Tag Archive: Knight Templar


On Cornwall’s Moor

Written from my true experiences….

 

Whispers within the landscape
A pulse vibrating
A breath
The hidden heart
On Cornwall’s moor
A needed sanctuary
When knights a travelling came
Lost in time
Out of time
Three lions roared
To leave their mark
The Dove hovers above
A blood red cross
Dimension’s change
Tis neither the beginning nor the end
Suspended forever in its own time
Tales unfold
Entwined within old ash roots
Never told
The land keeping its own counsel
Ancient eyes watch from the shadows
In recognition
Traveling pilgrims in modern dress
Also acknowledge
All gone before
Seeing within the green of the land
The sanctity of a bloodline
Secrets forever carved in stone
Spell the unspoken word
Tell an untold tale
Energies exchanged
Footprints left
Forever upon the moors

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

May 2021

“The truths have always been protected over the years, within this very shallow world of men; truths hidden behind tales of misadventure, tales of misdoings and tales of misdirecton, thus keeping that which needs protecting, forever secret, yet hidden totally within plain sight…”.

“Quest 31 around the west country of England has proved so far, to have been an amazing quest, despite the very challenging hot weather when we were so thankful for the air conditioning in the car. All the apartments we stayed in have been more than up to scratch, and the places visited and the  knowledge gained has been second to non, life altering and path afirming. One more day then home: lots to write up on, as you see here. I do hope all of you will continue to follow and learn with me as i share knowledge and photos galore. As said, all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time: past, present and future becoming one. Knowledge becomes personal power, when mysteries unravel and ancient codes reveal their truths to the ones whom can truly see….  All the sights we visit on our quests, we do so for very important Craft reasons and although many of the sights are marked ‘in time’ by a church building, it is about what one cannot ‘see’ physically that is the important factor, for in this physical realm, not everything is as it seems….”

‘BENEATH A ROCK ALIVE’

Day Six Wednesday 5th August: Church of St Mary, Templecombe: We left our lovely apartment in Plymouth to travel to pastures new and more adventures. It was to be a long day of traveling through counties galore it seemed! Intercepted by a lovely visit to Simouth Old Fore Street for lunch and retail therapy and then traveling onwards to the Templar church at Templecombe, which yet again was very sadly shut; such a shame as it is a very interesting church with a particular important artifact to be seen inside. Even more of a shame given the church’s Templar history (see below). It has to be said, that yet again G-ds doors were shut to true pilgrims on a sacred journey, something that is becoming all too familiar. No wonder G-d has abandoned this planet! Sacred sites with no access – it makes one wonder! One wonders how the christian church can survive in these times, for they are seemingly still in the ‘dark ages’ and need to move with the times and find ways of inspiring people to attend – which they certainly won’t do with all their doors locked! Mosques for example, are open 24/7 and are full of attendees!

Old Fore Street and Coastline, Sidmouth: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidmouth

Templecombe is a village in Somerset five miles south of Wincaton, 12 miles east of Yeovil and 30 miles west of Salisbury with a population of 1,560, forming along with Combe Throop, the parish of Abbas and Templecombe. Templecombe derives its name from Combe Templariorum, after the Knights Templar who established Templecoombe Preceptory in the village in 1185. After they were suppressed in 1312 it was granted to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem who held it until the Dissolution of the Monastries after which it was acquired by Richard Duke of Otterton, Devon. An attempt to discover ‘the village of the templars’ was made by the ‘Time Team’ television series, in a programme first shown in 1996. Late in the investigation, an old tithe map revealed the location of the Templar site, and an old stone boundary wall was found to be still standing seven feet high.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Templecombe

Photos from outside of St Mary’s Templecombe; showing what could have been if we were allowed inside… <click to enlarge>

The Anglican Church of St Mary at Templecombe, Somerset was built in the 12th century and is a Grade II listed building. The parish is part of the benefice of Abbas and Templecombe, Henstridge and Horsington. The church was probably established during the period when the manor was held by Shaftesbury Abbey, but granted to the Knights Templar while it was held by his descendant Serlo FitzOdo, who established a preceptory in the village in 1185. The preceptory served as an administrative centre for the lands held by the Templars in the south west of England and Cornwall. It may also have been used to train men and horses for the Crusades. After the Knights Templar were suppressed following the 1307 order by Pope Clement IV, it was granted to the Knights of St John, who held it until the dissolution of the monastries. Parts of the original 12th-century church remain, the foundations being Saxon, but it underwent a major Victorian restoration in the 19th century, including a rebuilding of the chancel plus a new  vestry.

In the church is a painting on wooden boards of a head, (see photos above) which was discovered in the roof of an outhouse of a local building in 1945. The painting is thought to be from the 13th century, with a connection to the Templecoombe Preceptory (or Combe Templariorum) which was established in the village in 1185. It was given to the church in 1956. For many years the head has been believed to be that of Christ without the halo which was the norm in religious iconography at the time. The Knights Templar were suppressed partly because of their use of the image of Christ without the halo. There has been speculation linking the image to the Shroud of Turin and other suggestions link to the image being of John the Baptist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St_Mary,_Abbas_and_Templecombe

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lancelot Desposyni (520-593) France. 48 x GGF of the Fordham Line.

After an interesting day of visits and travel we arrived at our cosy flat in the suburbs of Southampton, not far from the docks and our home for the next three nights!

‘OF BATTLES DRAWN’

Day Seven Thursday 6th August: St Mary’s Church, Southampton: It was already a sweltering hot morning when we arrived at St Mary’s Church, Southhampton, so we were very pleased to find the doors open and a welcoming coolness greeting us inside. Sadly due to ‘Miss Rona’ and our churches being habitually shut to pilgrims, we are always delighted when we are able to find welcoming open doors, and so it was with St Marys; a chuch full of life and vigor and being part of the modern times with a very forward thinking attitude. A vibrant church totally living in the times with much going on and an increasing attendance, all down to Adam the facillitator of the site whom has bought his enthusiasm and possitive vibes to the church! A huge lesson to be learned by many of those whom are connected to churches on many levels.

Southampton is a city in Hampshire, 70 miles south-west of London and 15 miles west of Portsmouth A major port close to the New Forest, it lies at the northernmost point of Southampton Water, at the confluence of the River Test and Itchen with the River Hamble joining to the south. The history of the area has always been influenced by the sea and rivers. Archaeological finds suggest that the area has been inhabited since the Stone Age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southampton

St. Mary’s Church, is a Church of England parish church, and the largest church in the port city of Southampton. This is the mother church to this former county town with its forerunners spanning back to the first Saxon settlements of the 7th century, including a major collegiate church of the European Middle Ages dedicated to the same patron saint. Parts of the church date to the 1880s. Interestingly, in 1914 the sound of its church bells inspired the song, ‘The Bells of St Mary’s’, originally recorded in 1919 by Frances Alda and later sung by Bing Crosby in a film of the same name. The church has listed building status expressly due to its church tower and spire being local landmarks. The interior and walls were gutted in World War II and rebuilt in 1954-6 save for the tower, which was architect designed. There have been up to six other churches on the site, with records entered in the Domesday ook.

The interior is very well looked after with one of the largest organs in South-East England. The church is full of some very interesting artifacts and has a collection of some stunning windows full of meaning, that tell an ancient tale or two.. We were shown around by Adam, a lovely guy, whom considers himself as a facilitator and certainly has his finger on the pulse as far as having a very modern approach, and thus increasing the congregation in leaps and bounds.

Many seafaring references are to be found within the church with an interesting plaque dedicated to the memory of the musicians whom perished on the Titanic, one of whom was of the Craft bloodlines we are documenting; especially poignant to our own head researcher, for this was his own relative on board the Titancic on that fateful night….

Some of the often poignant seafaring references to be found in St Mary’s Church, Southampton <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Mary%27s_Church,_Southampton

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • James Fordham (1697) Ware, Herts  9 x GGF of the Fordham line

Christchurch Priory Christchurch:  A lovely treat as this was not on our official list for today! It was an extremely hot day and we both struggled in the heat, and once again we were very thankful for the air-con in the car. So yes this church was a treat indeed, not on our list but very much a part of our quest and lovely to find it open. A wonderful experience here with so much amazing symbology within the building, telling tales of past truths, still relevant in today’s world; some stunning windows too which were so so full of meaning. Very nice too, to see clear documented reference to the Neville line – the main bloodline of our quests and an extremely important bloodline within history.

Christchurch is a town and civil parish in Dorset which adjoins Bournemouth to the west, with the new Forest to the east. Founded in the seventh century at the confluence of the rivers Avon and Stour, which flow into Christchurch Harbour, the town was originally named Twynham but became known as Christchurch following the construction of the Priory in 1094. The town developed into an important trading port, and was later fortified. During the 18th and 19th centuries it had a colourful history with smuggling! The town’s harbour, beaches, nature reserves and historically important buildings have made Christchurch a popular tourist destination attracting some 1.5 million visitors a year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch,_Dorset

Christchurch Priory is an ecclesiastical parish and former priory church in Christchurch in Dorset. It is one of the longest parish churches in the country and is larger than many English Anglican Cathedrals. The story of Christchurch Priory goes back to at least the middle of the 11th century, as the Domesday Book of 1086 says there was a priory of 24 secular canons here in the reign of Edward the Confessor. The Priory is on the site of an earlier church dating from 800AD. In 1094 a chief minister of William II, Ranulf Flambard, began the building of a church. Local legend has it that Flambard originally intended the church to be built on top of St Catherines Hill, but during the night all the building materials were mysteriously transported to the site of the present priory. By about 1150 there was a basic Norman church consisting of a nave, a central tower and a quire extending eastwards from the crossing. It was during this period that another legend originated, that of the miraculous beam. The legend of the miraculous beam dates to the early 12th century. The story is that a beam was found to have been cut too short when it was hoisted into place. This would have been embarrassing for the carpenters since the wood was expensive and would be difficult to replace. There was however a mysterious carpenter who had worked and eaten alone. The following day the carpenters returned and found the beam was now fitted in place. The unknown carpenter was never seen again, and the story came to be that it was Jesus Christ who had intervened. The church became Christ’s Church in commemoration of the event. The miraculous beam can be seen today and is located in the Priory’s ambulatory.

The church is full of interesting artifacts including a framed family tree chart mentioning Cicily Neville <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christchurch_Priory

Some of the many stunning windows inside the church <click to enlarge>

   

‘OF  KINGS ATTUNED’

St James Church Poole: After a welcomed lunch alongside the river at Christchurch we felt refreshed and cooled down but sadly the next port of call on this very hot day, St Jame’s Church in Poole was closed to us, so just a few photos from outside was all we managed.

Poole is a large coastal town and seaport in Dorset, 21 miles east of Dorchester and adjoining Bournemouth to the east. Human settlement in the area dates back to before the Iron Age. The earliest recorded use of the town’s name being in the 12th century when the town began to emerge as an important port, prospering with the introduction of the wool trade, later becoming one of the busiest ports in Britain. In the Second World War, Poole was one of the main departing points for the Normandy landings. Poole is a busy tourist resort with it’s large natural harbour and beautiful beaches. The town is a commercial port with both freight and passenger ferry services, connecting to Jersey, Guernsey, as well as to Saint-Malo in Brittany, where we had visited on Quest 28. The town’s name derives from a corruption of the Celtic word bol and the Old English word pool meaning a place near a pool or creek. The area around modern Poole has been inhabited for the past 2,500 years.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poole

St James is a Church of England parish church in Poole on the south coast of Dorset, originally built in 1142. The church is located in the historic quarter of the town, near Poole Quay. It is the parish church for the St James sub district of Poole. The church has long been associated with the local fishing trade and is known locally as ‘the fishermen’s church’. The church has an unusual weather vane fashioned in the shape of a fish. The church was mostly rebuilt around 1820, in Georgian style. The church is seen as a good example of English Georgian religious architecture and it is designated it a Grade II listed building. But without gaining access there is not really much else to mention.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_James%27_Church,_Poole

https://stjameschurchpoole.weebly.com/history.html

Grail Bloodline Connections: 

  • Lieut. Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

Before leaving Poole we spent a lovely time relaxing by the historic quayside; it was like a south of France day!

SOLDIERS WARS’

Nothe Fort Barrack Weymouth: Although the fort was closed by the time we arrived, the grounds around the outside overlooking the sea were just stunning, so it was enjoyable wandering around and relaxing there, despite the heat. Located at the entrance to Weymouth Harbour and overlooking Portland Harbour, the Nothe Fort was built between 1860-1872 to protect the Naval Harbour at Portland.

Weymouth is a seaside town in Dorset, situated on a sheltered bay at the mouth of the River Wey on the English Channel.  The town is 7 miles south of Dorchester 5 miles north of the Isle of Portland. Weymouth is a tourist resort, situated halfway along the Jurassic Coast; a World Heritage Site important for its geology and landforms. The stunning harbour has cross-channel ferries, and is home to both pleasure boats and private yachts. The history of the borough stretches back to the 12th century, including it’s involvement in the spread of the Black Death, it was also a major departure point for the Normandy Landings. King Henry VIII had two Device Forts built to protect the south Dorset coast from invasion in the 1530s: Sandsfoot Castle in Wyke Regis and Portland Castle in Castletown. Parts of Sandsfoot have fallen into the sea due to coastal erosion. During the English Civil War, around 250 people were killed in the local Crabchurch Conspiracy in February 1645.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weymouth,_Dorset

Situated at the end of the Nothe Peninsula, jutting eastwards from the town of Weymouth and Weymoth Harbour; the coastal defence at the site was built between 1860 and 1872 by 26 Company of the Royal Engineers, to protect Portland and Weymouth Harbours, with Portland becoming an important Royal Navy base. Shaped like the letter D, the fort was built with bomb-proof casemates and deep magazines. Work began on the Nothe Fort in 1860 and the first soldiers to be staioned there were No 2 Battery Royal Artillery (Tatton-Browns) The fort was abandoned in 1956 as it was no longer required as a coastal defence and then used by the Royal Navy as stores, before being purchased by the local council in 1961. It is now a museum and remains one of the best-preserved forts of its kind in the country. The fort and its outer gateway have been Grade II listed since 1974. It’s fusee steps, located in Nothe Gardens, have been Grade II listed since 2000; constructed for hauling trolleys transporting ammunition, spares and stores from the quay to Nothe Fort. In 1978, the Nothe Fort, tramway and searchlight battery at The Nothe, also became scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

https://nothefort.org.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nothe_Fort

See our video below of the Fort and beautiful surrounding scenery!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-3JA2vuILY

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • William Henry Fordham (1832) Lewes, Sussex  3 x GGF

AND KNIGHTS THAT FALL’

Day Eight Friday 7th August: St Pauls Church Ringwood: Today was to prove to be an overwhelmingly hot August Day; a bit too much for me in fact, yet we made our way towards our first destination of the day. Sadly again the church was shut, so a stroll around the outside had to suffice with some interesting roof-dwelling creatures looking down upon us!  The church stands in the market place and is an important landmark, the tower being visible from the top of the hill at picket post on the A31 some three miles east of Ringwood, as well as from high ground at Ibsley Common in the Forest.

Ringwood is a bustling market town in south-west Hampshire, located on the River Avon, close to the New Forest, northeast of Bournemouth and southwest of Southampton. It was founded by the Anglo-Saxons, and a weekly market has been held there since theMiddle Ages. Ringwood is recorded in a charter of 961, in which King Edgar gave 22 hides of land in Rimecuda to Abingdon Abbey. The name is also recorded in the 10th century as Runcwuda and Rimucwuda. The second element Wuda means a ‘wood’, Rimuc may be derived from Rima meaning ‘border’, hence ‘border wood.’ The name may also refer to Ringwood’s position on the fringe of the New Forest, or on the border of Hampshire.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringwood

The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 of 1086. It was rebuilt in the 13th century and survived until 1853, when it was completely knocked down and rebuilt. We could not get inside to discover it’s history or find much on the internet apart from a few bits as bobs, such as the church containing a 15th-century monumental brass of John Prophete, Dean of Hereford and York. The church was built of rough dressed squared Swanage stone, limestone dressings with a plain tile roof and is of a cruciform plan. It is a tall restrained church in late Early English/early Decorated style.  Interestingly, according to the internet, the patron of the parish church of St Peter & St Paul is the Dean of King’s college, Cambridge.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

TO MOTHER’S WOMB’

St Marys Church Ringwood: A deceptively simple looking grade I listed building set way back at the end of a wide spacious bricked pathway, but with the unusual feature of a large blue sundial set above the entrance to the church, which looked uncannily like a pyramid! The church, which is actually in the small village of Ellingham, west of the New Forest, has a very pretty garden graveyard around the back and some very attractive brickwork on the building itself. Ellingham is most famous for the story of Alice Lisle, who’s tomb can be found inside the church, and whom was executed by the infamous Judge Jeffreys in 1685, on the charge of harbouring fugitives after the defeat of the Monmouth Rebellion. Ellingham church was built in the 13th century. It is thought that there was an earlier, probably Saxon, church on the site. It is described in early charters as the church of St Mary or as the church of All Saints with the chapel of St Mary. It was added to in the 15th century, and the red-brick west wall was rebuilt in 1746. The church was restored in 1869-90 by Thomas Graham Jackson It has a large blue sundial located over the porch of the church.

St Mary’s Church Ringwood, showing it’s wonderful sundial/pyramid, its pretty graveyard and attractive brickwork <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellingham,_Hampshire

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Lieut Ralph Neville (1832) Lews, Sussex  3 x GGF

‘IN SALISBURY A WIND DID FALL’

St Marks Church Salisbury: Sadly once again the church was closed, so we had to make do with a walk around the outside of the building. Salisbury is a cathedral city in Wiltshire, at the confluence of the rivers Avon, Nadder and Bourne. The city is approximately 20 miles from Southampton and 30 miles from Bath; both of which we have visited on this quest. Salisbury is in the southeast of Wiltshire, near the edge of  Salisbury Plain. Of course the area is very well-known for Stonehenge, which has no Craft significance at all, but there are a lot of history and archaeological findings connected the whole area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salisbury

The church is in quite a built up area on a junction with roads traversing around, yet it nevertheless has a spacious and pretty garden graveyard. Even though it was closed, the church is said to be an active church in Sailsbury. It was built in 1892–94 to the designs of Joseph A. Reeve and has been a Grade II listed building since 1974. St Mark’s was built to serve the northern region of Salisbury, which at a time was undergoing much residential expansion; the foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rev. Edward White Benson, on 27 April 1892, accompanied by the Bishops of Salisbury, St Asaph and Truro. St Mark’s exterior is faced with stone from the Hurdcott Quarries, with dressings and window tracery in Doulting stone. Around the exterior of the building are some interesting additions to the architecture, so although we could not gain access we still managed some interesting photos.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mark%27s_Church,_Salisbury

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Sir John H Fordham (1432) Kelshall, Hertfordshire  18 x GGF

THE ROMANS HAD THEIR WAY’

Day Nine Saturday 8th August: St Mary the Virgin Church Gosport: Due to the very intense heat of the last two days, i was too poorly to participate in this day’s agenda, so we changed some of our planned visits and thus my dear Craft brother ventured out on his own. This church turned out to be very relevant to him and he took some great photos too. There is hardly anything on the internet on this church apart from it being an ancient, Grade I-listed church of Rowner, considerably extended twice in the late 20th century, in the 1960’s and again in the 1990’s, to considerable acclaim from architectural writers. It is a Norman church and the oldest building left standing in Gosport. it was extended in the Early English style with Victorian additions added after restoration. There are apparently some fine monuments in the church, including a rare limestone Sepulchre altar tomb to John Brune dated 1559.

Gosport is a town in Hampshire on the south coast of England, situated on a peninsula on the western side of Portsmouth Harbour, opposite the city of Portsmouth, linked by the Gosport Ferry. Until the last quarter of the 20th century, Gosport was a major naval town associated with the defence and supply infrastructure of Her Majesty’s Naval Base Portsmouth. There is a great sea-faring and naval tradition in the whole area, much of which is reflected in the churches and cathedrals, especially in the stained-glass windows. The name Gosport, is purported to derive its name from ‘goose’, but  an alternative etymology of ‘gorse’ is not supported by the regional name for this plant, “furze”. A third theory, claiming a derivation from “God’s Port” is believed to be a 19th-century invention, and yet this is the slogan of Gosport as seeen upon its emblem. The Rowner area of the peninsula was settled by the Anglo Saxons and is mentioned in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle as Rughenor (rough bank or slope). Both Rowner and Alverstoke, the name coming from the point where the River Alver entered the Solent at Stokes Bay, were included in the Domesday Book. Rowner was the earliest known settlement of the peninsula, with many Mesolithic finds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gosport

 

St Mary the Virgin Church with gravestones relating to the Clarke bloodline…

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Baron George Neville (1440) Aberga 14 x GGF

All in all a marvelous quest-listen to Karl sharing the bloodlines and chewing the cud!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W_k8KuzYV2s&t=5s

“So thus this marvelous and amazing quest has come to an end, and because of the infamous ‘Miss Rona’ we will be enforced to take a sabbatical from roaming for the time being. Memories are very sweet and long lasting though, and will more than treasured over the winter months with so much to mull over and to continue to digest and learn from, in some cases until the end of time.

During my time as Craft i have given up all my past beliefs. It has been very freeing, they were nothing but manmade chains around my soul. Religions are all a form of control. One can still enjoy all the many myths as good old stories, for hidden within them one can still find the truth if one has faith and looks hard enough, just as in life too, one can, if loyal and steadfast and with faith discover the truth and the Grail….

and so the Grail Quest continues…..”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

AKA Reverend Janis

AKA ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

December 2nd 2020

THE GRAIL QUEST

“The Grail was claimed to have healing abilities and to bring enlightenment connecting it to the metaphysical realms. Long before the time of Jesus, (the Jesus) stories tell of Angels (Djinn) (Ninansians) bringing the ‘cup’ from heaven and given to ‘sacred’ or round table knights, which ties in nicely with the tales of King Arthur’s knights partaking of their quest to find the Holy Grail. If the grail was bought from heaven, which seems very likely, to Tara, then why and what was it’s purpose here on this earth, has it still got a purpose today and how or if, does it connect to humankind?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY & LUXEMBOURG

31ST OCTOBER 2019

Germany into Luxembourg

  • Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz: Germany
  • Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City
  • Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg
  • Saint Sebastion Church, Ettelbruck

Day Five: We knew we would have a long day ahead as we made our way on day five on Thursday 31st October (a memorable date in many calendars) driving from Germany into Luxemboug, but with some lovely places to see on the way and the weather was most definitely in our favour. The sun was shinning and the weather was extremely warm as we arrives at our first and most beautiful destination of the day. Even the chemtrails in the skies above (not often seen in Germany) did not lower our spirits. After a two hour drive we arrived in Koblenz, Germany.

Basilica of Saint Castor Church, Koblenz, Germany: Modern day Koblenz is very popular with tourists and one can certainly see why; it is very pretty with mountains around and sits on the banks of the Rhine, where the river is joined by the Mosselle. It is full of energy and life; i had visited before as a pure tourist and my memories of it were very possitive. Koblenz was established as a  Roman military post by Drusus around 8 B.C. Its name originates from the Latin meaning “(at the) confluence” of the two rivers. The actual confluence is today known as the “German Corner”, a symbol of the unification of Germany that features an equestrian statue of Emperor William 1. As the Roman Soldier that he was, King Arthur travelled through here; and a representation of him inside the church certainly attests to this fact. The history of the area has a strong connection to the Romans which one can read much more anout in the link below.

Koblenz is a principal seat of the Mosel and Rhenish wine trade, mineral waters, the manufacture of automotive parts, pianos, paper, cardboard, machinery, boats, and barges. Since the 17th century, it has been home to the Konigsbacher brewery, the Old Brewery in Koblenz’s city centre, and now a plant in Koblenz-Stolzenfels. It is an important transit centre for the Rhine railways and for the Rhine navigation. The headquarters of the German Army Forces Command was located in the city until 2012. It’s successor, the new formed German Army Command is based at the von-Hardenberg-Kaserne in Strausberg, Brandenburg. In the more ancient part of Koblenz stand several buildings which have a historical interest. Prominent among these, near the point of confluence of the rivers, is the Basilica of St Castor or Kastorkirche, dedicated to Castor of Karden, with four towers. The church was founded in 836 by Louis the Pious, but the present Romanesque building was completed in 1208, the Gothic vaulted roof dating from 1498. In front of the church of Saint Castor stands a fountain, erected by the French in 1812, with an inscription to commemorate Napoleon’s invasion of Russia.

The unique representation of King Arthur, situated just inside the side door, testament to him having travelled through here as a Roman soldier which is of paramount importance for people to know; nearby a winged serpent and and angel keep silent watch over….

The Basilica of St. Castor:  is the oldest church in Koblenz situated at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle. A fountain called Kastorbrunnen (Castor Well) was built in front of the basillica during Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and the church is worth seeing for the historical events that have occurred in it. See link below for deatailed history.

The church of St. Castor was built between 817 and 836 by Hetto, the Archbishop of Trier with the support of Emperor Louis the Pious, just outside the city of Confluentes, the city founded by the Romans and dedicated on 12 November 836, but Louis did not come to Koblenz until after the consecration of the church, pointing to the importance of the Archbishop in the building of the church, especially as the church was until the 13th century outside the city of Koblenz. The church honours St Castor who is said to have worked as a missionary on the Moselle in the 4th century and to have founded a religious community in Karden, Rizza, the alleged daughter of Louis the Pious, is venerated in the church as a saint of the city of Koblenz and her shrine still stands in the church.

As one would expect the church is kept in immaculate condition with many piecies of fine artwork displayed

An extra treat of the day, and a very enjoyable one at that was a ride on the cable car across the beautiful Rhine, which was situated just behind the church, so far too good an opurtunity to miss and one could also get a great view of the equestruan statue mentioned above. What a lovely day it had turned out to be!

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur as the Roman Soldier travelled through Koblenz.

It was an interesting two hour drive as we made our way across the German border and into Luxembourg, over what proved to be a very mountainous and scenic route, but as we got higher and higher nearer to the clouds the weather closed in and it was a very wet day as we pulled into Luxembourg City; still very exciting though!

Notre-Dam Cathedral, Luxembourg City: The cathedral here is situated in a very built up area so it was very hard to get good views of it especially in the rain and gloom, and the photos did i manage to take were quite atmospheric. Howerver once inside the cathedral it, is a whole different story and it really was most beautiful, full of many paintings and tapestries and also very busy with tourists on such a wet day. It was originally a Jesuit church, and its cornerstone was laid in 1613. It is the only cathedral in Luxembourg and is a noteworthy example of late gothis architecture; however, it also has many Renaissance elements and adornments. At the end of the 18th century, the church received the miraculous image of the Maria Consolatrix Afflictorum, the patron saint of both the city and the nation.  Around 50 years later, the church was consecrated as the Church of Our Lady and in 1870, it was elevated by Pope Pius IX to the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

Luxembourge and cathedral on a very wet and gloomy day!

From 1935 to 1938 the Cathedral was enlarged and expanded: the rebuilding of the exterior architecture on the Gothic-style cathedral presented a challenge, since the goal was to harmoniously integrate the church with the surrounding buildings, as well as the old residential houses. The Cathedral has three towers, the west tower, which was the tower of the Jesuit church and which contains the bells, the east tower, and the central tower, which stands over the transept. When the Cathedral was enlarged in 1935-1938, the east and central towers were added. The central tower, which is only a third of the height of the other towers, consists of a wide, pyramid-shaped base and a narrow peak covered with copper. On Good Friday, 5 April 1985, around mid-day, work on the roof caused the west tower to catch fire. The church bells, i.e. the Virgin Mary bell, the Willibrord bell, the Peter bell, and the Cunigunde bell were destroyed in the fire. When the tower collapsed, the roof of the central aisle was also partly damaged. It took until 17 October 1985 for the tower to be repaired. It was here that King Arthur found his information and instructions in his quest for the Grail, at this pivotel point in time; a point in time indicated as to its true meaning by researching the old maps of Luxembourg…

The many stunning artworks inside the cathedral <click to expand>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

As we were staying in Luxembourg for a couple of nights it was nice to not have far to travel to our digs on that very wet night; the modern apartment we stayed in was very posh and shiny with a ‘touch’ button for almost everything! All needs catered for exept as seems the norm in Europe – they dont ‘do’ toasters!!

Day Six: This day started off quite bright but the further we got into the scenic side of Luxembourg and i guess higher up, the weather did close in on us again, but very dramatic no-the-less! Wiltz is a lovely old town in the Luxembourg mountains, although not too much about it or the church on the internet, but according to the internet it is a commune with town status in north-western Luxembourg and situated on the banks of the river Wiltz. It was also a battleground in the Battle of the Bulge, near the end of  World War II.  The name “Wiltz” comes from a Celtic word meaning “on the creek.” Wiltz was originally inhabited by the Celts, and was first documented in 764AD. It received its town rights in 1240. The counts of Wiltz are among the oldest in Luxembourg

Notre-Dam Church, Wiltz, Luxembourg: This church does sit up in the mountains amidst stunning scenery and one often has to take one’s shots on the move as it were, for good views do come and go, so one takes one’s chances. There are many buildings around this church so not many good views down at ground level. There are many churches and cathedrals in Europe, and this is just one, that go by the name of ‘Notre-Dam’, which means ‘Our Lady’, (The Virgin Mary in various forms explained in future quests) yet most folks only know the one in Paris, many thinking that, that one is ‘the’ Notre-Dam, yet that is far from the truth. Although quite plain and stark on the outside, the beauty and artworks within have to be seen to be believed, all so lovingly looked after with a very ancient feel to the church with the the ancient ‘energies’ still there, and it is there that King Arthur recieved further instructions on his quest for the Holy Grail, on his travels/pilgramage around Europe. Sometimes one needs to travel to the ‘back of beyond’ as it were to see the correct and meaningful churches; for we too are travelling the route that Arthur took – what a wonderful journey we are being treated too with knowledge and enlightenment in abundace along the whole route. The church here unsurpringly, given the magnetics of the area, had the most amazing energy, which all connects to the quest for the grail; a very powerful place both physically and metaphysically.

Notre-Dam Church set amidst Luxembourg’s mountains.

In the European churches and cathedrals one can not help but notice that what one in this country would be described as ‘occult’ symbols are very present and evident in these old buildings, hinting at an older christianity very far removed from what is practiced in the UK today. Various versions of ‘The All Seeing Eye’ and the ‘Marasa/Alpha-Omega’ symbols were particulary evident and also if one looks closely quiet a lot of Enochian sybolism. This would indicate a time, a common point in time, before there was a separation of religions. It was here that King Arthur found his information in his Grail Quest.

There are some lovely artworks here, (see above) one wooden-carved statue in particular (guarding the entrance) showing some very unique and meaningful (to Craft) hand gestures – close up shown on the video. There is a wonderful representation of the Ave Maria over a ‘sea serpent’, very unusual and not often seen; she has her foot upon the serpent; obviously Maria/Mary is connected to the sea…. There is also an interlocking Alpha to Omega upon the altar cloth, which of course represents many other things including pyramid energy. In front of the altar is a traditional gong, where it is usually a bell. The Lamb of God here at the High Altar is unusual, a slightly different pose with the ‘All Seeing Eye’ looking down upon it, surrounded by sunflowers, roses and berries and at the very top ‘The Queen’ with her scribe carrying a sword. All very beautifully carved in wood with many historical connections to Templarism and to King Arthur and his pilgrimage, all within this stunning church at Wiltz.

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here in his quest for the Grail.

Watch our video here:

Germany into Luxembourg – Koblenz, Luxembourg & Wiltz

After a lovely lunch at Wiltz we made our way once more into the mountains of Luxembourg; although it was a damp day, the scenery looked spectacular and oh so green and pretty. Fate took our hand once again and although our next unplanned destination was not a part of the actual quest itself, these little surprises do present themselves from time to time when one is off the beaten track, and who can resist a sign indicating a little historic chapel down a narrow mountain road! Thus we found this little octagonal chapel, dedicated to Saint Kunigunde and the only one of its kind in Luxembourg – so what an amazing find; a treasuee in the green mountains indeed.

A unique octagonal chapel chanced upon in the mountains on a wet and pleasant day

Saint Sebastien Church, Ettelbruck:  It was still raining when we made our way into Ettelbuck, which according to the internet is another commune with town status; the towns of Warken and Grentzingen are also within the commune. Until 1850, both Erpeldange and Schieren were part of the Ettelbruck commune as well, but both towns were detached from Ettelbruck by law on 1 July 1850. Ettelbruck lies at the exact spot where three rivers meet: the Sauer, the Wark, and the Alzette. This location has historically made Ettelbruck a major transportation hub for the country second only to the city of Luxembourg.

Germany occupied Ettelbruck on 10 May 1940 and US forces first liberated the town on 11 September 1944 but Germany retook the town on 16 December 1944 during the Battle of the Bulge. US General George S. Patten on Christmas Day, 25 December 1944, led US troops in the final liberation of Ettelbruck from Nazi occupation. One of Ettelbruck’s main squares is named Patton Square, and is located at the exact spot where the German offensive into Luxembourg’s Alzette Valley was stopped, ending its attempt to reoccupy the country as a whole. Since 1954, the town has held a Remembrance Day celebration each July honoring General Patton and the US, British, French, Belgian and Luxembourgish troops who fought with him there.

Saint Sebastien Church and Ettlebruck town square: even though very damp we had a very enjoyable stroll around

The church is situated next to Henri Muller Street, which had a real personal connection to our lead researcher, whom felt very at home there. Again, not a lot on the internet about the church but i did find this with some nice illustations – see link below. The first stone of the present Neoclassical-style parish church of Saint Sebastien was placed in 1841. However, completion of the building was delayed due to marshy conditions. Finally, four lateral circular chapels were added to reinforce the building. Although completed in 1851, the church was not conscecrated until 1864 by the bishop Monseigneur Nicolas Adames. The interior of the Church houses several precious art objects: an oil painting by Joseph Probst titled “Le buisson ardent”, an African Shona sculpture, a beautiful eight-and-a-half register organ and several remarkable stained-glass windows presenting, among other things a panorama of Ettlebruck. The parish church was badly damaged during the Ardennes offensive. The formal reopening of the restored church took place in 1948.

In the church are to be found an emblematical representaion of ‘The Four Corners’ or ‘The Four Directions’ which are of particular interest from a Craft point of view and not generally known of in this context. Shown upon the four windows are The Sash, The Disc, The Challice and The Cross. The quest for the grail was particulary strong there and it was also another site where (King) Arthur found his information in respect of his grail quest.

The Four Corners or Four Directions, emblematical of higher knowledge

Luxembourge had proved to be very revealing in respect of Arthurs grail journey, also to us on our quest; knowledge recieved to be digested and devoured over the weeks to come….

Blood Line Connections:

  • King Arthur found his information here on his Quest for the Grail.

And so we returned to our high-tech digs for one more night before embarking upon a four hour journey into France the next day. Luxembourg had proved to be beautiful, revealing and very wet!

“Let Angels tell tales; and Demons too

Let the secret of The Grail forever ring true”

 

Knights of the Red Order February 2020

The Keeper of Scrolls’

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

QUEST 27 CONTINUED…

Day Three: St Petrox Church and Dartmouth Castle: It was another gloriously sunny day when we arrived in beautiful Dartmouth; a town and civil parish in the county of Devon; we were on day three of this wonderful adventure. This is a designated area of outstanding beauty and one can easily see why. In 1086, the Domesday Book lists Dunestal as the only settlement in the area, and which now makes up the Parish of Dartmouth. Over time it developed as a port and was of strategic importance as a deep water port for sailing vessels. Interestingly the port was used as the sailing point for the Crusades of 1147 and 1190, and Warfleet Creek, close to Dartmouth Castle, which we also visited, is suposed by some, to be named for the vast fleets that assembled there; later it was also the home of the Royal Navy. The narrow mouth of the port is protected by two fortified castles, Dartmouth Castle and Kingswear Castle. In modern times a Royal Regatta takes place annually over three days at the end of August.

Arriving at beautiful Dartmouth in Devon; a well-known tourist destination on the western bank of the tidal estuary of the River Dart.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth,_Devon

St Petrox Church: So on Friday 3rd May we made our way across beautiful scenery and moorland to this very special church situated right next door to Dartmouth Castle; St Petrox church is packed with ‘hidden histories’ relating to the Knights Templars, the Nevilles and beyond. Both church and graveyard have a powerful and scenic vantage point overlooking the estuary. The church of St Petrox, which is a grade one listed building, perches above the mouth of the river like a guardian, but its exposed position has presented it with problems and challenges. First recorded in 1192 in deeds relating to Little Dartmouth, St Petrox is referred to as the ‘Monastery of St Peter’. There is little recorded history of the church around this time and there is little more information on what the ‘monastery’ was. It has been suggested that the monastery was perhaps started by the man whose name now graces the church: St Petrox. St Petroc was an interesting saint; a Welsh aristocrat who gave up worldly things and travelled to Ireland to study in piety. Later he ministered around Cornwall where legend has him converting the rather evil Cornish King Constantine to the faith. He was based in Bodmin for a while before heading to the continent, where he is supposed to have met the Pope, travelled to India and beyond and had many fantastical adventures before his death. His bones were held at Bodmin and venerated. However their is a lot more to St Petrox than meets the eye…

https://www.bythedart.co.uk/things-to-do-in-dartmouth/what%27s-in-church%3F—st.-petrox/

https://britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101297086-church-of-st-petrox-dartmouth#.XPfE1497l1s

St Petrox Church with stunning views across the estuary.

This church then is absolutely  steeped in Knights Templar history going back as far as the Crusades and beyond. This part of the castle was built around 1330, yet the history and actual sacred site goes back far beyond that, for many reasons to be learnt about; this really is the only church in the area that is worthwhile to spend time at. It is a must see for anyone interested in templarism and knightly virtues, or indeed who are like us and are actual Templars researching blood lines….

There are many symbols and connections to the Templars here, which you can see explained in detail in the video below. There are connections too, to the Fordham line, which traces back to the Desposyni line and the line of Christ, and to France. There is a very particular tomb in the central isle that screams templarism, displaying a symbol that the Extinction Rebellion group of modern times now use.

There is also reference on one of the windows to Gonville and Caius College in Cambridge (home town of one of us questers) and as what may come as a surprise to many, the city of Cambridge was actually founded on templar money! There is also a plaque near the font displaying the MacAndrew name, which ties us in at this point in time to previous quests. But the most delightful and important discovery is the churches connection to Lancelot! The connection can be seen on the Lancelot stained-glass widow with on the left hand side a German connection, while on the right of the window are the emblems of Lancelot Desposyni himself; one of the ancestors of the Fordham line. As we may already mentioned the Fordhams ‘spawned’ out of Westphalen in Germany and then into France, where they stayed for many centuries, and then from France onto England,  thus linking us into the Arthurian Ledgends and future quests but also connecting us to our up and coming visit to Tintagel

Images above that prove myth and legend have roots firmly in fact & can be traced right back from modern times – exactly what we are doing on these quests! The first two photos connect to Gonville & Caus College in Cambridge, the second two are the stunning Lancelot Desposyni window connecting to the bloodline of our quests, then the familiar Neville sheild & the MacAndrew surname again – all part of the same bloodline! Lastly, the very profound plaque that was hidden behind a curtain in a little ‘cubby hole’ reads “The cup of blessing which we bless is not the communian of the blood of Christ” So lots to pause for thought about..

See our video below for a tour of the church and much more info…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k3Q5nmKTT14&t=45s

Dartmouth Castle: The castle seems to sit precariously on the cliff edge where the River Dart meets the English Channel with amazing views out to sea. The day we were there was sunny and the views were spectacular. One can enjoy roaming the castle and learning about its history over several levels; while the narrow winding stairway to the top is challenging; it is a must for the views alone! The castle was begun in 1388 to protect the town and harbour of Dartmouth against French raids during the 100 years war and 100 years later it was strengthened with a gun tower, the first purpose-built coastal artillery for Britain! The castle continued to play an important role in our defences of the land throught out the years – see link for further info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dartmouth_Castle

St Edmund King & Martyr Church, Kingsbridge: Just a short drive along peaceful country roads bought us to our next scheduled stop which sadly on this occasion was closed to us, so a few shots of the outside will have to suffice. The symbols on the windows looked significant so a shame we could not get in – though we did have a good look aound the town, where there were some amazing charity shops!

The church is an Anglican churched dedicated to St Edmund the Martyr: once a parish church, it is no longer is used for regular worship. St. Edmund’s Church, is mainly in the Perpendicular style and retains some 13th century features including a font, but was enlarged and reconsecrated around 1414. The oldest part of the church is the 13th century crossing tower. The rest of the church is much altered with the addition of a large chapel in 1849. Further rebuilding of the nave was conducted in the late 19th century. There are a few other medieval remains in the south chancel chapel. Parts of the Rood Screen have been used to make the pulpit and the readers desk.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Edmund,_King_and_Martyr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsbridge

Hope Cove: So the last port of call for the day, for a bit of ‘down time’ and the best vegan pizza i have ever tasted, was the stunningly beautiful ‘Hope Cove’. Hope Cove is a small seaside village within the civil parish of South Huish in South Hams, Devon. It has tw beaches and is sheltered by the headland of Bolt Tail. The name ‘Hope Cove’ may derive tautologically from the Old Norse word hóp meaning “bay” or “small inlet”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hope_Cove

 

  • Bloodline connections: is that of Thomas Neville of Dartmouth, born 25/02/1810 & died 03/01/1893 & our lead questers 4th Great Grandfather. Originally from Tollesbury in Essex & died in Ballarat, Victoria, Australia & a frequent visitor to the area on Templar Business.
  • V. MacAndrew from the plaque in St Petroc’s Church
  • George Fairlie-Clarke from the memorial in church graveyard
  • Lancelot Desposyni of the Fordham line, depictedvon the church window of St Petrocs.
  • Thomas Neville again, connected also to Kingsbridge and Hope Cove

Join us for part three when we discover more secrets of time at Tintagel!

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ June 2019

When the tides turn
And the cold wind blows,
When the waters of creation
Finally consume the lived.
When the clock shall tick no more
I shall take my rightful place
Amongst my true kin.
The Sanctuary was always there;
Hidden within, in my dreams and desires.
Unknown by the unseeing eyes of humanity,
Whose achievements resonate not
Across the wider universe
With the seekers of human flesh.
Think not in human terms;
Think not of a world of matter.
The threshold has been crossed,
Yet it was never of the physical world;
Perceived of with my human eyes.
Everything is of its time;
The past, future and present
Have always been as one.
Future memories visit;
Perceived time lines merge,
Cycles repeat.
Be served well to remember
What is done cannot be undone,
What is known cannot be unknown;
Oaths taken upon the sphere of time
Cannot be untaken.
Remember well; that which you love the most
Is that which binds you to the mortal realm;
Soul bound to the shores of time,
Blood ties secured by DNA.
I guard the door; steadfast,
Knowing that Heaven will await.
The secrets of the blood
Have been gifted.
I stand firm; protector of my kin
Sword in hand and breastplate shinning.
Lest no one pass this way
Lest they stumble over times fragile threshold.
Without true love’s key
All answers remain hidden,
All secrets lost within man’s folly.
Blindness reigns,
Tethered by the ego of mortality.
Yet to those of faith
The secrets within the blood of life;
That sweet threaded coil
Of man-kinds destiny
Is forever within reach.
Yet to those whom mock
With tongue and heart of stone,
The sweet blood secrets hidden within the sacred chalice of life,
Sipped not by those of human descent.

 

DSC05639 (1)

 

moon.willow@ntlworld.com: July 2018

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

The oldest story written
Is joy to the listening ear
The blinded eyes will see
As the days of old come clear

On saddled shores, the Watchers
Have waited for mankind’s shift
Yet only a few ever made it
The rest will cease to exist

Mankind always had the chances
To rise above ego and greed
Yet took the easy way out
Never considered the planet’s needs

But everything comes home to haunt one
All misdeeds come home to roost
The Observers can only watch us
Time and tide is the judge of all

A dead planet is no good to no-one
Just look at Mars to agree
To travel afar is an answer
But sadly, only in dreams

We are bound to the truth of our actions
We are tied to this planet of time
Yet new realms beckon and call us
Vibrations calling us home

If you get it, you know where I’m going
If you don’t, well you never will
We can learn to challenge illusion
To escape the earthly veil

We are more than this human vessel
We are more than the mundane world
For it’s all been a great expectation
One that we spectacularly failed

Go dream from an outside perspective
Remember that time is manmade
Step away from the ties that bind you
Say no to religion and power

At the end of the day we are mortal
These skins that we wear will not last
We are trapped in lower vibrations
Never heeded the words of the past

Yet we can live again and can travel
Can be guided by shinning lights
We can journey afar to new realms
Can live without day or night

Another existence is out there
A holder of keys you can be
But first you must unlock this door
To see all you can truly see

As history and truth unravel
And the human mind finally sees
No more we will wander the shores
No longer live in dreams

 

DSC02385 (1)

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’  April 2018

DSC04803 (1)

The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

QUEST TWENTYFOUR: MARCH 2018. It was a very cold and wintery day as we journeyed over to the Isle of Wight on Quest 24. Amazingly though, and i guess because most folks were house bound and heeding the weather warnings, the journey was swift and without incident. with even the ferry ride being calm. However upon landing on the island the weather set in and snow and ice gave a serene beauty to the already stunning countryside.

 

 

Leaving Plymouth and arriving on the snow-bound Isle of Wight

DAY ONE AND TWO: Timeless snowscenes at Newport Minster, Carisbrooke Priory, St Mary the Virgin Church, Carrisbrooke, the slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle and the United Reformed Church, Shanklin. Today was a day of simply enjoying the stunning views and taking photos; most churches and venues we had planned to visit were shut with folks staying wisely at home apart from those brave souls who were braving the snow covered slopes of Carrisbrooke Castle with sledges in tow! We slithered and slipped our way though the day, braving a few very slippery slopes and icy roads but certainly made the most of it!

Reading on through this quest; some churches were kindly opened to us for a second visit and for that we thank all concerned; more detailed accounts are to be found by scrolling through. However those not opened to us are/were still very much a part of this quest and the reason we are doing them. All churches are part of a metaphysical/physical sacred alignment, all are ‘perfect points in time’: all tell a story of the past, present and future, all are a part of a whole truth and a part of the path we follow…

 

 

Newport Minster; picturesque in the snow

 

 

Serene snow-covered views: Carisbrook Abbey, showing the Neville Sheild and brave sous sledging on Carisbrook Castle slopes <click on all images to enlarge>

 

 

The Parish and Priory Church of St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrook looking stunning covered in snow.

 

 

The timelessness of a snow covered Carisbrook and an ‘orb’ just outside the church. <click to enlarge>

 

 

The United Reformed Church, Shanklin in a timeless snow covered setting..

DAY THREE: St Mary the Virgin, Carisbrooke: So on our second visit to this church, which sits high on a hilltop with commanding views over the town, we were thankfully able to gain access. The parish of Carisbrooke is one of the largest on the island in both size and population and also one of the oldest. Carisbrooke Church is considered to be ‘the most important ecclesiastical building on the Isle of Wight’. The church is mentioned in the Domesday Book and the present nave of the church was built in 1070 as decreed by William Fitz-Osbert who was governor of the island. It was originally attached to the Priory of St Mary the Virgin, which was occupied by monks from the Abbey of Lyra (now Lire) in Normandy. The noble tower, the crowing glory of the church (photos seen above), was erected fifty five years after the dissolution of the monastry. Later still are the two large windows of the north wall which date from the sixteenth century when Bishop Fox  held the see of Winchester. His rebus, a fox is carved on one of the label stops. Much more on the history can be found by following the link below:-

http://carisbrookestmary.org.uk/history/

 

 

Beautiful artworks within the church include a window showing ‘The Lamb of God’ pointing to a strong Templar influence, the Neville shield indicating the bloodline movement, the other two shields, when merged represent ‘Temperence’ and ‘Fortitude’. the statue of the madonna and child by John Skelton in 1969 and some very unusual carvings of a Sumerian nature…

The Bloodline links of interest here are:-

  • Penelope Fordham (1838-1879) Granddaughter of Edward King Fordam of Hertfordshire. She was born in Godshill and died in Godshill

All Saints Church, Godshill: The Church of the Lily Cross…. Where the Four Points Meet: Just as the name would suggest, this is an amazing church, set atop a sacred mound that rises above a very pretty and historic town. The earliest church at Godshill was built in the Saxon period, possible during the reign of Edward the Confessor, but the current church is is almost entirely 15th century and built by the monks of the Sheen Priory. The hill on which the church stands was the site of pagan worship long before christianity reached the Isle of Wight. All Saints is the largest medieval church on the island and one of the most visited and photographed, which is partly due to the treasure, found inside the church, of a 15th century wall painting of Christ crucified on a lily; a very Templar symbol.

 

 

The Lily Cross, or as it was formely known, ‘The Budding Cross’ is to be found painted on the east wall of the south transept and although this areas was locked up i did manage some shots through the bars. Although there are similar depictions in Europe, this is the only ‘Lily Cross’ in Britain and dates from the middle of the 15th century. Sadly during the Reformation the painting was white-washed several times; though we dont know if this was to preserve it or destroy it. t was only rediscovered in the 19th century and carefully cleaned and is now amazingly clear and brightly coloured

 

 

The Lily Cross’ and the entrance to where it is displayed <please click on images to enlarge>

I know that there is much more to the significance and meaning of The Lily Cross, yet it is very hard to find any indepth explanations but this below, together with a christian symbolism of the lily, is the nearest i could get to any thing that had a bite to it. So for the moment Godshill is keeping its secrets…

http://www.paintedchurch.org/godshill.htm

 

For a more detailed tour around the church with an explanation of the importance of the church, it’s symbolism and Templar connections please see our link to our youtube channel.

Godshill Church, the Isle of Wight

Always looking around with eagle-eyes, i was very pleased to see this significant symbol enscribed on the wall of the entrance porch of this ancient church, as it meant a lot to see it there, on The Church of the Lily Cross. Not as commonly thought, the Awen symbol, as significantly older with a deeper meaning; a footprint on the sands of time carved into the fabric of reality….

 

 

 

 

The above photos show the Knight Templar connection, the Judaic connection of two cherub statues, the ‘Gatekeeper’ statue, together with the mother and child that indicate a full Templar layout to the church (relating to Wisdom, Strength and Beauty). Our video explains much more… <click on photos to enlarge>

https://godshillparish.co.uk/history.php

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/eng/HAM/IOW/Godshill

The Bloodline Connections here are:-

  • John Peter Fordham 1810 – 1846 (3 X Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • George Albert Neville 1914 – 1989 (Grand Uncle to our head researcher)
  • Penelope Amelia Fordham 1838 – 1879 (Granddaughter to Edward King Fordham)
  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Frank Albert Bartram 1883 – 1962 (Great Grand Uncle to our head researcher)

 

The Four Major Physical and Metaphysical lines of our quests all come together here at Godshill. So we have the Neville line, the Fordham line, the Clarke line amd the Bartram line ie “Where the Four Points Meet”…

 

You can read much more about the church and its treasures by following the links below:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Saints’_Church,_Godshill

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/wight/churches/godshill.htm

 

St Lawrence, Vetnor: Being a pilgrim on the earthly plane is what a journey is all about; each step taken with intent and mindfulness, tuning into the physical and the metaphysical. As with our quests, very much of the metaphysical as well as the physical and being pilgrims in time treading the earthly plane…

 

 

A gorgeous and tiny, tiny ancient church, Parish of St Lawrence on the Isle of Wight, on a hilltop as per usual and overlooking a rugged landscape down to the sea.. Still used today and still visited by pilgrims as the two seeking refuge from the cold on this particular day. Small but with some very interesting treasures to be found inside with deep meanings….
I can imagine in days past, pilgrims making their way along a dirt track, with the cold wind blowing their cloaks around them; and this the only shelter for miles around….
Visiting these sites bring history and our past alive and one gets a true sense of walking with our ancestors. I dunno, just being there made me connect like a point on a circuit board and think of these things.

 

 

So tiny, yet very beautiful in a very simplistic yet spiritual way for centuries used by pilgrims and Templars alike; often one and the same…

St Lawrence, which is much older than Ventnor, is a village found on the south side of the Isle of Wight, west of Ventnor which many do consider to be a part of the town. St Lawrence is situated on the undercliff, where it is subject to frequent landslides. In the 19th century, St Lawrence was the subject of am ambitious plan to develope the village as a resort to rival Ventnor by a German developer named William Spindler, a man who had made his fortune as a chemist in Berlin and who lived on the island from 1881 to his ndeath 1889 amd subsequent burial at Whitwell. he did have enormous influence as a developer but most of his projects have now fallen prey to the ravages of time.

The small St Lawrences Church at Ventnor, dates from the 12th century and is one of three churches in St Lawrence and is easily missed and not the church that the tourists make a bee-line for with the Pre-Raphalite windows. This infact is the church that really matters; it is tiny and simple yet exudes it’s history, with some of the artifacts being very special indeed. Before the addition of a chancel in 1830, it was only 25 feet long and 11 feet wide and was considered the smallest church in England. It has a 15th century baptismal font,  a stoup that is about 500 years old and a series of 18th century hat pegs. The piscina niche is almost the same age as the church. The ‘Jesus’ is shown in beautiful red robes and wearing the garnet stone; the significance of which, within various ‘inner’ Craft circles, goes deep and powerful.

 

 

The ‘Jesus’ wearing the significant garnet stone around his neck, the open bible, the Neville shield, the list of past ‘bloodline’ rectors and the ancient wooden carving <click to enlarge>

Bloodline connections here are:

  • Lily May Clarke 1905 – 1994 (Great Grand Aunt to our head researcher)
  • Brent R. R. Neville; a rector here in 1902 (ancestor of our head researcher)
  • Edward S. Bartrum; a rector here in 1912 (ancestor of our head researcher)

For a full tour around this wonderful little church in Ventnor and to catch up on a snowy scene from outside Carrisbrooke church, please se our link:-

Carrisbrooke & Ventor on the Isle of Wight

https://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/101225276-old-church-of-st-lawrence-ventnor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Lawrence,_Isle_of_Wight

 

St Andrew, Chale: It had turned into a wet and rainy day, yet the journey was very worth it as this church proved to be a treasure trove of surprises.This medievil church is in the parish of Chale on the Isle of Wight and was founded by Hugh Gendon in 1114 when it was dedicated to St Andrew, though the present day church dates from the 14th century. Originally it was a Catholic church, but on the reformation it became part of the Church of England where for 900 years services have been held in St Andrew’s and in those years the church has been extended many times, with the tower being added in the 15th century. Read more about the church below:-

https://www.chalebayfarm.co.uk/st-andrews/

 

 

The church’s dedication to St Andrew has been explained in three ways. Firstly, St Andrew was a fisherman and fishing played an important part in this coastal community. Secondly, it could have been named after the man who paid to have it built. Another explanation is that the closest saint’s day to that on which it was dedicated is St Andrew’s. There is no evidence to give any of these explanations greater probability.  St. Andrew’s, although high above the sea, is exposed to the wind. The stonework is dotted with lichens; these are evidence of the purity of the air, which is damp enough to cover some stones very thickly.

 

 

Inside the church are some beautiful artifacts and windows that tell a tale or two of a history not generally know to the public. <click on an image to enlarge>

 

 

The ‘Angelic’ beings around the altar are interesting (all being slightly different) and relating to the ‘four pillars’ A more detail explanation can be found in the video below…