Tag Archive: Truth


QUEST TWENTYTHREE: DAY FIVE: JULY 2017

  • St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: 
  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth
  • St Nicholas Church, Bolden

St Cuthbert’s Church, Darlington: So day five of our wonderful quest to the north of England and Scotland, where we travelled across time to Raby country, came upon us all too soon. On this last day we were sadly unable to gain entry into St Cutberts Church in Darlington and so just a few photos of the exterior and a link for further info will be all I can leave you with on this occasion, yet suffice to say still an important connection on our quests in tracing the Neville lineage.

https://co-curate.ncl.ac.uk/st-cuthberts-church-darlington/

<click on all images here to view & expand>

  • St Nicholas’ Church, Hedworth: When we arrived at St Nicholas Church we also found it to be locked up, but upon making a quick phone call, a very nice lady, married to the vicar, and who coincidently used to lived in our neck of the woods in Cambridge, came to our rescue key in hand and was only too willing to let us in and give us a personal tour around. Obviously thus so, we were not at liberty to make any videos on this occasion, but yet another important link on our quests to tick off.

https://www.southtynesidehistory.co.uk/archive/people/children/625438-st-nicholas-church-hedworth-lane-boldon-colliery

St Nicholas Church, Bolden: Yet again this lovely little church in Bolden, near the quarry, with it’s very interesting graveyard, was not accesable to us. It is in a truly peaceful setting, yet it is the empty tomb near the entry that compells, and draws one in to wonder about it’s untold tale….  But sadly it was not giving up it’s story on this particular day 😉

http://www.boldon.yolasite.com/st-nicholas-church-boldon.php

And so our journey to the north was almost at it’s end; but as way of some downtime, just to chill and relax we spent some wonderful hours exploring; namely wandering around St Pauls Monastry, Yarrow, which is a beautiful world heritage site, with it’s connection to the scribe, the venerable Bede. Interestingly a theme seemed to have presented itself with yet another vacated tomb; surely tales to unfold and discover….  An ancient face looked knowingly down from above.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/st-pauls-monastery-jarrow/history/

And then as evening fell we enjoyed some beautiful beach and sea downtime, sand and shore, at both Southshields and Northshields; heralding a perfect end to a most perfect quest of many discoveries, not neccesarily of the mundane, but with many pieces of a jigsaw puzzle of truth slotting into place.

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2017

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“Let everyone who can hear, listen to what Spirit is saying to the churches; Everyone who is victorious shall eat of the hidden manna, the secret nourishment from heaven, and I will give to each”

QUEST TWENTY THREE: DAY FOUR: 

  • ST MARY’S THE VIRGIN CHURCH: STAINDROP

ST MARY’S THE VIRGIN CHURCH: STAINDROP This day was to prove to be our most significant to date with many pieces of the quest jigsaw puzzple falling into place. The meanings and purpose of the past, present and future were to be revealed in the hear and now; but yet as always only those meant to know will have heard the whisperings…. The church was full of very significant artifacts which were very relevant to our quests and to the teachings of The Priory as a whole. The metaphysical world simply collides with the mundane world here with some very wonderful and magical occurences revealed… It is of no further suprise that there are many Templar and Masonic features prominent about the church.

 

St Mary’s Church Staindrop from the outside, showing the ‘Eastern Star’ sundial above the porch, a good indication of more to come….

 

Nestled in the valley between Bishop Auckland and Barnard Castle on the main A688, Staindrop has been described as “quite simply one of the prettiest villages in County Durham.” It stands as one of the gateways into Teesdale, with its long village greens making it a typical rural Durham village. The village is also one of great antiquity with some evidence of neolithic activity, but it gained importance in the time of King Canute when he gave his manor at Staindrop and its surrounding ‘appendages’ (hamlets and houses) to the newly founded priory at Durham Cathedral in 1031. The church itself stands at what was once the Easternmost end of the village next to the Langley Beck, just past the magnificent Raby Castle, which we had visited a couple of days previously. More on the history via these links:-

http://www.stmarysstaindrop.org.uk/Staindrop/History.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staindrop

 

Above are some general views of the interior of the church showing the beautiful architectural and artistic features within. <click on photos for a larger view>

The shield on the font is depicted showing the cresent moon and the Sinclair Cross, the shield or plaque on the wall depicts the alignment of two families (two bloodlines), the church records records a ‘Ford’ (my bloodline and lineage), the close up of the window shows the ‘merkaba’ a familiar ‘Knight Templar symbol, the kneeling pads show the Neville Symbols and the window (possibly) shows the ‘Three Mary’s’.

Let Alek show you around and take you on a tour of his own family bloodline; explaining in full all the ‘family connections’ and the ‘Templar/Masonic/Priory’ symbolism which abounds within the church.

ST MARYS CHURCH: STAINDROP

 

 

To see all the Neville Family tombs in detail, as mentioned in the video and read the historical writings please click on each image to enlarge

 

 

For me personally a most ‘magical’ discovery was seeing with my own eyes the appearance of what looked like a ‘moon’ or ‘sun’ on the church floor with clouds scurrying past; a perfect disc formed by the rays of the sun through the centre of the red rose in the window above. Directly underneath was what apeared to be the ‘all seeing eye’ but i could also see a ‘square and compass’. At a certain perfect point in time an alignment will occur… a snippet of this is in the video above.

 

<click to enlarge>

There is so much more to this vast universe than our human existence or our human perception of it.

The ladder of knowledge is there for all to climb.

Happy in acceptance am i when i discover that what i once thought i knew was nothing more than human illusion…

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“the Keeper of Scrolls” August 2017

QUEST TWENTY THREE CONT:

  • ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH
  • ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND
  • DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH

ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH: ESCOMBE NEAR BISHOP AUKLAND: Escomb is situated two miles west of Bishop Auckland in the Wear Valley. The church was built around 675AD with stone probably from the Roman Fort at Binchester and is the oldest church in the country. It was originally thought that the church was an offshoot of one of the local monastries at Whitby of Hartlepool, but this s only one of several possibilities as there are no known written records until 990AD.

The church, as one would expect is small and simple, befitting the time in which it was built. It is set amidst a well kept graveyard with some unusual gravestones in the burial ground with an ancient sundial above the porch entrance.

Once inside, one can tell the church is lovingly looked after; it has a beautiful stillness and peace about it and one can still see a few traces of the medieval painting on the archway entrance to the altar area, although some items such as the shield once prominent upon the wall has sadly not stood the test of time, as befalls many original items once prominent in many churches and some of the original paintwork about the church has also fallen prey to the ravages of time.  Thers is also a very ancient cross behind the altar depicting the ‘Fleur De Lys’ which one can barely make out do to age and earthy time… There were beautiful fresh flowers within the church and a tapistry of Celtic design crafted by local people, set in an alcove on the wall. There was a lovely feeling of peace and some very calming energies here. There was also an interesting phenomona of the greenery outside of the church displaying as a beautiful shade of blue through the church windows, which indeed it should be…

 

<click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escomb_Church

Let Alek explain further in this short video below & show you around to explain the connections to the Neville bloodline.

ESCOMBE SAXON CHURCH

 

 The church is well looked after and well loved, which one can most certainly tell.

 

DAY THREE: ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND: Of course everyone is very familiar with Rosslyn Chapel, (formerly known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew) due to it’s inclusion in popular modern fiction and movies. I had visited the chapel previously yet was very much looking forward to visiting it again. The previous time i had visited, the chapel was hidden behind scaffolding; much renevation work was in progress, but as a bonus we did however get to walk around the actual roof of the chapel along the scaffolding itself – an experience not to be missed! So to see the chapel now in all it’s unfettered splendour was to be a treat indeed.

http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

The chapel has strong connections to the Sinclair family, who have been it’s custodians  over the years and also connections, as one would rightly expect, to the Knight Templars, in particular to the ROS and the Scottish Rite. Rosslyn Chapel was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness of the Scoto-Norman Sinclair family. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery. The Neville connection here is that the Sinclairs and the Nevilles have ‘been in bed together’ since the dawn of time!

 

Some fine examples of the beautiful stone work of the chapel <click on an image to enlarge>

Over the years many secrets and tales of intrigue have been associated with Rosslyn Chapel; tales that connect to the Knight Templars, the FreeMasons, Secret Ceremonies and indeed even to the Holy Grail and The Ark of the Covernent; one can only wonder as to the real truths hidden below the surface…. Sadly most of the sacred objects and artifacts of importance and significance have now been removed from the chapel for safe keeping and to this end the chapel has lost it’s very sacred energy and is sadly no more than a library of codes and hidden knowledge. I was glad to have visited Rosslyn before the items where removed, especially certain items of a KT connection that i was very drawn towards and of which i noticed imnediately that they were no longer there; i was glad to have felt those energies that were still there, at that time i visited previously. Interestingly the modern day tours of the Chapel do give out a great deal of  ‘misinformation’ to the public ears, but as we know, those who are meant to know will indeed, in time know.

 

Note that ‘The Jesus’ is saluting with the Ninasian salute as used within The Priory by it’s members. The Fleur de Lys depicted here is the only one to be found on the outside of the chapel, the photo from within the chapel is a representation of the ‘Raised Degree’

Sadly we unable to take photos inside of the chapel due to an ‘incident’ that happened there, but i was able to take many fine shots of the external architecture. I was glad to have been able to take shots of the interior last time i visited. As a footnote i did sneak one photo i was drawn too, see above….. 😉

DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH:  This church is renowned as having been the first collegiate church, in 1342, to have been established in the Lothians. The church was situated on the same site as the present-day parish church, on Queen’s Road just south of Dunbar town centre. The first mention of a church at Dunbar came in 1176 in the Taxatio of Lothian when the church was described as Eclessia de Dunbar. This church, dedicated to St Bega, served the parish as a whole until 1342 and its foundation as a collegiate church. On 21 April 1342, Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar was granted by charter, his right to the proprietorship of the church. The Dunbars were no strangers to the patronage of religious establishments, with the foundation of a house of Trinity friars in 1218, and then amonastery of Carmelite monks in 1263, by the 6th and 7th earls respectively. Dunbar Collegiate continued as decreed until it became forfeit to the crown in 1435. For a while the church was ‘enjoyed’ by the  Duke of Albany during the reign of King James 3rd of Scotland, before returning to the Dunbars. In 1483, it, once again, reverted to the crown and stayed that way until the Protestant reformation in 1560.

Sadly the church was totally closed when we were there but we did get some stunning views across the sea as the church is placed on a very commanding position with some very unusual stones and memorials in the graveyard.

The Neville family connection here is the family memorial, but sadly we were unable to investigate further on this occasion. <click on images to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Dunbar%20Collegiate%20Church

http://www.wow.com/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

Points to Consider:

  • Escombe Church, Raby Castle Chapel and St Andrew’s Church, all have a connection in respect of the Nevilles; they are all tied together.
  • The Sinclairs and the Nevilles have been connectted from time imemorial.
  • Just who really are ‘The Nevilles’, where did they come from, why are they so important and what is the purpose of their bloodline?

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2017

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

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A very profound inscription with a much deeper meaning discovered in the graveyard at Dunbar…..

 

“The mortal must put on immortality”

“Until the day break, and the shadows flee away”

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”

Aug 2017

In blessed darkness will I walk my path with footfalls silent on the earth.

Never alone I wander through an age of eternal night times

Yet fear not my lack of human companionship.

Under heavens starry canopy my becoming of self completes,

For I see the world for what it is

And in acceptance I surrender to the future.

I see the dark and light as one as they become each other,

I see the sun, moon and stars revealed through times illusion

And I see the earth bound in sorrows; secrets forever hidden within the wyrd.

And yet I also see myself; I see my secret beyond the skin,

I feel the truth flowing as blood upon the land

And in truth and being I unravel upon the sands of time.

Those I knew as kin, never were

And those that truly speak come to me through ages past

Whispering the secrets to my existence from their alabaster beds.

I read the signs left hidden by kindred long ago,

I see the glory revealed in echoes of lives that still resonate

Upon the unending shores of time.

Yet is it only I who can truly see their unwritten language of the past,

Who can feel their energy vibrating still with life;

A life which reverberates through my body;

A record left of all times gone and those yet to come?

I tread the path of the guardians, the watchers, the keepers and the Protectors of Light.

I know they watch me; yet leave me be; acceptance.

Yet when the blood finally flows and the rising water cleanses

I too will protect and in my becoming, rise to new heights of understanding.

Watching from the shadows I bide my time

Wearing this cloak of glorious darkness I await my time

When I too will whisper my tale upon  Destiny’s Hill to those whom would sit and listen.

 

 

The Keeper of Scrolls

July 2017

QUEST TWENTY THREE: NORTHUMBRIA, TEESDALE AND SCOTLAND.

  • HIGH FORCE WATERFALL
  • RABY CASTLE
  • ST ANDREW’S CHURCH

DAY ONE: So on Thursday the 29th of June we set off from Cambridge to embark on another quest. After a long yet pleasant journey we arrived at  Middleton in Teesdale which was to be our base for the next four nights. The area we stayed at was outstanding in its beauty, with rolling hills, wild rivers and ancient buildings, so we knew that lots was waiting for us to discover.

HIGH FORCE WATERFALL NEAR BARNARD CASTLE, COUNTY DURHAM: This magnificant waterfall has been a popular tourist attraction for many year now, but what folks do not realise is that it is also a sacred Templar site. This is truly an amazing spectacle of nature with immense power not to be underestimated. There is a very pretty forest walk down to the waterfall which passes through lush greenary and ancient trees. When one sees the waterfall one simply stops in awe, wondering how many gallons of water gush over the edge and into the river below, every minute. The ‘Templar’ energy is amazing and anyone on the ‘path’ can not fail to pick up on it. From everywhere though, many ‘guardians’ keep watch over their secret treasures…

 

The walk down to the waterfall was lush and verdant and full of ancient ‘energies’ including the watching ‘guardians’ keeping watch over treasures of old…. <click to enlarge all photos>

We crossed an ancient stone bridge over a bubbling stream, underwhich the guarding trolls were watching. Unwritten legend tells of Sir Lancelot secretly hiding a twentfour carat gold table under these very stone arches, where the trolls have watched throughout time…..

http://www.highforcewaterfall.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Force

DAY TWO: RABY CASTLE:  Raby Castle is one of Englands finest Medieval Castles with an intriging history of valiant knights, battles fought and family intrigues pondered over, as one would well expect. So thus a whole quest dedicated to discovering more about the enigmatic and mysterious Neville Family, often known as the ‘power behind the throne’ or indeed the true royal bloodline itself. The Neville line that is of interest here on this quest was created in 1254 with the death of Isobel de Neville, whom was born in Bracepeth and who married Lord Robert Fitzmaldred from Raby, and of course whose maiden name was indeed Neville. These are ‘our’ Alek’s 18 x Great Grandparents.

Their son, Lord Robert Fitzrobert changed his name by deed poll upon the death of his mother, to his mother’s name of Neville. Lord Robert de Neville, born in Raby, County Durham, 1240 – 1271 whom reached 31 years of age is ‘our’ Alek’s 17 x Great Grandfather. It is important to note that in 1033, Earl Maldred MacCrinnan, 1015 – 1045, moved from Dunbar. East Lothian to Raby, Countu Durham and is Alek’s 23 x Great Grandfather. His brother was Duncan, King of Scotland, 1001 – 1040)

 

The Castle and ‘Neville’ shield from the gardens.

Click on the link below to read more about the history of the Nevilles at Raby Castle

http://www.rabycastle.com/history/the-nevills

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raby_Castle

The castle is set amidst a vast landscaped estate, where herds of deer roam; with beautiful walled gardens and associated buidings near the main entrance. It was a damp but warm day when we arrived and the blooms in the garden were magnificant. Around the far side of the castle, the opposite side to the entrance are two landscaped ‘ponds’ which when viewed at a certain angle give the wonderful appearance of a moat.

The fair blooms of Raby Castle gardens

We filmed a short video below from just outside the gardens where Alek explained more on the Neville lineage and his own connection to it.

RABY CASTLE: NORTHUMBRIA

Although we were unable to roam freely inside the castle on this occasion, we were able to tag onto a tour and take some non-flash shots. Athough the tour mainly concentrated on the current owners of the castle, mentions were made of the Nevilles of the past, so we were able to pick up extra info as we toured around the vast rooms and many corridoors.

Portrait of Charles Neville, the Sixth Earl of Westmoorland, 1569 and plaques showing the Masonic past of the castle. <click to enlarge>

Members of the Neville family as depicted on the rear wall of the chapel wall and set into alcoves <click to enlarge>

The sumptuous interior of Raby Castle showing the many fine objects displayed throughout the castle; many of which have been handed down through the centuries often being lovingly restored. <click on to enlarge>

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In this very room (above) plots and deals were made, including famously, the plot to overthrow the then false queen, Elizabeth the first. Seven hundred knights in full armour, assembled in this very room to swear allegiance and their blood oaths to the rightful royal boodline, the Nevilles. Sadly, as history tells, the throne never made it back into the Neville hands and the crown wrongly took the castle for it’s own and later gave it to the Barnard family. Thus the history of this country was forever changed and the throne has remained in the wrong hands ever since. The Nevilles were somewhat appeased by an offering of land and dwellings in farther off lands, well away from those ‘who would be king’. But history and time has a way of working things out and the ‘mighty’ always fall… But how i wished i had been a fly on the wall to witness those seven hundred knights in full armour in readyness for duty…..

 

 

ST ANDREW’S CHURCH: BISHOP AUCKLAND: St Andrew’s Church is  fine Grade One listed building; a living church carrying on the long tradition of proclaiming the gospel to folks of each and every generation. St Andrews is cruciform in shape and is said to be the largest parish church in the Diocese of Durham. It is believed that the current church is the third to occupy this site. The first dated from 650AD, and the second 1100AD, housing monks expelled from Durham. This present church was built almost seven hundred and fifty years ago, in around 1274AD as a Collegiate Church, with a dean, twelve canons and the same number of vicars.

St Andrew’s church hides a great and wondrous surprise; a very ancient ‘Celtic’ cross; far the oldest in this country in fact, the origins of which go back to ancient Sumeria. It is situated under the tower at the west of the nave and incorparated into it are, what is said to be, large fragments of Saxon stonework. The carvings on the cross depict tales of Nergal and the underworld, the ouroborous, the archer and mythical beasts, including the Bennu Bird. The ‘so called’ human figures carved on the cross with very long fingers, bear a remarkable resemblance to bodily remains recently discovered.

 

St Andrew’s Church and the beautiful Celtic Cross with Alek and Martin examining it in full detail.

Martin who let us into the church was very interested and soaked up all Alek had to share. See the churches own interpretaion on the cross here:- “While it was difficult to discover much about the church or the real origins of the Celtic Cross from the internet , i did find this description (click on the link below) which was about as detailed as i could get. Meanwhile please enjoy my own selection of photos below. As with most of these sacred objects from the past, the cross did emanate an amazing ‘energy’ and one could not help being drawn towards it”

https://www.york.ac.uk/teaching/history/pjpg/cross.pdf

The carvings on the cross certainly have a feeling of death and rebirth about them.

In the church are to be found connections to the Neville bloodline; Alek’s own family line. One of the stained glass windows clearly shows the Neville Shield and the effigy of the ‘Unknown Knight’ and ‘Unknown Lady’ could pssibly have very strong connections to the Neville lineage; thus an important reasons for visiting this church. See photos below…

<click on images to enlarge>

Also of interest, in the south, is a holy water stoup (see below) commemorating Bishop Robert Neville whose coat of arms it bears; discovered in the churchyard in 1850 and believed to have been adapted from a Roman altar, probably taken in the ruins of Vinovia. So an interesting church indeed with some very significant ‘finds’ within it…

 

Points to consider on the Neville Lineage:

  • The Neville Estate covers a vast amount of land in the area visited here indicating prominence, importance and wealth for the times.
  • The Nevilles of interest on this quest are: Isobel de Neville, who gave birth to the Neville lineage upon her death, when her son used her name rather than his father’s. He then became  Lord Robert de Neville.
  • The ‘Unknown Knight’ (The Earl of Raby, Earl Ralph) and the ‘Unknown Lady’ (his wife) of St Andrews Church, are now revealed to be of the Neville lineage also, as is Bishop Robert Neville, whos coat of arms is in the church.
  • There is a connection to the chapel in Raby Castle, St Andrew’s Church and Escombe Saxon Church (more to come later on this church)

 

Part two follows above…

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

 

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the beginning to the end…..

For MG 3

Fortunately we still just about, live in a country with a culture where we can all freely have and express our individual opinions about anything and everything; yet at the same time respect our fellow creature’s points of view, even if they conflict with our own. I often see a lot of anger and strong opinions on social media; conflicting viewpoints, with ‘friends’ being ‘unfriended’ from peoples lists, when personal viewpoints are not shared ones. Quarreling about words is of no value and will only have a negative effect on those who listen or read.

In the blink of the universal eye, this does not really matter, social media does not matter, for the true purpose of human existence is yet to be revealed to the many. In future times who is to say what is right and what is wrong, for it is all subjective and relates to given timelines of humanity and current thinking modes. In future times, it matters not one jot who fell out with whom or who agreed with whom or who said what. When one ‘draws’ away from the insular traits of modern humanity, all this bickering and self opinions is revealed as totally pointless in the bigger scheme of things and is proved to be totally ego based. Many view this planet as a  ‘prison planet’ and indeed once one crosses over the threshold of profound knowledge one can see why so.

 

For MG 4

Many cultures and religions on planet earth worship false prophets and false gods with people choosing to allow their lives and how they live them, to be dictated to them by man-made rules created by those whom wish to keep their followers under control and in total darkness. These people will never know freedom of thought and choice, and sadly do not know they have no freedom of choice in the first place.  Even the so called enlightened ‘spiritual paths’ also provide teachings not to be of truth, often based on man’s misinterpreted mythology; thus they misinform their followers too. But as said, we all still have freedom of choice so it is up to each individual to discover the truths for themselves or not; to believe what they want to believe.

Go tread lightly folks on this precious journey called life, see the unsee-able, look behind the mundane world and question everything, question the reason for everything, all the whys and the wherefores, seek truth out at every turn, even though it may not be where you think it is or what you believe it to be. Truth is not pretty and does not come gift wrapped with a beautiful bow, so keep an open mind, yet neither is it a personal opinion of any self-elevated individual human. Look above and beyond humanity for the answers that really are already inside of us, within our very DNA; for those whom are meant to know, really will in time, know and will awaken.

 

For MG

Where-ever we are on this planet peace is always to be found within each individual and has nothing to do with the control or illusion of religion or politics. Learn and evolve to become the best you can be, break the barriers of the mind in order to truly grow and to expand your consciousness, it is more than possible. Seek knowledge and personal growth; question everything you are told by those who would profess to know. The illusions of life are starting to collapse and new concepts of truth are coming out into the open and being embraced, so always ask yourselves, why all the lies in the first place? What is it that humanity is not supposed to know and why? All else will then start to fall into place, petty arguments and differences especially will seem pointless. Don’t be ‘mind-controlled’ but be ‘mind-awakened’ and make each step matter; find your own way, in your own way, be individual not ‘one of the crowd’. Do not follow established man-made paths and viewpoints, take a big step out of the glaring light, above and beyond the ‘roar of the crowd’ and try a little bit of quiet shade; you may just be surprised at what you will find there in the shadows…..

That is the thing though; the human species has evolved way beyond the original purpose and intent of its creators. Over time human brains have developed and continue to develop above and beyond the purpose intended, but they dont know what for or where they are heading with this. A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing; one only has to look at how mankind is destroying the planet by greed and consumerism; mankind in these closing decades has not treated this planet well and has allowed greed and the fulfilment of ego to be the ‘be all and end all’ goal. All the carefully created balance of nature now being thrown out of the window. Of course many more human creatures live in the dark than will ever evolve towards the light of full knowledge, of whom and what they really are. Most live in the moment in the glare of the ‘Neon God’ they have created for themselves and have not an inkling of the huge possibilities that could lie ahead. Yet for those with a passion and a yearning for knowledge, those with a deep love and a hankering for the ‘Old Ways’ and for truth, the possibilities for growth within the right hands are endless and boundless.

 

For MG 5

As a teacher and guide (of Craft) I will always endeavour to guide humanity towards open doors wherein this knowledge lies, but that is all a teacher can do; gentle guidance and encouragement; it is up to each individual, whether or not they choose it, to step over that threshold or not. Knowledge once gained cannot be ‘un-gained’ yet knowledge gained can change one’s way of life and thinking for all times; those things that were once unthinkable become the norm, the thinkable and nothing can and ever will be the same again. I love to teach, love to share and love to experience with students that ‘light bulb’ moment when I know that their lives have been changed for always, above and beyond the norm; it is and always will be a very rewarding experience to share this brand new beginning with folks. Time is marching on and nothing is infinite, everything has a beginning and an end, yet new travellers are always welcome, those seekers of truth, those creatures with a sense of adventure, with a deep thirst for knowledge who wish to walk the road less travelled with us.

Family is above and beyond any earthly blood ties; honouring blood ties of another kind. For those who wish to follow the ‘ways of the blood’, of the original way, the journey is often long and ardarous, with one questioning every aspect of one’s current life and it’s associations. If within my life I can change just one person’s perspective of their reality, if i can cause them to stop and think about the very nature of reality, then I am very happy.  I try and give clues, give pointers and directions for people to follow and to maybe study up on more. In time they may wish to join us in the fold of Priory; to become as one with ‘family’ or they may simply go their own way, forever enlightened. Whatever happens to planet earth in future times, one thing is sure, the species known as humans will survive the coming end times, albeit in numbers much, much less than we are familiar with today and that will be a good thing. Each student is guided by the Elders of the path to a place of safety within the physical and metaphysical realms where temporal doorways do exist to cross through. To those students who have suceeded through the mundane’s constant  tempting of  them not to succeed, the true beauty of reality will at last be revealed.

 

For MG 1

 

‘Stay well and stay sharp’

‘Fan go maith agus fanacht géar’

 

Craft Tutor and Keeper of Scrolls

June 2017

 

 

Exmore 1

“Beautiful and Wild Exmoor which we all loved so much”

  • St Paul’s Church, Honiton:
  • St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway:
  • St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh:
  • St Michael’s Church, Beer:
  • Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: 
  • All Saint’s Church, Dulverton:
  • St Mary the Virgin, Lynton:
  • Valley of the Rocks, Lynton:
  • St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall:
  • Braddock Church, Churchyard & Fields: Cornwall:

Our next quest was amazingly Quest 21 and so starting out in the direction of Devon and Cornwall, we travelled all day down country to Woodbury in Devon, just outside of Honiton; our base for the next few days. To start off our journey and explanation of the area, here is a taster in the link below of what was to come…

EXETER, DEVON: PLACES OF PEACE & PLACES OF POWER

 

EXETER CATHEDRAL & EXMOOR: OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE COIN: Two totally opposite ends of the spectrum are portrayed in the above video, filmed in the beautiful and largely unspoilt county of Devon.  Exeter Catherdral on the one hand is a vast and amazing building; a wondrous piece of architecture in fact; yet it is sadly a place of strange and very draining energies, experienced by all to one degree or another. I certainly got very zapped and depleted by the energies here, so much so i felt quite unwell upon entering the Cathedral and had to sit down for a few minutes to re-align myself…
Exmoor on the other hand is a beautifully stunning place of natural peace, beauty and tranquility, very reviving, very refreshing and the time we were there the sky was a clear blue with no sign of a chemtrail anyway in sight, with the air being pure and untainted; two sides of coin then. Interestingly too, no sign of any earth curvature on the 360 degree video we filmed up on Exmoor. The one very interesting discovery from inside of the cathedral was the depiction of ‘The Jesus’ from around the front of the pulpit, showing quiet clearly the Ninasian salute; feel free to wonder why ‘The Jesus’ is shown using this sign and just what exactly is ‘The Ninasian Salute’ and from whence did it originate….

The Ninasian Salute shown here <click on all photos to expand & enlarge>

Day One Friday 21st April 2017: St Paul’s Church, Honiton: Honiton is a bustling market town and civil parish in East Devon, close to the River Otter and the home of the once thriving lace making industry. The town grew up along the line of ‘The Fosse Way’, the ancient Roman road which links Exeter to Lincoln, of which Honiton was an important stopping off point with a mention in the Doomsday Book.

Although the heyday of the lace making industry was in the 17th century, Queen Victoria, who herself had many connections to the area, famously used Honiton lace on her wedding gown. The gown can be seen in all it’s fine splendour in the local museum next to the church; the actual dress itself being made in the nearby village of Beer. Lace making was introduced to the area by Flemish migrants in the Elizabethan era and although the lace making industry has greatly declined, there is something of a small resurgence as local people are encouraged to take up the craft once more, for fear of it dying out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honiton

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/honiton-st-pauls.htm

St Paul’s Church: which is right next door to the lace museum, which itself was once an old chapel, is very well kept and obviously loved by the local community but sadly has been much modernised and in the process of which, has lost some of its much older artifacts and items of interest to us upon this quest;  it has sadly lost it’s ‘energies’ too, although intrestingly there may, as mentioned in the video be interesting finds within the very foundations of St. Paul’s Church itself.

Inside and out of Honiton Church in Devon, showing ‘The Ford line’ connection too. Click on individual photos to enlarge.

  • The bloodline connection here is of Henry John Clarke (or variations of the spelling) 1900 – 1982 (Our Alek’s GGF)

See our link below for our account of St Paul’s Church Honiton & St Michael’s Church Farway

ST PAULS CHURCH HONITON & ST MICHAELS CHURCH FARWAY

 

St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway: Hidden away off the beaten track, this beautiful church is well and truly secluded within the Devonshire countryside, and very importantly placed within our quests with the knowledge that those who are meant to find it will indeed do so. The church was built in the Norman period with a west tower added in the 15th century with a north aisle being added in 1682, though the entire church was rebuilt in 1877. ‘The East Devon Way’ long distance footpath runs directly past the church.

Farway Church & Graveyard, near Exmoor

There are many Templar and Freemasonic symbols within this church, which are a delight to discover and the whole church itself has an amazing feeling to it. The symbols significant here include the Rose Cross, the Red Rose, The Red Robes of the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (King of Kings) and the Red Wings of the Archangels; red being the colour of blood, of the rose and of sacrifice and obviously very significant here. Also here we seee the ‘triskelion’ symbol with the daisys and the ‘leaves of hope’, both of which relate to higher Masonic chapters. The video above will show and explain more.

Templar & Masonic influences and symbolism inside of Farway Church

Local tales of interest are of a Humphrey Hutchins who was ploughing the land at the top of the hill when his plough turned up a crock of gold. He gave part of his miraculous treasure to the church to rebuild the north aisle. The field where Hutchins discovered his golden hoard is still known as ‘Money Acre’; sadly no sign of any further hoards while we were there. In the church yard are a pair of old yew trees. The largest of which measures 25 feet around its base and is thought to be 800 years old.

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/farway.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Robert Clark 1773 – 1861 (Our Alek’s 4xGGF) but John Moyne is also an important character to research.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh: Cotleigh is a small, pretty village and civil parish near Honiton in the beating heart of rural Devon; it is the final resting place of the author John Green. Once again another of Devon’s churches to be found well off the beaten track, nestled in the heart of the most delightful and beautiful scenery that one could possibly imagine. People have been praying at this site since 500 BC and in it’s present guise is a traditional old fashioned English church. The church was restored with a rebuilt chancel in 1867 with local stone and flint rubble with Beerstone and some Hamstone detail; the tower is partly plastered with a slate roof and sadly most of the exterior detail has been replaced.

St Michael’s Church Cotleigh showing the Neville Shield, the Lilly Banner and the mystrious hidden vault in the grave yard.

The church boasts some rather unsual and stunning stained glass windows; non more so than those showing the ‘Chi Rho’ symbol in it’s full glory; the very first thing one notices when pulling up outside the shurch, we comment and expand upon further in the video, sharing the “Blood turn Black and Blood turn Blue” aspect that Priory and Craft folk will relate to. The fittings inside the church are not that old, yet some very interesting symbolism on the stained glass windows and an interesting church banner beside the altar depicting a lily, with strong hints to Sumerian connections and to the Alpha and Omega. There is also a modern version of The Neville Sheild hanging just inside the entrance. Outside in the grave yard we came across a rather mysterious hidden vault where in past times there would have been steps leading down to; now hidden by the hand of time and possibly mankind….

The stunningly beautiful and magical windows inside of Cotleigh Church – click on image to enlarge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotleigh

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir William Clark 1804 – 1861 (Aleks 3xGGF) and also Adophus Clark – a past rector.

See our link below for our account of St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh and St Michael’s Church, Beer

ST MICHAELS CHURCH’S: COTLEIGH & BEER

 

St Michael’s Church, Beer: The present church was erected in 1877 but a previous church had exsited on the site since about 1600. An even earlier religous building was thought to have stood here dating back to  1122AD when Beer and Seaton belonged to the Abbey of Sherbourn

St Michael’s Church Beer; in the ‘devils own’ village  (Click on photos to expand)

The village of Beer is traditional and lively with some fine old buildings full of character; it even has a stream running down the side of the main street and through it. Beer is nicknamed ‘The Devils Own Village’ and fascinatingly has many connections from it’s past history to the very devil himself. It is thought very apt then that the Archangel that threw Satan out of heaven should be the patron saint of the church itself and seemingly there are other ‘satanic’ influences inside the church, if one knows what one is looking for and explained further in the video. Again more Masonic influences here and some interesting symbolic windows and artifacts found within and also explained. As always, these churches, as are all the churches we visit, are found on ancients sites of ‘energy alignments‘ puposefully hidden aons ago within our planet.

Stained glass windows at Beer with connections to the ‘Bennu Bird’ and the ‘Wolf in Sheeps Clothing’ (click to expand inages)

http://pastremains.co.uk/stmichaelsbeer.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Edward Clark  1574 – 1623 (Our Alek’s 9xGGF) and Walter George Clark.

Day Two Saturday 22nd April 2017: Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: This huge cathedral in the heart of the bright and busy city of Exeter is properly known as the Cathedral of St Peter at Exeter; being an Anglican cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, Devon. The founding of the cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter dating from 1050 when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107 William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style.

Exeter Cathedral – click to enlarge

The present building was completed by about 1400 and has several noteable features including an early set of misery cords, an astronomical clock and the longest uninterupted vaulted ceiling in England. The catherdral is built in the Norman Romanesque style and the two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls survive the present cathedral. A major rebuild in decorated Gothic style was carried out  between c. 1270 and c. 1350, where the Norman towers were incoporated into this enlarged building as the North and South Transepts. It is a vast magnificant building yet i could not help feeling that when looking up at the ceiling, that i was trapped inside a very large extinct whale…..

The Neville Crest in situ can be seen placed in the right hand side of the catherdral when facing the altar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter_Cathedral

  • The bloodline connection is once again that of ‘The ‘Nevilles’ particularily Garth Neville-Walford, Captain of the Royal Artillery who died 26th April 1915.

 

All Saint’s Church, Dulverton: This pretty little church is once again situated right off the beaten track in a small village in the heart of Devon. It has a timeless peace about the place and is set within the typically traditional English graveyard. This present church has been here since the early 1800, but before that the site had been in use for seemingly aons;  the use of which was a for a very different purpose. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1885 in Pependicular style, with the exception of the plain tower, of moorland character which is said to be or 12th to 13th century origin.

Beautiful Dulverton near Exmoor: Also in the church grounds is a very interesting and ancient way marker which no doubt has many a tale to tell…

There are many very interesting artefacts and histories within the church itself. The ‘bloodline’ connection here is that of the Neville and Cainan connection; the Cainan line which can be traced back to 7000 years ago, which together with some very fascinating archeolological discoveries under the actual church itself, made for a fascinating and worthwhile trip across the stunning moors.  The said discoveries were in the form of excavations beneath the flagstone floor of the northen aisle, which revealed a set of five stone steps observed via a ventilation hole. This set of steps led down to a blocked corridoor, the walls of which were painted white. Directly to the south of the central aisle a concave area of brick work was revealed beneath a row of pews. The curved brick work is very likely to be the top of a vault and if so may have formed the entrance to a crypt which extends across the central part of the nave. It may be that the vault and steps relate to an earlier phase of the church prior to the 1850’s rebuild. As an observation, we have come to realise and recognise that many of the churches visited on our quest do have hidden underground vaults, whether hidden on purpose or within the confines of passing time, i will allow you to decide, but often one need to be eagle eyed and awake to recognise the signs of ‘activities’ now well buried within time itself….

All Saints Church Dulverton

Most of the interior of the church is original and there are some very symbolic stained glass windows here depicting man’s evolution and a rather special statue of St Nikalaus complete, dare i say it, with horns; something that many of you astute readers will find interesting to say the lest. The Lady Chapel is dedicated in this instance to a male species. The tomb there, of the Viscount de Vesci, who died in the Great War, has an amazing amount of energy emanating from it and almost felt alive; in fact the whole area felt qute amazing. In the chapel itself are to be found the Templar Cross and the Fleur de Lyss and there are other artifacts within the church older than the church itself. Once again there is reference here to the ‘Ninasian’ salute and the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (the King of Kings)

The stained glass windows at Dulverton Church

See our link below to find out much more on Dulverton Church

ALL SAINTS CHURCH DULVERTON

  • The bloodline connection is that of The ‘Neville’ and ‘Cainan’ connection

Day Three Saturday 22nd April 2017: St Mary the Virgin, Lynton: Sitting atop of tall craggy cliffs and overlooking, on this particular day, the most crystal clear azure-blue sea, St Mary the Virgin Church could possibly have the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited. We were so lucky when we arrived as we did not expect to be able to enter the church due to the lateness of the hour, yet were delighted to discover that a local meeting taking place was just coming to an end so were able to sneak in and take a few photos but sadly no video out of respect for the gentleman who kindly let us have a quick look around before locking up.

“…the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited”

Lynton itself is a small town on the Exmoor coast, settled atop of the cliffs above the harbour village of Lynmouth, connected to Lynton by the narrow gauge cliff railway. The beautiful church here on its commanding outlook across the bay has been enlarged and altered over the years, most notable in 1741 when the nave was build, yet the tower is mainly 13th century. Much of the rebuilding is broadly medieval in form, yet there is some good Art Nouveau detailing, including some combined with neo-Norman features. Many of the towns buildings were constructed in the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century and befitting a cliff top seaside town, many of the streets up on different levels connected by alleyway and steps going up and down. Evidence of Iron Age activity can be found at the nearby Roborough Castle and the novel Lorna Doone was set in the Lynton area and their are many beautiful coastal walks and paths running nearby. Nearby is the spectacular Valley of the Rocks with it’s stunning views and mysterious tales of the werewolves to just waiting to be divulged and our next port of call. But before moving on we made time to simply stand and stare in peace at this ‘out of the world‘ view….

The interior of St Mary the Virgin Church at Lynton, once again showing the Neville Sheild and some beautiful stained glass windows

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynton

  • The bloodline connection is again that of The ‘Cainan’ connection

Valley of the Rocks, Lynton: Tales of Old Kingdoms and werewolves may seem to have fallen straight out of the pages of Folkelore and Fantasy, but are they? The Valley of the Rocks is a truly magical and wild place where these ancient tales of of old kingdoms and roaming werewolves really do come to life. It is situated just half a mile west of Lynton in Devon and is a vast scenic area of outstanding natural beauty, with coastal views unsurpassed and ferral goats running wild. There have been many reported sightings of werewolf activity up to the 1990’s which we talk about further in the video.

A spectacular sunset over ‘The Valley of the Rocks’ which is not quite as ‘natural’ as one is led to believe….

But most importanly and undocumted, the whole area was once a vast early kingdom for the Irish Kings, of which almost nothing has ever been written about; it was the actual landing place of the first invading kings from Ireland who thus settled here and left many traces upon the land. My first instinctual thoughts when driving into the valley, not knowing anything about it, was ‘wow!’ what an amazing castle; something that took me completely by surprise! When one looks around the area one can indeed see the remains of a large fortress, temples and many other buildings of ancient everyday life of which is explained in the video but of which nothing is written about. One can sense a great power and energy alignment here as the early settlement was built purposefully  on the site of ancient pyramids placed within the land, by by those who came first with intent and design, hence why it is such an important place. The pyramids are there for all to see and ‘feel’ yet hidden carefully within ‘plain sight’ and most folks will never know… One can certainly feel the energies and power here; it is indeed a very sacred site. Interestingly as soon as we started filming, what had been a quiet and deserted scene was now populated by a mixture of ‘listeners’ and ‘watchers’ seemingly intent on diverting us off the track as it were, though patience and stealth prevailed. Listen carefully to the video for further explanation.

Close up detail of the ‘Old Kingdom’ showing where once fine buildings and temples etc would have been

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Rocks

The stunning sunset as we departed reluctantly from this very sacred place & video below with previously untold tellings

THE VALLEY OF THE ROCKS & OVER THE SEA TO ST MICHAELS MOUNT

 

Day Four Sunday 23rd April 2017: St Michael’s Mount: After a beautifully relaxing, yet all too brief journey across the sea to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, we embarked upon the shores of the the beautiful and fairy tale world of St Michael’s Mount. The mount has many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen, secrets not ever documented in the present world of men…. In the meantime enjoy the ride across the waters in the video above. 🙂

St Michael’s Mount & terraced gardens over looking the ocean & a first glimps of the solitary unmarked cross…

St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, linked to the mainland by a man-made causeway of granite, of which much of the actual island is made, and which is passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust; the castle and chapel having been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since about 1650. The earliest buildings on the summit date to the 12th century. The mount’s cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe many more tales that lie hidden within ‘folk memory’. Remains of trees have been seen at low tide following storms on the beach at Perranuthoe and radiocarbon dating has established the submerging of the hazle wood at about 1700BC.

Views from te summit overlooking the battlements & ocean – click to enlarge

Historically, St Michael’s Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, it was given to the Benedictine religous order  by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. There is evidence of people living in the area during the Neolithic period, as important ancient finds such as an arrow-head and flint tools have been unearthed in the gardens on the island.  It is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries and as said Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman Abbey of Mont Saint-Michael. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien house, as a side-effect of the of the war in France by Henry V, when it was given to the Abbess and Convent of Syon at Iselworth, Middlesex in 1424, thus ending its association with Mont St Michael and any connetion with Looe Island, dedicated to the Archangel Michael.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century and in 1275 an earthquake destroyed the original Priory Church, which was subsequently rebuilt in the late 14th century and has thus remained in use. In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake cause a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in ten minutes at St Michaels Mount, ebbing at the same rate and continuing to rise and fall for some five hours and it was reported that a great loss of life and property occurred along this Cornsh coast.

Inside the Abbey & Chapel on the mount – click each image to expand

A local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant names Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack took on this gigantic menace, who had an appetite for cattle and children, and killed him by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

On the quiet terraces of the island that overlook the sea, and not writen about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever but to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant ‘Neville Stronghold’. So for the first time on our quests we have mention now of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands….

Our lasting thoughts of that day would be with that solitary cross, that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound.and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty beyond the mundane…

  • The bloodline connection is of the ‘Solomon Solamh, whos unmarkd cross is seen above’ and again of the enigmatic ‘Nevilles’

Farewell to a magical island

Braddock Church Braddock Cornwall: Churchyard and Fields: So here we were in the dead of night, on a night time quest to a very deserted and lonely church in Cornwall. Braddock Church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin; the earliest parts of the building being Norman with a Norman font inside. This area is the site of the Battle of Braddock Down; a hard fought battle of the civil war which took place on the 19th January 1643. It was a crushing defeat for the parliamentarian army where many souls were lost. It is the site of the Cromwellian Defeat in fact. Braddock (or Broadoak) village itself is a civil parish in Cornwall which is situated about seven miles west of Liskard and five miles south-east of Bodmin. it is rural in character and is well wooded, especially in the north. The earliest parts of the church are Norman but an asle and a tower were added in the 15th century. The font is Norman and there are many good examples of woodcarvings in the church. Obviously it was the dead of night so unable to get in and see for our selves.

There are stories abound here of various manifestations in the churchyard and nearby fields, roaming vampires and connections to the werewolf tales at the Valley of the Rocks. and so we were here to investigate further; to see if there were any truths in the tales.

Although nothing untoward shows in the photos one does get a sense of the desolation & atmosphere here; amazed that anything came out at all…

It was very dark and challenging to film and the sense of forboding and negative energies felt by most of our party is very hard to convey on film, but one can hear the reactions of our party as we venture around the church, especially when we all heard the deep growling warning noise emanating from out of the darkness. One does get a sense of the darkness and desolation of the area too; both of physical and of a metaphysical darkness as the link below treis to convey….

Again not much on film but a very interesting experience at Bradock Church in Cornwall

HAUNTED BRADOCK CHURCH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock,_Cornwallmystery

 

the moors

We loved Devon & Cornwall, the peace, the beauty, the many tales and of course the truths…”

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017 “The Keeper of Scrolls”

QUEST NUMBER NINETEEN: SHROPSHIRE AND WALES

  • St Peter’s Church: Clee Hill Shropshire
  • St Peter’s Church: Ludlow Shropshire
  • The Space Guard Centre: Knighton Wales
  • St Edwards Church: Knighton Wales
  • St Georges Church: Clun Shropshire
  • The Great Tower of Clun: Craven Arms Shropshire
  • St John the Baptist Church: Bishops Castle  Shropshire

 

Stunning views from Clee Hill – click on each photo to expand

St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill, Shropshire:  It was a beautiful sunny day in Febuary, when after a journey of some three hours from Cambridge, with the road winding ever higher and higher upwards, we arived in the village of Clee Hill  in Shropshire. Clee Hill is also the name given to the imposing hill itself of which the village sits atop of.  The village lies on the slope of  Titterstone Clee Hill and lying between 340 metres (1,120 ft) and 380 metres (1,250 ft) above sea level, this is one of the highest settlements in the country.

St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill <click on each photo to expand>

A beautiful and very scenic part of the country where sheep can roam freely and the views across the mountains are astounding. A wild energetic place indeed; the earth energies here are very powerful due to the pyramid placement within the land; another site where the hidden royal bloodlines of this country can be discovered.

The Alpha and Omega with a tapestry of the last supper from behind the altar

This church sits atop of the magnificent Clee Hill, which features both on the Mappa Mundi and in Brother Cadfael. St Peter’s is known to have a freindly, hard working congregation with good community links. I was unable to find out much about the actual history of this tiny church but there is a tale that if one runs round St Peter’s Church, three times, at midnight, then knock on the door, a spirit is supposed to come out and snatch you in. Please watch the video below for a few more insights on the church and its history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clee_Hills

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleehill

The bloodline ancestor discovered here is that of Thomas de Nevill, who was a resident of the parish and one of the Kings trusted freinds. Those who have been following our quests will have already picked up on the important connections between the Neville family and  to ‘The Crown‘ itself.

Click on the link below to take a tour around St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill with us with its plethera of Masonic influenence and symbolism. Also included is St Peter’s Church, Ludlow representing the Dome on the Rock and the connection between Heaven & Earth and  St Edwards Church Knighton, with it’s significant Victorian artworks.

ST PETERS CHURCH: CLEE HILL, ST PETERS CHURCH: LUDLOW, ST EDWARDS CHIRCH: LUDLOW

 

Bloodline connection:

  • Thomas de Nevill; ancestor to Alek was a resident of the parish

St Peter’s Church, Ludlow Shropshire: Our next stop on this glorious day was to the charming old town of Ludlow. This ancient market town is a truly stunning place to visit, a very vibrant town with lots of energy and some fantastic old buildings, including a castle and the one time home of Katherine of Aragon. The town is steeped in history, especially medieval with much written about it. On the day we were there it was a very busy market day and the town, even in February, was abustle with people.

Ludlow looking stunning in the sunshine;  the timbered building (1 & 4) was once home to Katharine of Aragon <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow

St Peter’s Church Ludlow, representing ‘The Dome on the Rock’

St Peter’s Church is a modern Catholic church, established in 1935 and built to represent the ‘Dome on the Rock’. The style of the building is stunning and designed by an Italian architect, which is very evident to the eye; the colour of the inside of the dome is amazing in a deep, deep blue. There are some beautiful artworks around the church including a ‘chiro’ with the ‘alpha’ and ‘omega’ symbols on either side, which as we know are Templar Symbols. The church is Romanesque in structure with the dome signifying heaven and earth united in praise of god. Despite the style and magnificence of the building, most of the work was carried out by local craftsmen, with it’s grey stone being extracted from Oreton Quarry at Farlow, Clee Hill, where we were only minutes previously.

http://cornmill.freeshell.org/stpetersludlow/tour.pdf

Church artworks showing the chiro, alpha and omega and the true stigmata of ‘the Jesus’ and above the ‘Dome’ next to the beautiful wndow depiction of Mary and the child.

Bloodline Connection:

  • Richard Neville and ancestor of Alek b. 1400 and The Earl of Salisbury was a resident of Ludlow

The Space Guard Centre, Knighton Wales: The day could not have got any better as we drove up and up and up, almost it seemed to the top of the world, where the views across the unspoilt valleys made one assume that one was the only person left alive in the whole world….

Magnificent views from the Space Guard Centre in Wales; click on photo to expand for full view and click on link below.

THE SPACEGUARD CENTRE: KNIGHTON

The Space Guard Centre is for tracking near earth objects, such as comets, meteorites and any object that could potentially harm the planet in the future. Of particular interest is that the centre is currently installing the large telescope that used to be housed in the observatory in Cambridge. The telescope is og no longer use here in Cambridge due to the ammount of light polution that obscurs all views of the skies; not such problen at all at the new site. It has taken many years of dedication, planning and hard work to dismantle it, transport it and then to build a new home for it, before installing it at one of the loftiest sites in the UK! The work has nearly been completed and all by volunteers, as sadly and shockingly no government funding for this important project has ever been forthcoming….

With the new telescope installed there will be three fully functioning telescopes at the centre

If you are in the area it is a fascinating site to visit, for the stunning views alone and the energies too, which  due to various obvious reasons, are amazing!

https://spaceguardcentre.com/

As one drives up to the entrance of the Space Guard Centre, one can almost miss, in the wilderness on the left-hand side, the beautiful stone circle dedicated to the goddess Dianna.

The Stone circle dedicated to Dianna

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=15302

St Edwards Church at Knighton Wales: Still in Knighton; slightly lower down and ten minutes ride from the space centre, this old church is situated in a beautifully scenic area and does have a few unusual items within it.

St Edward’s Church at Knighton set amidst a scenic backdrop

This present church is probably the fourth church on the site; there is vague reference to a Saxon Church, circa 990 and certainly a Norman Church, circa 1160 and the base of the tower still retains Norman workmanship. In 1752 the Norman church was in such a perilous state of repair that it was completely demolished, so apart from the tower, a new church and chancel were thus built. There were many reports of the new church building works recorded in local publications at the time. Sadly the old font was replaced at the time of the complete rebuilding in 1877 and the old font was buried in a neighboring field. However in 1911, it was removed and and put in the care of the Rev. D. Edmund Owen, rector of Llandingad Carmarthenshire. This ancient font is octagonal in shape and can now be found in Llanelwedd churchyard, Poowys, although it would be nice if it could find it’s way back home. If an old font could not be relocated in another church, it was buried; this was to ensure that the font would not be available for any use apart from baptism after its removal. See our video below to take a tour around the church.

The interior of St Edward’s showing some beautiful windows and the painting mentioned in the video

The bloodline relative associated with this church is Walter Neville who sadly died quite young at age 32 years, but he was very prominent in the area and was involved in trade with Russia and a lovely painting that was probably part of his trading hangs just near the entrance. There are some unusual and interesting interesting Victorian painted artworks and other items here with some significant symbology attached.

 

Bloodline Connection:

  • Walter Neville (anceestor of Alek) 1869 – 1901, died at age 32 years; once again indicating the significance of the Neville Family.

 

St George’s Church, Clun Shropshire: Although not on our list and definitely not scheduled for us to visit today; this church is certainly worth a mention here. If we had not been magically directed to St Georges, we would not have been in the right place and the right time afterwards, to be able to see our next, seemingly elusive port of call peering at us in the distance between the hedges and back gardens of a local country lane. As said it was not connected to the research but deserves a few photos here…

St George’s Church, Clun

http://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/69/

Although not on our list to visit we did interestingly discover a ‘Parry’ on the regimental memorial board  <click on images to expand and view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clun

The Great Tower of Clun, Craven Arms Shropshire:  Upon leaving the church above we were resigned to not finding the derelict chapel of St John the Baptist Chapel at Clun, yet were momentarily diverted along a quiet country road aside the church. Upon turning around to journey in another direction i momentarily glimpsed the shape of a ruin from the car window, looming above the distant roof tops! So trusting in our instincts and following the road, we amazingly (or not) found ourselves where we needed to be!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clun_Castle

We approached Clun Castle in the rapidly gathering twilight and it certainly afforded us a formidable view. Set high up on a high hillside overlooking the spreading land below; it proved quite a trek to walk up some steep slippery slopes to gain access, although afterwards we did spy a slightly speedier route.

Approaching Clun Castle in the gathering twilight  <click to expand photos> Information depicting the castle’s history showing the ancestory line, and part of our quests, of the ‘Fitzalans’, another piece of the puzzle

Amazing as these things are; there upon the information board just outside the castle entrance, the name of ‘Fitzalans’ is placed very prominitely within the castle history and also very meaningfully within the bloodline of our head researcher Alek’s family line, testifying that we certainly did not find this place by accident. Family names over the years change and evolve, which one must always bear in mind when doing historical family recearch. As we soon saw for ourselves though the Chapel of St John the Baptist no longer exists there and has dissapeared under the ravages of time; one could take a guess though and summise where it would have stood, on the flat ground, just outside the main keep of the castle.

History of Clun Castle: Clun Castle is thought to have been built by Picot de Say in the years following the Norman invasion to dominate a former Saxon village and to help sustain Norman rule in the troublesome border area (known as the Marches). In this latter role it was well placed to control movement on the Clun-Clee Ridgeway, a historic trading route in and out of Wales. Constructed to a traditional motte and bailey design it started as an earthwork and timber castle and had two baileys.

As a border outpost Clun Castle inevitably suffered as the fortunes of the Welsh ebbed and flowed. It was attacked and burnt to ashes in 1196 by Prince Rhys of South Wales. Rebuilt or repaired it was attacked again in 1214 by Prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great). It was these attacks that probably led to the rebuilding of the castle in stone and this prompted another attack, again by Prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, in 1234. In this instance the castle withstood the siege but the associated town was destroyed by the attackers.

Clun Castle and it’s views

The castle was seized by John Fitzalan from the custody of King John in 1215. In 1233 the castle was garrisoned by the household troops of King Henry III as the loyalty of John Fitzalan was ‘suspect’. Late that year the royal garrison successfully withstood a Welsh onslaught led by Prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, although the attackers did succeed in reducing the town to ashes. During a period of minority the castle was held by a father-in-law of one of the several generations of John Fitzalans, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore Castle.

Edward I’s conquest of Wales in the late 1270s/early 1280s meant the requirement for the castle as a border stronghold significantly diminished. Accordingly building priorities changed from defence to comfort and in 1292 Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel, built the Great Tower to provide luxury accommodation most probably for hunting parties who made use of the nearby forest of Clun. By the start of the fifteenth century it was used exclusively as a hunting lodge but was hastily re-fortified during the Owain Glyn Dŵr  rebellion of 1400-14. Thereafter it reverted to disuse with a writer in 1539 describing the castle as ruinous. Even though it had played no part in the Civil War, Clun Castle was slighted in 1646 on the orders of Parliament.

Clun Castle looking stunning as dusk settles

The Fitzalans abandoned Clun Castle to focus their attention and wealth on the more impressive Arundel Castle in Sothern England. Consequently, Clun Castle fell into ruin. Although Owain Glyndwr attacked the castle in the early 1400’s, it was no longer the formidable foe it would have been two centuries earlier. After Glyndwr’s assault, the castle vanishes from historical records. The castle was in ruins by the time of the English Civil War of 1642 and never saw action.

Bloodline Connection:

  • Edmund Neville born 11th June 1887 of Craven Arms, Shropshire and  an ancestor of Alek
  • The Fitzalan family and ancestors of Alek, were of great prominence and importance here as history tells

St John the Baptist Church, Bishops Castle Shropshire: It was very late and dark by now when we arrived here, so as expected no entry was gained and it was too dark for filming. However we did take a stroll around the perimiter of the church and managed a few photos too 🙂 The church itself is a grade 2 listed building which has a Mediaeval tower mostly rebuilt in C17, rest of 1860 by T Nicholson of Hereford. It has a coursed limestone rubble tower with ashlar dressings and pyramidal slate cap; the rest is of squared and coursed limestone with ashlar dressings, and slate roof with ridge cresting. As the photos show it has a squat square Gothic survival West tower and if we were able to see inside, we would see that the gothic theme continues there too. The church is very unusual in the fact that it still has one of England’s oldest clocks with only one hand, from a time when time ‘down to the minute’ was less important.

St John the Baptist Church and visitors looking atmospheric at night

On these quests we are very much aware that many churches, especially the ones that we are researching, have secret vaults or hidden chambers underneath their floors and sometimes ‘other’ very hidden features too. In March 2010 it was recorded that a hidden chamber had been discovered underneath St John the Baptist Church in Bishops Castle, said to contain sixteen coffins. An inscription on one bears the name Byne Oakeley, with the date 1825. It is believed the bodies in the coffins are all members of the Oakeley family, an important and well-thought of family in the area at the time. It is said that the burial vault was hidden for 150 years.

Architects were called in after the partial collapse of the unknown chamber below the floor which led to the discovery of the burial vault. Work was begun to make the church safe but experts said at the time that further investigations by structural engineers and architects were needed. Stephen Lowick, a member of the parochial church council, said: “The architect and a structural engineer will come to the church and will open up the vault again for them to have a look at how bad the structural problems are and at the same time we will seek to identify the other coffins.”

James Wade, of Shrewsbury-based architects Arrol and Snell Ltd, said the original church was believed to have burned down and been rebuilt in 1859. Protected by the vault, the coffins survived the flames. “Nobody knows a lot about the older church but we are guessing that it was part and parcel of the chancel of the older church,” he said, adding that vaults were not unusual in churches. “People wanted to be buried in the church, there was a feeling that to be buried in the church was a good thing and it was the privilege of those who could afford it,” he added.

Fascinating and interesting stuff indeed; it would have been great to discover more one way or the other but as we could not get it, it was not meant to be…

Bishop’s Castle, Shropshire:  This is a small market town in the southwest of Shropshire England and formerly its smallest borough. According to the 2011 Census it had a population of 1,893. It is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) east of the borderlands between England and Wales, about 20 miles (30 km) north-west of Ludlow and about 20 miles (30 km) south-west of Shrewsbury. The town is within an agricultural area and has also become known for its alternative community including artists, musicians, writers and craftspeople. The surrounding area is hillwalking country and Bishop’s Castle is a “Walkers are Welcome Town”. The long distance footpath the Shropshire Way runs through the town and the well known Offa’s Dyke is only a few miles to the west. The ancient trackway of the Kerry Ridgeway, a prehistoric Bronze Age route, runs from the town. The BC Ring, a 60-mile (100 km) challenging route around the town, was published in 2008. The town has two micro breweries, including the Three Tuns, the UK’s oldest brewery. Befire embarking upon our return journey we had a very tasty meal in the Boars Head in the village.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop’s_Castle

Bloodline Connection:

  • Henry Neville of Bishops Castle b 18th August 1886 and again an ancestor of our lead researcher Alek

Conclusions: The Neville Family, often known in history as the power behind the throne have proved to be leading and prominent people in these areas of Wales and Shropshire, holding both important roles within the community with established historical connections to the crown. But who really are ‘The Nevilles’ and how and why did they rise to such prominence? All will surely be revealed in the conclusions of time…..

If you are interested in joining The Priory or joining our Quest please leave a message here in the comments section

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

The Keeper of Scrolls

February 2017

 

Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day One: Found us in a mood of anticiption as we traveled from East Anglia to the mythical lands of North Wales for what would turn out to be a vey busy, informative and exciting quest. Traveling with caravan in toe to our chosen base for the duration of this quest; Rhualt Country Park, we soon pitched up and made home  Night-time fell and with the long journey ended, we were soon the next day, amidst deserted beaches and snow capped peaks. What a wonderful way to welcome in the new Gregorian year. This quest turned out to be an absolute delight for all of us, yet was more more of a fact finding historical quest than the others; no ghost hunting, no unexplained mysteries, no dog walking entitties and certainly no headless horsemen! We were here to unravel the mysteries of the untold royal bloodlines…

Day Two: 13th January 2017

  • St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli
  • St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog

St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli: The first stop of day two, the first real questing day, found us at St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli. It was quite a journey to arrive there; it is along the Llyn Penisular and the seas on both side and elsewhere on this journey were truly manificent to behold. The town was given its charter as a borough by Edward the Black Prince, in 1355 and a market is still held each Wednesday in the centre of the town on ‘Y Maes’ (“the field” or “the town square” in English). The town grew around the  shipbuilding and fishing industries and the granite quarry Gimlet Rock. (Carreg yr Imbill). During the 1890s, the town was developed by Solomon Andrews, a Cardiff businessman. This work included the Promenade, roads and houses at West End. A tramway was built linking the town to Llanbedro; the trams ran until 1927 when the section of track between Carreg-y-Defaid and Tyddyn-Caled was seriously damaged by a storm.

Inside St Peter’s Church (click on images to enlarge)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pwllheli

There has been a church on the site serving the peoples of the parish since ancient times; right back as far as the 6th century although not always on the same site. The first church was built by St Beuno or his disciples about half a mile north of this present site and the old cemetry still remains on ths spot. Like all churches many changes came and went over the years and in 1834 a new church was built on the present site and thus the old St Beuno’s Church became St Peter’s Church. It is built in the early decorated gothic style from local granite and from yellow felstone on the outer walls. It is interesting to note that the local landscape and building materials really do give these old churches their own very unique and distnctive flavour; they seems to nestle into the landscape without any effort at all.

  • Bloodline connections:  Gwen Wynn, Alek’s 10 x Great Grandmother who was born here in 1560. Gwen Wynn married Richard Perry and thus a great feud began between the Wynns, the Perry’s and the Nevilles…

St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog: Llanbedrog is a stunning coastal village in North Wales,  situated on the south side  of the Llyn penisulay of Gwynedd, between Pwllheli and Abersoch.  Formerly in the county of Caernarfonshire, it has a population of 1,020, reducing slightly to 1,002 at the 2011 Census. The village takes its name from Saint Petroc, a 6th-century Celtic saint. Petroc may be a form of the name Patrick, but Saint Petroc should not be confused with Saint Patrick. Saint Petrog’s church is a grade II* listed building. South of the village is the headland and open area of Mynyyd Tir-y-cwmwd. Granite quarrying was commercially important in the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The quarry closed down in 1949.

Pretty views of St Pedrogs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanbedrog

The day we visited we were the only visitors at this small but stunning church and we were privy to our very own private bell ringing session with warm thanks to a great guy; Malcolm. Yet also worth a very big mention; we were very fortunate to gain access at all as the church would have been closed to us, but we happened to bump into the vicar whilst at the previous church (St Peter’s) who performed some vicarly magic for us – and lo and behold, we had entry! The church of St. Pedrog was probably established sometime in the 5th century; when St. Pedrog landed and he set up a community here. The original founding of the Church was probably built of wattle and daub. He died in 564 and his ministry predates St. Augustine, who died in 597. The link below is well worth a read as another link to one or our bloodline families (the Parrys) can be discovered in connection to the bells here.

http://www.llanbedrog.info/llanbedrogstpedrognotes.htm

Inside St Pedrogs; the close of of the window is worth a look at for the KT symbolosm – click on to enlarge

The beach; a short walk away and delightfully empty in winter, was so beautiful and totally deserted and interestingly we did find a rather unusual ‘mystery’ object on the beach…

mystery-object

  • Bloodline connection: The Neville line which also connects to Scotland, Ireland and to the Knights Templar.
  • The Parry line too were very important in respect of the very fine bells here.

Follow the link for the video of our trip and discover the secrets of bell ringing

ST PETER’S CHURCH PWLLHELI & ST PEDROG’S CHURCH LLANBEDROG.

Day Three: 14th January 2017

  • St Giles Church: Wrexham
  • St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen
  • St Peters Church: Ruthin

St Giles Church: Wrexham: Wrexham is very large town in North Wales with a lot of history connected to its past; the town lies between the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley on the borders of England. Human activity in the Wrexham area dates back to the Mesolithic period (8000 to 4300 BC) By the early Middle Bronze Age the area had developed into a centre for an innovative metalworking industry. A Roman civilian settlement was located in the Plas Coch area of Wrexham and excavations have revealed evidence of agriculture and trade with the wider Roman world. By the end of the 6th century AD, the area was being contested between the Celtic-speaking inhabitants and the English-speaking invaders advancing from the east. The Anglo-Saxons went on to dominate north-east Wales from the 8th to 10th centuries and the settlement of Wrexham was likely founded by Mercian colonists on the flat ground above the meadows of the River Gwenfro during the 8th century. The origins of the name “Wrexham” may possibly be traced back to this period.

Views from outside St Giles Church, showing the very ancinet carvings; <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrexham

St Giles’ Church: is the parish church of Wrexham and is a Grade 1 listed building, described by Simon Jenkins as “the glory of the Marches”. At 180-feet long, it is the largest mediaeval Parish Church in Wales. Since 2012, its interior has been re-ordered to include a remodelling of the Chancel as St David’s Chapel, and its north aisle is the home of the regimental chapel of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (now part of the Royal Welsh). The core of present building dates from the 14th century, although it was extensively remodelled in the later 15th century by Thomas, Lord Stanley and his wife Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Giles%27_Church,_Wrexham

The stunning interior structure of St Giles, Wrexham

We were here to pull together some more of the threads on our search for the true royal bloodlines and the hidden histories of these Celtic Lands. One again we found a strong connection to the Neville line; a beautifully stunning shield (Alek’s family shield) hangs up inside the church that will testify to this fact. Photos are on this webpage but we were not able to film inside; however the stunning shots that we do have prove the Templar connection beyond any doubt.

Some of the amazing and symbolic artwork in St Gile’s Church; including a stunning example of the Neville Family Crest