Tag Archive: Hidden Pyramids


DAY THREE CONT:

  • HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON
  • HAILES CASTLE
  • HOLY ISLAND

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON: Still in Scotland, day three continued with our next visit which was to be the Holy Trinity Church at Haddington in the diocese of Edinburgh.  Set in a kind of small cul-de-sac off from the main street in a heritage area, both church and grounds are beautifully kept; from the outside the church looks quite small yet upon entering it appears much larger than it looks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haddington,_East_Lothian

With funds raised by the congregation and a very generous donation from the Earl of Wemyss, the first phase of the church building was constructed in 1770 on the site of the original ‘Lamp of Lothian’ which, from the middle of the thirteenth century until 1555, had been the property of the Franciscan Friars. It was built of a local stone known as Rattlebags, a volcanic agglomerate (a complex breccia made of fragments of lavas). An article in the transactions of the Antiquaries of Scotland published in 1792 describes the building as a very elegant chapel. Holy Trinity Church is a Grade B Listed building and is in the Haddington Conservation Area.

 

In 1843 the church was ‘Gothicized’ with the addition of the nave parapet, nave south elevation window surrounds (note the lancet shape), porch and shallow apsidal sanctuary, using a different stone, a finer, pale buff sandstone.  The same year, the committee appointed to report on the state of the building described it as being extremely uniform and homely. Following completion of the reconstruction, a service of dedication to the Holy Trinity and of consecration was perfor med by the Rt Rev Charles Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh, who in 1814 had returned to Scotland to serve as an Incumbent in Haddington.

 

The interior of the church showing ‘The Jesus’ using the now familiar ‘Ninasian Salute’ used by Priory members. Symbols such as the Lamb of God and other Templar symbols are to be discovered throughout the church and a beautiful tapistry on the altar, which is described as three angels, though it could be the ‘Three Marys’.

In 1930, the present Chancel was added to replace the apse and the interior remodelled in neo-Byzantine style by the Scottish architect B N H Orphoot. The Chancel external walls were built of Rattlebags and sandstone but have reinforced concrete detailing such as columns, arches, decorative bands and the corbel course below the gutter.

 

The church also had some interesting detail on its exterior walls <click on all images to enlarge>

Holy Trinity Church had some nice features and details both inside and out; it was a peaceful enough place but i got the feeling that  lot of the older artifacts from the past had been removed or had not stood the test of time and therefore the older ‘energies’ were no longer there

http://holytrinityhaddington.co.uk/

HAILES CASTLE: We paid an unexpected visit to Hailes Castle; one time home to Mary Queen of Scots.The castle is a mainly 14th century castle about a mile and a half south west of East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland and is quite secluded and hidden away. This castle, which has a fine riverside setting, belonged to the Hepburn family during the most important centuries of its existence. The castle was founded as a fortified tower house by Hugo de Gourlay before 1300, making it one of the oldest constructions of its kind in Scotland. The castle has a long and interesting history which one can read more of on the internet and it is certainly worth a visit to look around and explore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailes_Castle

 

This is where Mary Queen of Scots was staying as an adult, for it was deemed to be a safe place for her; secluded and hidden away and she had freinds and allies on her side; however this was not to be and history tells us otherwise…..

Just opposite the castle is a hill fort by the name of ‘Traprain Law‘ that rises in an imposing fashion above the horizon. It has an interesting name, yet was only known as ‘Traprain Law’ from the late 18th century, taking its name from a local hamlet. This is etymologically a Cumbric name cognate with Welsh tref ‘farm’ and either pren ‘tree’ or bryn ‘hill’. Law comes from the Old English word hlāw, meaning a burial mound.

It rises about 221m (724 feet) in elevation and is located 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Haddington. It covered at its maximum extent about 16 ha (40 acres) and must have been a veritable town. Whether it was a seasonal meeting place or permanent settlement is a matter of speculation.  Also speculated is whether the site is the site of an actual pyramid or not….  But it was a burial place by around 1500 BC with evidence of occupation and signs of ramparts after 1000 BC and has been ocupied at various points throughout it’s history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traprain_Law

 

Trapain Law together with Hailes Castle: an interesting area to stop a while to soak up more history…

HOLY ISLAND: The last point of call for day three was to be Holy Island; more of a winding down visit after a very busy day where many miles were covered. We arrived on the off chance knowing that the tides may not be in our favour and this did prove to be true. The evening sunset was amazing, so no better place in which to unwind whilst watching (and dodging) the beautiful incoming tides. When the tide is out one can pass happily back and forth from the main land to Holy Island and Lindisfarne, but when the tide is incoming one literally has to watch ones back and ones parked car as we discovered!

 

What better way to end the day than to watch the tide coming in…. <click on images to enlarge>

https://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumerland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD. It was an important centre of Celtc Christianlty under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindidfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Normsn conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550. Much more can be red about it’s history here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindisfarne

 

“Incoming Tide!!!”

So day three came to an end in a rather beautiful and fun fashion; not much to comment about on ‘The Neville‘ front but suffice to say that the whole area is steeped in ‘Neville’ history and intrigue with a very special day to come on day four…

 

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Aug 2017

 

 

QUEST NUMBER NINETEEN: SHROPSHIRE AND WALES

  • St Peter’s Church: Clee Hill Shropshire
  • St Peter’s Church: Ludlow Shropshire
  • The Space Guard Centre: Knighton Wales
  • St Edwards Church: Knighton Wales
  • St Georges Church: Clun Shropshire
  • The Great Tower of Clun: Craven Arms Shropshire
  • St John the Baptist Church: Bishops Castle  Shropshire

 

Stunning views from Clee Hill – click on each photo to expand

St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill, Shropshire:  It was a beautiful sunny day in Febuary, when after a journey of some three hours from Cambridge, with the road winding ever higher and higher upwards, we arived in the village of Clee Hill  in Shropshire. Clee Hill is also the name given to the imposing hill itself of which the village sits atop of.  The village lies on the slope of  Titterstone Clee Hill and lying between 340 metres (1,120 ft) and 380 metres (1,250 ft) above sea level, this is one of the highest settlements in the country.

St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill <click on each photo to expand>

A beautiful and very scenic part of the country where sheep can roam freely and the views across the mountains are astounding. A wild energetic place indeed; the earth energies here are very powerful due to the pyramid placement within the land; another site where the hidden royal bloodlines of this country can be discovered.

The Alpha and Omega with a tapestry of the last supper from behind the altar

This church sits atop of the magnificent Clee Hill, which features both on the Mappa Mundi and in Brother Cadfael. St Peter’s is known to have a freindly, hard working congregation with good community links. I was unable to find out much about the actual history of this tiny church but there is a tale that if one runs round St Peter’s Church, three times, at midnight, then knock on the door, a spirit is supposed to come out and snatch you in. Please watch the video below for a few more insights on the church and its history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clee_Hills

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleehill

The bloodline ancestor discovered here is that of Thomas de Nevill, who was a resident of the parish and one of the Kings trusted freinds. Those who have been following our quests will have already picked up on the important connections between the Neville family and  to ‘The Crown‘ itself.

Click on the link below to take a tour around St Peter’s Church, Clee Hill with us with its plethera of Masonic influenence and symbolism. Also included is St Peter’s Church, Ludlow representing the Dome on the Rock and the connection between Heaven & Earth and  St Edwards Church Knighton, with it’s significant Victorian artworks.

ST PETERS CHURCH: CLEE HILL, ST PETERS CHURCH: LUDLOW, ST EDWARDS CHIRCH: LUDLOW

 

Bloodline connection:

  • Thomas de Nevill; ancestor to Alek was a resident of the parish

St Peter’s Church, Ludlow Shropshire: Our next stop on this glorious day was to the charming old town of Ludlow. This ancient market town is a truly stunning place to visit, a very vibrant town with lots of energy and some fantastic old buildings, including a castle and the one time home of Katherine of Aragon. The town is steeped in history, especially medieval with much written about it. On the day we were there it was a very busy market day and the town, even in February, was abustle with people.

Ludlow looking stunning in the sunshine;  the timbered building (1 & 4) was once home to Katharine of Aragon <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow

St Peter’s Church Ludlow, representing ‘The Dome on the Rock’

St Peter’s Church is a modern Catholic church, established in 1935 and built to represent the ‘Dome on the Rock’. The style of the building is stunning and designed by an Italian architect, which is very evident to the eye; the colour of the inside of the dome is amazing in a deep, deep blue. There are some beautiful artworks around the church including a ‘chiro’ with the ‘alpha’ and ‘omega’ symbols on either side, which as we know are Templar Symbols. The church is Romanesque in structure with the dome signifying heaven and earth united in praise of god. Despite the style and magnificence of the building, most of the work was carried out by local craftsmen, with it’s grey stone being extracted from Oreton Quarry at Farlow, Clee Hill, where we were only minutes previously.

http://cornmill.freeshell.org/stpetersludlow/tour.pdf

Church artworks showing the chiro, alpha and omega and the true stigmata of ‘the Jesus’ and above the ‘Dome’ next to the beautiful wndow depiction of Mary and the child.

Bloodline Connection:

  • Richard Neville and ancestor of Alek b. 1400 and The Earl of Salisbury was a resident of Ludlow

The Space Guard Centre, Knighton Wales: The day could not have got any better as we drove up and up and up, almost it seemed to the top of the world, where the views across the unspoilt valleys made one assume that one was the only person left alive in the whole world….

Magnificent views from the Space Guard Centre in Wales; click on photo to expand for full view and click on link below.

THE SPACEGUARD CENTRE: KNIGHTON

The Space Guard Centre is for tracking near earth objects, such as comets, meteorites and any object that could potentially harm the planet in the future. Of particular interest is that the centre is currently installing the large telescope that used to be housed in the observatory in Cambridge. The telescope is og no longer use here in Cambridge due to the ammount of light polution that obscurs all views of the skies; not such problen at all at the new site. It has taken many years of dedication, planning and hard work to dismantle it, transport it and then to build a new home for it, before installing it at one of the loftiest sites in the UK! The work has nearly been completed and all by volunteers, as sadly and shockingly no government funding for this important project has ever been forthcoming….

With the new telescope installed there will be three fully functioning telescopes at the centre

If you are in the area it is a fascinating site to visit, for the stunning views alone and the energies too, which  due to various obvious reasons, are amazing!

https://spaceguardcentre.com/

As one drives up to the entrance of the Space Guard Centre, one can almost miss, in the wilderness on the left-hand side, the beautiful stone circle dedicated to the goddess Dianna.

The Stone circle dedicated to Dianna

http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=15302

St Edwards Church at Knighton Wales: Still in Knighton; slightly lower down and ten minutes ride from the space centre, this old church is situated in a beautifully scenic area and does have a few unusual items within it.

St Edward’s Church at Knighton set amidst a scenic backdrop

This present church is probably the fourth church on the site; there is vague reference to a Saxon Church, circa 990 and certainly a Norman Church, circa 1160 and the base of the tower still retains Norman workmanship. In 1752 the Norman church was in such a perilous state of repair that it was completely demolished, so apart from the tower, a new church and chancel were thus built. There were many reports of the new church building works recorded in local publications at the time. Sadly the old font was replaced at the time of the complete rebuilding in 1877 and the old font was buried in a neighboring field. However in 1911, it was removed and and put in the care of the Rev. D. Edmund Owen, rector of Llandingad Carmarthenshire. This ancient font is octagonal in shape and can now be found in Llanelwedd churchyard, Poowys, although it would be nice if it could find it’s way back home. If an old font could not be relocated in another church, it was buried; this was to ensure that the font would not be available for any use apart from baptism after its removal. See our video below to take a tour around the church.

The interior of St Edward’s showing some beautiful windows and the painting mentioned in the video

The bloodline relative associated with this church is Walter Neville who sadly died quite young at age 32 years, but he was very prominent in the area and was involved in trade with Russia and a lovely painting that was probably part of his trading hangs just near the entrance. There are some unusual and interesting interesting Victorian painted artworks and other items here with some significant symbology attached.

 

Bloodline Connection:

  • Walter Neville (anceestor of Alek) 1869 – 1901, died at age 32 years; once again indicating the significance of the Neville Family.

 

St George’s Church, Clun Shropshire: Although not on our list and definitely not scheduled for us to visit today; this church is certainly worth a mention here. If we had not been magically directed to St Georges, we would not have been in the right place and the right time afterwards, to be able to see our next, seemingly elusive port of call peering at us in the distance between the hedges and back gardens of a local country lane. As said it was not connected to the research but deserves a few photos here…

St George’s Church, Clun

http://www.crsbi.ac.uk/site/69/

Although not on our list to visit we did interestingly discover a ‘Parry’ on the regimental memorial board  <click on images to expand and view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clun

The Great Tower of Clun, Craven Arms Shropshire:  Upon leaving the church above we were resigned to not finding the derelict chapel of St John the Baptist Chapel at Clun, yet were momentarily diverted along a quiet country road aside the church. Upon turning around to journey in another direction i momentarily glimpsed the shape of a ruin from the car window, looming above the distant roof tops! So trusting in our instincts and following the road, we amazingly (or not) found ourselves where we needed to be!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clun_Castle

We approached Clun Castle in the rapidly gathering twilight and it certainly afforded us a formidable view. Set high up on a high hillside overlooking the spreading land below; it proved quite a trek to walk up some steep slippery slopes to gain access, although afterwards we did spy a slightly speedier route.

Approaching Clun Castle in the gathering twilight  <click to expand photos> Information depicting the castle’s history showing the ancestory line, and part of our quests, of the ‘Fitzalans’, another piece of the puzzle

Amazing as these things are; there upon the information board just outside the castle entrance, the name of ‘Fitzalans’ is placed very prominitely within the castle history and also very meaningfully within the bloodline of our head researcher Alek’s family line, testifying that we certainly did not find this place by accident. Family names over the years change and evolve, which one must always bear in mind when doing historical family recearch. As we soon saw for ourselves though the Chapel of St John the Baptist no longer exists there and has dissapeared under the ravages of time; one could take a guess though and summise where it would have stood, on the flat ground, just outside the main keep of the castle.

History of Clun Castle: Clun Castle is thought to have been built by Picot de Say in the years following the Norman invasion to dominate a former Saxon village and to help sustain Norman rule in the troublesome border area (known as the Marches). In this latter role it was well placed to control movement on the Clun-Clee Ridgeway, a historic trading route in and out of Wales. Constructed to a traditional motte and bailey design it started as an earthwork and timber castle and had two baileys.

As a border outpost Clun Castle inevitably suffered as the fortunes of the Welsh ebbed and flowed. It was attacked and burnt to ashes in 1196 by Prince Rhys of South Wales. Rebuilt or repaired it was attacked again in 1214 by Prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth (Llywelyn the Great). It was these attacks that probably led to the rebuilding of the castle in stone and this prompted another attack, again by Prince Llywelyn ap Iorwerth, in 1234. In this instance the castle withstood the siege but the associated town was destroyed by the attackers.

Clun Castle and it’s views

The castle was seized by John Fitzalan from the custody of King John in 1215. In 1233 the castle was garrisoned by the household troops of King Henry III as the loyalty of John Fitzalan was ‘suspect’. Late that year the royal garrison successfully withstood a Welsh onslaught led by Prince Llywelyn ab Iorwerth, although the attackers did succeed in reducing the town to ashes. During a period of minority the castle was held by a father-in-law of one of the several generations of John Fitzalans, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore Castle.

Edward I’s conquest of Wales in the late 1270s/early 1280s meant the requirement for the castle as a border stronghold significantly diminished. Accordingly building priorities changed from defence to comfort and in 1292 Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel, built the Great Tower to provide luxury accommodation most probably for hunting parties who made use of the nearby forest of Clun. By the start of the fifteenth century it was used exclusively as a hunting lodge but was hastily re-fortified during the Owain Glyn Dŵr  rebellion of 1400-14. Thereafter it reverted to disuse with a writer in 1539 describing the castle as ruinous. Even though it had played no part in the Civil War, Clun Castle was slighted in 1646 on the orders of Parliament.

Clun Castle looking stunning as dusk settles

The Fitzalans abandoned Clun Castle to focus their attention and wealth on the more impressive Arundel Castle in Sothern England. Consequently, Clun Castle fell into ruin. Although Owain Glyndwr attacked the castle in the early 1400’s, it was no longer the formidable foe it would have been two centuries earlier. After Glyndwr’s assault, the castle vanishes from historical records. The castle was in ruins by the time of the English Civil War of 1642 and never saw action.

Bloodline Connection:

  • Edmund Neville born 11th June 1887 of Craven Arms, Shropshire and  an ancestor of Alek
  • The Fitzalan family and ancestors of Alek, were of great prominence and importance here as history tells

St John the Baptist Church, Bishops Castle Shropshire: It was very late and dark by now when we arrived here, so as expected no entry was gained and it was too dark for filming. However we did take a stroll around the perimiter of the church and managed a few photos too 🙂 The church itself is a grade 2 listed building which has a Mediaeval tower mostly rebuilt in C17, rest of 1860 by T Nicholson of Hereford. It has a coursed limestone rubble tower with ashlar dressings and pyramidal slate cap; the rest is of squared and coursed limestone with ashlar dressings, and slate roof with ridge cresting. As the photos show it has a squat square Gothic survival West tower and if we were able to see inside, we would see that the gothic theme continues there too. The church is very unusual in the fact that it still has one of England’s oldest clocks with only one hand, from a time when time ‘down to the minute’ was less important.

St John the Baptist Church and visitors looking atmospheric at night

On these quests we are very much aware that many churches, especially the ones that we are researching, have secret vaults or hidden chambers underneath their floors and sometimes ‘other’ very hidden features too. In March 2010 it was recorded that a hidden chamber had been discovered underneath St John the Baptist Church in Bishops Castle, said to contain sixteen coffins. An inscription on one bears the name Byne Oakeley, with the date 1825. It is believed the bodies in the coffins are all members of the Oakeley family, an important and well-thought of family in the area at the time. It is said that the burial vault was hidden for 150 years.

Architects were called in after the partial collapse of the unknown chamber below the floor which led to the discovery of the burial vault. Work was begun to make the church safe but experts said at the time that further investigations by structural engineers and architects were needed. Stephen Lowick, a member of the parochial church council, said: “The architect and a structural engineer will come to the church and will open up the vault again for them to have a look at how bad the structural problems are and at the same time we will seek to identify the other coffins.”

James Wade, of Shrewsbury-based architects Arrol and Snell Ltd, said the original church was believed to have burned down and been rebuilt in 1859. Protected by the vault, the coffins survived the flames. “Nobody knows a lot about the older church but we are guessing that it was part and parcel of the chancel of the older church,” he said, adding that vaults were not unusual in churches. “People wanted to be buried in the church, there was a feeling that to be buried in the church was a good thing and it was the privilege of those who could afford it,” he added.

Fascinating and interesting stuff indeed; it would have been great to discover more one way or the other but as we could not get it, it was not meant to be…

Bishop’s Castle, Shropshire:  This is a small market town in the southwest of Shropshire England and formerly its smallest borough. According to the 2011 Census it had a population of 1,893. It is 1.5 miles (2.4 km) east of the borderlands between England and Wales, about 20 miles (30 km) north-west of Ludlow and about 20 miles (30 km) south-west of Shrewsbury. The town is within an agricultural area and has also become known for its alternative community including artists, musicians, writers and craftspeople. The surrounding area is hillwalking country and Bishop’s Castle is a “Walkers are Welcome Town”. The long distance footpath the Shropshire Way runs through the town and the well known Offa’s Dyke is only a few miles to the west. The ancient trackway of the Kerry Ridgeway, a prehistoric Bronze Age route, runs from the town. The BC Ring, a 60-mile (100 km) challenging route around the town, was published in 2008. The town has two micro breweries, including the Three Tuns, the UK’s oldest brewery. Befire embarking upon our return journey we had a very tasty meal in the Boars Head in the village.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bishop’s_Castle

Bloodline Connection:

  • Henry Neville of Bishops Castle b 18th August 1886 and again an ancestor of our lead researcher Alek

Conclusions: The Neville Family, often known in history as the power behind the throne have proved to be leading and prominent people in these areas of Wales and Shropshire, holding both important roles within the community with established historical connections to the crown. But who really are ‘The Nevilles’ and how and why did they rise to such prominence? All will surely be revealed in the conclusions of time…..

If you are interested in joining The Priory or joining our Quest please leave a message here in the comments section

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

The Keeper of Scrolls

February 2017

 

QUEST NUMBER SIXTEEN:

Where we were supposed to have been…

  • RAF KIRTON IN LINDSEY, NEAR GAINSBOROUGH, LINCOLNSHIRE
  • TATTERSHALL ABANDONED RAILWAY STATION, LINCOLNSHIRE

Where we actually ended up in a unique ‘twist of fate’…

  • TATTERSHALL CASTLE AND CHURCH GRAVEYARD

All that i am about to tell you is true; i have changed nothing and although there were five of us present, the feelings and tellings are totally mine. I have been doing these quests long enough now, to know that nothing is ever what it seems and other forces are around that distort the truth for both the good and the bad, but further more to guide and protect. We live on a many dimensional plane and often the dimensions will merge, or chinks in reality will ocurr.  Many folks do tune into to this and have the ability to ‘see’ or to ‘feel’ the other existences and dimensions

We know that there are ‘places of power’ caused by the hidden ‘Geo Magnetics’ of this earth (the hidden pyramids) which act an a kind of ‘energy conductor’ and this is one of the purposes of our quests, to investigate these sites. We know that these earth magnetics can retain ‘echoes‘ or ‘imprints’ of both past and future lives. Why both past and future lives? Well the answer is simple; there is no such thing as ‘time’ as it is percieved here on earth. Time is merely a manmade constraint; another form of ‘control‘, for example how often do we hear the phrase ‘slave to time’ repeated? So because of these quests and the interesting facts that they are throwing up, we now know of course, that many of the so called ‘christian’ churches of these lands, are built on top of these hidden ‘places of power’ simply to keep the facts underneath, well and truly hidden. What better way of hiding something in plain sight than to build something else over the top of it.

We now know that manifested aparitions; call them ‘ghosts’, ‘spirits’,djinn’, do not manisfest in our world as a kind of ethereal ‘woo woo wooing‘ aparition formed of white mists floating in time and space. Indeed they are far more real and often totally three-dimensional and solid; for all intents and purposes exactly like you and me; yet they uncannily always turn up when needed for a reason, to guide, to warn or to inform. They appear as if out of nowhere and when the message has been delivered they vanish just as quickly. People with dogs innocently manouvering through our space and time are quite a common example. People who are there at the right place and the right time to guide us (or to warn us) to where we need to be are another example. Of course one can always speculate and put all this down to coincidence, but in fact there is no such thing as coincidence and everything happens for a reason and a purpose.

So then just a brief discription of where we had planned to be:

RAF KIRTON IN LINDSEY, NEAR GAINSBOROUGH, LINCOLNSHIRE It took a good few hours of traveling to drive to Lincolnshire in the cold dark of night; so after feasting on the way we were raring to go and good for anything! The Lincolnshire landscape is mostly flat and vast and a lot colder than down south; yet there are gradual undulations in the structure of the land and even some cliff-like terraces that the road crawls snake-like atop of. There seems to be a pervading sense of ‘unfinished buisness’ in the atmosphere of the land here; stories untold that maybe never will be told. The ‘spirits’ of the land seem to be holding on to something which maybe they never will give up.

RAF Kirton in Lincolnshire, which was opened on this new site in the 1940’s is built atop of an ancient burial ground on the site of the pyramid grid that we are investigating, so it was with great excitement and expectation that we ventured forward on what was to be Quest Number Sixteen! After many years of use however, it was announced that in 2013 that the RAF were to dispose of the site, yet according to many ‘urban explorers’ who regularly visit the site, many interesting ‘artifacts’, various equipment etc and even vehicals are still to be found on site. In it’s heyday the site was passed from RAF control to the US Air Force, then on to the British Army and finally back again to RAF control. It’s final years saw it used as a technical park and it provided housing for another nearby base, where the site was administered from. So now sadly abandoned and another case of wondering why all these perfectly good buildings are allowed to go to rack and ruin, when we have a housing shortage in this country…

We found the site very easily, yet were dissapointed to find a strong and high security fence all around the whole perimiter with not one single access point in. We drove carefully around just to make sure, but on this occasion had to admit defeat. We know the ‘urban explorers’ do get in and i would not like to speculate how, but we are not urban explorers, simply researchers doing our thing and working within the confines of not tresspasing.  There are various hauntings said to have occured here but as we were unable to gain access we could not get a ‘feel’ for the place to form our own opinions; though suffice to say it is on an ‘energy’ site and is part of the ‘pyramid grid’ of the UK.

Read more about RAF Kirton here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Kirton_in_Lindsey

TATTERSHALL ABANDONED RAILWAY STATION, LINCOLNSHIRE So a short drive away, along the twisty Lincolnshire byways that seemingly defey any logic of direction, we found ourselves in the village of Tattershall on the look out for it’s abandoned railway station. The station was closed on the 17th June 1953, to both passengers and goods but during the 1970’s and 1980’s the Tattershall Air Museum was to be found located in the station goods yard. The station is now in private occuption but it does house ‘The Tattershall Station Gallery’ in the booking office, selling paintings and pottery with public access along part of the up platform. There are tales of a young girl who reportedly wanders the platform but again as we never actually located the site in the dark i cannot comment further; also a site of ‘energy’…

Interesting photos and info here:

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/t/tattershall/

The other reason why we never actually found the old railway site was because we were not meant to; for we thus saw the signposts to Tattershall Castle, which looked strangely compelling in the dark, so following our instincts we turned down a very dark and narrow lane; it was almost midnight….

TATTERSHALL CASTLE AND CHURCH GRAVEYARD: The very narow lane ended in the very dark public car park of the castle; we could see nothing and no one was around; it was almost midnight and at that point not a single soul stirred. So bearing in mind that we had no inklng that we were going to be there, at that place and at that time, and that it had been a split second decision to visit the castle, imagine our suprise then to find that another car had come out of nowhere and was now following us into the carpark! This other car was now parking a short way from us; slightly unerving to say the least. What was the chance of that randomly happening at that unearthly hour? While we explored the layout of the carpark with our torches to find the exit (yes it really was that dark!), two guys alighted from the other vehical and dissapeared along a dark grassy track in another direction.

Upon following we discovered the track to be  a path into a then, unknown to us, church graveyard and so for a moment we recognized the familiar territory of a graveyard; even though something did not feel quite right. We surveyed the scene for a few moments to get our bearings, then proceeded to follow the pathway around the side of the church. Obviously at that very late hour everything was shrouded in darkness and it was hard to see, apart from the help of our trusted torches. Upon coming around the corner of the church, we made our way across open ground towards a tourist map of the castle and surrounding area, which we proceeded to study or to ‘pretend’ to study, for upon looking back we could clearly see two very mysterious figures with their backs to us, strangely highlighted by their own torch lights.

My feelings at that moment were that of being totally compelled to look, wanting to look yet unsure if i should; unsure of interupting the others privacy. And yet, yet there was something totally compelling and completely ‘out of time’ about those two figures; almost as if two time lines were converging. The weirdest thing was that they acknowledged no recognition of us whatsoever, not a nod, a smile, an embarassed shuffle; not even a ‘sod off’! We moved around towards the castle to see if we could gain access but all boundary fences were well and truly locked. Yet on making our way back the two figures were still there exactly the same, seemingly not moved. I still tried to look and yet not look; they seemed to be dressed not of our era at all, but apeared to be wearing cloaks or mantles with leggings or gaters, maybe a bit Goth-like or so it looked in the distorted shadows and light of their torches. They certainly did not look like the folks in the carpark only minutes before and although very compelling, a feeling of unease had decended upon us all and we knew it was time to depart.

However, upon walking around to where the grassy path left the churchyard back into the carpark, a bent-over huddled figure suddenly instantanously appeared from nowhere, seemingly with a mission well and truly in mind. He rushed past us, again not looking up at all, or in any way being aware of our presence there. No ‘good eveing’ or ‘lovely night’ or any comment that led one to believe that he had any conception of us being there. He appeared to rush down a leafy pathway and that was that or so it seemed…

Two of our party, intrigued and wanting to investigate further and not believng their eyes, made their way along the leafy pathway to see where the huddlesd figure had gone to. Yet again though, that feeling of uneasiness pervaded upon all of us; a feeling that we should not be lingering there a moment longer. The path the figure had scurried down had led to nowhere, just a complete dark dead end in fact, the path went nowhere…

We took no time in leaving lest our welcome be outstayed. Once back inside the car and upon driving out of the carpark two of us happened to glance in the direction of the path that lead to the church, only to see two more figures at the end of the path, walking towards us…

SO TO CONCLUDE:

  • Nothing is ever a coincidence.
  • Nothing is ever a random act.
  • Everything is meant to be.
  • Timing is everything.
  • ‘Energy’ and ‘echoes’ from other timelines exist.
  • Time lines exist simultaniously
  • All ‘energy’ affects other energy.
  • We were obviously meant to be there at the ‘perfect point in time’
  • THIS was the site we were REALLY meant to be at, at that place and time
  • No random act or coincidence bought us to that place and at that time, at that ungodly hour; unexpected, unanouced, not knowing it ourselves until we turned into that dark castle lane at  midnight, to discover five other figures, not all of this dimension,  in that small out of the way churchyard….
  • Allways follow your instinct and be prepared to change plans at the very last moment
  • Nothing ever happens by chance as we on these quests, well and truly know.
  • A quest here to be continued…

 

For more info of the mundane kind please see here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tattershall

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

Leave a message here and we will get back to you:

 

 “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

November 2016 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Quest Number Fifteen: Hertfordshire

  • Little St Mary’s Church: Cold Christmas Lane Thundridge
  • All Saint’s Church Datchworth, near Thundridge

So another exciting night time foray found us once again in the Hertfordshire countryside. As we have learnt, so many ancient churches are to be found miles away from modern day highways and this trip was no exception; literally right off the beaten track and only accessible via grassy footpaths and byways. We had to park the car miles away, down a dead end, not knowing which path to take or which way to turn. The night was dark, which did not help and we were guided by just the light of the moon and a few torches. After one false start and driving off in a completely different direction, we gained our bearings and eventually found the site we were looking for. The site opens out beyond the trees and bushes of the byway, causing one to almost stumble upon it; but what a site to behold indeed. One walks through the open area and graveyard to reach the church, which in the cover of darkness almost looms upon one unexpectedly from the gloom. It was crisp clear night, with moonlight marred only by persistent chemtrailers dong their deeds under cover of darkness. The energies of the site are very similar to another site of an earlier quest; that of Santon Downham – almost, if not, identical; hinting at the fact that both sites are on the very same energy alignment.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thundridge

Little St Mary’s Church or Cold Christmas Church: as it is locally known, due to its proximity to Cold Christmas Lane, as said took some finding in the dark, but it was well worth all our efforts. Sadly all that is left of the building these days is the bell tower, which is now boarded up due to ‘health and safety’ reasons; so a great shame we could not get inside. A very old building indeed built in 1086 for the private use of the estate and family of Hugh De Desmaisnil. There are many rumours of the church being built on a North/South alignment instead of on an East/West. Many medieval churches were built this way which was said to be the sign of the devil, which is why it was later demolished. In fact it is known that the site is indeed used for satanic worship and gatherings, and when you view our videos you will see proof of this fact. It did in fact look very magical in the moonlight and very compelling. The original church was demolished in 1853 but much of the graveyard remains to be explored. One unusual epitaph in the graveyard for one Roger Gadiner and his wife reads:

“Roger lies here before his hour

Thus doth the Gardiner lose his flower”

Photos taken on the night, around the graveyard and tower; please click on individual images to enlarge. The last two in the sequence do show ‘Light Orbs’ and a mysterious mist.

The extensive graveyard is very much in evidence here, though i suspect that like all ancient graveyards quite a few of the headstones are no longer where they were originall placed and some have fallen into quite bad disrepair. There are even reports of a mausoleum being here and that mass buriel graves lie under where the old church once stood and indeed one of our investigation team thought he actually saw the mausoleum upon first entering the site. The most paranormal activety is said to occur in and around the old church tower; activity such as growlings coming from the old tower itself, which have been reported as recently as 2009 and a sense of an ‘evil’ pressence, a figure in black has also been spotted on many occasions around the graveyard and in 1978, a report of a marching army coming out of the dorrway of the tower whilst letting out a blood-curdling roar…  Also ghost horses have been reported and recordings of strong EVP have been captured.

Sadly we did not manage to capture anything unusual on camera, but all of our investigation team experienced different feelings and sensations at different times and the energies, although fluctuating were indeed very strong. Some of us certainly saw Light Orbs in the trees at the boundary of the graveyard, which we have manged to just about capture on camera, albeit by mobile phone; it was certainly a feeling of being observed. Some of us picked up on more tangible happenings and one of our team, actually had physical interaction by way of her clothes and skin being touched. So all in all, extremely interesting and well worth the trip and getting lost for!

Please enjoy our video investigations via our Priory youtube channel:-

COLD CHRISTMAS CHURCH: PART ONE

COLD CHRISTMAS CHURCH: PART TWO

 

All Saint’s Church Datchworth: So a few miles down the road in the same Hertfordshire vincinity we found ourselves at the parish church in the village of Daxworth and this time most certainly not off the beaten track! The village of Daxworth  appears in the Anglo-Saxon charter of 969 when King Edgar gave land in Daxworth to St Peter’s Church, Wesminster and when the name of Datchworth was spelt Decewrthe; the village is also mentioned in the Domesday book of 1086.

One can read more of the history of Datchworth here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datchworth

On this occasion though it was the church we were visiting; Norman in origin, it was erected within the confines of the moat and subsequently a manor house was built nearby and it is thought that an earlier church did in fact preceded the present one. The night was dark and cold but strangely on this occasion the church and surroundings seemed quite calm and with a lack of energies really; even though the village has the reputation of being the most haunted in Hertfordshire.The church was well lit with floodlights and had CCTV clearly in evidence, which would be a good thing as i imagine that many visitors and investigators visit the church and graveyard here. As said it was peaceful, cold and subdued when we were there, but an interesting experience non the less, wandering the graveyard at night and around the vincitity of the church.

See above for the video shot around the graveyard and church.

There have been several sightings of an old woman dressed in black walking with a hunch and no head. She is thought to be the spirit of an old woman whoes husband died unexpectedly and in as deperate attempt to meet her husband again she hung herself. Close to the church is a narrow lane called Rectory Lane and people wandering along this eerie hedge-lined lane at night have heard phantom footsteps and seen the ghostly apparition of a cart carrying dead bodies, which local believe to be the bodies of the Eaves family who tragically starved to death during the famine of 1762.  One of the houses along Hollybush Lane is said to be haunted by the ghost of a lady with long red hair; this flame headed spirit is said to wear brigh clothing and manifest at the sound of tinkling bells. These are just a few of the many hauntings of Datchworth Village.

We did manage to obtain a few night-time shots via a mobile; on two or three shots white orbs of light can be seen; however with the flood lights in the graveyard i will leave it up to the viewer to make up their own minds. As always click on an image to enlarge:

The Keeper of Scrolls

November 2016

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 “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

 

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER FOURTEEN

  • RAF UPWOOD: CAMBRIDGESHIRE

So a dark yet mild Friday evening at the end of October 2016, found us on our way to the dissused and derelict airfield of RAF Upwood, practically on our doorstep in the Cambridgeshire countryside. It was to prove to be a very interesting night indeed. This is a site used frequently by urban explorers and ghost hunters alike and yet a site which proved intitially quite difficult for us to locate. We were seeking the run down living quarters, admin blocks and accomadation of a once thriving community;  a facility for airmen after the wars and, it has been told, a great source of paranormal activity. This site has a direct connection to the first site we visited (Quest Number One) at Spooks Hill, Warboys and is in the general area of Warboys and Ramsey; the sites share the same underground magnetic connections. There is much evidence on the internet and youtube that the site is haunted and we were very excited to be finding out for ourselves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Upwood

Our ‘satnav’ took us to the general area but did not locate the airfield itself, so seeking another source, we did eventually arrive at the vast open landscape of the dissused airfield. Asking our way of lads nearby, heading also in the same direction, we were advised to go back out onto the road and drive around to the front of the site and yet something told us to keep on. The airfield is a vast, open flat space with only a few flood-lights lighting up industrial buildings on the horizon. It is very dark with large open skies above, yet one can follow a laid down track, maybe a vehical access from many years ago. As we walked across this seemingly endless, dark plain of emptiness a feeling of not being alone, of being watched permeatted every pore of our being. As we walked, we passed by long strips of security fences protecting fields of solar panels; the biggest solor panel complex that we had ever seen… The complex was dotted with CTV cameras and sattelite dishes, so obviously we wondered what was going on there.

We did meet others too, again local lads, crouching in the shadows, who also advised we were gong the wrong way, but we just needed to check out further into the distance before coming back. For it was just as well that we did, for on the horizen and coming towards us we spied some bright lights which flashed a couple of times before dissapearing from the sky and out of our sight completely; we all saw them so no one persons over-imagination. We did try and walk towards the bright flood-lights but were met by high security fences with no way in. At that point we did decide to make our way back to the road, but still that sense of not being alone, of being followed and also more of the mysterious lights apeared on the horizon. We were definitely at the wrong part of the airfield but never the less the walk had proved to be very eye-opening indeed with the constant brooding feeling of not being alone still with us.

So back to the main road then as advised where we found the main gateway to the abandoned airfield; sadly high security fencing was all around with security and CCT in action, or so it said on the notices. At this point we did start to wonder how we could gain access, as obviously others before us had certainly done so; the whole area was about to be demolished to make way for new housing so important not to give up. Not to be deterred we got in the car again and started to continue our slow ride around the perrimeter, only to be very surprised moments later when two more young lads dissapeared between the trees and bushes around the perimiter and were gone – vanished! So we had to follow, as we knew this to be our way in; we parked up next to what was their parked car and followed  their tracks and sure enough, from behind the trees we could indeed walk right in. We never saw sight or sound of the two lads who guided us in, ever again….

Some of the corridors and grafitti at RAF Upwood

 

The whole area is amazing and truly is an urban explorers playground and a ghost hunters’s paradise too, for that matter. Wandering around in the dark, along the long pitch black corridoors of the living quarters, shower blocks and communial rooms, one could not help but wonder at what life would have been like in the heyday of the complex. It is now very eerie with graffiti everywhere, some of which is very beautiful, but one does get a huge sense of lost souls seeking some sort of sollace. The energies constantly changed from hot and cold, of being followed, of whisperings on the steps leading into one of the blocks; to two of our party actually seeing a fleeing male figure right in front of them, which promptly dissapeared into thin air…

Many of our photos revealed unexplained orbs, lights,  figures and other unexplained images…

Please ‘click’ on any image to enlarge

 

Take a look at our videos for a full tour around and see further evidence of the unexplained

(Please note we are actually at RAF Upwood – not Alconbury!! 🙂 )

RAF UPWOOD: PART ONE

Check out the background at 5.20 above!

RAF UPWOOD: PART TWO

RAF UPWOOD: PART THREE

Check out the orbs at 5.23!

The whole site is very eerie and yet extremely beautiful to behold and to explore. A dark, ethereal kind of beauty that is soon to be no longer and which does certainly come alive at night; alive with those lost souls of wartime airmen who have their mysterious tales still to tell…

End Oct 2016

‘Keeper of Scrolls’

“Through the veil we will see into the deep, dark sea eternally….”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER TWELVE: LINCOLNSHIRE

  • St Margaret’s Church Laceby
  • St James’ Church Louth
  • St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke
  • St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping

So after a small break, early September found us travelling all the way to farthest Lincolnshire; almost all the way to the Yorkshire borders in fact, on what was to be ‘Quest Number Twelve’. Traffic was bad, very bad and the journey was long and slow but this day, this quest was to prove to be very exciting and interesting indeed.

St Margaret’s Church Laceby: Laceby is a village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire, situated outside the western boundaries of Grimsby and is an ancient place in terms of human occupation; being listed in the Doomsday Book in 1086. There is a Mesolithic flint working site to the North-East of the village, found in 1958 and finds of Anglo-Saxon pottery were discovered in Coopers Lane in 1969. Welbrooke Hill nearby, is the site of Roman pottery finds and there is an Anglo-Saxon cemetry just South of the village alongside Barton Street. Further Anglo-Saxon evidence can be seen in the remains of an Anglo-Saxon cross found embedded in the North wall of St Margarets’s Church. The oldest part of the church is said to be the lower third of the Tower; constructed in the twelth century. Among the many stained glass windows is a very small window, left of the main entrance, which depicts St Margaret of Antioch, of whom the church is dedicated to. She is depicted here with a dragon, which could denote strength and courage, or strength in battle or adversity. The other side of the doorway is depicted St John the Baptist.

imgp0126-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laceby

St Margaret was a native of “Antioch” and the daughter of a pagan priest named Aedesius. imgp0142-1Her mother, it is said, died soon after her birth and Margaret was thus nursed by a Christian woman five or six leagues from Antioch. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her ‘virginity’ to God, Margaret was then disowned by her father and was adopted by her nurse; she lived in the country keeping sheep with her foster mother (in what is now Turkey). Olybrius, Governor of the Roman Diocese of the East, asked to marry her, but with the demand that she renounced her Christianity. Margaret refused and upon her refusal, she was cruelly tortured during which, various miraculous incidents occurred. One of these involved her being swallowed by Satan, in the shape of a dragon from which she escaped alive when the cross she was carrying irritated the dragon’s innards. This tale is said to represent Margaret’s escape from her fathers false beliefs of paganism and of her being born anew by escaping from the dragon’s belly. However the account never the less was not taken seriously, especially the last incident which was descibed as “apocryphal and not to be taken seriously” and thus sadly she was put to her death; attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning but she miraculously survived and managed to convert many spectators who were also  subsuequently executed, before being finally beheaded, in AD 304.  Because of this tale she has become the patron saint of childbirth, labour and pregancy. As Saint Marina, she is associated with the sea, which “may in turn point to an older goddess tradition,” reflecting the pagan divinity, Aphrodite. But how interesting that a church in England would take her name and that she would be it’s patron but even odder and more interesting still, she has patronage to Cambridge too; what a fascinating connection with furhter stories to be told….

‘The Blacksmith’s Ghost’: Solomon Fenner it is said, is still around the area of Laceby to this day. Around 1710 Solomon Fenner lived in the village of Laceby where he worked as the local Blacksmith, but although highly skilled and profesional he was not a rich man as such, yet neither did he live in poverty. He had previously served in the army of King William and King Henry on the continent, before returning home to Linconshire to take up his trade of which he had apprenticed for as a youth. He was known as a pious man who attended church each Sunday and whom gave a little of what he earned to the poor of the parish.

He never married but fell under the charms of one Rebecca Pettitt; a beautiful, witty young woman with long red hair and green eyes, who lived in the market town of Caister. It is said she had many suitors but her father Wiiliam Pettit; a greedy man who owned land and several shops in Caister, was determined that his daughter’s husband to be, would be one who would be financially advantageous to William.

And so it was that one day Solomon Fenner, was walking the country road to Caister and showed himself at the Pettit’s home, asking William for his daughters hand in marriage. William Pettit was furious that a humble blacksmith should ask such a question and thus angrily denied him and threw him out onto the street where something inside the normally gentle and pious blacksmith snapped. So knowing William Pettit to be a man of habit who regularily drunk and gambled with freinds at a hamlet near Cabourn, on a Saturday afternoon, Solomon made note. It was always late, lonely and dark when William made his way home through the Linconshire fens and the next Saturday night the vengeful Solomon was thus to be found waiting in the shadows….

When he saw the drunk and helpless William Pettit coming along on his own, he leapt out at him and bludgeoned him to death with a hammer. When his ‘red mist’ cleared and Solomon Fenner realise what he had done, he was filled with instant remorse and ran to the nearest farmhouse to confess to the sleepy inhabitants what he had done. When the body of William Pettit was discovered, bloody and battered, there was no doubt to Fenner’s confesion and so in due course he was of course hanged, as was the way in those times. Before his death it is said he wept bitterly, cursing his actions of that night, expressing fear for his imortal soul. His body was gibbeted on a hill near Cabourn overlooking the scene of his crime and to this day, if legend is anything to go by Solomon Fenner is still not at rest. For according to local folklore, travellers walking between Cabourn and Caister late at night will be approached by a tall and robust looking man, stepping out of the shadows to confront them. He wears dirty apparel and caries a blood-stained hammer in his hand. His red eyes do not lie; he has been weeping, yet he tells the travellers not to be afraid; he will do them no harm as he sadly recounts his story of his crime, adding that they must remember that all life is sacred and his punishment for forgetting this is to spend all enternity telling others of his crime…

We were unable to carry out any filming inside the church on this occason due to an afternoon ‘tea social’ and community gathering going on in the church, but we did manage to take some interesting photos which once again showed a great deal of Templar and Masonic symbolism and even from further beyond; symbols that are certainly not ‘christian’. Though sadly the church has very little of it’s former ‘energy’ alive to this day…

Masonic and Templar symbolism in St Margaret’s Church, Laceby, also showing a reference to the ‘Neville’ linage (click on images to enlarge)

ST MARGARETS CHURCH: LACEBY LINCOLNSHIRE

A short video taken from outside of St Margaret’s Church, Laceby; here you will discover the beginnings of the ‘Neville’ line and more references to the symbolism inside the church (as shown above in the photos)

Laceby as mentioned in the clip above is actually where the ‘Neville’ line originated; and interestingly our lead researchers 18th grandmother’s father has a connection here. People always asume that the Neville line started from France (de Ville in France); going back to Geoffrey De Neville who was actually granted, by King Henry 3rd on 26th Dec 1234, an act, was given permission for this area, the right to hold a fair on the 24th July, as anyone at that time had to have the King’s permission to do so. Interestingly though, for some reason the locals were not tuned into the history of their church…..

St James Church Louth: Louth is situated at the foot of the beautiful Lincolshire Wolds, at the point where they meet the Lincolshire Marshes; it is known as the Capitol of the Lincolshire Wolds. It developed where the ancient trackway along the wolds, known as Barton Street, crossed the river Lud. The town is east of a gorge carved into the Wolds that forms the Hubbards Hill. This area was formed from a glacial overspill channel in the last glacial period; the River Lud meanders through the gorge before entering the town. Various interesting archeology finds have been unearthed in the area including hand axes dating from between 424,000 ans 191, ooo years ago, indicating inhabitation in the Paleolithic era. Bronze age finds include a ‘barbed and tangled’ arrowhead in the grounds of Monks Dyke, Tennyson College. There is an Anglo-Saxon burial ground, northwest of Louth, which dates from the fifth to sixth centuries. It was  first excavated in 1946 and with an estmated 1200 urn burials is one of the largest Anglo-Saxon cemetries in England.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louth,_Lincolnshire

This mainly fifteeth century parish church with the tallest medieval parish church spire in England, is the third building on the site here, succeeding the previous eleventh and thirteeth century structures. The chancel and nave were rebuilt in 430-40 but the very tall spire was not completed until 1515. This was the site of the Lincolnshire Rising, the first serious rebellion that threatened the crown which was followere by the Pilgrimage of Grace. These occurances were the results of the national discontent resulting from Henry V111’s taxation and ecclesiastical changes; sadly both rebellions failed and serious represions followed; the church then being swept clean of its richest, icluding the dismantling of the rood screen.

The unusual happening here is said to be of the appearance of the ghost of St. Hererith, the Bishop who died in 873, killed at the hands of the invading Danes and whom is also known as Louths ‘forgotten Saint’. Sadly due to being delayed by the trafic on the road on this particular day, the church was closed when we arrived so we were not able to prove or disprove any ‘tales’ but we managed some very useful video and photos from outside…

St James’s Church, Louth showing the tallest medieval spire in the counrty and an interesting sigil carved into the church wall; often know as the ‘Awen’ sign in the modern druidic world, more can be read about it here:-

To most people this symbol represents the modern day ‘Awen’ sign, yet the truth and meaning is very far removed as the symbol goes back much further in time; it was adopted with the re-birth of the so called ‘old ways’ in the 1960’s. In Templarism it actually represents the ‘three pillars’ yet in Priory something different again, where it goes back to it’s original roots.

Earth: Body & Love,
Sea:Mind / Wisdom,
Air:Spirit / Truth

The ‘Awen’ symbol is also said to represent ‘Inspiration of Truth’ and it is further suggested that without Awen (inspiration) one could not understand truth, so the original truths have stuck and been passed down. What is further interesting is the three rays (three pillars) also represent the universe in balance, meaning:

Left Ray:Female
Centre Ray:Balance
Right Ray:Male

One needs to attune to the three rays (or rather the ‘three pillars’) to fulfil their understanding of the world within them and all around them (the without)  (There is much more on the original metaphysical meaning of this symbol within Templarism in The Knights Bible found on Amazon)

Follow the link to our youtube channel for some interesting historical comments on the history of this spendid church and of its Knight Templar connection…

ST JAMES CHURCH: LOUTH,  LINCS

St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke: This very interesting, hidden away, redundant Anglican church situated near the village of Skidbrooke, seven miles northeast of Louth in Lincolnshire is now under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. This isolated church is nestled well off the beaten track in a woodland copse, in the heart of rural Lincolnshire and totally not what any of us was expecting at all… Upon arriving, the site was very open, the fields were bare and the harvet was in, all in all a typical scene of the English countryside. The apearance of the church on the horizon, as it looms from under its secret cover of lush surrounding trees could easily be mistaken for a very atmospheric and eerie film set and indeed tales of ghosthunters, witch covens and satanic ritual still freshly abound and entice to this very day. This once, and i can only assume beautiful church, is now a vast empty shell; a ghost of its former self yet strangely very beautiful and compelling. The stained glass windows and what were probably wonderful church fittings etc have now all been removed and yet the ceiling still remains fairly intact as do surprisingly some of the carvings and significant writings which we may learn about later.

imgp0188-1

As said , an isolated church standing in the flat Lincolnshire marshes, St Botolph’s is early medieval, dating from the early thirteeth century with various renovations covering the Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic periods.This spacious building is composed of a nave with clerestory, north and south aisles, south porch, chancel, and an embattled west tower. The interior of the church is almost completely bare and unadorned, with unplastered walls letting the bones of the building show. The nave arcades are Early English, with wide, slender arches and nicely carved column capitals. The south arcade, built circa 1400, has it’s columns built up on bases several feet high. The tower arch is much narrower, in Perpendicular style. The church is constructed in limstone and brick with some rendering and the roof is in slate with stoned coped gables. Once inside it really opens out and has the feeling of a large hall; light pours in through the many glassless windows and the many fine arches all the way along the inside of the building hint at older different times. The piers of the arches are octagonal in construction representing ‘the eight points of perfection.’

 St Botolph’s; an abandoned yet beautiful chuch…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Botolph%27s_Church,_Skidbrooke

If the building is used for rituals and gatherings, and by the looks of things remaining and clues opon the ground, it most probably is, one can immedietly sense why; the whole place most certainly have a feel to it; an atmosphere not of this world. Skidbrooke has been the subject of much publicity due to reports of paranormal activity at the church. Several ghosthunters have reported unusual goings-on at the building, and the church was nicknamed ‘the Demon church’ after it became popular with groups of Satanists in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Visitors have reported seeing a ghostly monk on the site, seeing odd lights and hearing sounds of storms in calm weather, and hearing strange, unexplained noises at night. Also reported at the sight are the cries of screaming satanists, a headless knight and demons from a specific tomb, where it is said is an entrance to ‘dimensional changes’.

Some of the symbols still left in this abandoned church <click on any image to enlarge>

Follow the link to our youtube channel for a tour around St Botolph’s Church and hear of the scary tales old and new, of dark gatherings still taking place here…

ST BOLTOPHS CHURCH:  SKIDBROOKE, LINCS

We all experienced many different feelings here; feelings of the atmosphere changing, sensing the atmosheric presure changing, sensing hot and cold; in fact great activity all around us, feelings of breathlessness and tight chestedness. The ‘energies’ of the site constantly changed from knowing ‘others’ were there to a quite openly unfriedly, unwelcomed feeling; a deep and oppresive atmosphere that manifested in a physical way upon us. So certainly we were definitely not alone here but i get a true sense that the ‘guardians’ here are a tad fed up with it all and just want to be left in peace guarding ‘their truths’….. I myself loved the place and was very reluctant to leave, although it is not for the faint-hearted. I loved the whole experience of being there with communication from other dimensions, although some folks say that even today events of a ‘not nice’ nature are still practiced to this very day……

St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping:  And so with nightfall well and truly upon us we arrived at St Guthlac’s Church in the pretty town of Market Deeping, for what was to be our first full night time visit. This church is largely fifteenth century and is the only church in Market Deeping, being part of the Church of England Anglo-Catholic tradition. On the south face of the tower is a very unusual sundial with ‘The Day is Thine’ enscribed upon it, while on the north face is a similar one enscribed with the words ‘The Night Cometh’; very compelling indeed… St Guthlacs is a grade 1 listed building that has been contiuously in use in Market Deeping for at lest eight hundred years. The site was clearly a centre of worship long before that as Anglo-Saxon religous masonry had been discovered in the grounds. It has a fascinating history, not only the building but also of St Gutlac himself. As we intend to return in the daytime for a more indepth look at this fascinating church; much more will follow…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Market_Deeping

Of interest to us is the fact that demons are said to roam the grounds and torment the living. Wandering around these church burial grounds at night, one certainly gets the direct sense of not being alone, of being watched and of experiencing very intense ‘energies’ in certain parts of the grave yard. Some of our team experienced hearing and seeing unexplained movements and sounds emancipating from certain areas, an orb was seen and also figures at the upper church windows when the security lights did not turn off. We did manage a few night-time photos and all will be continued….

In the graveyard of St Guthlac’ at night; look closely for the orbs….

If you wish to join us on our quests, especially if you love uncovering untold histories, please leave a message here in the comments section.

To find out more about The Priory, who we are and what we do please see the following link:-  http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“It is not the falsety of religion to rely upon for there is no meaning. It is Dumuzi, the son of Enki whom shall rise as a King amongst the wolves”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

 

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER ELEVEN

THE GARDEN OF ENGLAND

  • St Peter and St Paul’s Church Seal
  • St George’s Church Wrotham
  • St Nicholas’ Church Pluckley

An early morning start found us on quest number eleven and on our way to Kent; commonly known as ‘The Garden of England’ and one can certainly see why, as once off the ‘beaten track’ one is in wooded countryside, pretty little villages and amongst rolling chalk downs – a taste of ‘Old England’ to be sure and a lovely place to be for a day of questing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal,_Kent

ST PETER AND ST PAUL: SEAL. Our first stop of the day was this small medieval church, a grade one listed building, in the village of Seal,  just outside Sevenoaks. The church was built in 1243 upon the grounds of a former Saxon church and burial ground. It is a very quiet spot with stunning views right across the north downs. There is altogether a lovely peaceful feel to the church and graveyard; yet upon entering the church itself, many surprises await the eagle eyed Craft explorer, for this is a very Masonic driven English church…

A very peaceful and picturesque setting with stunning view across the downs <click on all photos for a larger view>

On entering St Peter and Paul church, one can see straight away over the main doorway, the figure of Boaz, from the two biblical figures; the two pillars, while inside the porch itself and the entrance are placements upon the windows of very masonic symbols; the square and compass, the tau within the philosophers stone, the keys, the sword (logos), emblems of blood sacrifice and blood letting and within the church itself many references to, and symbols of the Raised (third) Degree icluding the skull and crossbones.

Let Alek our head researcher show you around and explain all the meaning of the Masonic symbolism for you (apologies for the noises from the wind outside)

ST PETERS & ST PAULS CHURCH: SEAL KENT

In 1874 a female apparition (Djinn) with a pair of garden ‘loppers’ was recorded as being seen frantically chopping the bushes in the graveyard, while in 1263 a faceless monk was seen from the now blocked over window, looking outwards. In 2015 a Seal man named Paul Gevauxx was jailed for commiting a double stabbing. One wonders just how these kind of incidents occur and what could have provoked someone to carry out such a crime as this… We ourselves (our team) whilst in the church experienced a few ‘happenings’ sadly not on camera though; seeing white lights near the organ, various loud bangings/thumpings and a white light near the original doorway.

See our second video link to explain further about St Peter and Paul Church

ST PETERS & ST PAULS CHURCH: SEAL KENT

 

St Peter and St Paul: A church  full to the brim with Masonic symbolism

The ‘family lines’  we were particularly researching today in Kent were:

  • Richard Neville 1674
  • Catherine Turner 1716
  • Robert Neville 1714
  • Anne Neville 1679

As shared in the above clip there ocurred a subsequent ‘family’ migration to Shipdham in Norfolk, where of course we have previously quested at.

ST GEORGES CHURCH: WROTHAM. The church is located on the ‘north’ side of a small square in Wrotham village, but sadly on this occasion the church doors to this little late Saxon/early Norman period church were not open to us, due to extensive electrical wiring renovations being carried out. The church was founded in 946 AD by Richard de Wrotham. We stayed awhile though strolling aroung the burial ground at the church itself and also the second graveyard just over the road, where many beautiful celtic crosses can be seen; obviously again carrying their fare share of Templar and Masonic symbols, as can also be seen around the outside of the church. The ‘family’name associations to be discovered here are as that in Seal, Kent.

http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/01/03/WRO.htm

Some of the beautiful Celtic crosses and other ‘non christian’ sybolism to be found in the pretty setting of St George’s Church in Wrotham.

By way of an introduction and a record of our visit, even though we were unable to gain entry, we did make a very short video – see below:

ST GEORGE CHURCH: ROTHERAM KENT

ST NICHOLAS: PLUCKLEY. This church, which is also a grade one listed building and is situated in the picturesque vilage of Pluckley, has been on the site in some form or other since Saxon times; the present church being some 900 years old, with Pluckley being a name of Saxon origin and record of the monks of Cantebury actually recording a church being here in 1090. As the village is so pretty and typically English one can totally see why the TV series ‘The Darling Buds of May’ was mostly filmed in and around this village.

The inside of St Nicholas showing the many brasses to be found on the floor, but especially pay attention to the beautiful ‘prophetic’ window with tellings of our earth’s future….

Of course the village and church does now have the infamous reputation of being the most haunted church and village in England; whether true or not or just folklore tales, one as usual has to make up ones own mind on the matter. The village though, certainly does attract its fair share of ‘ghost hunters’, especially on nights such as Halloween/Samhain. Among the ‘ghosts’ seen or recorded here are ‘The Highwayman’, The sounds of a ‘horse drawn’ coach, a gypsy woman or watercress woman, a ‘red’ lady and a ‘white’ lady and a monk; these are just a few of the many sightings recorded here so one can only assume that the Djinn are in proliferation here; maybe protecting much more than meets the eye… While we ourselves were here, we did experience a mysterious woman and a dog entering the church and then leave, but as the video below explains, Alek who was outside at the time, just near the door, witnessed no one what so ever entering or leaving the church….

http://www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/england/kent/hauntings/pluckley.html

So while most visitors are seeking verification of ‘hauntings’ they are of course missing the whole point of why this church is really here; the reason why all the churches we are visiting are where they are, ie the placement of pyramids within the earth. From the actual church’s themselves, especially this one today; the real truths of existence and of life on this planet are here for all to see… The overiding theme of the day, from the churches we visited certainly seemed to revolve around blood sacrifice, blood letting and blood offerings; of offerings and the taking of ‘energy’ as told within the designs of the stained glass windows; presenting us with a lesser know yet true tale of ‘The Jesus’ and whom he really was; his true origins and the customs of his kin and how they fit into the ‘jigsaw’ of life on earth. We also see a future time in relation to this so called planet, spread out before us upon the magnificant window, messages from the past for all to decipher…

See the video link of this amazing and very special window to find out more:

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH: PLUCKLEY KENT

There were a couple of ‘hidden’ rooms, above the entrance porch and in the bell tower area which we did wonder about; why were they closed, why no public access? That was a bit of a mystery to us… then sadly before we had finished filming and taking our photographs, the present day ‘Keeper of the Keys’ arrived on the scene at this point in time, to lock up. However before she bade us farewell she did mention that the ‘hidden’ rooms were being refurbished as a visitors diaplay and historical centre, which was useful to know. Thus then our research for the day was cut abruptly short, though thankfully we had enough to gain much knowledge and insight.

See our Youtube link to the last video of the day at St Nicholas, Pluckley where more symbolism is revealed….

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH: PLUCKLEY KENT

The Days Thoughts and Conclusions….

  1. We know that the churches on the sites we are investigating are full of Masonic symbolism, but where did these symbols originate from in the first place?
  2. Why are the churches built upon sites where underground ‘secrets’ need to be kept buried from the people of the lands?
  3. We know that the ‘Djinn’ are very much in attendence at these sights but are they protecting or hiding something?
  4. We have learnt today of the exsistence of The Kolbrin bible and of the truths that it contains and the fact that many of the Freemasons scriptures do in fact originate from The Kolbrin.
  5. The windows are full of prophetic happenings; we saw the future history of our planet before us today bold as brass, as foretold in the Kolbrin Bible.
  6. We learnt of the truths and real life of  ‘The Jesus’;  of blood spilling, blood letting and of blood scarifice and that the giving and receiving of ‘energy’ is not what one is lead to believe.
  7. We now know that Mary Magdalene was indeed male; so what then of this realationship to The Jesus?
  8. We learnt today of the ‘family’migration from Kent to Norfolk; the ‘Nevilles’ as always being very prominent ‘players’ in our quests;  the bloodline of whom goes back as far as Enoch.
  9. All the churches of all the quests attract the inquisitve public, the ‘ghost hunters’, the ‘paranormal investigaters’ etc… etc, for all the wrong reasons. What better way then to hide a secret – hidden in the spooky tales of headless horseman, white ladies, monks, black schucks, knights, people with dogs etc… etc… Smoke and mirrors and more than a little bit of misdirection…. Perfect camoflauge to hide the truths i would say!

August 2016

If you are fascinated with a mystery, especially one that arrives at the truths, then you are very welcome to join us on our quests: please email me for further info at moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 Should you wish to go deeper and become a true member of The Priory; either email me or see the website:  http://priory7.wix.com/priory

 “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER TEN

  • All Hallows within Tottenham Cemetary
  • St Mark Noel Park Wood Green
  • All Saints Edmonton
  • Saint Mary Magdalene Enfield

So our destination for Quest Number Ten was to take us in a completely different direction alltogether from our quests of before, for we were leaving the quiet of the coast and countryside behind us and were making tracks towards the urban jungle of North London. So why these four paticular churches? What is so special about them? Sure they have their fair share of unexplained tales of ghostly sightings; even quite unerving stories affecting local people & children; including poltergeist sightings and interactions over the years, but the real facts do go much deeper and relate to the purposes of our ongoing quests, including family blood lines, royal blood lines, hidden histories and long hidden pyramids so please do read on and enjoy…

All Hallows Church within Tottenham Cemetary: A visit to the much loved family grave in beautiful Tottenham Cemetry was an important call for our lead researcher. This lovely cemetry is much like a park with its own lake, picnic areas and an abundance of wildlife; yet this was also a time of reflection and of a cleaning up of the family plot. There were definitely some other ‘presences’ around us here on this day, yet certainly nothing untoward in any way and of course this visit was very important and relevant to our quests 🙂

The family plot of Alek in Tottenham cemetry, now loving restored to beauty <click on photos to enlarge>

The Church itself, we were unable to gain entry to, yet we were able to film some interesting footage outside. All Hallows aka All Saints Church was a Zion church in times past, which is quite evident from the design of the building, however it is now an Anglican church and is one of the oldest buildings in the London Borough of Haringey, having been built as All Saints in the 12th century. The church has been painted by many fine artists over the years and there has even been a book written about it. It has it’s fair share of mysteries including that of a real life physical vampire whom roamed the cemetry for a good few years and of course because of the churches placement as one of the ‘four corners’ it has many a ghosty tale woven into its history. The church also has connections to the Knight Templars and the Grail.

Let Alek tell you more by clicking on the link to our youtube channel:

TOTTENHAM: A FAMILY GRAVE & INVESTIGATING VAMPIRES

 

There are some beautiful carvings and artwork to be discovered both on the church and in its graveyard

<click on images to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All_Hallows%27_Church,_Tottenham

St Mark Noel Park Wood Green: Sadly we were unable to gain entry into the second church of quest number ten, but never the less we did manage to record a short film outside of the churche’s gates amidst the roar of the North London traffic. There was a solid boarded fence all around the church too, making still photography also difficult. This is a ‘Church of England’ Victorian church built in 1889 on the charming Noel Park estate; one of the first ever municiple housing estates to be built. There are quite a few unexplaind and scary happenings recorded here; some from the fairly recent past. It is the second point of the ‘four corners’ so thus no surprise.

See our link here

ST MARK NOEL PARK, WOOD GREEN AND ALL SAINTS CHURCH, EDMONTON

 

All Saints Church Edmonton: So yet again at this point in time we were unable to gain access to this church; the third church of quest number ten and the third of the ‘four corners’. After our travels around the rural and coastal church sites which are open mostly much of the time to visitors and pilgrims, one can only assume that in built up urban areas, the churches are closed for reasons of safety and security. All Saints is an Anglican church within the borough of Enfield. The oldest known reference to the church shows up in a document dating some time between 1136 and 1142. It was completely rebuilt in the 15th century and has undergone many alterations since. Again because of it placement and importance of our quests, much poltergeist and ghostl activity has been recorded here.

http://www.allsaintsedmonton.org.uk/

A pretty church set amidst beautiful grounds open to the public which are a public byway

The Four Corners revealed…..

Saint Mary Magdalene Windmill Hill Enfield: And so with visiting this church on quest number ten, we arrive at point number four of the ‘four corners’ and thus by now dear reader you will have gained great insight into just what the ‘four corners’ are refering too and yet some mysteries as always do remain. When we arrived here, the church was about to be closed for the night but with promt action on our parts we were able to gain access and to have two informative guides by our side. The interior of this church is truly an amazing sight to behold and has been recently refurbished with the help of a lottery grant. As expected due to its placement, it has it’s tales of the unexlained here and even a well documented report of an exorcism performed by one of the past days priests. But it is the Templar, Masonic, Egyptian, Eastern and Eastern Star symbology that predominates everywhere within the church for all to see, which reveals and tells the true tales….

http://www.stmarymagdalene.church/

See the stunningly beautiful and exquisite artwork and mosaic tiles that adorn the wall and floors of St Mary Magdalene Church in Enfield: not just artworks but clues left to us of our true hidden history of our country and our planet. All left for us to decipher; left for the truth seekers to discover and acknowledge – truly and surely quest for the modern day Knight….

“Seek and ye shall find”

Follow the link to our Youtube channel for an informal tour of the church and a viewing of  an alternative version of ‘The Last Supper’

MARY MAGDALENE CHURCH: ENFIELD

 

All Saints Edmonton: Back to the Future…. Happily and to our delight the vicar of All Saints returned our call and invited us back to view this lovely and very interesting church which was well worth the wait for the visit, for inside the churches walls we were presented with many suprises and delights. There were many ancient carvings all around the church; the font in particular relaid to us important and relevant messages from the past, as did the ‘Grail Kingship’ plaque upon the wall to the left of the font; a more detailed description of which is in the video. As always messages from the past, way back from ancient Sumerian times and beyond, left for the astute amongst us to decipher; for those who love a good quest 🙂

The video link below tells much more of the church in finer detail and of further bloodline & ‘family’ connections and sumerises our quest for today and thus so far.

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: EDMONTON

Read the true ‘story’ from the carvings and artwork

<click to enlarge>

The Four Corners: So from todays quest we have discovered what is meant by the ‘Four Corners’ and of the placement within our land of this great pyramid, marked by these four north London churches:

  • All Hallows within Tottenham Cemetary
  • St Mark Noel Park Wood Green
  • All Saints Edmonton
  • Saint Mary Magdalene Enfield

The apex; the pinnacle of which rises here <see link below> gives us more mysteries to solve:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pymmes_Brook

So to conclude:

  1. We are discovering some of the deeply significant messages hidded in stone at all of these sites.
  2. We now know that these sites are places of immense power and magnectic resonance.
  3. We have leant that the ‘Guardians of Secrets’ protected these sites and still do.
  4. We know these sites to be frequented by the Djinn.
  5. The quest for the true ‘Grail Kingship’ continues as we delve into the untold history of our lands…

“For i am the reason that you exist, the reason for your event and the reson that you will depart. It is at the point of reason that the seasons shall reveal themselves for what they truly are…”

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more on an England; on a history you really thought you knew….

https://themidnightgarden.org/
http://priory7.wix.com/priory

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER NINE

  • St Marys Church: Therfield
  • St Faith’s Church: Kelshall
  • Minsden Chapel: Chaplefoot
  • All Saints Church: Little Munden
  • St John The Baptist Church: Royston

Therfield Church

ST MARYS CHURCH THERFFIELD: This was to be our first port of call of the day, for Quest Number Nine; for what was to prove to be a very busy and fascinating quest. Upon arriving at Therfield Church one cannot fail to notice the proliferation of Templar and Masonic gravestones covering the burial ground, adorned with much  ‘Old Craft’ symbolism that we have now grown to expect.

<click to enlarge images>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therfield

An interesting church which was funded directly by the Fordham Family (one of our lead researchers, Alek’s pedigree lines). It is said that Edward King Fordham, (1750-1847) is the protector here (i.e. the Guardian of Secrets). There have been reports of his hauntings and of his ghostly apparitions here since 1853,  yet oddly they only started 6 years after his death.

A nice church, but a wee bit of a red herring for us and our quest…. Interesting though that the Vicar, Richard came over and took our head researcher Alek directly  to the grave of John Henry Fordham, who of course had connections to the masonic lineage, which is no surprise. Such a shame we did not have a chance to record here, as who knows what potential for EVP could have occured.

St Faiths Church

ST FAITH’S CHURCH KELSHALL: Situated in a very quiet corner of Hertfordshire, one hundred metres above sea level on the chalky Chiltern ridge, where the parish land sweeps northwards down to the well known Icknield Way. As is usual nothing can be seen of an earlier church building, but a late 14th century preaching cross still stands in the churchyard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelshall

GK sheild

This is a ‘Key’ area of the Fordham Line, with major signs and placards very evident in the Church itself, to the Fordams. What was more interesting: The  K.e.y Line of Alek (the Neville Line) which tracks back to Noah and beyond; i.e. the beautiful and inspiring ‘Grail Kingship Shield’ (shown here) hangs proud and high just within this church over the entrance. Built on top of a Saxon Church, but more importantly; encompassed by Pyramid Energy, also with great potential for EVP.

Note: Edward King Fordham is Aek’s 5 x Great Grandfather from the Fordham Line.

 

Please see our Youtube link to take a tour around the church to learn more about the Fordham line and the symbolism within the church:

KELSHALL: THE FORDHAM LINE

 

MINSDEN CHAPEL CHAPLEFORD:  So our next destination was right off the beaten track, literally in the middle of nowhere, where a bridle way is the only indication that something might be hiding in the woods. It was quite an uphill trek and a worthy battle with nettles and brambles; for this small chapel with a very fascinating history sits within a copse, atop of a mound overlooking the Hertfordshire countryside. From looking at other video clips of the chapel it is now a lot more innaccesable than it has been in previous years and very difficult to get to and even to see properly through the overgrowth of vegetation. It is now very difficult to see much of the chapel walls as leafy bushes and trees have now sprung up everywhere, obscurring the view.

First of all, it was interesting to note that the pub we had enjoyed a lovely late lunch in and which had been renamed, was the pointer we were indeed looking for and yet could not find; the Chapelfoot Farmhouse itself ! Now known as The Rusty Gun; not easily recognizable these days as areas look so different as the seasons move on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minsden_Chapel

Minsden Chapel was built in 1368, yet the mound (Hill) is more sacred and powerful than even Stonehenge… Reginald Hine, an historian from Baldock born 25th September 1883, knew of its significance and was burdened with the duty of sealing the area to stop evil spreading out. Signs of witchcraft and sacrifice are evident here today, so not a spot for the faint-hearted! There is a memorial stone somewhere on the chapel site for Reginald but i guess the ground covering was so dense it was not easy to find and we missed it. A site personally ticked off by Alek whom vows NEVER to re-visit and firmly believes that it is best to be forgotten; for when the oceans rise it shall be returned to the sea from whence it came… A clear and definite presence was cetainly felt here with many tales of whispers unfolding and an atmosphere which gradually became denser, so much so that members of our team reported pressures on the front of their heads and headaches….

Important to note the ‘odd sign’ of warning of which Reginald wrote, upon receiving his lifetime lease from the Diocese:

 

TRESPASSER AND SACRILEGIOUS PERSONS TAKE WARNING,

FOR I WILL PROCEED AGAINST THEM WITH THE UTMOST RIGOUR OF THE LAW,

AND, AFTER MY DEATH AND BURIAL, I WILL ENDEAVOUR, IN ALL GHOSTLY WAYS,

TO PROTECT AND HAUNT ITS HALLOWED WALLS


How interesting too, considering that over and above the circular portal entrance is the out-mould of a strange human face forever staring down and keeping watch…

Take a look around the Chapel via our link below nd learn of some of its mysterious history first hand:

SACRED MINSDEN CHAPEL

 

As an interesting footnote, which goes along with not being welcomed by ‘The Guardian’ of the site, and the fact that the site is well and truly hidden under trees and is not mentioned anywhere as a place to visit…. while we were in a nearby carpark assessing how to find Minsden Chapel, a couple seemed to appear from a leafy footpath over the road that seemed to go nowhere in particular, yet complete with map in hand. They professed to know where we needed to go but strangely the directions they gave were not where the chapel actually was……

 

ALL SAINTS CHURCH LITTLE MUNDEN: After travelling across pretty countryside we next found ourselves at All Saints Church, Little Munden. We expected it to be closed as the hours of opening had passed by, so a search around the burial ground was all we were expecting but never the less we were in for a few suprises…

Little Munden 1

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/herts/vol3/pp129-135#h3-0007

It is an interesting church, and although as said it was locked upon our arrival (given the time of evening at 7:30 at night), enough was experienced to confirm the placement of a ‘tablet’. We all heard noises and a voice from the lower chambers, just right of the church porch, together with a cold, very dark feeling energising fear, emanating from the bottom of the steep and crumbling stone steps. At the bottom of the steps and to the left where there was pitch blackness, one could just make out the shape of the iron bars of a (cell?) door and upon peering through them, there was total darkness and a strong sense of an utter foreboding; an all encompassing void, the nature of which can only be described as ‘not nice’ in any way and a wind above that blew in three different directions at the same time. Built in 1385, though the older structure was built in the year 897.

There are reports of  ghostly apparitions of Ralph Fordham; the protector, the Guardian of Secrets; see the link below…

LITTLE MUNSDEN: GHOSTLY HAPPENINGS

 

ST JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH ROYSTON:

Upon arriving at this church it was easy to see how it differed from the ‘out of the way’ villages we had previously visited on our quests. The church takes pride of place in this busy and well known tourist town;  it is set amidst stunning gardens and immaculate manicured lawns. The town itself is also well know for having two ancient thoroughfares that cross each other here; the previously mentioned Icknield Way and Ermine Street, also very well known. Most famously, it is known for The Royston Cave; which is said to have Knight Templar connections.

http://roystonparishchurch.org.uk/index.php/about-us/church-history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royston,_Hertfordshire

http://www.roystoncave.co.uk/

There is a connection here at this church to Elias Fordham (1762 – 1838), who is said to roam the grounds of this quite plain yet, interesting church.  What was of great interest to us was that William Henry Clarke whom we expected to be mentioned at the Church memorial in Shipdham, Norfolk, was in fact mentioned here at Royston, on the Great War (1914 – 1918) memorial just outside the Church…. This makes a direct connection between the Clarke and Fordham Lines that originate as such: the Fordham Line from Limerick Ireland and the Clarke Line from Plympton in Devon. No great surprise as Limerick to Plympton is not a major distance at all – just across the water in fact!

ROYSTON: ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, PEELING BELLS

 

 Royston War Memorial showing the Clarke family name and the church itself showing the very prominent ‘Entwined Serpent’ symbol (The emblem of the ‘Serpent Priesthood). Very interestingly displayed on a ‘christian’ church….

To join us in our future quests: especially if you love history, if you love a mystery, if you see beyond the mundane or simply if you love a good day out, please contact us via this webpage or email me here:  ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

To join The Priory itself: where we go much deeper on many aspects of life, creation, the true history of the planet and the future times to come; please see here:- http://priory7.wix.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is merely seasons in front. So be it that all those whom disbelieve shall cease to remain”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER EIGHT

  • ST MARY’S CHURCH SNETTISHAM
  • CASTLE RISING KINGS LYNN
  • GYSPSY CORNER MOULTEN

 

ST MARY’S CHURCH SNETTISHAM: One cannot help but wonder what these three seemingly separate sites have in common with each other; yet there is a connection, a thread running through which connects to our quests so far. So here we were in Norfolk once again, starting out on Quest Number Eight, at the stunningly beautiful Templar church; known as St Mary’s Church, Snettisham. This church which in reality is more like a catherdral is mentioned in the Domesday Book compiled in 1066; but most of the ‘present’ day church dates to the period of 1300 – 1340, although there would have been a church on this site which dates back to a much earlier time in history. The spire; one of only five in Norfolk, is second only to that of Norwich Cathedral in height and is, along with the rest of the church, testiment to a much wealthier time in the history of Snettisham, when the wool trade and textile industry kept the hands of the village weavers far from idle!

TK C

Snettisham itself is a very pretty little village situated near the west coast of Norfolk, just five miles south of Hunstanton. It has a beautiful unspoiled beach where many semi-precious gemstones can be found and an abundance of wildlife. Snettisham has a complex entry in the Domesday Book, where it is divided in ownership between Wiilliam de Warenne and the Bishop of Bayeux. It is also know for the Snettisham Horde; a series of discoveries of Iron Age precious metals.

To read more see here:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snettisham

But we were here to visit St Mary’s Church with it’s strong Templar influences that go beyond even that; connections that go deep into our unrecorded British history. We had tried to gain access to the church on a previous occasion but due to safety aspects of roof repair work being carried out, St Mary’s church was locked to us on that occasion. However we did make an introductory video to mark the occasion of our first vist. Strangely while we were lingering on the church porch inquiring over the phone, about access, another couple arrived whom informed us, had driven all the way from London to visit, and who also eagerly listened to our phone conversation. This was a strange yet not unusual happening for us as ‘co-incidences’ do tend to follow us around – see why in the video 🙂

Follow the link below to our Youtube channel and let our lead researcher give you an introduction and glimpse into this very special church’s history:

SNETTISHAM: THE KING OF TIR & A TEMPLAR CHURCH

The architecture, decorations and fittings of the church are truely amazing and do hark back to times that simply do not relate to christianity at all, but hint to many other ancient paths as you will see in this next video. The true Celtic cross with the Fleur de Lys, that connects to the King of Tir is evident for all to see in the main part of the church; a huge chandelier Merkaba (star of David) decorated with more Fleur de Lys hangs prominently in the vestry, as does a family crest relating to the ‘Neviile’ family; one of the bloodlines we are tracing. Yet most stunningly of all is the stained glass window, to the right of the vestry and along one side of the church which is under repair, is the very rare image of the King of Tir (the original Green Man) So once again we can see very many Knight Templar and Masonic symbolism here and even beyond that. Within the vestry itself i for one can attest to the fact that the magnetic energy is so powerful there, it almost knocks one off one’s feet; i was not alone in feeling this amazing power.

Photos above which show beautifully all the amazing symology and imagery in this stunning Templar church… <click to enlarge imags>

CASTLE RISING: After a brief but enjoyable visit to Snettisham beach, our next port of call was to be Castle Rising; the home of many tales, many families and royal intrigue. This castle is one of the most important twelth century castles in England. The stone keep has particularly fine arcading and embellishments on the fore building and was built around 1140 by William D’Albini to show his increased importance on his marriage to Alice of Louvian, widow of Henry 1st. The most infamous piece of history here stems from when the castle was the home (prison?) to Queen Isabella, the mother of Edward 3rd, who had a hand in the murder of her husband Edward 2nd. The records show that she was visited at the castle several times by her son Edward  3rd. Some say she went mad, some say she was in exile there, some say she is still there… Listen to what our lead researcher has to say in the next video on Castle Rising’s history and it’s tales of mystery…

Click through to our Youtube channel…

CASTLE RISING: A MURDERING QUEEN…

The keep of Castle Rising presents a dramatic and formidable sight, set against the vast East Anglian skies.

C R

A GYPSY BOY’S GRAVE:  Most folks local to the village of Moulton near Newmarket in Suffolk, know of ‘Gypsy Corner’ and can tell the sad tale of the young gypsy lad who is burried there; some may know of the gypsy curse attached to the grave site while others may not. But the mystery surounding the small burial site doe not end there and goes way deeper.

Our head researcher  will explain when you follow the link to our Youtube channel.

GYPSY CORNER NR NEWMARKET

Apologies for the many ‘cuts, stops & starts’ in the video due to a very busy road & noisy traffic!

G G 1

 

Conclusions of Quest Eight:

  • St Mary’s Church, Snettisham

Leading on from the previous visit; amazing to actually get inside courtessy of Peter Murray. He is an interesting chap in himself, having much hidden knowledge contained. After a conversation about burial or cremation, Peter assured that ‘we will make sure that this happens for you’. He was certainly more than just an organist.

The Vestry holds the key of the Hamilton surname linked with the Neville surname, with more important aspects of Judaism embedded within this timeless building. The lighting in the vestry is made from wood and the Hexagram ‘Star of David’, with trails around the hexagram of the Fleurs de Lys, gives tales of Judaism enshrined with Templarism. So the world at large would believe that it is the English Christian faith which guided the Templars. Clearly not correct, it was Judaism that over-stood all other beliefs and faiths.

The Celtic connection is contained within this church, spanning over 1,000 years tales to be deciphered, if only some were able to decipher such encryption.

  • Castle Rising

Evidence of Ghostly presence contained within the acoustic room within the castle itself. There is most definitely a regional hub of energy transmitting and being received at this point. Hardly surprising with Pyramid energy gathering at all crossings through this vibrant land of Castle Rising.

Particular attention must be given to the Norman Chapel which contains a sealed entrance to the underground tunnels that will reveal more to those whom seek to find.

It is of no surprise that our visit was enlightened with the presence of a protector, a Guardian of Secrets that brisked through and around us within the acoustic chamber.

  • The Gypsy Boy’s Grave

Of course most know the tale of the young man whom fell asleep and lost one of his sheep, no more than myth, where one is able to clearly identify the myth with that of ‘The Lamb of God’. The boy’s real name is Elias F born in 1828 and subsequently passed in 1841, some 13 years old. But was this boy a Gypsy and was he really guiding sheep? We must look to the meaning behind the name ‘Elias’ as this is where the Quest and the Clues originate. ‘Elias’ means ‘The Lord is my God’. It does not make reference to a God, it clearly refers to a Lord. So whom is the Lord? The Lord is connected to Snettisham Church and to that of Castle Rising. What we are permitted to reveal is that this boy has a direct connection to a Hertfordshire Banker in 1833.

To join us in our future quests or to join The Priory; especially if you love history and have a desire to see beyond the mundane…

please contact us via this webpage or email me here:-

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

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