Tag Archive: The Neville Bloodline


QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle

St Edmund King & Martyr Church, Kingsbridge: Just a short drive along peaceful country roads bought us to our next scheduled stop which sadly on this occasion was closed to us, so a few shots of the outside will have to suffice. The symbols on the windows looked significant so a shame we could not get in – though we did have a good look aound the town, where there were some amazing charity shops!

The church is an Anglican churched dedicated to St Edmund the Martyr: once a parish church, it is no longer is used for regular worship. St. Edmund’s Church, is mainly in the Perpendicular style and retains some 13th century features including a font, but was enlarged and reconsecrated around 1414. The oldest part of the church is the 13th century crossing tower. The rest of the church is much altered with the addition of a large chapel in 1849. Further rebuilding of the nave was conducted in the late 19th century. There are a few other medieval remains in the south chancel chapel. Parts of the Rood Screen have been used to make the pulpit and the readers desk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Edmund,_King_and_Martyr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsbridge

Hope Cove: So the last port of call for the day, for a bit of ‘down time’ and the best vegan pizza i have ever tasted, was the stunningly beautiful ‘Hope Cove’. Hope Cove is a small seaside village within the civil parish of South Huish in South Hams, Devon. It has tw beaches and is sheltered by the headland of Bolt Tail. The name ‘Hope Cove’ may derive tautologically from the Old Norse word hóp meaning “bay” or “small inlet”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Cove

 

  • Bloodline connections: is that of Thomas Neville of Dartmouth, born 25/02/1810 & died 03/01/1893 & our lead questers 4th Great Grandfather. Originally from Tollesbury in Essex & died in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia & a frequent visitor to the area on Templar Business.
  • V. MacAndrew from the plaque in St Petroc’s Church
  • George Fairlie-Clarke from the memorial in church graveyard
  • Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, depictedvon the church window of St Petrocs.
  • Thomas Neville again, connected also to Kingsbridge and Hope Cove

Join us for part three when we discover more secrets of time at Tintagel!

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ June 2019

QUEST TWENTY THREE CONT:

  • ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH
  • ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND
  • DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH

ST JOHN’S SAXON CHURCH: ESCOMBE NEAR BISHOP AUKLAND: Escomb is situated two miles west of Bishop Auckland in the Wear Valley. The church was built around 675AD with stone probably from the Roman Fort at Binchester and is the oldest church in the country. It was originally thought that the church was an offshoot of one of the local monastries at Whitby of Hartlepool, but this s only one of several possibilities as there are no known written records until 990AD.

The church, as one would expect is small and simple, befitting the time in which it was built. It is set amidst a well kept graveyard with some unusual gravestones in the burial ground with an ancient sundial above the porch entrance.

Once inside, one can tell the church is lovingly looked after; it has a beautiful stillness and peace about it and one can still see a few traces of the medieval painting on the archway entrance to the altar area, although some items such as the shield once prominent upon the wall has sadly not stood the test of time, as befalls many original items once prominent in many churches and some of the original paintwork about the church has also fallen prey to the ravages of time.  Thers is also a very ancient cross behind the altar depicting the ‘Fleur De Lys’ which one can barely make out do to age and earthy time… There were beautiful fresh flowers within the church and a tapistry of Celtic design crafted by local people, set in an alcove on the wall. There was a lovely feeling of peace and some very calming energies here. There was also an interesting phenomona of the greenery outside of the church displaying as a beautiful shade of blue through the church windows, which indeed it should be…

 

<click on photos to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Escomb_Church

Let Alek explain further in this short video below & show you around to explain the connections to the Neville bloodline.

ESCOMBE SAXON CHURCH

 

 The church is well looked after and well loved, which one can most certainly tell.

 

DAY THREE: ROSSLYN CHAPEL SCOTLAND: Of course everyone is very familiar with Rosslyn Chapel, (formerly known as the Collegiate Chapel of St Matthew) due to it’s inclusion in popular modern fiction and movies. I had visited the chapel previously yet was very much looking forward to visiting it again. The previous time i had visited, the chapel was hidden behind scaffolding; much renevation work was in progress, but as a bonus we did however get to walk around the actual roof of the chapel along the scaffolding itself – an experience not to be missed! So to see the chapel now in all it’s unfettered splendour was to be a treat indeed.

http://www.rosslynchapel.com/

The chapel has strong connections to the Sinclair family, who have been it’s custodians  over the years and also connections, as one would rightly expect, to the Knight Templars, in particular to the ROS and the Scottish Rite. Rosslyn Chapel was founded on a small hill above Roslin Glen as a Catholic collegiate church (with between four and six ordained canons and two boy choristers) in the mid-15th century. The chapel was founded by William Sinclair, 1st Earl of Caithness of the Scoto-Norman Sinclair family. Rosslyn Chapel is the third Sinclair place of worship at Roslin, the first being in Roslin Castle and the second (whose crumbling buttresses can still be seen today) in what is now Roslin Cemetery. The Neville connection here is that the Sinclairs and the Nevilles have ‘been in bed together’ since the dawn of time!

 

Some fine examples of the beautiful stone work of the chapel <click on an image to enlarge>

Over the years many secrets and tales of intrigue have been associated with Rosslyn Chapel; tales that connect to the Knight Templars, the FreeMasons, Secret Ceremonies and indeed even to the Holy Grail and The Ark of the Covernent; one can only wonder as to the real truths hidden below the surface…. Sadly most of the sacred objects and artifacts of importance and significance have now been removed from the chapel for safe keeping and to this end the chapel has lost it’s very sacred energy and is sadly no more than a library of codes and hidden knowledge. I was glad to have visited Rosslyn before the items where removed, especially certain items of a KT connection that i was very drawn towards and of which i noticed imnediately that they were no longer there; i was glad to have felt those energies that were still there, at that time i visited previously. Interestingly the modern day tours of the Chapel do give out a great deal of  ‘misinformation’ to the public ears, but as we know, those who are meant to know will indeed, in time know.

 

Note that ‘The Jesus’ is saluting with the Ninasian salute as used within The Priory by it’s members. The Fleur de Lys depicted here is the only one to be found on the outside of the chapel, the photo from within the chapel is a representation of the ‘Raised Degree’

Sadly we unable to take photos inside of the chapel due to an ‘incident’ that happened there, but i was able to take many fine shots of the external architecture. I was glad to have been able to take shots of the interior last time i visited. As a footnote i did sneak one photo i was drawn too, see above….. 😉

DUNBAR PARISH CHURCH:  This church is renowned as having been the first collegiate church, in 1342, to have been established in the Lothians. The church was situated on the same site as the present-day parish church, on Queen’s Road just south of Dunbar town centre. The first mention of a church at Dunbar came in 1176 in the Taxatio of Lothian when the church was described as Eclessia de Dunbar. This church, dedicated to St Bega, served the parish as a whole until 1342 and its foundation as a collegiate church. On 21 April 1342, Patrick, 9th Earl of Dunbar was granted by charter, his right to the proprietorship of the church. The Dunbars were no strangers to the patronage of religious establishments, with the foundation of a house of Trinity friars in 1218, and then amonastery of Carmelite monks in 1263, by the 6th and 7th earls respectively. Dunbar Collegiate continued as decreed until it became forfeit to the crown in 1435. For a while the church was ‘enjoyed’ by the  Duke of Albany during the reign of King James 3rd of Scotland, before returning to the Dunbars. In 1483, it, once again, reverted to the crown and stayed that way until the Protestant reformation in 1560.

Sadly the church was totally closed when we were there but we did get some stunning views across the sea as the church is placed on a very commanding position with some very unusual stones and memorials in the graveyard.

The Neville family connection here is the family memorial, but sadly we were unable to investigate further on this occasion. <click on images to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

https://www.revolvy.com/topic/Dunbar%20Collegiate%20Church

http://www.wow.com/wiki/Dunbar_Collegiate_Church

Points to Consider:

  • Escombe Church, Raby Castle Chapel and St Andrew’s Church, all have a connection in respect of the Nevilles; they are all tied together.
  • The Sinclairs and the Nevilles have been connectted from time imemorial.
  • Just who really are ‘The Nevilles’, where did they come from, why are they so important and what is the purpose of their bloodline?

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ July 2017

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

DSC02317 (1)

A very profound inscription with a much deeper meaning discovered in the graveyard at Dunbar…..

 

“The mortal must put on immortality”

“Until the day break, and the shadows flee away”

 

The Keeper of Scrolls”

Aug 2017

QUEST TWENTY TWO: YORKSHIRE: For this one-day quest to Yorkshire, we travelled northwards on Thursday 25th May; the day proved to be stunning as we ventured over the mighty Humber Bridge to our first port of call for the day, which was to be Hessle.

  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE:
  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD:
  • SKIPSEA CASTLE:
  • HORNSEA:

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE: The town of Hessle, near Hull is a pretty little town and the bright sunshine made it extremely picturesque. Hessle has a rather lovely town square with many little shops and listed buldings to it’s credit. It is very near by to that marvelous feat of engineering, the Humber Bridge. In the past Hessle has been a thriving centre for shipbuiding and even earlier on, for the building of wooden boats. It was also a centre for chalk quarying; the largest being at the Humberside Bridge Park, now a nature reserve.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessle

The medieval, largely Gothic church itself has been here since the twelth century with modernization in 1884; there are some rather interesting original carvings on dispay to the right of the altar area and more info on them is mentioned in our video; they depict some rather ancient Gaelic symbols together with a representation of a female minatuar. The Neville family shield is on very prominent display here.

Inside All Saints, Hessle showing the Neville Shield & the name of Clarke on the wall plaque; all part of the ‘bloodline’ <click to enlarge images>

http://www.allsaintshessle.karoo.net/History%20-%20All%20Saints%20Church%20Hessle.htm

 

The ancient relics showing the female minataur & the entry to the church vault upon the floor – blink & you will miss it!

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON: A short car ride away was the next stop of the day, although the church was sadly locked up with the keys being too far away to collect; even so i managed some good shots of the exterior of the church. Preston is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, six miles east of Hull. The parish church of All Saints is a grade one listed building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preston,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=166663

 

All Saints Church, Preston, showing memorial to the ‘Fords’ & the ‘Clarks’ <click to enlarge>

 ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE: Tucked away behind some beautiful tall trees amidst a sea of green countryside; Rise Church is easy to miss and drive straight past, which is exactly what we did do! Rise is a village and small parish in East Riding in Yorkshire, in the heart of a very rural area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

This beautiful church is a grade two listed building in Rise: this current version of the church was rebuilt in 1844/45 using some old reclaimed medieval roof timbers. There was a church at Rise by 1221 but years of neglect sadly took their toll. The current church was built by local landowner Richard Bethal to designs by R. D. Chantrel.

Rise Church in it’s very rural setting <click to enlarge>

The beautiful painted ceiling here is very similar to other Templar churches we have visited over the past few months and to that also of the Italian Chapel in the Orkneys, Scotland. Quite clearly there is a very strong Templar connection here, especially from the aspect of a sacred site and the church is indeed still used by and supported by the local Freemasons of today. There is also a big connection here to the shipbuilding industry of Hull. Other significant symbols to look out for are the Harp, the tower of Babel with a direct connection to the Unicorns of earlier quests and strong connections to the female Minataur of Hessle, from ealier today. Take note also of the ‘Demons’ wheel; (the Samnu Emua) of the Templar teachings, all of which have strong Priory connections…

The bloodline names are once again the Nevilles, in particular Frederick W. Neville who was christened in this church, but who sadly died at a young age, and also the name of Bethal, the current church warden and estate owners.

See the Harp upon the window, the beautiful and very old bibles and the name of ‘Clark’ upon the gravestone, noted as leaving…

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1083419

 

See our link below for more info on All Saints Church, Rise

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE

 

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD: After  short journey we arrived at our next destination of the day and after phoning the reverend, she very kindly came with the keys to let us in, as the church was unusually locked for that hour of the day. We were so glad she did, as this is an amazing church with so much to see once inside. Driffield, also known as Great Driffield is a market town and parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A bronze-age mound just outside of Driffield was excavated in the nineteenth century; the findings of which are now in the British Museum.

All Saints, Driffield <please click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driffield

This church has been here since the early part of the twelth century and probably going back to Saxon times even. A church, as is usual practice, has been built over a site of earlier significance. Basically what we have now is a Norman church, without side aisles with remodelling carried out over the centuries. It has a beautiful five hundred year old tower which is very dominant within the landscape; the churches bells of which were restored for the millenium. There are many beautiful and rather delightful gargoyles, grotesques and other little stone creatures all around the outside of the church; see below…..

Inside, the Templar influence on the stained glass widows is very evident for all to see, with the symbolism, yet the windows do stand alone in their maginficance, design and above all their colour.

Click to enlarge to see the Templar symbolism of these stunning windows

 

See our link below for the next three sites we visited

ALL SAINTS CHURCHES: HESSLE & DRIFFIELD, & SKIPSEA CASTLE

 

SKIPSEA CASTLE: It was a beautifull and peaceful evening when we arrived here at this ancient site, in the middle of a very rural landscpe, complete with it’s own grazing herd. The ‘castle’ is situated near the village of Skipsea in the East Riding of Yorkshire. I was unable to make it up to the summit myself, but the walk around the ramparts was stunning in itself. It is said to have been an impressive Norman motte and bailey castle, dating from before 1086 and among the first raised in Yorkshire, with the earthworks of an attendant fortified ‘borough’. The mound itself has recently been shown to date from the Iron Age. This is of course true but the actual site goes back much further still and is a site of one of the UK’s hidden and strategically placed pyramids, of which we are currently tracing and recording.  The energy here does indeed testify to this fact and our video will explain more still and also about the hauntings here too. It is a beautifully peaceful, energetic and picturesque site and well worth a visit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipsea_Castle

Skipsea ‘Castle’, site of a very ancient pyramid <please click to enlarge>

HORNSEA: We did very briefly call in at the seaside resort of Hornsea and had a quick stretch of legs by way of a stroll along the concrete sea-defence wall, which serves as a ‘promenade’ too, sadly though one cannot see the actual sea whilst strolling along. The area where we stopped is rather comercialised and ‘touristy’ which is a shame, hence we never stayed long. The settlement itself dates back to the early medieval period at lest; the town was expanded in Victorian times with the coming of the Hull and Hornsea Railway.

DSC01581

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsea

  • The family bloodline name significant to the whole area of today’s quest; ie the East Riding of Yorkshire is once again that of The Nevilles and are as follows:-
  • Arthur Henry Neville: born 1864, Hull
  • Arthur John Neville: married 1898, Hull
  • Augusta Emma Neville: born 1887, died 1888
  • Edward Neville: born 1908, died 1908
  • Ellen Neville: married 1843, Hull, died 1975, Hull
  • Enid Neville: born 1923, died 1946  (23 years old)
  • Eva Neville: married (Harper) 1951
  • Frederick W. Neville: born Sealcoates 1927, died Hull 1941 (14 years old)
  • Henry Thorpe Neville: born Sealcoates 1857, married Hull 1873
  • Margaret Elizabeth Neville: born Sealcoates 1845, married Hull 1908, died Sealcoates 1918

 

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

 

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