Tag Archive: Europe


THE GRAIL QUEST

” Even in our modern times, the Grail still represents hope to people, yet still remains something unattainable, something still very much an enigma. Many of the tales trace it, as a vessel, back to Joseph of Arimathea, whom it was said collected Jesus’s blood from the cross and whom was said to have bought it to England. Yet as already stated, the lineage of the grail goes back to much earlier times,  and as we already know, we can discount the tales of a challice collecting blood from the cross, for we know the crucifixion tales to be untrue. Yet if Joseph was of the ‘pure bloodline’, which Templar knowledge indicates he was, the tales take on another meaning, Over time many and various churches and religions have claimed different successions and connections to the Grail and there are claimed to be many ‘resting places’ for the Grail, some believable, some not, but of course that does depend on what the Grail actually is. It could be resting/hiding within Time itself (within a ‘cloak of time’), maybe hidden in secret underground chambers of sacred buildings, kept watch over by guardians. Some say it found its way to Scotland and has a connection to the enigmatic Neville family whom may have guarded over it themselves.  Mary too, is said to be connected to it, in her own right and through her relationship with Jesus, and she too found her own way to Scotland. Lots of accounts refer to the blood of Christ or the flesh/DNA of Christ as being of pure blood, of being the Grail, and Christ certainly knew and kept the secrets to his grave.  So, did Christ possess the Grail or was it the ‘knowledge’ of the Grail he possessed? If Lucifer’s secret is the Holy Grail, that would certainly mean that Christ/Jesus/Lucifer knew the secret; that unattainable secret of the Holy Grail.”

QUEST 28: FRANCE, DUNKIRK & BELGUIM

12TH  NOVEMBER 2019

After three great days in La Boussac, our amazing trip was almost over and we left France to begin our journey towards Belguim via Dunkirk. Luckily yet again the sun was shining and it was a gorgeous Autumn day when we set forth. We journeyed all the way from the south of France up to Dunkirk and i managed to take some quite good shots on the way.  The drive was interesting and very scenic and the weather was good.  It was a long journey, of gorgeous autumn colours, dramatic skies and an amazingly huge suspension bridge that crossed a wide, wide estuary somewhere along the route. It was very windy and high up so not all lanes were open. The nearer we got to England though, the more horrid the weather became, settling down later.

Our last big road trip of the quest taking us out of France, towards Belguim, Dunkirk and back to good old Blighty! That bridge was so high and scary in the windy conditions – much higher than it looks! <click to enlarge>

Catholique Collegiale Notre-Dame-de-la-Crypte a Cassel: Cassel France: Quite late in the day we arrived here at Cassel, France. It had become quite chilly now and was getting dark, but there were shops still open and folks around, so we had a nice stroll and bought in supplies for when we reached our digs.

Cassel, from the Dutch meaning Kassel is a commune in the Nord department in northern France. Built on a prominent hill overlooking French Flanders, the town has existed since Roman times. It was developed by the Romans into an important urban centre and was the focus of a network of roads, which are still in use today, that converge on the hill. After the fall of the Roman Empire, Cassel became an important fortified stronghold for the rulers of Flanders which was repeatedly fought over before finally being annexed to France in the 17th century. It was the headquarters of Marshal Ferdinand Foch during part of the First World War. In 1940, during the German invasion of France, Cassel was the scene of a fierce three-day battle between British forces and German forces which resulted in much of the town being destroyed. Today the town, which was rebuilt following the war, is a popular destination for visitors to French Flanders.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassel,_Nord

As the hour was late and the skies darkening, we half expected the church to be closed and spent dilligent time wandering around the seemingly closed building until at last we found a way in via the big stiff old wooden doors! Our efforts were well worth it as the church is beautiful inside and like a lot of these seemingly plain on the outside churches, what greets one inside is often amazing!

Sadly i could not find much on the internet in English about the churches history apart from a few lines from the above link, so most of my comments are from pure observation. The Collégiale Notre-Dame de la Crypte is Cassel’s main church, built in brick. Parts date from the 11th century but the main part is a 16th-century  Gothic structure of a design known as a hallekerk or hall-church, peculiar to Flanders and Artois. It comprises a huge rectangular space with three gables, three aisles, three apses and a square tower over the transept.

Many interesting symbols inside the church & the  ‘All Seeing Eye’ is prominent, together with relevant heraldry & shields. Some beautiful windows are here too & ornate artworks. A nice feel to the church connecting to the Desposyni bloodline.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Galains Desposyni (48th GGF) 480-551, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.
  • Nascien Desposyni(49th GGF) 450-494, born in Sommant, with Grail connections.

The hour was late, dark and very wet when we arrived in Dunkirk and visability in respect of driving was very confusing. We were staying right in the middle of Dunkirk, near the river, in a very built up area with  lots of traffic lights, bus lanes and one way systems. It took us several tries to find a way out of the one-way system in order to reach our apartment – which we could see but not actually get too! Well done to my dear driver though for his persistence and patience! Tomorrow we are venturing into Belgium.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne, Belgium: So the day had arrived – Friday 8th November and the last day of this amazing quest and fabulous road trip. We found the church fairly easily and it looked quite inviting and very well maintained from the outside with planted flowers and a nod to it’s fishing history by way of the historic fishing vessel outside. However once we gained access and got inside through the main doorway, it was dissapointing to find a vast and very locked glass screen acoss the entrance barring any access into the rest of the church. So sadly the only photos i have are of the outside and taken through the glass screen. A shame as there were very relevant artefacts and info to be seen there. Based on a design by the Veurne-based architect Joseph Vinck, this aisled neo-Gothic hall church in yellow brick was built in 1891, at a time when De Panne was still a fishing hamlet of Adinkerke and a chapel built circa 1878 stood on this site. The tower was added in 1936, by which time the church was no longer located in the centre of town due to the construction of the Dumont Quarter.

St Peter’s Church, De Panne showing the historic fishing vessel <click to enlarge>

De Panne is the westernmost Belgian coastal town, sharing a border with France. It has a population of almost 10.800 people. Its history is closely linked with Adinkerke, nowadays a small village, situated about 3 kilometres from the sea.  The situation used to be reversed, for during the late 18th century, De Panne was part of the larger parish and municipality of Adinkerke. Because of the growing importance of coastal tourism from the late 19th century on, De Panne eventually transformed into a larger town than Adinkerke, beoming independent in 1911.  Originally De Panne was primarily a fishing place, founded in 1783. The fisheries, especially the small herring fisheries close to the coast, in De Panne flourished from the middle of the 19th century, and the fishing community steadily grew. Around the turn of the century, a number of shipyards were active in De Panne, while several small fish smoke houses were also present in the village. By courtesy of the local history and heritage club ‘De Panneboot P1′, the town possesses one of the last traditional inshore fishing vessel of the Flemish coast, also named the ‘Panneboot P1’. The vessel is an example of a ‘pannekotter’, the smaller successor of the famous ‘pannepot’, now on display in front of the Saint Peter’s Church of De Panne. On occasion, the ‘Panneboot P1’ still sails and from time to time, the ship is used for educational purposes

http://www.coastalwiki.org/wiki/Fisheries_in_De_Panne

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Panne

Very selective views through the huge secured glass panel

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

Sadly, our very last day of this wonderful experience has come upon us all too soon. Lots of pieces of a very large puzzle to ponder over and put together but it will all be revealed in time, as they say. We have visited amazing places and met many folks – some friendly, some not, sadly often ‘church’ folks were not welcoming, but that’s for another day.

Saint Bavo Cathedral, Ghent, Belgium: When we arrived in Ghent it was certainly a lovely day and the city was full of life with lots of hustle, bustle and energy; trams and buses busily swung around the narrow city streets. Ghent is a city and a  municipality in the Flemish Region of Belgium. It is the capital and largest city of the East Flanders province, and the third largest in the country, exceeded in size by Brussels and Antwerp. The city originally started as a settlement at the confluence of the Rivers Scheldt and Leie and in the Late Middle Ages became one of the largest and richest cities of northern Europe, with some 50,000 people in 1300. It is a port and university city. Around 650, Sain Amand founded two abbeya in Ghent: St Peter’s and St Bavo’s. Around 800,  Louis the Pious, of   Charleymagne, appointed Finhard, the biographer of Charlemagne, as abbot of both.  The city grew from several nuclei, the abbeys and a commercial centre. However, both in 851 and 879, the city was plundered by the Vikings. Within the protection of the County of Flanders, the city recovered and flourished from the 11th century, growing to become a small city-state By the 13th century, Ghent was the biggest city in Europe north of the Alps after Paris, bigger than Cologne or Moscow. Within the city walls lived up to 65,000 people.  Lots about Ghent in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghent

 The main city square of Ghent; full of life with lots of shops and resturants nearby!

The Saint Bavo Cathedral, also known as Sint-Baafs Cathedral, an 89-meter-tall Catholic Gothic Cathedral is the seat of the dioces of Ghent, is named for Saint bavo of Ghent and contains the well-known Ghent Altarpiece. It is built on the site of the former Chapel of St. John the Baptist, a primarily wooden construction that was consecrated in 942 by Transmarus,  Bishop of Tournai and Noyon. Traces of a later Romanesque structure can be found in the cathedral’s crypt. Construction of the Gothic church began around 1274. Continuous expansion, in he Gothic style were carried out from the 14th through 16th centuries. In 1539, as a result of the rebellion against Charles V, who was baptized in the church, the old Abbey of St. Bavo was dissolved. Its abbot and monks went on to become canons in a Chapter that was attached to what then became the Church of Saint Bavo. When the Diocese of Ghent was founded in 1559, the church became its Cathedral and construction was considered complete June 7, 1569. Sadly in the summer of 1566, bands of Calvinist iconoclasts visited Catholic churches in the Netherlands, shattering stained-glass windows, smashing statues, and destroying paintings and other artworks they perceived as idolatrous. However, the altarpiece by the Van Eycks was saved. It was a beautiful looking cathedral but sadly yet again had lost much of its ‘energy’, not helped by the negative attitude of one of its human ‘religous’ helpers, trying to bar me from taking a photo of a sheild relevant to our quest. A beautiful building with many stunning works of art, but sadly with no actual spirituality…

There were some stunning marble memorial carvings that made good use of the skull imagery. There were some beautiful oil paintings, along with relevant Craft/Quest related heraldry and sheilds <click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Bavo%27s_Cathedral,_Ghent

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Bloodline connection associated with King Marcomer (51st GGF) 387-458 Cologne, Germany.

All that remained now was just one more view from our apartment window aside the river in Dunkirk before setting out on the road again in the morning and back home to the UK via the channel tunnel!

“On this epic journey we experienced the different energies of many lands as we followed in the footsteps of King Arthur around Europe and found out that churches are not what they seem;  I also found an amazing light inside me that I never want to dim. Putting aside the spiritual aspect of our quest and all the knowledge gained for a moment, this was the most amazing road trip ever. We journeyed through 6 countries including the uk; the experience of a road trip is mind-expanding in itself; an experience that I fully embraced. So that was it; an amazing quest fullfilled and I for one cannot wait until our next adventure.

Many of you have followed our quests since the very beginning and have read my in-depth write-ups on these pages, so have a good idea of what the quests are all about and why. It is always from a physical, spiritual and more importantly a metaphysical purpose that we partake of these quests and now we have bought ‘the grail’ into the mix.

The buildings we visit are built on very sacred sites, yet it is not the buildings as such, as to why we are there. The sites are of sacred, pyramid energy; the buildings atop have come and gone over the centuries, leaving no clues in the buildings since, as to their purpose and real reason within the rhyme of time; except of course to those whom can decode the symbols. The churches could be describes as ‘markers’ in time and space.

The quest, the King Arthur quest, traces his journey to these sites, it was his quest then, just as it is our important quest now; a journey of learning sacred knowledge, that has often been hidden within very time and the landscape itself. But yet most importantly never told of in history, yet the links are now appearing, like the colours of a magic painting book when the water is added, for when knowledge and understanding is added to our life, magically the truth appears.

We have visited many pyramid sites, some where the earth magnetis were so strong, that the so-called ‘sat-nav’ (which works via earth-based communications anyway), was caused to spin around in circles; going crazy due to the pyramid energy. The energy can often be overwhelming causing one to lose balance and feel a bit ‘woozy’ at times until one tunes into it and finds one’s balance. There is always so much more to space and time than meets the eye.”

DSC09853

“The Keeper of Scrolls” March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

The Knights of the Red Order

THE GRAIL QUEST

“The Grail was claimed to have healing abilities and to bring enlightenment connecting it to the metaphysical realms. Long before the time of Jesus, (the Jesus) stories tell of Angels (Djinn) (Ninansians) bringing the ‘cup’ from heaven and given to ‘sacred’ or round table knights, which ties in nicely with the tales of King Arthur’s knights partaking of their quest to find the Holy Grail. If the grail was bought from heaven, which seems very likely, to Tara, then why and what was it’s purpose here on this earth, has it still got a purpose today and how or if, does it connect to humankind?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY & LUXEMBOURG

31ST OCTOBER 2019

Germany into Luxembourg

  • Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz: Germany
  • Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City
  • Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg
  • Saint Sebastion Church, Ettelbruck

Day Five: We knew we would have a long day ahead as we made our way on day five on Thursday 31st October (a memorable date in many calendars) driving from Germany into Luxemboug, but with some lovely places to see on the way and the weather was most definitely in our favour. The sun was shinning and the weather was extremely warm as we arrives at our first and most beautiful destination of the day. Even the chemtrails in the skies above (not often seen in Germany) did not lower our spirits. After a two hour drive we arrived in Koblenz, Germany.

Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz, Germany: Modern day Koblenz is very popular with tourists and one can certainly see why; it is very pretty with mountains around and sits on the banks of the Rhine, where the river is joined by the Mosselle. It is full of energy and life; i had visited before as a pure tourist and my memories of it were very possitive. Koblenz was established as a  Roman military post by Drusus around 8 B.C. Its name originates from the Latin meaning “(at the) confluence” of the two rivers. The actual confluence is today known as the “German Corner”, a symbol of the unification of Germany that features an equestrian statue of Emperor William 1. As the Roman Soldier that he was, King Arthur travelled through here; and a representation of him inside the church certainly attests to this fact. The history of the area has a strong connection to the Romans which one can read much more anout in the link below.

Koblenz is a principal seat of the Mosel and Rhenish wine trade, mineral waters, the manufacture of automotive parts, pianos, paper, cardboard, machinery, boats, and barges. Since the 17th century, it has been home to the Konigsbacher brewery, the Old Brewery in Koblenz’s city centre, and now a plant in Koblenz-Stolzenfels. It is an important transit centre for the Rhine railways and for the Rhine navigation. The headquarters of the German Army Forces Command was located in the city until 2012. It’s successor, the new formed German Army Command is based at the von-Hardenberg-Kaserne in Strausberg, Brandenburg. In the more ancient part of Koblenz stand several buildings which have a historical interest. Prominent among these, near the point of confluence of the rivers, is the Basilica of St Castor or Kastorkirche, dedicated to Castor of Karden, with four towers. The church was founded in 836 by Louis the Pious, but the present Romanesque building was completed in 1208, the Gothic vaulted roof dating from 1498. In front of the church of Saint Castor stands a fountain, erected by the French in 1812, with an inscription to commemorate Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

The unique representation of King Arthur, situated just inside the side door, testament to him having travelled through here as a Roman soldier which is of paramount importance for people to know; nearby a winged serpent and and angel keep silent watch over….

The Basilica of St. Castor:  is the oldest church in Koblenz situated at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle. A fountain called Kastorbrunnen (Castor Well) was built in front of the basillica during Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and the church is worth seeing for the historical events that have occurred in it. See link below for deatailed history.

The church of St. Castor was built between 817 and 836 by Hetto, the Archbishop of Trier with the support of Emperor Louis the Pious, just outside the city of Confluentes, the city founded by the Romans and dedicated on 12 November 836, but Louis did not come to Koblenz until after the consecration of the church, pointing to the importance of the Archbishop in the building of the church, especially as the church was until the 13th century outside the city of Koblenz. The church honours St Castor who is said to have worked as a missionary on the Moselle in the 4th century and to have founded a religious community in Karden, Rizza, the alleged daughter of Louis the Pious, is venerated in the church as a saint of the city of Koblenz and her shrine still stands in the church.

As one would expect the church is kept in immaculate condition with many piecies of fine artwork displayed

An extra treat of the day, and a very enjoyable one at that was a ride on the cable car across the beautiful Rhine, which was situated just behind the church, so far too good an opurtunity to miss and one could also get a great view of the equestruan statue mentioned above. What a lovely day it had turned out to be!

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur as the Roman Soldier travelled through Koblenz.

It was an interesting two hour drive as we made our way across the German border and into Luxembourg, over what proved to be a very mountainous and scenic route, but as we got higher and higher nearer to the clouds the weather closed in and it was a very wet day as we pulled into Luxembourg City; still very exciting though!

Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City: The cathedral here is situated in a very built up area so it was very hard to get good views of it especially in the rain and gloom, and the photos did i manage to take were quite atmospheric. Howerver once inside the cathedral it, is a whole different story and it really was most beautiful, full of many paintings and tapestries and also very busy with tourists on such a wet day. It was originally a Jesuit church, and its cornerstone was laid in 1613. It is the only cathedral in Luxembourg and is a noteworthy example of late gothis architecture; however, it also has many Renaissance elements and adornments. At the end of the 18th century, the church received the miraculous image of the Maria Consolatrix Afflictorum, the patron saint of both the city and the nation.  Around 50 years later, the church was consecrated as the Church of Our Lady and in 1870, it was elevated by Pope Pius IX to the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

Luxembourge and cathedral on a very wet and gloomy day!

From 1935 to 1938 the Cathedral was enlarged and expanded: the rebuilding of the exterior architecture on the Gothic-style cathedral presented a challenge, since the goal was to harmoniously integrate the church with the surrounding buildings, as well as the old residential houses. The Cathedral has three towers, the west tower, which was the tower of the Jesuit church and which contains the bells, the east tower, and the central tower, which stands over the transept. When the Cathedral was enlarged in 1935-1938, the east and central towers were added. The central tower, which is only a third of the height of the other towers, consists of a wide, pyramid-shaped base and a narrow peak covered with copper. On Good Friday, 5 April 1985, around mid-day, work on the roof caused the west tower to catch fire. The church bells, i.e. the Virgin Mary bell, the Willibrord bell, the Peter bell, and the Cunigunde bell were destroyed in the fire. When the tower collapsed, the roof of the central aisle was also partly damaged. It took until 17 October 1985 for the tower to be repaired. It was here that King Arthur found his information and instructions in his quest for the Grail, at this pivotel point in time; a point in time indicated as to its true meaning by researching the old maps of Luxembourg…

The many stunning artworks inside the cathedral <click to expand>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

As we were staying in Luxembourg for a couple of nights it was nice to not have far to travel to our digs on that very wet night; the modern apartment we stayed in was very posh and shiny with a ‘touch’ button for almost everything! All needs catered for exept as seems the norm in Europe – they dont ‘do’ toasters!!

Day Six: This day started off quite bright but the further we got into the scenic side of Luxembourg and i guess higher up, the weather did close in on us again, but very dramatic no-the-less! Wiltz is a lovely old town in the Luxembourg mountains, although not too much about it or the church on the internet, but according to the internet it is a commune with town status in north-western Luxembourg and situated on the banks of the river Wiltz. It was also a battleground in the Battle of the Bulge, near the end of  World War II.  The name “Wiltz” comes from a Celtic word meaning “on the creek.” Wiltz was originally inhabited by the Celts, and was first documented in 764AD. It received its town rights in 1240. The counts of Wiltz are among the oldest in Luxembourg

Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg: This church does sit up in the mountains amidst stunning scenery and one often has to take one’s shots on the move as it were, for good views do come and go, so one takes one’s chances. There are many buildings around this church so not many good views down at ground level. There are many churches and cathedrals in Europe, and this is just one, that go by the name of ‘Notre-Dam’, which means ‘Our Lady’, (The Virgin Mary in various forms explained in future quests) yet most folks only know the one in Paris, many thinking that, that one is ‘the’ Notre-Dam, yet that is far from the truth. Although quite plain and stark on the outside, the beauty and artworks within have to be seen to be believed, all so lovingly looked after with a very ancient feel to the church with the the ancient ‘energies’ still there, and it is there that King Arthur recieved further instructions on his quest for the Holy Grail, on his travels/pilgramage around Europe. Sometimes one needs to travel to the ‘back of beyond’ as it were to see the correct and meaningful churches; for we too are travelling the route that Arthur took – what a wonderful journey we are being treated too with knowledge and enlightenment in abundace along the whole route. The church here unsurpringly, given the magnetics of the area, had the most amazing energy, which all connects to the quest for the grail; a very powerful place both physically and metaphysically.

Notre-Dam Church set amidst Luxembourg’s mountains.

In the European churches and cathedrals one can not help but notice that what one in this country would be described as ‘occult’ symbols are very present and evident in these old buildings, hinting at an older christianity very far removed from what is practiced in the UK today. Various versions of ‘The All Seeing Eye’ and the ‘Marasa/Alpha-Omega’ symbols were particulary evident and also if one looks closely quiet a lot of Enochian sybolism. This would indicate a time, a common point in time, before there was a separation of religions. It was here that King Arthur found his information in his Grail Quest.

There are some lovely artworks here, (see above) one wooden-carved statue in particular (guarding the entrance) showing some very unique and meaningful (to Craft) hand gestures – close up shown on the video. There is a wonderful representation of the Ave Maria over a ‘sea serpent’, very unusual and not often seen; she has her foot upon the serpent; obviously Maria/Mary is connected to the sea…. There is also an interlocking Alpha to Omega upon the altar cloth, which of course represents many other things including pyramid energy. In front of the altar is a traditional gong, where it is usually a bell. The Lamb of God here at the High Altar is unusual, a slightly different pose with the ‘All Seeing Eye’ looking down upon it, surrounded by sunflowers, roses and berries and at the very top ‘The Queen’ with her scribe carrying a sword. All very beautifully carved in wood with many historical connections to Templarism and to King Arthur and his pilgrimage, all within this stunning church at Wiltz.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

Watch our video here:

Germany into Luxembourg – Koblenz, Luxembourg & Wiltz

After a lovely lunch at Wiltz we made our way once more into the mountains of Luxembourg; although it was a damp day, the scenery looked spectacular and oh so green and pretty. Fate took our hand once again and although our next unplanned destination was not a part of the actual quest itself, these little surprises do present themselves from time to time when one is off the beaten track, and who can resist a sign indicating a little historic chapel down a narrow mountain road! Thus we found this little octagonal chapel, dedicated to Saint Kunigunde and the only one of its kind in Luxembourg – so what an amazing find; a treasuee in the green mountains indeed.

A unique octagonal chapel chanced upon in the mountains on a wet and pleasant day

Saint Sebastien Church, Ettelbruck:  It was still raining when we made our way into Ettelbuck, which according to the internet is another commune with town status; the towns of Warken and Grentzingen are also within the commune. Until 1850, both Erpeldange and Schieren were part of the Ettelbruck commune as well, but both towns were detached from Ettelbruck by law on 1 July 1850. Ettelbruck lies at the exact spot where three rivers meet: the Sauer, the Wark, and the Alzette. This location has historically made Ettelbruck a major transportation hub for the country second only to the city of Luxembourg.

Germany occupied Ettelbruck on 10 May 1940 and US forces first liberated the town on 11 September 1944 but Germany retook the town on 16 December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. US General George S. Patten on Christmas Day, 25 December 1944, led US troops in the final liberation of Ettelbruck from Nazi occupation. One of Ettelbruck’s main squares is named Patton Square, and is located at the exact spot where the German offensive into Luxembourg’s Alzette Valley was stopped, ending its attempt to reoccupy the country as a whole. Since 1954, the town has held a Remembrance Day celebration each July honoring General Patton and the US, British, French, Belgian and Luxembourgish troops who fought with him there.

Saint Sebastien Church and Ettlebruck town square: even though very damp we had a very enjoyable stroll around

The church is situated next to Henri Muller Street, which had a real personal connection to our lead researcher, whom felt very at home there. Again, not a lot on the internet about the church but i did find this with some nice illustations – see link below. The first stone of the present Neoclassical-style parish church of Saint Sebastien was placed in 1841. However, completion of the building was delayed due to marshy conditions. Finally, four lateral circular chapels were added to reinforce the building. Although completed in 1851, the church was not conscecrated until 1864 by the bishop Monseigneur Nicolas Adames. The interior of the Church houses several precious art objects: an oil painting by Joseph Probst titled “Le buisson ardent”, an African Shona sculpture, a beautiful eight-and-a-half register organ and several remarkable stained-glass windows presenting, among other things a panorama of Ettlebruck. The parish church was badly damaged during the Ardennes offensive. The formal reopening of the restored church took place in 1948.

In the church are to be found an emblematical representaion of ‘The Four Corners’ or ‘The Four Directions’ which are of particular interest from a Craft point of view and not generally known of in this context. Shown upon the four windows are The Sash, The Disc, The Challice and The Cross. The quest for the grail was particulary strong there and it was also another site where (King) Arthur found his information in respect of his grail quest.

The Four Corners or Four Directions, emblematical of higher knowledge

Luxembourge had proved to be very revealing in respect of Arthurs grail journey, also to us on our quest; knowledge recieved to be digested and devoured over the weeks to come….

Blood Line Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here on his Quest for the Grail.

And so we returned to our high-tech digs for one more night before embarking upon a four hour journey into France the next day. Luxembourg had proved to be beautiful, revealing and very wet!

“Let Angels tell tales; and Demons too

Let the secret of The Grail forever ring true”

 

Knights of the Red Order February 2020

The Keeper of Scrolls’

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

THE GRAIL QUEST:

“Some sources say the Grail Bloodline came from Christ, but we of Craft know it to be much older, yet ‘the’ Jesus was still a carrier of the royal bloodline in this timeline. We have been taught in later degrees that the dynasty of kings whom descended from this royal bloodline were known as sorcerer-kings, some of whom hinted or even stated outright that they were in fact descendants of Lucifer. There is much speculation too of the royal/grail bloodline being connected to Cain/Samael/Lilith and Asmodeus; far too much to write about here but maybe for another day?  We can of course pause for some dot connections here; why sorcery? What is the connection to the Knights of the Round Table? What is the connection to the Templars? What is the connection to the Apostles? Could they all be one and the same; i.e. all have the same source?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY

30TH OCTOBER 2019

St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf, Germany: a dull, slightly wetter day today, but certainly not cold as we drove an hour from our digs, to reach St Nicholaus Church in a very quiet suburb of Dusseldorf; the capital and second-largest city of the most populous German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, after Cologne. The city lies in the centre of both the Rhine-Ruhr and the Rhineland Metropolitan Regions; most of the city lies on the right bank of the Rhine (as opposed to Cologne, whose city centre lies on the river’s left bank). “Dorf” means “village” in German  but of course these days Dussledorf is now a large city. There are strong Roman connections here, and thus to King Arthur, yet when the Roman Empire was strengthening its position throughout Europe, a few Germanic tribes clung on in marshy territory off the eastern banks of the Rhine. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the odd farming or fishing settlement could be found at the point where the small river Dussell flows into the Rhine. It was from such settlements that the city of Düsseldorf grew.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCsseldorf

St Nikolaus Church is a beautiful church and it was such a shame to find it locked, for it was the place of instruction for King Arthur, which is interesting for us and our quest; it is also the very same place where our head researcher’s grandfather recieved his instruction, for he was here in the area in relation to ‘religious’ reasons. A place of intruction too, in our current time frame, for holders of the quest/grail bloodline. So who know what treasures lie waiting inside but sadly the church was locked so those treasures inside were not for our eyes on this occasion, and we could find no telephone number to make contact with anyone.

This is an older-style church which has been here for the last 300 years, but obviously as we know with churches, built upon a much older and sacred site. There are some really nice Roman/Knights Templar connected artworks in the grounds of the church; a lovely peaceful feel to the site and a great shame we could not get inside. There is very little on the internet about this church, although it does have a facebook page, but more for social activities rather than history, so this church will remain an enigma…

The grounds and artworks at St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf <click on an image to expand>

St Nickolaus Church, Dusseldorf; last video on link

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur; his place of Instruction
  • Place of instruction also of our head researcher’s grandfather
  • Frotmund (Frotherius) link to the year 794 AD

Cologne Cathedral, Cologne, Germany: An approximately 50 minute drive bought us to the hustle and bustle of Cologne; one of Germany’s most well-know and much visited city. It is the largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth-most popolous city in Germany. With slightly over a million inhabitants (1.08 million) within its city boundaries. Cologne is the largest city on the Rhine and also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region.  Centered on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia’s capital of  Dusseldorf, where we had just driven from.

Cologne was founded and established in Ubii territory in the 1st century AD as the Roman Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, the first word of which is the origin of its name. An alternative Latin name of the settlement is Augusta Ubiorum, after the Ubii. “Cologne”, the French version of the city’s name, has become standard in English as well. Cologne functioned as the capital of the Roman province of  Germania Inferior and as the headquarters of the Roman military in the region until occupied by the Franks in 462. During the Middle Ages the city flourished as being located on one of the most important major trade routes between east and western Europe. Cologne was one of the leading members of the Hanseatic League and one of the largest cities north of the Alps in medieval and Renaissance times. Prior to World war two, the city had undergone several occupations by the French and also by the British (1918–1926). Cologne was one of the most heavily bombed cities in Germany during World War II, with the Royal Air Force (RAF) dropping 34,711 long tons (35,268 tonnes) of bombs on the city. The bombing reduced the population by 95%, mainly due to evacuation, and destroyed almost the entire city. With the intention of restoring as many historic buildings as possible, the successful postwar rebuilding has resulted in a very mixed and unique cityscape.

The hustle & bustle of Cologne with many styles of architecture

Cologne Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of St Peter: is a Catholic cathedral whch lies right in the heart of Cologne and it’s famous spires can be seen from right across the river and makes for a compelling sight. It was actually built upon a past Roman Temple and a Roman museum is nearby full of fascinating history and finds. It is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires. The towers for its two huge spires gives the cathedral the largest façade of any church in the world. Construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 but was halted in 1473, unfinished. Work did not restart until the 1840s, and the edifice was completed to its original Medieval plan in 1880.

When construction began on the present Cologne Cathedral in 1248,  the site had already been occupied by several previous structures. The earliest may have been for grain storage and possibly was succeeded by a Roman Temple built by Mercurius Augustus. From the 4th century on, the site was occupied by Christian buildings, including a square edifice known as the “oldest cathedral” commissioned by Maternus, the first bishop of Cologne. During excavations of the present cathedral, graves were discovered in the location of the oldest portion of the building; including that of a boy that was richly adorned with grave goods and another of a woman, popularly thought to be Wisigard. Both graves are thought to be from the 6th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cologne_Cathedral

Sadly there is no actual spirituality left at the cathedral, yet it is non the less a very splendid and impresive building, loved and visited by thousands. There is a bloodline connection here to King Marcomer 38-458, and there is much meaningful Templar symbology contained within this beautiful building.

Cologne Cathedral is full of beautiful & meaningful peices of art upon the floor and above… <click on an image to expand>

Grail Bloodline Conections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458 (51st GGF) born here, though a prior building.
  • King Arthur; the place of apprenticeship

St Paul’s Cathedral, Munster, Germany: With night-time almost upon us it was hit and miss whether we would make it to Munster on time to gain access to the cathedral as it was a two hour drive from Cologne, but made it we did by the skin of our teeth. The cathedral is a very imposing building set in a big square in the heart of the city and with festive lights sparking from the nearby shops, it cut quite an impresive sight. The name Munster is said to derive from Latin and Greek words meaning monastry and the building does indeed have a very monastry feeling to it. It is an independant city  in North Rhine-Westphalia,  Germany. It is in the northern part of the state and is considered to be the cultural centre of the Westphalia region. It is also capital of the local government region Munsterland and is today it is known as the bicycle capital of Germany. The city’s built-up area is quite extensive. There are no skyscrapers and few high-rise buildings but very many detached houses and mansions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster

Munster Cathedral; very impresive looking in the dark.

Münster Cathedral or St.-Paulus-Dom is the cathedral church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Munster in Germany, and is dedicated to St Paul. It is counted among the most significant church buildings in the city and along with the City Hall, is one of the symbols of the city. The cathedral stands in the heart of the city, on a small hill called Horsteberg, which is encircled by streets and the and the Munstersche Aa river. Today the cathedral is the parish church for this area. The cathedral had two predecessors. The first cathedral (called the Ludgerus Dom, 805-1377) stood to the north of the current cathedral; the second cathedral was built in the tenth or eleventh century and was demolished during the construction of the third and current cathedral between 1225 and 1264. The imposing westwek with its nearly identical towers was built as part of the second cathedral around 1192 and was incorporated into the current building. As a result, the cathedral is a mixture of styles, combining the Romanesque westwerk, old choir and west towers with the Gothic nave, transepts, high choir and ring of chapels.

Some rather nice artifacts inside the cathedral including the mechanical clock, that found us ‘stealing’ our photos of it, much to the disgruntlement of the cathedral ‘holy man’ and ‘jobsworth’!

As it was dark outside, there seemed to be a lovely warm glow inside the cathedral and there were one or two lovely items that needed closer examination but time and the lateness of hour were not in our favour. However it has to be said that both my brother and i objected to being hurried along in quite a ‘gruff’ fashion by one of the so called ‘holy men’; the priest ‘on duty’ there who was intent in getting us outside of the doors as quickly as possible for the ‘witching’ hour of 7pm was striking. We were at the door, having finished our historical research and just wanted to take a quick photo of the beautiful clock and its mechanism, just inside the door, but he was having non of it, making sure we knew they were now closed! So we just had to take the photos anyway. My brother and i are both ordained as priests and we were treated disrespectfully, but other than this it is no way to treat anyone whom has travelled from afar to visit a sacred building; ‘jobsworths’ are everywhere it seems and holy buildings are no exception, we were not expectng clergy to act like this. A lovely building yet sadly again with no spirituality.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster_Cathedral

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458, whom was educated here.
  • King Arthur

‘The Red Cross is the coded symbol used within the Grail teachings and you will see this symbol in many places around the globe’

X

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

 

%d bloggers like this: