose windows and mosiacs, echo the broad tradition of Christian art, yet not only christain art, the cathedral is full of deeply symbolic art, that not everyone would know the meanings too and one often has to look twice for hidden in the art are many significant meanings to true history on earth. The cathedral dome, at a height of 44.2 metres (145 ft), is a prominent landmark on the city skyline. The beautiful connemara marble was used in the construction of the cathedral, on the floors.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Our_Lady_Assumed_into_Heaven_and_St_Nicholas,_Galway

“Quest 31 around the west country of England has proved so far, to have been an amazing quest, despite the very challenging hot weather when we were so thankful for the air conditioning in the car. All the apartments we stayed in have been more than up to scratch, and the places visited and the  knowledge gained has been second to non, life altering and path afirming. One more day then home: lots to write up on, as you see here. I do hope all of you will continue to follow and learn with me as i share knowledge and photos galore. As said, all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time: past, present and future becoming one. Knowledge becomes personal power, when mysteries unravel and ancient codes reveal their truths to the ones whom can truly see….  All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it seems….”

‘BENEATH A ROCK ALIVE’

Day Six Wednesday 5th August: Church of St Mary, Templecombe: We left our lovely apartment in Plymouth to travel to pastures new and more adventures. It was to be a long day of traveling through counties galore it seemed! Intercepted by a lovely visit to Simouth Old Fore Street for lunch and retail therapy and then traveling onwards to the Templar church at Templecombe, which yet again was very sadly shut; such a shame as it is a very interesting church with a particular important artifact to be seen inside. Even more of a shame given the church’s Templar history (see below). It has to be said, that yet again G-ds doors were shut to true pilgrims on a sacred journey, something that is becoming all too familiar. No wonder G-d has abandoned this planet! Sacred sites with no access – it makes one wonder! One wonders how the christian church can survive in these times, for they are seemingly still in the ‘dark ages’ and need to move with the times and find ways of inspiring people to attend – which they certainly won’t do with all their doors locked! Mosques for example, are open 24/7 and are full of attendees!

Old Fore Street and Coastline, Sidmouth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth

Templecombe is a village in Somerset five miles south of Wincaton, 12 miles east of Yeovil and 30 miles west of Salisbury with a population of 1,560, forming along with Combe Throop, the parish of Abbas and Templecombe. Templecombe derives its name from Combe Templariorum, after the Knights Templar who established Templecoombe Preceptory in the village in 1185. After they were suppressed in 1312 it was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem who held it until the Dissolution of the Monastries after which it was acquired by Richard Duke of Otterton, Devon. An attempt to discover ‘the village of the templars’ was made by the ‘Time Team’ television series, in a programme first shown in 1996. Late in the investigation, an old tithe map revealed the location of the Templar site, and an old stone boundary wall was found to be still standing seven feet high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templecombe

Photos from outside of St Mary’s Templecombe; showing what could have been if we were allowed inside… <click to enlarge>

The Anglican Church of St Mary at Templecombe, Somerset was built in the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building. The parish is part of the benefice of Abbas and Templecombe, Henstridge and Horsington. The church was probably established during the period when the manor was held by Shaftesbury Abbey, but granted to the Knights Templar while it was held by his descendant Serlo FitzOdo, who established a preceptory in the village in 1185. The preceptory served as an administrative centre for the lands held by the Templars in the south west of England and Cornwall. It may also have been used to train men and horses for the Crusades. After the Knights Templar were suppressed following the 1307 order by Pope Clement IV, it was granted to the Knights of St John, who held it until the dissolution of the monastries. Parts of the original 12th-century church remain, the foundations being Saxon, but it underwent a major Victorian restoration in the 19th century, including a rebuilding of the chancel plus a new  vestry.

In the church is a painting on wooden boards of a head, (see photos above) which was discovered in the roof of an outhouse of a local building in 1945. The painting is thought to be from the 13th century, with a connection to the Templecoombe Preceptory (or Combe Templariorum) which was established in the village in 1185. It was given to the church in 1956. For many years the head has been believed to be that of Christ without the halo which was the norm in religious iconography at the time. The Knights Templar were suppressed partly because of their use of the image of Christ without the halo. There has been speculation linking the image to the Shroud of Turin and other suggestions link to the image being of John the Baptist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Mary,_Abbas_and_Templecombe

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Desposyni (520-593) France. 48 x GGF of the Fordham Line.

After an interesting day of visits and travel we arrived at our cosy flat in the suburbs of Southampton, not far from the docks and our home for the next three nights!

‘OF BATTLES DRAWN’

Day Seven Thursday 6th August: St Mary’s Church, Southampton: It was already a sweltering hot morning when we arrived at St Mary’s Church, Southhampton, so we were very pleased to find the doors open and a welcoming coolness greeting us inside. Sadly due to ‘Miss Rona’ and our churches being habitually shut to pilgrims, we are always delighted when we are able to find welcoming open doors, and so it was with St Marys; a chuch full of life and vigor and being part of the modern times with a very forward thinking attitude. A vibrant church totally living in the times with much going on and an increasing attendance, all down to Adam the facillitator of the site whom has bought his enthusiasm and possitive vibes to the church! A huge lesson to be learned by many of those whom are connected to churches on many levels.

Southampton is a city in Hampshire, 70 miles south-west of London and 15 miles west of Portsmouth A major port close to the New Forest, it lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water, at the confluence of the River Test and Itchen with the River Hamble joining to the south. The history of the area has always been influenced by the sea and rivers. Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

St. Mary’s Church, is a Church of England parish church, and the largest church in the port city of Southampton. This is the mother church to this former county town with its forerunners spanning back to the first Saxon settlements of the 7th century, including a major collegiate church of the European Middle Ages dedicated to the same patron saint. Parts of the church date to the 1880s. Interestingly, in 1914 the sound of its church bells inspired the song, ‘The Bells of St Mary’s’, originally recorded in 1919 by Frances Alda and later sung by Bing Crosby in a film of the same name. The church has listed building status expressly due to its church tower and spire being local landmarks. The interior and walls were gutted in World War II and rebuilt in 1954-6 save for the tower, which was architect designed. There have been up to six other churches on the site, with records entered in the Domesday ook.

The interior is very well looked after with one of the largest organs in South-East England. The church is full of some very interesting artifacts and has a collection of some stunning windows full of meaning, that tell an ancient tale or two.. We were shown around by Adam, a lovely guy, whom considers himself as a facilitator and certainly has his finger on the pulse as far as having a very modern approach, and thus increasing the congregation in leaps and bounds.