Tag Archive: The Quests


‘Our Grail Quest Continues, seeking out the places in these lands that were important to ‘Arthur’ and ‘Lancelot’; following in their footsteps and knowing them and their journeys too…’

QUEST 31: Travelling around the beautiful lands of the south-west was amazing and was everything we had hoped it would be, despite the very intense heat, and being so thankful for air conditioning in the car, our quest was a triumph where much knowledge was assimilated and new places explored. All the apartments stayed in whilst journying had been more than up to scratch and the places visited and knowledge gained has been second to non. As said before, our quests are all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time; past, present and future becoming one as knowledge gainrd becomes personal power…

DAY ONE: FRIDAY 31ST JULY: CIRENCESTER:  With the boundaries of Cambridge left miles behind us, we escaped to the first destination of our quest; the tranquill beauty of Cirencester, a market town in Gloucestershire, 80 miles west of London. Cirencester lies on the  River Churn, a tributary of the Thames, and is the largest town in the Cotswolds. The Roman name for the town was Corinium which is thought to have been associated with the ancient British tribe of the Dobunni, having the same root word as the River Church. The earliest known reference to the town was by Ptolemy in AD 150. I had never been to Cirencester before and it was much prettier and older than i was expecting, and had a most definite ‘Roman’ feel to it, and the ‘energies’ there reminded me of Autun in France.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirencester

 

The Roman town of Corinium, now known as Cirencester <click to enlarge>

“FOUND HIS HEART IN JOHN”

CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST:  Sadly closed due to the virus; a situation that was to follow us around on this quest, we never the less did what we needed to do… The church is a medieval Church of England parish church, and is the largest in Gloucestershire.  Some parts date from the 12th century, though most is from the 15th and 16th centuries, of the perpendicular gothic style. The chancel is the oldest part of the church; construction starting around 1115. To the north of the chancel is St Catherines Chapel, which dates from around 1150 and contains a wall painting of St Christopher carrying the Christ child and vaulting given by Abbot John Hakebourne (whom liked to be simply called John), in 1508. The church was originally part of a monastery (Augustinian), founded here by Henry I in 1117, on the site of an earlier Saxon church replacing an ancient Roman settlement. Because of its size, grandeur and historical importance, the church is known, informally, as the Cathedral of the Cotswolds, and is constructed out of the local yellowish Cotswold limestone, which illuminates lovely in the sun.

Besides the tall tower, the exterior is also notable for the south porch, originally a separate, administration building, connected to the church in the 18th century. The church interior includes five chapels and an assortment of historical artefacts including a 14th century font, a 15th century pulpit, fragments of wall paintings, coats of arms, a collection of tombs and memorials, often very ornate, and the Anne Boleyn cup, given by Anne to a local doctor (Richard Master) who treated her, and presented to the church in 1561. Sadly non of these artifacts did we see due to the church being closed but we took some good exterior photos.

St John the Baptist Church Cirencester <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St._John_the_Baptist,_Cirencester

https://www.uksouthwest.net/gloucestershire/church-of-st-john-baptist-cirencester/

Grail Bloodline Connections:

UNDERSTOOD THE ROMAN CONNECTION’

THE ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE: Just a short drive from the main town centre is to be found the wonderful Roman Amphitheatre, which would become in time, the second largest in the UK. Archeological digs have uncovered earthworks revealing the outline of the construction, with the banking reaching 25 feet from the bottom of the arena. The arena itself is approximately 150 feet by 135 feet. Roman artefacts including coins and pottery have been discovered on the site. It is estimated that it was constructed towards the beginning of the 2nd century. The earthworks show evidence of tiered wooden seating, for around 8000 people, placed upon a terraces of stone, although a timber only structure may have existed before the 2nd century. There are two entrances, located at the North-Eastern and South-Western ends of the stadium. During the 5th century, when the Western Roman Empire was under attack and soldiers returned to Rome to defend it, the amphitheatre was fortified to defend against the invading Saxons. Unlike other amphitheatres, it is aligned in parallel to the streets of the town itself. It has also been referred to as the ‘Bull Ring’ due to the ‘sport’ of bull baiting taking place there; yet also ‘human sport’ would have taken place there too. It also has one or two other secrets hidden in plain sight within the arena itself; the Romans of course understanding completely the geo-magnetics of this site…

Corinium’s Amphitheatre <plese click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirencester_Amphitheatre

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/cirencester-amphitheatre/history/

‘See our video below for a trip to the Roman Amphitheatre’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKjdx036OHA

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • James Fordham: 1697 Ware Herts (9 x GGF) ‘Understood the Roman Connection’

So after a very long and busy day we had a lovely meal and coffee in Cirencester, using the (then) new phone scanning method of ordering and paying, before retiring to our very nice apartment for the night.

DAY TWO: SATURDAY 1ST AUGUST: BATH AND AVEBURY. Because of the restrictions of covid we had booked in a time slot for the Roman Baths in the beautiful Roman city of Bath which in many ways is not unlike Cambridge. Bath is the largest city in Somerset, known for and named after the Roman-built baths.  The city became a spa  known as Aquae Sulis (“the waters of Sul”) c. 60 AD when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although  hot springs were known even before then.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath,_Somerset

‘OF SECRET MEETINGS’

THE ROMAN BATHS: It was an extremly hot day and we were so greatful to be queing in the shade of the baths entrance, albeit only for a short while. Navigating the labyrinth of the baths proved to be very challenging due to covid distancing, and although it meant only a few people in any one space at any one time, it did mean movement around the baths was very slow. The baths are very well-preserved and certainly worth a visit. A temple was constructed on the site between 60-70CE in the first few decades of Roman Britain and its presence led to the development of the small Roman settlement known as Aquae Sulis, around the site. The Roman baths, designed for public bathing were used until the end of the Roman rule in Britain in the 5th Century CE. According to the Anglo Saxon Chronocle, the original Roman baths were in ruins a century later but the area around the natural springs was redeveloped several times during the Early and Late Middle Ages. Although i have visited the Roman Baths before, they never cease to amaze me and I wondered upon, what meetings and social occasions must have been held here; many a secret assignations too… Some even say that this was the place where secret meetings were held with King Henry VI himself, in the year 1459 – what were these meetings about i wonder. A hot sacred spring fed from below ground, the Penyquick fault, where ‘fault lines’ hold their own secrets too, looked very inviting…. This was also a place of worship by the Celts, so always sacred and special throughout the years.

The amazing Roman Baths, where new bathing areas are still being discovered were a place of social activity and shall we say ‘fun’ and where a hot spring bubbles up an from underground fault <please click on an image to enlarge>

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Baths_(Bath)

https://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS: Barron George Neville: 1440 Aberganveny (14 xGGF) ‘Of secret meetings’

“A MEETING HELD IN SECRET”   “A SECRET TO TELL”

BATH ABBEY & ST THOMAS CHURCH Both sites over time would have had many secrets to keep and maybe keen ears overhearing secrets whispered in the pews would have voved never to tell. One of these meetings held in secret at Bath Abbey was with a king with Jacobs Ladder upon their lips, a meeting so to ‘enhance’ the Ladder, but sadly today due again to ‘Miss Rona’ and social distancing, entry into the Abbey was via a very long queue in sweltering sunshine, which was not possible to do. The abbey is a parish church of the Church of England and a former Benedictine monastery. It was founded in the 7th century and was reorganised in the 10th century and rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries; major restoration work was carried out by Sir George Gilbery Scott in the 1860s. It is one of the largest examples of Perpendicular Gothic Architecture in the West Country. Although we were unable to enter in we made notes of the important features of both ‘Jacobs Ladder’ and also the ‘Tree of Life’, both very significant on a Craft level, upon both sides of the entrance to the Abbey.

 

Bath Abbey showing ‘Jacobs Ladder’ and the ‘Tree of Life’ <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_Abbey

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS: Barron George Neville: 1440 Aberganveny (14 xGGF)A meetig held in secret’

Sadly in respect of St Thomas Church, tucked away on a quite hillside just outside the main centre of Bath (blink and you would miss it) in a very peaceful spot, we yet again found G-ds doors well and truly locked, so lovely exterior photos were all we could manage. St Thomas à Becket Church is a parish church of  Widcombe, Bath and is one of a number of churches named after Thomas Becket and a Grade II listed building. The church was built between 1490 and 1498 by John Cantlow, Prior of Bath Abbey and took the place of an older Norman church. However, there was a common tradition that a weaver was the founder of the church, and an escutcheon bearing a weaver’s shuttle can be seen on the outside of one of the north battlements of the tower. It is believed that there was originally a Saxon chapel on the site. The church was commonly called Old Widcombe Church and used to be the principal church of the parishes of Widcombe and Lyncombe. The Domesday survey of 1086 shows a small settlement around the church although no trace of it remains. the wardens of St Thomas’s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Thomas_%C3%A0_Becket_Church,_Widcombe

https://www.batharchives.co.uk/cemeteries/st-thomas-%C3%A0-becket-and-st-marks-widcombe

St Thomas Church where there are writtings hidden within this church <please click to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: 1518 Newton Somerset (12 x GGF) ‘A secret to tell’
  • St Thomas Beckett: Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162; murdered by followers of King Henry II in 1170

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Becket

‘UNDERSTOOD THE IMPORTANCE OF A COLLECTION’

AVEBURY STONE CIRCLE: Thought by many to have ‘pagan’ connections, this enigmatic site may in fact have other secrets to tell, other stories hidden firmly in time with similarities to other significant sites recently visited and connecting to our Craft Quests. Here at Avebury in the beautiful countryside of Wiltshire, important messages were given and recieved (for me), messages that will change my outlook for ever and will forever have far reaching effects (for me) in this physical world. Of course i had been to Avebury on a few occasions before for different reasons, but this time with fresh eyes wide open i saw a very different Avebury indeed, and those marvelous structures whispered a few secrets to me of past times, past ocurences and past peoples. Avebury Stone circle in Wiltshire, contains the largest megalithic stone circle in the world and is a place of many pilgrimages and rituals alike, for modern day pagans. Yet its history does not connect to the pagan world or pagan ways and is certainly not what it is commonly thought to be (even though many say its original purpose is unknown. It was constructed in a different time period than is usually thought; the following link is here for reference only, and the true history and purpose of the site is different than many previously think. It was a lovely day out and the structures were shimmering in the sunshine.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/avebury

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/avebury/

Avebury: modelled to be ‘The Stones of Time’ and created in 3,000 BC (5K years ago) <please click to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Sir John H. Fordam: 1423 Kelshal Hertfordshire 918 x GGF) ‘Understood the importance of a collection’

‘Watch our video of our Quest so far: the round up with lots of interesting facts’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdVNWRNvFnQ

“A day where more pieces of the Grail puzzle fell into place and a time and history previously thought known was scattered as ashes to the sands of time”

“The Keeper of Scrolls” September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

Next: Day three and four: On the Dartmoor trail…..

QUEST 29: MARCH 2020

It is always so exciting to go on a surprise quest and Quest 29 into Suffolk was most certainly that! It was March 29th and a gorgeous springtime day, a bit chilly but the sky was blue and clear; it was also just before ‘lockdown’ in the UK and so upon looking back i was doubly glad we were able to get out and about when we did. Suffolk is a beautiful area of East Anglia with many pretty, unspoilt villages and beautiful old churches too, with many surpises when it comes to our quests. The churches we visited were of course all Knight Templar related, all a part of, and with connections to our grail quest; the whole area being part of a large Roman encapement in its day.

  • All Saints Church Icklingham
  • Saint James Church Icklinham
  • All Saints Church Wordwell
  • Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish

 

All Saints Church Icklington: The church is set in a pretty landscaped area with wide views across the countryside. All Saints Church is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. It is of Norman and English Gothic architectural style built in the fourteenth century. The church stands in the highest point in the village, adjacent to the A1101 road between Mildenhall and Bury St Edmunds; this was formerly the ancient trackway of the Roman Empire, the Icknield Way, in 120AD. The church was almost completely rebuilt in the 14th century with a south porch added in the 15th century. Sadly the church has been unused for over 100 years, being declared redundant in the 1970s. The roof has been re-thatched in the traditional manner with the rest of the church being constructed in flint rubble with freestone dressing. Read more about the church below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints%27_Church,_Icklingham

The church has a wonderful feel to it when one enters, no surprise as Icklingham has a important connection to our previous quest to Autun in France. Obviously there was a huge Roman presence in Autun too, which you will know if you have read our previous quest, Icklingham would have been a pathway into East Anglia for the Romans. The whole area here was a very large Roman encampment with thousands and thousands of troops being present in 124 AD, reaching all the way up to Wordwell. It was not only an invasion, but a transformation of the whole area too.

 

The interior of All Saints Church Icklingham <click to enlarge>

There are some stunning medieval tyles on the floor, with very well peserved Templar Symbolism, some with ‘the flowers and the petals of life’ connecting to the Knight Templars, whom would certainly have used this church. We are looking at the year 1314 here, when Jaques de Molay was burnt at the stake; yet the Templars did flee from France to survive in other areas, and Icklingham was one such area where they recieved some kind of unofficial Sanctuary. The tiles on the floor are original and of course we did not walk on them, but they were amazing to see, one that caught our eye, had a great depth of detail on it, which can be seen in our video and photos.

 

The original floor tyles with Templar symbology

The church is still in an original, natural state and has not been ‘victorianised’ at all. It still has most of its original features from the thatched roof, the pulpit, the original spiral stairs (now leading nowhere) and even an old original wrought iron funeral cart with original wheels and spokes, still in working order. One can certainly imaging the pall-bearers pushing it along with its coffin on board, entering the service, with the noise of the iron wheels reverberating upon the stone floors, echoing throughout the chambers of the church. Nearby is a wonderful church organ by W. Howlett and Son, an item any musical person would simply love. Even though it could have done with a very good clean it did add to the ascetics of the church, rather than being of any functionality. The pews of course are original complete with by-gone graffitti, from a time when folks would have sat there in the church listening to the sermons of Reverend, one can well imagine bored tots sittng there and picking away at the wood. So much history here; so many stories to be told.

The recently thatched roof is beautifully crafted allowing straw to fall naturally to the ground, just as it would have all those many years ago. There is a fairly modern, yet lovely stained-glass window depicting two of the saints, with many theories abounding in the area as to who they actually are; our understanding is that they are James and Peter – James to the left and Peter to the right. Almost under the window is an original wooden built up pew, which one enters by a hinged and brackets door in order to be able to sit down, and with its high bible-rest in front, it is almost like being in the dock! The stone pulpit (or font) is also original and in good condition, save for a bit of wear and tear. We were unable to find the stone carvings we were interested in, neither on the inside or outside of the church, so sadly maybe they never survived the test of time. A very interesting church with lots of references to the Templars, the Roman Empire, but very importantly, let us not forget King Arthur himself. Our Templar history informs us that Lancelot Desposyni was in this area on his travels, journeying through the area, visiting St James Church. King Arthur and Lancelot, when one separates them from the ‘myths and legends‘, did not just travel to one area, they moved around, changing things, transforming things during the times that we know as the ‘Dark Ages’. An amazing church with many untold stories to tell…. This would have been the most ‘energetic’ church of the day.

DSC01193

Standing in front of the old funeral carts

See our video below to take a stroll inside the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH ICKLINGHAM

Saint James Church Icklinham: Sadly when we arrived at this church it appeared to be well and truly locked up and maybe closed for health and safety reasons , so just a quick write up with a few shots from outside. It looked a peaceful church on the outside with some important items for us to see inside, but in a fairly built up area and a shame it was closed.

 

 I am including a link which contains several photos of the interior of the church which we did not get to see: http://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/icklingj.html

In brief, it is a Medieval Church, which has been restored, in an area where there would have been a Roman encampment on land occupied by the Romans in 120 AD. It would have been a Knights Templar preceptory in times past, 1066-1539 AD, even more reason to have been able to go inside. The Knights Templars did exist beyond the burning at the stake of Jaques de Molay in 1314. The namesake of the church St James, was the first disciple of Jesus and the patron saint of Spain, he was sadly executed by sword in 44 AD at Judea, Jerusalem and importantly was linked to Lancelot of Valencia, Spain.

All Saints Church Wordwell: After going slightly off course through the countryside and down a small lane, to end up at a completely different church, we finally arrived at this still out of the way church at Wordwell. All Saints is a redundant Anglican church, it is recorded in the National Heritage list for England as a designated Grade 1 listed building and is under the care of the Churches Conversation Trust. It was established in 1129 AD, prior to a Roman Empire encapement. The present church is a tiny Norman church, restored in the Victorian period and containing some superb medieval and Norman carvings.

‘Wordwell’ is an interesting name, with various meanings just crying out for some further research. All Saints Church at Wordwell still has its original construction; it was established at the time of the Templars, being used frequently by the Knights of the area at the time, and further going forwards into the midpoint of the thirteen hundreds, it was used as Sanctuary for the Templars, as they fled from Europe during the time of their demise, thus the church has so much history attached to it.

The church had a very nice feel to it, good energies were present. There were some interesting windows; one showed a triskellian and upon looking closer a pyramid within a petaled flower, shown in the form of a triangular pyramid ascending within a petaled flower, which is unusual. At first gance this could be seen as very masonic, but one must ask, which came first, the chicken or the egg? As we have learnt previously, the Freemasons were formed after the Knights Templars, lest we forget.

The old original church organ, here in the church with its big square paddles, is now being used as a table for leaflets, but it looks like it may be in good working order. However nearby and just above the organ, is indeed the prize catch of this church in every way, shape or form, in the form of a wonderful oiginal wall carving, which could almost be mistaken for being Sumerian, in style, being very reminiscent of the clay tablets. The people shown in the carving are of quite a short build; the carving having been viewed differently by different people over time; some folks thinking it is of St Catherine or the other saints, but it is non of them; there being other reasons for it being what it is. What is interesting is that the figures are both male, not as in male and female as often thought. One figure is holding a ring which is being given to the other male, but not in a context of marriage, more of in a binding ceremony, a binding with G-d context. A very interesting find indeed, of which one does not often get to see in an English church in this day and age. One cannot help but wonder why it is there and the full story behind it.

The interior of the church, showing the very unusual carving <please click to enlarge>

Moving around, the wooden pews are all beautifully carved with animals and folaige, and have aged wonderfully over the years. The atmosphere of the church, its age and how it has been set out certainly brings to mind that famous Knight Templar painting entitled ‘The Acolade’. The scene here before us, is very reminiscent of that particular painting with the steps acending as the Templar comes forward, to bow and drop three times before reaching the altar (thrice the times). The church is very well looked after and has very well preserved tyles on the floor, with many Galic symbols represented. One can see represented in the tyles;  earth, air, fire and water, with the most important symbols being fire and water, (south and west)  (the water and the fire), which gives us ‘pure light’. We know from history that the south-western quadrant is always the most important; in Masonic terms a candidate is asked ‘Why did you leave the west to travel east?‘ and later on on ‘Why did you leave the east to travel west?‘ The response would be ‘In search of Light in Craft’, however when they reach the west they dont find the Light in Craft because then, in the west, the candidates are later on informed in their degrees (from the 42nd degree upwards), that they need to head south to find the Light in Craft. They have to then journey from the east to the west, and thence instructed to go south, (south-west), which is most important, as it is the ‘pure-light’ of the compass-points.

There are some interesting restored artworks on the other window with a cow emblem at the top, albeit a very intricate stylised design, but i saw it clearly, although some may not see it at all. Also there is the ‘fan-fare‘ wheel in the window and a ‘triklesite’ aspect to the right and to the left. On the high altar is a lovely red and gold altar cloth with some nice old guilding from around the 1900’s, probably replaced at some point, but lovely non the less. At the back of the altar on the wall carvings, one can see the ‘flowers of life’, being the daisy and the tulip, there are other schools of thought on this subject, but this is correct. There are some wonderful quotes upon the wall behind the altar, one in particular from Exodus, see the photo below for the full quote.

Truth and religion in the UK today, has become a very flexible subject and often open to many interpretations, yet for those whom profess to follow the faith and the path; it says very clearly here, that thou shall have non other gods but me, no other gods, apart from G-d; we know already that there are angels and djinn, but no other gods which is very important to not forget. For a small church there is a lot going on here, a lot of history; this church being on a par I noticed, with the one we visited in Mepal recently on our Fenland Quest, the same level and size etc. Much to take away with us from this visit, much to pause and think about. This was probably the best church of the day from a conservation viewpoint, the most enigmatic church.

See our video below to take a stroll around the church:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH WORDWELL

Saint Mary the Virgin Church Cavendish: This was the last church of the day, in the pretty village of Cavandish. St Mary the Virgin Chirch is a grade 1 listed parish church in  Cavandish, Suffolk. It was built in the 1300’s, thus only 700 years old, yet built on much earlier foundations over earlier buildings, earlier temples etc. This church is mostly 14th-century, with building dating from about 1300 to about 1485, with some 19th-century additions and alterations. The oldest parts of the church, dating from about 1300, are the Tower, the Porch and the lower parts of the walls of the aisles. In 1350 the South aisle walls were rebuilt to their present height and new windows were inserted. The exterior of the church is dressed in flint, as are many of the churches and buildings of the area. While we were there extensive renovations were being carried out and much of the church, including the tower were hidden under scaffolding; we were lucky it was actually open to us. Some beautiful artworks are in the church and although it has been modernised over its 700 years of time, this does not distract from its interest and it is kept beautifully clean and tidy. What we noticed straight away upon entering, was the baptismal roles for folks of the area on the wall, showing a Lynne Clarke baptised in 1964, (so could be still alive). Clarke is one of the blood-lines we are tracing, so an interesting find, and on another listing , on the roll of honour from the Cypress Regiment dated 1956, a Cuthbert H. Clark, so maybe her grandfather?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary_the_Virgin%27s_Church,_Cavendishhttp://www.suffolkchurches.co.uk/cavendish.htm

The Knights Templar had a preceptory here in Cavandish from 1308-1312, just before the demise of the Templars;  just before the Papal Bull was released from Rome, but they were here for only  a short period of time. The reason being is that they would have been in transit and moving artifacts along ‘upstream’ as it were, up through the country. The church would have been used as a holding place for the movement of treasures and various artifacts.

The church contains an amazingly beautiful piece of carved artwork showing the Knight Templar ‘two swords’ with an inverted challace; the pyramid, the ship, the sea, the ocean are all included.  ‘Pure Light‘ as mentioned before is represented here by the sword (fire) in the water. (Fire in the Water to make Pure Light) The ‘Jesus’ here has sadly lost a finger but would have been showing the ‘Ninasian Salute‘ (the salute of Ninasu)

There is so much Templar symbolism to be discovered in the above artwork <click to see in detail>

There is a small Lady Chapel area to the left hand side, with curtains above its altar, and interestingly, nothing at all behind them which is unusual as normally the curtains are open with a painting or something on display. A window on the right-hand side of the church contains many clues and symbolism to the fact that the knights were indeed here; non more so than the red cross of the Nevilles (our main research blood-line) with the rose in the middle of the Neville cross clearly defined. The window also shows the ‘Flower of Life‘ and moving upwards we see the ‘Lamb of God’ (Agnus Dei), all beautifully depicted, and very much of standard Knight Templar symbolism.  However on moving across to the next panel, we see imagery that is far removed from standard, in the form of what appears to be a bull with wings, amazingly depicted. We also have the cow, the ram and the stag symbolised here in the window, with interestingly a symbolic circle reference to the ‘Fisher King’, which on closer inspection could be a shell, again referencing The Fisher King. In the earlier writings of the Fisher King ‘the winged animals’ are referenced, but suprisingly, not the infamous unicorn of myth and legend as one would expect. Also adjacent on another window we can clearly see the Chi-Rho, a ‘star’ which we are now refering to as ‘The Pyramid of Intergration’, a translation from an earlier language; this symbol has had many names over the years, and is probably best known as ‘The Star of David’, which is not relevant here; also shown is the ‘IHS’ symbol. Moving down the window one can see various other symbols, such as ‘The Jesus’ showing the Ninasian Salute, and also shown with his hands ‘open to all’. At the side of the altar, behind blue curtains, just in front of the vestry, are to be found some very historic paintings, portraits and photographs upon the walls, some of the choir, some of old scenes from outside the church.

The windows contains a language of symbols relating to the Knights Templars and the true history of this earthly plane – just waiting to be de-coded! <click to enlarge>

See our link below to take a stroll around the church:

ST MARY THE VIRGIN’S CHURCH CAVENDISH

Quest 30 in May 2020 would have been another exciting European trip but due to the outbreak of the corona virus, we have had to cancel and put everything on hold for a while. Hopefull in the spring of 2021 we can get on the road again, but in the meantime,watch this space, as they say!

 

acolade

The Acolade by Lord Leighton

The Knights of the Red Order

Author ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

April 17th 2020

 

 

THE GRAIL QUEST:

“Some sources say the Grail Bloodline came from Christ, but we of Craft know it to be much older, yet ‘the’ Jesus was still a carrier of the royal bloodline in this timeline. We have been taught in later degrees that the dynasty of kings whom descended from this royal bloodline were known as sorcerer-kings, some of whom hinted or even stated outright that they were in fact descendants of Lucifer. There is much speculation too of the royal/grail bloodline being connected to Cain/Samael/Lilith and Asmodeus; far too much to write about here but maybe for another day?  We can of course pause for some dot connections here; why sorcery? What is the connection to the Knights of the Round Table? What is the connection to the Templars? What is the connection to the Apostles? Could they all be one and the same; i.e. all have the same source?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY

30TH OCTOBER 2019

St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf, Germany: a dull, slightly wetter day today, but certainly not cold as we drove an hour from our digs, to reach St Nicholaus Church in a very quiet suburb of Dusseldorf; the capital and second-largest city of the most populous German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, after Cologne. The city lies in the centre of both the Rhine-Ruhr and the Rhineland Metropolitan Regions; most of the city lies on the right bank of the Rhine (as opposed to Cologne, whose city centre lies on the river’s left bank). “Dorf” means “village” in German  but of course these days Dussledorf is now a large city. There are strong Roman connections here, and thus to King Arthur, yet when the Roman Empire was strengthening its position throughout Europe, a few Germanic tribes clung on in marshy territory off the eastern banks of the Rhine. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the odd farming or fishing settlement could be found at the point where the small river Dussell flows into the Rhine. It was from such settlements that the city of Düsseldorf grew.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCsseldorf

St Nikolaus Church is a beautiful church and it was such a shame to find it locked, for it was the place of instruction for King Arthur, which is interesting for us and our quest; it is also the very same place where our head researcher’s grandfather recieved his instruction, for he was here in the area in relation to ‘religious’ reasons. A place of intruction too, in our current time frame, for holders of the quest/grail bloodline. So who know what treasures lie waiting inside but sadly the church was locked so those treasures inside were not for our eyes on this occasion, and we could find no telephone number to make contact with anyone.

This is an older-style church which has been here for the last 300 years, but obviously as we know with churches, built upon a much older and sacred site. There are some really nice Roman/Knights Templar connected artworks in the grounds of the church; a lovely peaceful feel to the site and a great shame we could not get inside. There is very little on the internet about this church, although it does have a facebook page, but more for social activities rather than history, so this church will remain an enigma…

The grounds and artworks at St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf <click on an image to expand>

St Nickolaus Church, Dusseldorf; last video on link

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur; his place of Instruction
  • Place of instruction also of our head researcher’s grandfather
  • Frotmund (Frotherius) link to the year 794 AD

Cologne Cathedral, Cologne, Germany: An approximately 50 minute drive bought us to the hustle and bustle of Cologne; one of Germany’s most well-know and much visited city. It is the largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth-most popolous city in Germany. With slightly over a million inhabitants (1.08 million) within its city boundaries. Cologne is the largest city on the Rhine and also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region.  Centered on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia’s capital of  Dusseldorf, where we had just driven from.

Cologne was founded and established in Ubii territory in the 1st century AD as the Roman Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, the first word of which is the origin of its name. An alternative Latin name of the settlement is Augusta Ubiorum, after the Ubii. “Cologne”, the French version of the city’s name, has become standard in English as well. Cologne functioned as the capital of the Roman province of  Germania Inferior and as the headquarters of the Roman military in the region until occupied by the Franks in 462. During the Middle Ages the city flourished as being located on one of the most important major trade routes between east and western Europe. Cologne was one of the leading members of the Hanseatic League and one of the largest cities north of the Alps in medieval and Renaissance times. Prior to World war two, the city had undergone several occupations by the French and also by the British (1918–1926). Cologne was one of the most heavily bombed cities in Germany during World War II, with the Royal Air Force (RAF) dropping 34,711 long tons (35,268 tonnes) of bombs on the city. The bombing reduced the population by 95%, mainly due to evacuation, and destroyed almost the entire city. With the intention of restoring as many historic buildings as possible, the successful postwar rebuilding has resulted in a very mixed and unique cityscape.

The hustle & bustle of Cologne with many styles of architecture

Cologne Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of St Peter: is a Catholic cathedral whch lies right in the heart of Cologne and it’s famous spires can be seen from right across the river and makes for a compelling sight. It was actually built upon a past Roman Temple and a Roman museum is nearby full of fascinating history and finds. It is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires. The towers for its two huge spires gives the cathedral the largest façade of any church in the world. Construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 but was halted in 1473, unfinished. Work did not restart until the 1840s, and the edifice was completed to its original Medieval plan in 1880.

When construction began on the present Cologne Cathedral in 1248,  the site had already been occupied by several previous structures. The earliest may have been for grain storage and possibly was succeeded by a Roman Temple built by Mercurius Augustus. From the 4th century on, the site was occupied by Christian buildings, including a square edifice known as the “oldest cathedral” commissioned by Maternus, the first bishop of Cologne. During excavations of the present cathedral, graves were discovered in the location of the oldest portion of the building; including that of a boy that was richly adorned with grave goods and another of a woman, popularly thought to be Wisigard. Both graves are thought to be from the 6th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cologne_Cathedral

Sadly there is no actual spirituality left at the cathedral, yet it is non the less a very splendid and impresive building, loved and visited by thousands. There is a bloodline connection here to King Marcomer 38-458, and there is much meaningful Templar symbology contained within this beautiful building.

Cologne Cathedral is full of beautiful & meaningful peices of art upon the floor and above… <click on an image to expand>

Grail Bloodline Conections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458 (51st GGF) born here, though a prior building.
  • King Arthur; the place of apprenticeship

St Paul’s Cathedral, Munster, Germany: With night-time almost upon us it was hit and miss whether we would make it to Munster on time to gain access to the cathedral as it was a two hour drive from Cologne, but made it we did by the skin of our teeth. The cathedral is a very imposing building set in a big square in the heart of the city and with festive lights sparking from the nearby shops, it cut quite an impresive sight. The name Munster is said to derive from Latin and Greek words meaning monastry and the building does indeed have a very monastry feeling to it. It is an independant city  in North Rhine-Westphalia,  Germany. It is in the northern part of the state and is considered to be the cultural centre of the Westphalia region. It is also capital of the local government region Munsterland and is today it is known as the bicycle capital of Germany. The city’s built-up area is quite extensive. There are no skyscrapers and few high-rise buildings but very many detached houses and mansions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster

Munster Cathedral; very impresive looking in the dark.

Münster Cathedral or St.-Paulus-Dom is the cathedral church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Munster in Germany, and is dedicated to St Paul. It is counted among the most significant church buildings in the city and along with the City Hall, is one of the symbols of the city. The cathedral stands in the heart of the city, on a small hill called Horsteberg, which is encircled by streets and the and the Munstersche Aa river. Today the cathedral is the parish church for this area. The cathedral had two predecessors. The first cathedral (called the Ludgerus Dom, 805-1377) stood to the north of the current cathedral; the second cathedral was built in the tenth or eleventh century and was demolished during the construction of the third and current cathedral between 1225 and 1264. The imposing westwek with its nearly identical towers was built as part of the second cathedral around 1192 and was incorporated into the current building. As a result, the cathedral is a mixture of styles, combining the Romanesque westwerk, old choir and west towers with the Gothic nave, transepts, high choir and ring of chapels.

Some rather nice artifacts inside the cathedral including the mechanical clock, that found us ‘stealing’ our photos of it, much to the disgruntlement of the cathedral ‘holy man’ and ‘jobsworth’!

As it was dark outside, there seemed to be a lovely warm glow inside the cathedral and there were one or two lovely items that needed closer examination but time and the lateness of hour were not in our favour. However it has to be said that both my brother and i objected to being hurried along in quite a ‘gruff’ fashion by one of the so called ‘holy men’; the priest ‘on duty’ there who was intent in getting us outside of the doors as quickly as possible for the ‘witching’ hour of 7pm was striking. We were at the door, having finished our historical research and just wanted to take a quick photo of the beautiful clock and its mechanism, just inside the door, but he was having non of it, making sure we knew they were now closed! So we just had to take the photos anyway. My brother and i are both ordained as priests and we were treated disrespectfully, but other than this it is no way to treat anyone whom has travelled from afar to visit a sacred building; ‘jobsworths’ are everywhere it seems and holy buildings are no exception, we were not expectng clergy to act like this. A lovely building yet sadly again with no spirituality.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster_Cathedral

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458, whom was educated here.
  • King Arthur

‘The Red Cross is the coded symbol used within the Grail teachings and you will see this symbol in many places around the globe’

X

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

 

“And so Quest 27 sadly draws to a close: Moors, sea & heaven, all spectacular and atop the moors in the sunshine, one could be forgiven for thinking that one was oh so near to heaven, for in reality one actually is. Dartmoor at times was wonderfully moody, wild and desolate and high, high up the rains merged into the clouds. Churches sat alone and serene on top of hilltops reached only by winding lanes. England at it’s best, and when safely tucked up for the night in our converted chapel acommadation, one can only give thanks for this life. Down upon the rocky shores life ebbs & flows with the tides; dreams come true and perceptions change as challenges to reality are met…”

“One is so near the clouds on the top of Dartmoor that one can really get a sense & feeling of being able to reach out & touch the firmament above. Today I felt so incredibly and wonderfully close to it. Reach out & touch the beauty before it is too late.”

Day Five: All Saints Church Okehamton: All too soon Sunday, our last day of this amazing and revealing quest was upon us: the weather was still gorgeous and so we intended to make the most of every moment and as we drove across beautiful moorland we could not help but to be in fine spirits.

Okehampton is a town and civil parish in West Devon and it is situated at the northen edge of Dartmoor with a population of 5,922 (2011 census). The town itself was founded by the Saxons; the earliest settlement on record being from 980 AD, known as ‘Ocmundtune’, meaning settlement by the Ockment, a river which runs through the town, which grew because of the medieval wool trade and there are some noteble buildings in the town. The oldest building is the castle which dates back to the Domesday Book and which was once the largest castle in Devon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okehampton

The church itself, up a hill at the edge of town is very secluded, peaceful and pretty and is almost set within a woodland setting and yet is still at the heart of its community. A Church has stood on this hill since Saxon times when the little hilltop village of Ocmundtune was closely grouped around its (probably wooden) Church and surrounded on all sides by dense forests. With the building of Okehampton Castle soon after 1066, present day Okehampton began to develop in the river valley and the little Saxon village was progressively abandoned. The church is a grade two listed building, mostly built in perpendicular style and rebuilt in 1842

https://tickets.twomoorsfestival.co.uk/sales/view-venues/all-saints-church-okehampton

 

Inside the very well-kept church is an array of symbolic artefacts relating to Craft and beyond as shown above: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

The stained-glass windows are also very stunning pieces of art showing much symbolism.

  • Blood line connection: Our lead researcher’s 10 x Great Grandfather, Sir George Clark 1509 – 1580. Born in Holland but registered later in Devon, having connections to Colyton with buisness in Okehampton.

“The oh so peaceful and gorgeous Devon countryside where one can literally hear a pin drop and one gets the reality of being truly in the clouds……”

St Andrews Church Moretonhamstead: We drove through some wonderful and practically isolated countryside where one could actually hear a pin drop, to reach Moretonhamstead (anciently Moreton Hampstead) a pretty market town, parish and ancient manor in Devon, situated on the north-eastern edge of Dartmoor, within the Dartmoor National Park. At the 2011 census the population of the parish was 1,703; the parish church is St Andrews.

The  Domesday Book of 1086 records the manor as ‘Mortone’; which derives from the Old English for a farmstead in moorland, referring to the town’s situation on the edge of Dartmoor. By 1493 ‘Hampstead’ had been added to the name which simply means “homestead”, The Oxford Names Companion (1991) speculates that this may be a family name, or a nearby place. The central region of Devon was occupied by the Saxons soon after 682 AD. It was divided into vast estates, and one of these divisions included all land within the boundaries of the rivers Teign and with Moreton as its major settlement.

Wool and (in later years) the manufacture of woollen cloth, formed the basis of the town’s economy for over 700 years. The economy was evidently healthy when Moreton Hampstead established a water-powered fulling mill before the end of the 13th century.Read more in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moretonhampstead

This grade one listed parish church is to be found at the eastern end of the town; it was originally built in 1418 and had heavy restorations in 1856 and 1905. It is quite spacious inside with some nice stained glass windows. It is in a rather lovely position overlooking the countryside as are many of the churches we visit. There’s something really special about a cemetry on a hillside with a wonderful view over the surrouding countryside; it can evoke all sorts of feelings and connections inside of one, but sadly, the sacred energies once attached to the church here long ago, are now departed…

St Andrews Church with an interesting plaque just inside the porch

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101334222-church-of-st-andrew-moretonhampstead#.XT3mJnt7l1s

Interia shots of the church showing some lovely stained glass with some close up detail: <please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

St Werburgh’s Church Wembury: This amazing 14th century church sits on the cliff edge overlooking the ocean and the enigmatic Mewstone and it really is the jewel in Devon’s crown.

“The Lifes that meets the sea in hidden and mystical Wembury”

Wembury is a village on the south coast of Devon, very close to Plymouth Sound, located south of Plymouth; it is also the name of the peninsular in which the village is situated. This is an area of outstanding natural beauty with a beautiful beach well known for surfing and rock pooling, and basking sharks can be seen in the summer near the Mewstone. The population of the electoral ward was 4,455 in the 2011 census. The name ‘Wembury’ may derive from a place name containing the name ‘Woden’ and noted by a John Mitchell Kemble that it was called ‘Wodnesbeorh’. Saxons colonised south-west Devon during the 7th century founding agricultural settlements in the area and the church is dedicated to the Saxon saint, Saint Werburgh. Of course it is a delight for holiday makers with it’s sandy beaches and crystal clear sea.

The mysterious triangular Mewstone, which is uncannily similar to the rock just off Tintagel, is very visable from the beach. In the past it was inhabited and has been a prison, a private home and a refuge for local smugglers. It’s most infamous resident was Sam Wakeman who avoided transportation to Australia in favour of the cheaper option of transportation to the Mewstone, where he was interned for seven years. After his internment on the island he remained there paying his rent by supplying rabbits for the Manor House table. It is said Sam Wakeman is responsible for carving the rough stone steps to the summit of the Mewstone. The artist Turner has painted the island several times, after sketching it during a sailing trip. However the island does have many secrets and not everything is as it would seem….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wembury

The church, standing as it does on the clifftop overlooking the sea and Mewstone is a firm favourite for couples getting wed.

Inside the church, which was built in the 14th century and visited by mesolithic man, is a stunning array of carvings, both stone and marble quite unlike anything i had seen before, ancient, unusual and intriging, including a rarely seen Serpent Goddess holding the ‘Staff of Wisdom’. She is surrounded by a representation of the angels, yet this time shown in their very dark guise; maybe showing their true selves? This brings to mind the phrase, of the angels masking themselves as demons and the demons as angels themselves within the Light and Dark of the world.

Also displayed in oils and gilt is the Neville shield (the Royal Crest), indicating the strong connection to our deepening bloodline quest. The shield always displays the unicorn and lion, but why, leaving much to think about upon the sphere of time. A genuine knights helmet is displayed up high; kind of hidden in plain sight really…  Also, yet again, another connection revealed here to Lancelot Desposyni, taking us deeper into our bloodline quest, with connection to our future quest in Europe, when we will follow in the footsteps of the Knights of the Round Table. The bible here is open on Romans 9:4, (G-d’s Soverign Choice) which if read may bring revelations to the reader…. There is mention too of the ‘Black Rod’ with further connections to Ely in Cambridgshire; much for the astute student to research and discover.

<please click on photo to enlarge and view in detail>

 

Watch the video below and find out so much more of the history of the church and surprisingly of its connection to Ely, our area and to see many of the wonderful carvings in real time (starts at 2.00)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qU5qmTaCRbs&t=1s

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni (our head researcher’s bloodline) was in this area, this place at around 562 AD, in respect of purpose and spirituality.

“I sat around, but was not found, I took a trip and did not fall,
I saw the moon, but not the sky. When time was tough, I reached up high.
A height in time and trip to thee. For in times telling the mystery.>
For seek to find, and trip to rule I saw the sun, with the sky and all”

 

And so sadly this quest 27, has drawn to a close with much to digest and many revelations swirling around like the tides upon the sands. Much then to take on board, but before we depart, why not chew the cud with us, with memories and thoughts of an amazing and wonderful time in Devon and Cornwall….

Devon & Cornwall: A Mythic Quest

Chewing the cud of a very mythic quest!

But time does certainly not stand still for these ‘Questers’, for in the blink of an eye we will be embarking on Quest 28 with a new name and a new look; all a part of our continued evolution on this earthly plane. Those of you with eyes peeled and ears open may have noticed our many references to King Arthur and his Knights (the true men/energies behind the myths). So we are off to Europe at the end of October to travel in the footsteps of those real knignts – please be with us and follow us all the way!

 

“The Keeper of Scrolls” August 2019

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

A day of following a trail to find a knight of renown and connecting to a Lady true. The trail took us to Tintagel, via Boscastle where words were spoken on the breeze to those whom could hear. Bloodlines and energy lines all finally making sense…

QUEST 27 CONTINUES…

Saturday had arrived and wonderfully we were still experiencing the most gorgeous of weather, made even the more enjoyable in the knowledge that it was very wet and cold back home, further north. This part of the quest, day four, took us to Clovelly, Boscastle and Tintagel.

All Saints Church Bideford, Clovelly: This pretty little secluded Norman church, not far from Clovelly village is set in a lovely wooded graveyard and on the day we arrived, bluebells and other springflowers were everywhere. It looked very magical. The church actually stands in the grounds of Clovelly Court, and is bounded by the Court’s walled garden. The church was begun in the 12th century on the site of an earlier timber building. The Norman church was a simple cruciform building, consisting of a nave, chancel, and transepts. As the population of Clovelly grew, more space was needed, and in the 14th century a north aisle was added.  The renovation may have been carried out by William Cary, lord of the manor, who received permission to make the church collegiate in 1387. Cary’s plan was to establish a college of 6 chaplains under a Warden, but the plans were never implemented, and All Saints remained a simple parish church.

 

Clovelly Church set in the grounds of Clovelly Court <please click on an image to enlarge>

https://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/clovelly.htm

Although there has been a church building at this site from 630 AD, in actual fact there has been a place of actual ‘gathering’ here from the early 500’s AD here. Lancelot Desposyni, who is our lead reseachers x 48 Great Grandfather and of the bloodline we are tracing on our quests, was here in this area around about 530 AD.

We have discovered that the Desposyni line links onto the Fordham line, and the Fordham line links onto the Clark line (with or without an E!). The Clarks and the Fordhams have had a very long association with each other; almost since the dawn of time! References to both lines and the Nevilles too can all be seen in this very church.

See our video for more detail & references, together with explanations on the meanings of church symbolism and so much more. (2nd clip on link at 17.56)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=227s

 

Some of the stunning windows that contain references to Lancelot, the Nevilles, the Fordams and to the Lamb of God (a riddle in itself) See much more in our video above…

Clovelly is a totally unspoilt fishing village in Devon that seems to be lost in time, with no cars or traffic of any kind allowed.  It is privately owened and there is a rather steep charge to enter the village, almost as steep as the way down into the village itself! So thus we did not enter…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clovelly

  • Bloodline connections: Lancelot Desposyni (from the Fordham line) Born 520 AD & our head researchers 48 x Great Grand Father)
  • Also references in All Saints Church to the Nevilles, the Clarkes and the Fordhams

Boscastle: For our quest, for Craft and research reasons, this pretty little coastal village and fishing port on the north coast of Cornwall was certainly on our agenda. But for obvious reasons there is a lot of falseness around, but if one can see past all the fake touristy consumer traps, it is a lovely little spot. In cornish the name means Kastel Boterel and it is part of the civil parish of Forrabury and Minister. Its harbour is a natural inlet protected by two stone harbour walls built in 1584 by Sir Richard Grenville and it is the only significant harbour for 20 miles along the coast.  The village extends up the valleys of the River Valency and the River Jorden. Heavy rainfall on 16 August 2004 caused extensive damage to the village and made all the headlines as water raged through the village in a torrent, washing away all in its path. It was a terrifying ordeal for all those who experienced it.

 

The very pretty albeit touristy village of Boscastle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boscastle

One cannot visit Boscastle without a visit to the infamous Musuem of Witchcraft which draws many folks to the area for a multitude of reasons. It is a strange place seemingly stuck firmly in an earthly time warp of a particular era and earthly perception. There were quite a lot of negative vibes there, but i was pleased to see a few items and symbols that alluded to Enochian and Templar magic and thus to ‘real’ Craft. It is difficult to know just how much of these ‘histories’ of old witchcraft and folk magic are actually real or not, or simply came into being at the time wicca was birthed and have been elaborated upon over the years since. Magic like any path should always evolve, as especially too should the practitioner and not get stuck within the realms of ‘myth and magic’.

 

An array of interesting items from the museum, some of which show a connection to Craft and Enochian magic.

After driving from Boscastle to Tintagel, it was time for a welcomed coffee before visiting King Arthur’s Hall; a site of an ancient and sacred underground spring, and thus we found ourselves in a quaint little cafe on the main street – just up our street in fact!

 

Tintagel: Tintagel or Trevena  (Cornish: Tre war Venydh meaning village on a mountain) is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall in England. The modern-day village of Tintagel was always known as Trevena until the Post Office started using ‘Tintagel’ as the name, in the mid-19th century. Until then, ‘Tintagel’ had been restricted to the name of the headland and of the parish. The population of the parish was 1,820 people (2001 census), but decreased to 1,727 at the 2011 census. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with and steeped in the legends of King Arthur. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers and tourists, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain. There are many literary and film associations with the village and like Boscastle it attracts more than its fair share of moden-day witches, pagans and role players whom simply fail to see the real truths right under their noses and their swishing capes…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintagel

King Arthur’s Hall: King Arthurs Hall at Trevena is a substantial building of the early 1930s. It was built for custard powder manufacturer F. T. Glasscock as the headquarters of the “Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table”, behind Trevena House. A variety of Cornish stones are used in the construction, and the 73 stained glass windows illustrating the Arthurian tales are by Veronica Whall; there are several paintings of scenes from the life of King Arthur by William Hatherell. In 1927, the “Order of the Fellowship of the Knights of the Round Table” was formed in Britain by Frederick Thomas Glasscock (a retired London businessman, d. 1934) to promote Christian ideals and Arthurian notions of medieval chivalry. Glasscock was resident at Tintagel (in the house “Eirenicon” which he had built) and responsible for the building of King Arthur’s Hall (an extension of Trevena House which had been John Douglas Cook’s residence and had been built on the site of the former Town Hall and Market Hall). The hall is now used as a Masonic Hall, and is home to four Masonic bodies as the photos below show.

 

Masonic symbolism which always feature on our quests; the meaning of which certainly pre-dates modern-day Freemasonary <click on an image to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Arthur%27s_Hall,_Tintagel

Since 1952, the building has been used as a Masonic Hall and is home to the King Arthur Lodge No. 7134. In 1962 a Royal Arch Chapte was formed by the Lodge, and the building is used by some other lodges to hold their installation meetings. The hall is now as home to four Masonic bodies:

  • King Arthur Lodge No. 7134 which was warranted on 13 November 1951;
  • St Enodoc Lodge No. 9226 which was consecrated on 30 May 1987;
  • King Arthur Royal Arch Chapter No. 7134 which was consecrated on 31 March 1962;
  • Tintagel Castle Lodge of Mark Master Masons No. 1800 which was consecrated on 23 April 1999.

 

It is certainly a stunning building inside, where one gets a real sense of a ‘Grand Hall’, the sort of hall where King Arthur could certainly have conducted his buisness, feasted and ruled from. The masonic influence is everywhere in the building too; it being an amazing and fitting building to hold lodge meetings. The day we went, a ‘Fairy Fayre’ was taking place, bringing together, the psychic, spiritual, witchy and pagan worlds, which meant entry was free on that day, but clear photos of the halls design were out of the question.

The very striking stained glass windows and the emblems associated with them are the work of Veronica Mary Whall (1887–1967) who was an important stained glass artist, painter, and illustrator and part of the Arts and Crafts Movement. She created 73 windows for King Arthurs Hall, Tintagel, that opened in 1933. As of 1997 it is considered to be the largest collection of stained glass panels of  King Arthur made in the 20th century and a great example of Arts and Crafts workmanship. I have tried to include as many as i can here, together with some of the descriptions.

 

Tintagel is steeped in the tales of King Arthur, but few know of the real Lancelot or King Arthur & that they did indeed walk upon these shores: for everywhere we went we were reminded of the ‘knightly virtues’ by which each knight, then and now always endevours to live by. A true knight must always follow the codes of their life and of course importantly their oaths, for an oath taken can never be ‘untaken’ as it resonates on the metaphysical planes as well as the physical.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_Whall

St Materiana’s Church Tintagel: In St Materiana’s Church, Tintagel; a site sacred and profound on so many levels with deep connections to Mary Magdalene and our quests, are some amazing and sacred artefacts, which although themselves do not go back to the actual ‘dawn of time’, they allude to and tell true stories that do. This church is so relatable to this ‘quester’ on a very personal level, both physical and metaphysical, for very profound reasons; important discoveries were truly made here. There are those rare moments in life (in time) where myth and reality collide head on and time seems to stop and one finds one’s self catching ones breath. Out of this comes an understanding so deep that one’s whole life simply falls into place and nothing can ever be the same again. As those whom have gone before, in who’s footsteps I walk, I will continue to guide those whom seek the light…

The parish church of Saint Materiana, stands on a very isolated, yet beautiful location some distance away from the village of Tintagel. Almost on top of the cliff-edge, it’s rocky headland view commands stunning views across the ocean. The church is a Church of England,  grade 1 listed building; the first church on the sight, thought to have been founded in the sixth century, as a daughter church of Minister

 

St Materiana’s Church on the cliff-top is a peaceful and profound sacred site with connections to both Mary Magdalene and Lancelot Desposyni <click to view>

The existing church may have been created in the late 11th or early 12th century. Art historian Nikolaus Pevsner (writing in 1950) suggested that its Norman-era design includes some Saxon features, while the tower may be 13th or 15th century in date. The most significant change in its design was the restoration in 1870 by Piers St Aubyn which included a new roof. Later changes include a number of new stained glass windows: many of these portray saints, including St Materiana, St George and St Piran. There are three modern copies of Old Master paintings, and a Roman milestone bearing the name of the Emperor Licinius (d. 324).

 

The church has connections to both Mary Magdalene and to Lancelot Desposyni, both whom have walked upon these lands and visited this church in times past. Mary traveled from France to England; to Cornwall in fact before the church was even here but never the less it was indeed a sacred mound and Mary would have known this. This site would have been her first port of call, for she would eventually land in Scotland. Inside the church are many artefacts, some with hidden meanings that connect to Templarism and certainly to Mary Magdalene herself, especially in the lower part of the Lady Chapel. Lancelot, also journying from France was here in Cornwall around 538 AD, almost one might say on a pilgrimage, as indeed some of us are doing today.

 

Often hidden histories lie hidden for years but surface at perfect points in time and maybe just for a moment of earthly time they share…

Saint Materiana’s Church Tintagel

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Materiana%27s_Church,_Tintagel

  • Bloodline Connections: Lancelot Desposyni x 48 Great Grandfather or our head researcher, from the Fordham line. Born 520 Ad in France.

For one of our party this quest and indeed St Materianna’s Church with knowledge of Mary Magdalene herself proved to be a revelation of profound importance and significance…

“On sadled shores in time of hands, A riddle for one in all the land, A time to know and a time to learn, A time to sew and a time to burn. That burning sensation of all inside, as one reaches the top of Tintagels perfect site… But what of space and time and fate?”

After a busy day, what better end could there be for a beautiful evening, than a short drive to Port Issac to chill out in the Old School House having a lovely meal…

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  July 2016

Email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle