Tag Archive: Old Churches


DAY THREE CONT:

  • HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON
  • HAILES CASTLE
  • HOLY ISLAND

HOLY TRINITY CHURCH: HADDIGTON: Still in Scotland, day three continued with our next visit which was to be the Holy Trinity Church at Haddington in the diocese of Edinburgh.  Set in a kind of small cul-de-sac off from the main street in a heritage area, both church and grounds are beautifully kept; from the outside the church looks quite small yet upon entering it appears much larger than it looks.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haddington,_East_Lothian

With funds raised by the congregation and a very generous donation from the Earl of Wemyss, the first phase of the church building was constructed in 1770 on the site of the original ‘Lamp of Lothian’ which, from the middle of the thirteenth century until 1555, had been the property of the Franciscan Friars. It was built of a local stone known as Rattlebags, a volcanic agglomerate (a complex breccia made of fragments of lavas). An article in the transactions of the Antiquaries of Scotland published in 1792 describes the building as a very elegant chapel. Holy Trinity Church is a Grade B Listed building and is in the Haddington Conservation Area.

 

In 1843 the church was ‘Gothicized’ with the addition of the nave parapet, nave south elevation window surrounds (note the lancet shape), porch and shallow apsidal sanctuary, using a different stone, a finer, pale buff sandstone.  The same year, the committee appointed to report on the state of the building described it as being extremely uniform and homely. Following completion of the reconstruction, a service of dedication to the Holy Trinity and of consecration was perfor med by the Rt Rev Charles Terrot, Bishop of Edinburgh, who in 1814 had returned to Scotland to serve as an Incumbent in Haddington.

 

The interior of the church showing ‘The Jesus’ using the now familiar ‘Ninasian Salute’ used by Priory members. Symbols such as the Lamb of God and other Templar symbols are to be discovered throughout the church and a beautiful tapistry on the altar, which is described as three angels, though it could be the ‘Three Marys’.

In 1930, the present Chancel was added to replace the apse and the interior remodelled in neo-Byzantine style by the Scottish architect B N H Orphoot. The Chancel external walls were built of Rattlebags and sandstone but have reinforced concrete detailing such as columns, arches, decorative bands and the corbel course below the gutter.

 

The church also had some interesting detail on its exterior walls <click on all images to enlarge>

Holy Trinity Church had some nice features and details both inside and out; it was a peaceful enough place but i got the feeling that  lot of the older artifacts from the past had been removed or had not stood the test of time and therefore the older ‘energies’ were no longer there

http://holytrinityhaddington.co.uk/

HAILES CASTLE: We paid an unexpected visit to Hailes Castle; one time home to Mary Queen of Scots.The castle is a mainly 14th century castle about a mile and a half south west of East Linton, East Lothian, Scotland and is quite secluded and hidden away. This castle, which has a fine riverside setting, belonged to the Hepburn family during the most important centuries of its existence. The castle was founded as a fortified tower house by Hugo de Gourlay before 1300, making it one of the oldest constructions of its kind in Scotland. The castle has a long and interesting history which one can read more of on the internet and it is certainly worth a visit to look around and explore.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hailes_Castle

 

This is where Mary Queen of Scots was staying as an adult, for it was deemed to be a safe place for her; secluded and hidden away and she had freinds and allies on her side; however this was not to be and history tells us otherwise…..

Just opposite the castle is a hill fort by the name of ‘Traprain Law‘ that rises in an imposing fashion above the horizon. It has an interesting name, yet was only known as ‘Traprain Law’ from the late 18th century, taking its name from a local hamlet. This is etymologically a Cumbric name cognate with Welsh tref ‘farm’ and either pren ‘tree’ or bryn ‘hill’. Law comes from the Old English word hlāw, meaning a burial mound.

It rises about 221m (724 feet) in elevation and is located 6 km (3.7 mi) east of Haddington. It covered at its maximum extent about 16 ha (40 acres) and must have been a veritable town. Whether it was a seasonal meeting place or permanent settlement is a matter of speculation.  Also speculated is whether the site is the site of an actual pyramid or not….  But it was a burial place by around 1500 BC with evidence of occupation and signs of ramparts after 1000 BC and has been ocupied at various points throughout it’s history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traprain_Law

 

Trapain Law together with Hailes Castle: an interesting area to stop a while to soak up more history…

HOLY ISLAND: The last point of call for day three was to be Holy Island; more of a winding down visit after a very busy day where many miles were covered. We arrived on the off chance knowing that the tides may not be in our favour and this did prove to be true. The evening sunset was amazing, so no better place in which to unwind whilst watching (and dodging) the beautiful incoming tides. When the tide is out one can pass happily back and forth from the main land to Holy Island and Lindisfarne, but when the tide is incoming one literally has to watch ones back and ones parked car as we discovered!

 

What better way to end the day than to watch the tide coming in…. <click on images to enlarge>

https://www.lindisfarne.org.uk/

The Holy Island of Lindisfarne is a tidal island off the northeast coast of England. It is also known just as Holy Island. It constitutes the civil parish of Holy Island in Northumerland. Holy Island has a recorded history from the 6th century AD. It was an important centre of Celtc Christianlty under Saints Aidan of Lindisfarne, Cuthbert, Eadfrith of Lindisfarne and Eadberht of Lindidfarne. After the Viking invasions and the Normsn conquest of England, a priory was reestablished. A small castle was built on the island in 1550. Much more can be red about it’s history here:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lindisfarne

 

“Incoming Tide!!!”

So day three came to an end in a rather beautiful and fun fashion; not much to comment about on ‘The Neville‘ front but suffice to say that the whole area is steeped in ‘Neville’ history and intrigue with a very special day to come on day four…

 

Please feel free to contact us if you are curious to find out much more about our quests; on an England; on a history you thought you knew….

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Aug 2017

 

 

Quest Number Fifteen: Hertfordshire

  • Little St Mary’s Church: Cold Christmas Lane Thundridge
  • All Saint’s Church Datchworth, near Thundridge

So another exciting night time foray found us once again in the Hertfordshire countryside. As we have learnt, so many ancient churches are to be found miles away from modern day highways and this trip was no exception; literally right off the beaten track and only accessible via grassy footpaths and byways. We had to park the car miles away, down a dead end, not knowing which path to take or which way to turn. The night was dark, which did not help and we were guided by just the light of the moon and a few torches. After one false start and driving off in a completely different direction, we gained our bearings and eventually found the site we were looking for. The site opens out beyond the trees and bushes of the byway, causing one to almost stumble upon it; but what a site to behold indeed. One walks through the open area and graveyard to reach the church, which in the cover of darkness almost looms upon one unexpectedly from the gloom. It was crisp clear night, with moonlight marred only by persistent chemtrailers dong their deeds under cover of darkness. The energies of the site are very similar to another site of an earlier quest; that of Santon Downham – almost, if not, identical; hinting at the fact that both sites are on the very same energy alignment.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thundridge

Little St Mary’s Church or Cold Christmas Church: as it is locally known, due to its proximity to Cold Christmas Lane, as said took some finding in the dark, but it was well worth all our efforts. Sadly all that is left of the building these days is the bell tower, which is now boarded up due to ‘health and safety’ reasons; so a great shame we could not get inside. A very old building indeed built in 1086 for the private use of the estate and family of Hugh De Desmaisnil. There are many rumours of the church being built on a North/South alignment instead of on an East/West. Many medieval churches were built this way which was said to be the sign of the devil, which is why it was later demolished. In fact it is known that the site is indeed used for satanic worship and gatherings, and when you view our videos you will see proof of this fact. It did in fact look very magical in the moonlight and very compelling. The original church was demolished in 1853 but much of the graveyard remains to be explored. One unusual epitaph in the graveyard for one Roger Gadiner and his wife reads:

“Roger lies here before his hour

Thus doth the Gardiner lose his flower”

Photos taken on the night, around the graveyard and tower; please click on individual images to enlarge. The last two in the sequence do show ‘Light Orbs’ and a mysterious mist.

The extensive graveyard is very much in evidence here, though i suspect that like all ancient graveyards quite a few of the headstones are no longer where they were originall placed and some have fallen into quite bad disrepair. There are even reports of a mausoleum being here and that mass buriel graves lie under where the old church once stood and indeed one of our investigation team thought he actually saw the mausoleum upon first entering the site. The most paranormal activety is said to occur in and around the old church tower; activity such as growlings coming from the old tower itself, which have been reported as recently as 2009 and a sense of an ‘evil’ pressence, a figure in black has also been spotted on many occasions around the graveyard and in 1978, a report of a marching army coming out of the dorrway of the tower whilst letting out a blood-curdling roar…  Also ghost horses have been reported and recordings of strong EVP have been captured.

Sadly we did not manage to capture anything unusual on camera, but all of our investigation team experienced different feelings and sensations at different times and the energies, although fluctuating were indeed very strong. Some of us certainly saw Light Orbs in the trees at the boundary of the graveyard, which we have manged to just about capture on camera, albeit by mobile phone; it was certainly a feeling of being observed. Some of us picked up on more tangible happenings and one of our team, actually had physical interaction by way of her clothes and skin being touched. So all in all, extremely interesting and well worth the trip and getting lost for!

Please enjoy our video investigations via our Priory youtube channel:-

COLD CHRISTMAS CHURCH: PART ONE

COLD CHRISTMAS CHURCH: PART TWO

 

All Saint’s Church Datchworth: So a few miles down the road in the same Hertfordshire vincinity we found ourselves at the parish church in the village of Daxworth and this time most certainly not off the beaten track! The village of Daxworth  appears in the Anglo-Saxon charter of 969 when King Edgar gave land in Daxworth to St Peter’s Church, Wesminster and when the name of Datchworth was spelt Decewrthe; the village is also mentioned in the Domesday book of 1086.

One can read more of the history of Datchworth here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Datchworth

On this occasion though it was the church we were visiting; Norman in origin, it was erected within the confines of the moat and subsequently a manor house was built nearby and it is thought that an earlier church did in fact preceded the present one. The night was dark and cold but strangely on this occasion the church and surroundings seemed quite calm and with a lack of energies really; even though the village has the reputation of being the most haunted in Hertfordshire.The church was well lit with floodlights and had CCTV clearly in evidence, which would be a good thing as i imagine that many visitors and investigators visit the church and graveyard here. As said it was peaceful, cold and subdued when we were there, but an interesting experience non the less, wandering the graveyard at night and around the vincitity of the church.

See above for the video shot around the graveyard and church.

There have been several sightings of an old woman dressed in black walking with a hunch and no head. She is thought to be the spirit of an old woman whoes husband died unexpectedly and in as deperate attempt to meet her husband again she hung herself. Close to the church is a narrow lane called Rectory Lane and people wandering along this eerie hedge-lined lane at night have heard phantom footsteps and seen the ghostly apparition of a cart carrying dead bodies, which local believe to be the bodies of the Eaves family who tragically starved to death during the famine of 1762.  One of the houses along Hollybush Lane is said to be haunted by the ghost of a lady with long red hair; this flame headed spirit is said to wear brigh clothing and manifest at the sound of tinkling bells. These are just a few of the many hauntings of Datchworth Village.

We did manage to obtain a few night-time shots via a mobile; on two or three shots white orbs of light can be seen; however with the flood lights in the graveyard i will leave it up to the viewer to make up their own minds. As always click on an image to enlarge:

The Keeper of Scrolls

November 2016

If you are interested in The Priory: http://priory7.wix.com/priory

Or wish to join our quest please do contact us:-

(leave a message in the comments)

 “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

 

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER TWELVE: LINCOLNSHIRE

  • St Margaret’s Church Laceby
  • St James’ Church Louth
  • St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke
  • St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping

So after a small break, early September found us travelling all the way to farthest Lincolnshire; almost all the way to the Yorkshire borders in fact, on what was to be ‘Quest Number Twelve’. Traffic was bad, very bad and the journey was long and slow but this day, this quest was to prove to be very exciting and interesting indeed.

St Margaret’s Church Laceby: Laceby is a village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire, situated outside the western boundaries of Grimsby and is an ancient place in terms of human occupation; being listed in the Doomsday Book in 1086. There is a Mesolithic flint working site to the North-East of the village, found in 1958 and finds of Anglo-Saxon pottery were discovered in Coopers Lane in 1969. Welbrooke Hill nearby, is the site of Roman pottery finds and there is an Anglo-Saxon cemetry just South of the village alongside Barton Street. Further Anglo-Saxon evidence can be seen in the remains of an Anglo-Saxon cross found embedded in the North wall of St Margarets’s Church. The oldest part of the church is said to be the lower third of the Tower; constructed in the twelth century. Among the many stained glass windows is a very small window, left of the main entrance, which depicts St Margaret of Antioch, of whom the church is dedicated to. She is depicted here with a dragon, which could denote strength and courage, or strength in battle or adversity. The other side of the doorway is depicted St John the Baptist.

imgp0126-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laceby

St Margaret was a native of “Antioch” and the daughter of a pagan priest named Aedesius. imgp0142-1Her mother, it is said, died soon after her birth and Margaret was thus nursed by a Christian woman five or six leagues from Antioch. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her ‘virginity’ to God, Margaret was then disowned by her father and was adopted by her nurse; she lived in the country keeping sheep with her foster mother (in what is now Turkey). Olybrius, Governor of the Roman Diocese of the East, asked to marry her, but with the demand that she renounced her Christianity. Margaret refused and upon her refusal, she was cruelly tortured during which, various miraculous incidents occurred. One of these involved her being swallowed by Satan, in the shape of a dragon from which she escaped alive when the cross she was carrying irritated the dragon’s innards. This tale is said to represent Margaret’s escape from her fathers false beliefs of paganism and of her being born anew by escaping from the dragon’s belly. However the account never the less was not taken seriously, especially the last incident which was descibed as “apocryphal and not to be taken seriously” and thus sadly she was put to her death; attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning but she miraculously survived and managed to convert many spectators who were also  subsuequently executed, before being finally beheaded, in AD 304.  Because of this tale she has become the patron saint of childbirth, labour and pregancy. As Saint Marina, she is associated with the sea, which “may in turn point to an older goddess tradition,” reflecting the pagan divinity, Aphrodite. But how interesting that a church in England would take her name and that she would be it’s patron but even odder and more interesting still, she has patronage to Cambridge too; what a fascinating connection with furhter stories to be told….

‘The Blacksmith’s Ghost’: Solomon Fenner it is said, is still around the area of Laceby to this day. Around 1710 Solomon Fenner lived in the village of Laceby where he worked as the local Blacksmith, but although highly skilled and profesional he was not a rich man as such, yet neither did he live in poverty. He had previously served in the army of King William and King Henry on the continent, before returning home to Linconshire to take up his trade of which he had apprenticed for as a youth. He was known as a pious man who attended church each Sunday and whom gave a little of what he earned to the poor of the parish.

He never married but fell under the charms of one Rebecca Pettitt; a beautiful, witty young woman with long red hair and green eyes, who lived in the market town of Caister. It is said she had many suitors but her father Wiiliam Pettit; a greedy man who owned land and several shops in Caister, was determined that his daughter’s husband to be, would be one who would be financially advantageous to William.

And so it was that one day Solomon Fenner, was walking the country road to Caister and showed himself at the Pettit’s home, asking William for his daughters hand in marriage. William Pettit was furious that a humble blacksmith should ask such a question and thus angrily denied him and threw him out onto the street where something inside the normally gentle and pious blacksmith snapped. So knowing William Pettit to be a man of habit who regularily drunk and gambled with freinds at a hamlet near Cabourn, on a Saturday afternoon, Solomon made note. It was always late, lonely and dark when William made his way home through the Linconshire fens and the next Saturday night the vengeful Solomon was thus to be found waiting in the shadows….

When he saw the drunk and helpless William Pettit coming along on his own, he leapt out at him and bludgeoned him to death with a hammer. When his ‘red mist’ cleared and Solomon Fenner realise what he had done, he was filled with instant remorse and ran to the nearest farmhouse to confess to the sleepy inhabitants what he had done. When the body of William Pettit was discovered, bloody and battered, there was no doubt to Fenner’s confesion and so in due course he was of course hanged, as was the way in those times. Before his death it is said he wept bitterly, cursing his actions of that night, expressing fear for his imortal soul. His body was gibbeted on a hill near Cabourn overlooking the scene of his crime and to this day, if legend is anything to go by Solomon Fenner is still not at rest. For according to local folklore, travellers walking between Cabourn and Caister late at night will be approached by a tall and robust looking man, stepping out of the shadows to confront them. He wears dirty apparel and caries a blood-stained hammer in his hand. His red eyes do not lie; he has been weeping, yet he tells the travellers not to be afraid; he will do them no harm as he sadly recounts his story of his crime, adding that they must remember that all life is sacred and his punishment for forgetting this is to spend all enternity telling others of his crime…

We were unable to carry out any filming inside the church on this occason due to an afternoon ‘tea social’ and community gathering going on in the church, but we did manage to take some interesting photos which once again showed a great deal of Templar and Masonic symbolism and even from further beyond; symbols that are certainly not ‘christian’. Though sadly the church has very little of it’s former ‘energy’ alive to this day…

Masonic and Templar symbolism in St Margaret’s Church, Laceby, also showing a reference to the ‘Neville’ linage (click on images to enlarge)

ST MARGARETS CHURCH: LACEBY LINCOLNSHIRE

A short video taken from outside of St Margaret’s Church, Laceby; here you will discover the beginnings of the ‘Neville’ line and more references to the symbolism inside the church (as shown above in the photos)

Laceby as mentioned in the clip above is actually where the ‘Neville’ line originated; and interestingly our lead researchers 18th grandmother’s father has a connection here. People always asume that the Neville line started from France (de Ville in France); going back to Geoffrey De Neville who was actually granted, by King Henry 3rd on 26th Dec 1234, an act, was given permission for this area, the right to hold a fair on the 24th July, as anyone at that time had to have the King’s permission to do so. Interestingly though, for some reason the locals were not tuned into the history of their church…..

St James Church Louth: Louth is situated at the foot of the beautiful Lincolshire Wolds, at the point where they meet the Lincolshire Marshes; it is known as the Capitol of the Lincolshire Wolds. It developed where the ancient trackway along the wolds, known as Barton Street, crossed the river Lud. The town is east of a gorge carved into the Wolds that forms the Hubbards Hill. This area was formed from a glacial overspill channel in the last glacial period; the River Lud meanders through the gorge before entering the town. Various interesting archeology finds have been unearthed in the area including hand axes dating from between 424,000 ans 191, ooo years ago, indicating inhabitation in the Paleolithic era. Bronze age finds include a ‘barbed and tangled’ arrowhead in the grounds of Monks Dyke, Tennyson College. There is an Anglo-Saxon burial ground, northwest of Louth, which dates from the fifth to sixth centuries. It was  first excavated in 1946 and with an estmated 1200 urn burials is one of the largest Anglo-Saxon cemetries in England.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louth,_Lincolnshire

This mainly fifteeth century parish church with the tallest medieval parish church spire in England, is the third building on the site here, succeeding the previous eleventh and thirteeth century structures. The chancel and nave were rebuilt in 430-40 but the very tall spire was not completed until 1515. This was the site of the Lincolnshire Rising, the first serious rebellion that threatened the crown which was followere by the Pilgrimage of Grace. These occurances were the results of the national discontent resulting from Henry V111’s taxation and ecclesiastical changes; sadly both rebellions failed and serious represions followed; the church then being swept clean of its richest, icluding the dismantling of the rood screen.

The unusual happening here is said to be of the appearance of the ghost of St. Hererith, the Bishop who died in 873, killed at the hands of the invading Danes and whom is also known as Louths ‘forgotten Saint’. Sadly due to being delayed by the trafic on the road on this particular day, the church was closed when we arrived so we were not able to prove or disprove any ‘tales’ but we managed some very useful video and photos from outside…

St James’s Church, Louth showing the tallest medieval spire in the counrty and an interesting sigil carved into the church wall; often know as the ‘Awen’ sign in the modern druidic world, more can be read about it here:-

To most people this symbol represents the modern day ‘Awen’ sign, yet the truth and meaning is very far removed as the symbol goes back much further in time; it was adopted with the re-birth of the so called ‘old ways’ in the 1960’s. In Templarism it actually represents the ‘three pillars’ yet in Priory something different again, where it goes back to it’s original roots.

Earth: Body & Love,
Sea:Mind / Wisdom,
Air:Spirit / Truth

The ‘Awen’ symbol is also said to represent ‘Inspiration of Truth’ and it is further suggested that without Awen (inspiration) one could not understand truth, so the original truths have stuck and been passed down. What is further interesting is the three rays (three pillars) also represent the universe in balance, meaning:

Left Ray:Female
Centre Ray:Balance
Right Ray:Male

One needs to attune to the three rays (or rather the ‘three pillars’) to fulfil their understanding of the world within them and all around them (the without)  (There is much more on the original metaphysical meaning of this symbol within Templarism in The Knights Bible found on Amazon)

Follow the link to our youtube channel for some interesting historical comments on the history of this spendid church and of its Knight Templar connection…

ST JAMES CHURCH: LOUTH,  LINCS

St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke: This very interesting, hidden away, redundant Anglican church situated near the village of Skidbrooke, seven miles northeast of Louth in Lincolnshire is now under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. This isolated church is nestled well off the beaten track in a woodland copse, in the heart of rural Lincolnshire and totally not what any of us was expecting at all… Upon arriving, the site was very open, the fields were bare and the harvet was in, all in all a typical scene of the English countryside. The apearance of the church on the horizon, as it looms from under its secret cover of lush surrounding trees could easily be mistaken for a very atmospheric and eerie film set and indeed tales of ghosthunters, witch covens and satanic ritual still freshly abound and entice to this very day. This once, and i can only assume beautiful church, is now a vast empty shell; a ghost of its former self yet strangely very beautiful and compelling. The stained glass windows and what were probably wonderful church fittings etc have now all been removed and yet the ceiling still remains fairly intact as do surprisingly some of the carvings and significant writings which we may learn about later.

imgp0188-1

As said , an isolated church standing in the flat Lincolnshire marshes, St Botolph’s is early medieval, dating from the early thirteeth century with various renovations covering the Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic periods.This spacious building is composed of a nave with clerestory, north and south aisles, south porch, chancel, and an embattled west tower. The interior of the church is almost completely bare and unadorned, with unplastered walls letting the bones of the building show. The nave arcades are Early English, with wide, slender arches and nicely carved column capitals. The south arcade, built circa 1400, has it’s columns built up on bases several feet high. The tower arch is much narrower, in Perpendicular style. The church is constructed in limstone and brick with some rendering and the roof is in slate with stoned coped gables. Once inside it really opens out and has the feeling of a large hall; light pours in through the many glassless windows and the many fine arches all the way along the inside of the building hint at older different times. The piers of the arches are octagonal in construction representing ‘the eight points of perfection.’

 St Botolph’s; an abandoned yet beautiful chuch…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Botolph%27s_Church,_Skidbrooke

If the building is used for rituals and gatherings, and by the looks of things remaining and clues opon the ground, it most probably is, one can immedietly sense why; the whole place most certainly have a feel to it; an atmosphere not of this world. Skidbrooke has been the subject of much publicity due to reports of paranormal activity at the church. Several ghosthunters have reported unusual goings-on at the building, and the church was nicknamed ‘the Demon church’ after it became popular with groups of Satanists in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Visitors have reported seeing a ghostly monk on the site, seeing odd lights and hearing sounds of storms in calm weather, and hearing strange, unexplained noises at night. Also reported at the sight are the cries of screaming satanists, a headless knight and demons from a specific tomb, where it is said is an entrance to ‘dimensional changes’.

Some of the symbols still left in this abandoned church <click on any image to enlarge>

Follow the link to our youtube channel for a tour around St Botolph’s Church and hear of the scary tales old and new, of dark gatherings still taking place here…

ST BOLTOPHS CHURCH:  SKIDBROOKE, LINCS

We all experienced many different feelings here; feelings of the atmosphere changing, sensing the atmosheric presure changing, sensing hot and cold; in fact great activity all around us, feelings of breathlessness and tight chestedness. The ‘energies’ of the site constantly changed from knowing ‘others’ were there to a quite openly unfriedly, unwelcomed feeling; a deep and oppresive atmosphere that manifested in a physical way upon us. So certainly we were definitely not alone here but i get a true sense that the ‘guardians’ here are a tad fed up with it all and just want to be left in peace guarding ‘their truths’….. I myself loved the place and was very reluctant to leave, although it is not for the faint-hearted. I loved the whole experience of being there with communication from other dimensions, although some folks say that even today events of a ‘not nice’ nature are still practiced to this very day……

St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping:  And so with nightfall well and truly upon us we arrived at St Guthlac’s Church in the pretty town of Market Deeping, for what was to be our first full night time visit. This church is largely fifteenth century and is the only church in Market Deeping, being part of the Church of England Anglo-Catholic tradition. On the south face of the tower is a very unusual sundial with ‘The Day is Thine’ enscribed upon it, while on the north face is a similar one enscribed with the words ‘The Night Cometh’; very compelling indeed… St Guthlacs is a grade 1 listed building that has been contiuously in use in Market Deeping for at lest eight hundred years. The site was clearly a centre of worship long before that as Anglo-Saxon religous masonry had been discovered in the grounds. It has a fascinating history, not only the building but also of St Gutlac himself. As we intend to return in the daytime for a more indepth look at this fascinating church; much more will follow…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Market_Deeping

Of interest to us is the fact that demons are said to roam the grounds and torment the living. Wandering around these church burial grounds at night, one certainly gets the direct sense of not being alone, of being watched and of experiencing very intense ‘energies’ in certain parts of the grave yard. Some of our team experienced hearing and seeing unexplained movements and sounds emancipating from certain areas, an orb was seen and also figures at the upper church windows when the security lights did not turn off. We did manage a few night-time photos and all will be continued….

In the graveyard of St Guthlac’ at night; look closely for the orbs….

If you wish to join us on our quests, especially if you love uncovering untold histories, please leave a message here in the comments section.

To find out more about The Priory, who we are and what we do please see the following link:-  http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“It is not the falsety of religion to rely upon for there is no meaning. It is Dumuzi, the son of Enki whom shall rise as a King amongst the wolves”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

 

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER NINE

  • St Marys Church: Therfield
  • St Faith’s Church: Kelshall
  • Minsden Chapel: Chaplefoot
  • All Saints Church: Little Munden
  • St John The Baptist Church: Royston

Therfield Church

ST MARYS CHURCH THERFFIELD: This was to be our first port of call of the day, for Quest Number Nine; for what was to prove to be a very busy and fascinating quest. Upon arriving at Therfield Church one cannot fail to notice the proliferation of Templar and Masonic gravestones covering the burial ground, adorned with much  ‘Old Craft’ symbolism that we have now grown to expect.

<click to enlarge images>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therfield

An interesting church which was funded directly by the Fordham Family (one of our lead researchers, Alek’s pedigree lines). It is said that Edward King Fordham, (1750-1847) is the protector here (i.e. the Guardian of Secrets). There have been reports of his hauntings and of his ghostly apparitions here since 1853,  yet oddly they only started 6 years after his death.

A nice church, but a wee bit of a red herring for us and our quest…. Interesting though that the Vicar, Richard came over and took our head researcher Alek directly  to the grave of John Henry Fordham, who of course had connections to the masonic lineage, which is no surprise. Such a shame we did not have a chance to record here, as who knows what potential for EVP could have occured.

St Faiths Church

ST FAITH’S CHURCH KELSHALL: Situated in a very quiet corner of Hertfordshire, one hundred metres above sea level on the chalky Chiltern ridge, where the parish land sweeps northwards down to the well known Icknield Way. As is usual nothing can be seen of an earlier church building, but a late 14th century preaching cross still stands in the churchyard.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelshall

GK sheild

This is a ‘Key’ area of the Fordham Line, with major signs and placards very evident in the Church itself, to the Fordams. What was more interesting: The  K.e.y Line of Alek (the Neville Line) which tracks back to Noah and beyond; i.e. the beautiful and inspiring ‘Grail Kingship Shield’ (shown here) hangs proud and high just within this church over the entrance. Built on top of a Saxon Church, but more importantly; encompassed by Pyramid Energy, also with great potential for EVP.

Note: Edward King Fordham is Aek’s 5 x Great Grandfather from the Fordham Line.

 

Please see our Youtube link to take a tour around the church to learn more about the Fordham line and the symbolism within the church:

KELSHALL: THE FORDHAM LINE

 

MINSDEN CHAPEL CHAPLEFORD:  So our next destination was right off the beaten track, literally in the middle of nowhere, where a bridle way is the only indication that something might be hiding in the woods. It was quite an uphill trek and a worthy battle with nettles and brambles; for this small chapel with a very fascinating history sits within a copse, atop of a mound overlooking the Hertfordshire countryside. From looking at other video clips of the chapel it is now a lot more innaccesable than it has been in previous years and very difficult to get to and even to see properly through the overgrowth of vegetation. It is now very difficult to see much of the chapel walls as leafy bushes and trees have now sprung up everywhere, obscurring the view.

First of all, it was interesting to note that the pub we had enjoyed a lovely late lunch in and which had been renamed, was the pointer we were indeed looking for and yet could not find; the Chapelfoot Farmhouse itself ! Now known as The Rusty Gun; not easily recognizable these days as areas look so different as the seasons move on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minsden_Chapel

Minsden Chapel was built in 1368, yet the mound (Hill) is more sacred and powerful than even Stonehenge… Reginald Hine, an historian from Baldock born 25th September 1883, knew of its significance and was burdened with the duty of sealing the area to stop evil spreading out. Signs of witchcraft and sacrifice are evident here today, so not a spot for the faint-hearted! There is a memorial stone somewhere on the chapel site for Reginald but i guess the ground covering was so dense it was not easy to find and we missed it. A site personally ticked off by Alek whom vows NEVER to re-visit and firmly believes that it is best to be forgotten; for when the oceans rise it shall be returned to the sea from whence it came… A clear and definite presence was cetainly felt here with many tales of whispers unfolding and an atmosphere which gradually became denser, so much so that members of our team reported pressures on the front of their heads and headaches….

Important to note the ‘odd sign’ of warning of which Reginald wrote, upon receiving his lifetime lease from the Diocese:

 

TRESPASSER AND SACRILEGIOUS PERSONS TAKE WARNING,

FOR I WILL PROCEED AGAINST THEM WITH THE UTMOST RIGOUR OF THE LAW,

AND, AFTER MY DEATH AND BURIAL, I WILL ENDEAVOUR, IN ALL GHOSTLY WAYS,

TO PROTECT AND HAUNT ITS HALLOWED WALLS


How interesting too, considering that over and above the circular portal entrance is the out-mould of a strange human face forever staring down and keeping watch…

Take a look around the Chapel via our link below nd learn of some of its mysterious history first hand:

SACRED MINSDEN CHAPEL

 

As an interesting footnote, which goes along with not being welcomed by ‘The Guardian’ of the site, and the fact that the site is well and truly hidden under trees and is not mentioned anywhere as a place to visit…. while we were in a nearby carpark assessing how to find Minsden Chapel, a couple seemed to appear from a leafy footpath over the road that seemed to go nowhere in particular, yet complete with map in hand. They professed to know where we needed to go but strangely the directions they gave were not where the chapel actually was……

 

ALL SAINTS CHURCH LITTLE MUNDEN: After travelling across pretty countryside we next found ourselves at All Saints Church, Little Munden. We expected it to be closed as the hours of opening had passed by, so a search around the burial ground was all we were expecting but never the less we were in for a few suprises…

Little Munden 1

http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/herts/vol3/pp129-135#h3-0007

It is an interesting church, and although as said it was locked upon our arrival (given the time of evening at 7:30 at night), enough was experienced to confirm the placement of a ‘tablet’. We all heard noises and a voice from the lower chambers, just right of the church porch, together with a cold, very dark feeling energising fear, emanating from the bottom of the steep and crumbling stone steps. At the bottom of the steps and to the left where there was pitch blackness, one could just make out the shape of the iron bars of a (cell?) door and upon peering through them, there was total darkness and a strong sense of an utter foreboding; an all encompassing void, the nature of which can only be described as ‘not nice’ in any way and a wind above that blew in three different directions at the same time. Built in 1385, though the older structure was built in the year 897.

There are reports of  ghostly apparitions of Ralph Fordham; the protector, the Guardian of Secrets; see the link below…

LITTLE MUNSDEN: GHOSTLY HAPPENINGS

 

ST JOHN THE BAPTIST CHURCH ROYSTON:

Upon arriving at this church it was easy to see how it differed from the ‘out of the way’ villages we had previously visited on our quests. The church takes pride of place in this busy and well known tourist town;  it is set amidst stunning gardens and immaculate manicured lawns. The town itself is also well know for having two ancient thoroughfares that cross each other here; the previously mentioned Icknield Way and Ermine Street, also very well known. Most famously, it is known for The Royston Cave; which is said to have Knight Templar connections.

http://roystonparishchurch.org.uk/index.php/about-us/church-history

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royston,_Hertfordshire

http://www.roystoncave.co.uk/

There is a connection here at this church to Elias Fordham (1762 – 1838), who is said to roam the grounds of this quite plain yet, interesting church.  What was of great interest to us was that William Henry Clarke whom we expected to be mentioned at the Church memorial in Shipdham, Norfolk, was in fact mentioned here at Royston, on the Great War (1914 – 1918) memorial just outside the Church…. This makes a direct connection between the Clarke and Fordham Lines that originate as such: the Fordham Line from Limerick Ireland and the Clarke Line from Plympton in Devon. No great surprise as Limerick to Plympton is not a major distance at all – just across the water in fact!

ROYSTON: ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, PEELING BELLS

 

 Royston War Memorial showing the Clarke family name and the church itself showing the very prominent ‘Entwined Serpent’ symbol (The emblem of the ‘Serpent Priesthood). Very interestingly displayed on a ‘christian’ church….

To join us in our future quests: especially if you love history, if you love a mystery, if you see beyond the mundane or simply if you love a good day out, please contact us via this webpage or email me here:  ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

To join The Priory itself: where we go much deeper on many aspects of life, creation, the true history of the planet and the future times to come; please see here:- http://priory7.wix.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is merely seasons in front. So be it that all those whom disbelieve shall cease to remain”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGTES: QUEST NO SEVEN

  • ALL SAINTS CHURCH SHIPDHAM
  • FURTHER CHURCH HAUNTINGS
  • REVEALING THE LINEAGE

So for quest number six we once again made our way into the beautiful county of Norfolk, where so many unusual tales and ghostly stories abide. All Saints Church is situated in a busy parish and the church itself  is the beating heart of the community and very active.  Shipdham is not far from Dereham and the church is on a quite a busy highway that cuts its way through the village and around the church and graveyard; which are surrounded by a high wall. Upon looking over the wall one can see that the tower of the church is crowned by what must be one of the mosr ornate spire crownings in the county. This late medieval tower is surmounted by a great wood and lead fleche, pointing heavenwards. It is completely out of character with the rest of the church and is almost eastern looking in design and could have been designed purposefully that way. This church is certainly imposing and has a great presence about it; a great energy to be precise.  

 All Saint’s Church Shipdham, showing the unusual ornate spire crown and the statue of the ‘walvebane’ above the entrance porch, also revealing one of the ‘Nevilles’ of our quest, whose memorial is a beautiful Celtic Cross placed just outside the main porch entrance to the church. What is fascinating is that that Celtic Cross has a crown prominitely placed at its centre; indicating a connection to the crown. <click on image to enlarge>

Such a beautifully ornate church would not look out of place in a big prosperous market town and one wonders why a church of such granduer is situated in a village in Norfolk. The church can trace its history back to the 12th/13th century and the top mof the spire is said to have been added in the 17th century.

To read more:  http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/shipdham/shipdham.htm

         The stunning windows and beautifully ornate heraldry tapistry inside the church that indicate a time in the past of great wealth and strong connection to the crown.

Once again let Alek explain about the about the mysteries (hauntings) that happen at these sites and most importantly why and what they really are. He will go on to explain more about our quest and our reasons for being here; in particular the connection between the ‘Nevilles’ and the ‘Clarkes’ to Royalty and to the Duke of Norfolk himself. Click on our link below.

ALL SAINT’S SHIPDEN: NORFOLK

The funny thing is that a gentleman with a dog did appear at the church doorway while we were filming there, which was an uncanny coincdence to say the least. When questioned about the Nevilles he semed somewhat confused and was unable to help, although he did know other details about the church.

 

The Duke of Norfolk

Portrait of the Duke of Norfolk who has a strong connection to this site and to our quest

 

 Some examples of the ‘symbolism’ to be found within churches, especially prolific at the sites our team are investigating; symbols that should now be familiar to those of you following our quests. These symbols are certainly very interesting and not what they seem; having double or hidden meanings which relate to Craft, the Knight Templars or even further back and which are very far removed from being christian in origin. This all makes one wonder just who were the architects and designers of these churches…

Conclusions of the day:

  • Ghosts are not what we are led to believe; they are simply ‘echos of the past’ that ‘exist’ in a timeless enviroment.
  • Yet another church built over a site of immense energy and power
  • Another ‘Guardian of Secrets’ is connected to the site
  • Royalty once again also has a connection here, suggesting that they were ‘in on the secrets’
  • The symbolism within churches has nothing whatsoever to do with ‘christianity’; very far removed from it in fact.
  • Many churches are built upon ‘sites’ that have been purposefully hidden from the masses.
  • Churches are libraries of information; often hidden information.
  • The bloodlines and linaige of two members of our team are now revealed as part of our quest.

Intrigued in finding out more or joining us? Please do get in touch with us via this webpage or email me at ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

To find out more about The Priory and our search for truth please click here: http://priory7.wix.com/priory

JC 1

‘Clarke’ another link to the Quest; another piece of the puzzle..

June 2016

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER TWO

  • BORLEY RECTORY & CHURCH PART ONE: THE FACTS
  • PART TWO: FACES FROM THE PAST

<Click on photos to enlarge>

It was a bright sunny (if not windy) day in March 2016 that we arrived in the small village of Borley in Essex. Anyone with a keen interest in the paranormal or places of unusual events or happenings, cannot fail to have heard of the infamous happenings and hauntings that, over the years, have occured at Borly Rectory and Church. The Rectory was demolished many years ago but the church is still very much here.

For a bit of useful background and historical infomation, the following links are very useful and help to paint the overall picture:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley_Rectory

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley_Church

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borley

 

We wondered what we would find there; listening to other clips and snippets on the internet the signs were not good; the church had been well and truly locked to visitors for years, no one was ever around and lest of all welcoming, the small carpark was always chained across with no where else to park and the villagers activey discouraged visitors and researchers by going to the trouble of removing any sign posts that directed one to the village. So not a very good start then but never the less we remained optimistic and really looking forward to the day.

So imagine our surprise then, when as soon as we arrived at Borley Church, not only was the car park unchained allowing us to pull straight up to the church entrance, but there was also another car already parked there with a guy inside seemingly viewing the expansive country side through binoculars. We got out of the car, as did he and before we knew it and quite unexpectedly, freindly conversation had ensued along with introductions, who we were and our reason for being there; namely research into the Church and Rectory and the strange happenings documented to have occured there.

The next suprise happened almost immedietly when seemingly from out of nowhere two others appeared, also engaging straight away in conversation with us; one of whom was a lady who told us she had been taking a ‘tour’ around the church, yet i could not help wondering where the people on the tour actually were and there was ‘something’ unsettling about her that i could not quiet put my finger on; she seemed to be a bit ‘out of time’. Again all seemingly very interested in what we were doing there; not at all what we were expecting or had been led to believe about the village.

We then made our way around the back of the church where there appeared to be a much older area; less manicured and with much older gravestones but with stunning views across the rolling Essex countryside with light rays shinning on where ‘the bones’ are buried…

  We then made our way along the back of the church to the front again but on coming around the side to what was, only a few minutes ago an empty space, a gardener complete with wheelbarrow plus an array of various gardening tools and equipment was now diligently going about his daily buisness. Pleasantries were of course exchanged, yet curiously while we introduced ourselves, he in fact did not, but he did tell us a little more about the church and its history and its current application for lottery funding in respect of its leaking roof yet also making a big point of telling us that the Old Rectory would have been situated way, way down the road where modern bungelows had now been built upon. The church doors that only minutes before had been tightly locked shut and chained, were now wide open and welcoming and thus on our inquiring he bid us to go inside; telling us that the church is often open to visitors on a weekend, yet this was not a weekend, so very contary to what we had been led to believe and certainly not what we were expecting

.View of the inside of the church showing in detail the tomb and its placement, the  window directly opposite the tomb and a view of the altar.

Once inside the small church one can see that it is certainly very stunning with some beautiful stained glass windows of amazing craftmanship. But one can not help noticing the ‘family’ tomb, rising from floor to ceiling, towards the left hand side of the altar and how elaborate, well preserved and detailed it is, being placed directly opposite one of the stained glass windows. I myself felt nothing untoward inside the church; in fact i would say the very opposite, it felt very natural, almost as if we were ‘meant’ to be there and were placed inside of a (to us) protected enviroment.

At the very back of the church, outside the actual boundaries is a piece of ground very ‘different’ from the surounding area with a type of flora growing there which has been left in a natural state and unattended. This is in actual fact the site of the very original Borley Rectory which lasted up until 1161 yet had been added to and modified since 934 CE, but was subsequently demolished, to make way (i guess) for the now infamous rectory of the ‘hauntings and happenings’.

See the link below for a full account of part one the days happenings

BORLEY CHURCH & RECTORY: PART ONE

(Apologies for poor sound quality; it was a very windy day!)

  • So where is the real rectory?
  • Why were we given a red herring in respect of it?
  • Who was the mystery gardener, ‘tour guide’ and companions?
  • Why were the church doors open and welcoming?
  • Why does all this connect to one of our party?

All is revealed in ‘Faces from the Past’ (part two of our Borley investigation)

FACES FROM THE PAST:

After a full day of research and investigations at Borley Church on March 27th 2016, we certainly came home with plenty to consider and to think about. It had been such a truly amazing day where many anomalies had occurred; all being very unusual to say the lest. While still fresh in our minds; to help with further research we decided to try to record our immediate thoughts on the day’s events, there and then. Our team discussed the events of the day, the people we met and the ‘happenings’ of the day, seemingly not adding up or making sense.

Mulling over the day….

Upon discussing the many ‘oddities’ of our day at Borley we noted from watching numerous YouTube videos that it was apparent that previous researchers always found the chain well and truly across the tiny car park, which can only fit about five or six cars in it anyway. What the videos all say is that the chain is padlocked across the car park entrance making it very difficult to find somewhere to park, but on this day the chain was unlocked and we were able to drive straight in.

We had parked next to a rather elderly couple and thus chatted with them, exchanging pleasantries; the lady from the car advised us that she was from two villages down, a village called ‘Chapel’ (or did she mean the chapel?) She seemed to know a lot about Borley Rectory and Church and said she had been taking a ‘tour’ around the Church; yet they were no one else to be seen there. The gentleman who was driving the vehicle had a pair of binoculars and was generally just looking across the open landscape. But what was most odd was that when a question was asked in respect of Borley Rectory and Church; the lady’s face changed suddenly froze and went quiet stern…

Then almost within a moment’s breath, a little white van turned up and a mature gentleman, maybe in his early fifties gets out and comes over to us; again exchanging pleasantries; he told us his name was Steve and that he often came up to the Church, but was quite adamant in saying that the Church was normally locked and that he, himself could never gain entrance. He also said he had been to Borley Church at night time but had not really seen anything, although to him it has seemed ‘eerie’. We then went on to discuss the location of the Rectory, yet strangely he did not seem to know where it was, though listened avidly to our theories of where we thought it would have been; behind the actual church on the piece of ‘wild ground’ to one side. The next minute he seemed to go on a ‘walk around’ in that very direction but not into the actual Church area. The mystery is that none of us actually saw him arrive in the actual church area  but one of our party, when upon our arrival and initial walk around the church saw ‘Steve’ talking to a ‘gardener’ at the back of the Church as if they knew each other. What was more interesting is that the ‘gardener arrived from nowhere; he was suddenly there trimming a bush!

So to recap; the people there at the site at this time are us (the research team), the elderly couple from the blue car, (the man with the binoculars and the lady who said she was from ‘Chapel’), Steve (in the white van)

When we walked up initially and had a look at the Church there was no gardener in sight. The ‘elderly couple’ did eventually leave in their car, so that just left Steve and us and when we first walked up to the Church to start filming, there was no sign of any gardener, but when two of our party walked around the Church, prior to filming; the door to the Church was suddenly unlocked and wide open, the hedge strimmer attached with extension cable plugged in!  There was also a wheelbarrow and tools all ready and in action yet only minutes before no-one was there and the chain and padlock was well and truly over the locked and shut Church doors! The ‘gardener’ did indeed look as if he had been working on the bush trimming for some time; had been there a lot longer that had appeared yet only two or three minutes had elapsed in real time!

Steve then re-appears and disappears again and so for a place that everyone says is always locked and one cannot gain access to see inside the Church and that there is no one around; at the very moment we arrived it seemed to be a height of activity with people there and a gardener appearing from nowhere cutting a bush! The gardener also had ‘tools’ and ‘electrics’ that were not stored in the Church and neither did he have a vehicle in the car park! So a mystery that needs a lot more research and thinking about or maybe visiting again at another time of day to see what the experience will be. We have four different individuals; the couple, Steve in the white van and the gardener; four people in fact who suddenly arrived from nowhere, yet all the youtube footage tells of no-one ever being around, never anyone from the local village being anywhere near Borley Church but oddly, this day when we were there, it was a hive of activity!

Past and Present Become One: Findings of our Research:

So despite the information we had been given by the ‘gardener’ we subsequently discovered that Borley Rectory, the site of many unusual happenings was not, as we suspected, down the road at the bottom of the hill, but was of course just across the road from Borley Church, which of course makes perfect sense.

real rectorysite

Aerial photo showing the site of the old Rectory and it’s geographical relationship to Borley Church.

The old rectory, which had previously burned down, was as one can see, well within walking distance of the church and right where it needed to be. At the back of the church where we were filming on the day, is the site of the very first rectory, also needing to be near the church. So the ‘gardener’ did actually give us misinformation, as he said the rectory was way down the hill where two bungalows are now built; but why did he say this?

Directly opposite the church there are in fact two bungalows but not built on the old rectory ground itself. The rectory site is grassed over and the original vegetable patch is the only remaining evidence. The vegetable patch is however still used by the first bungalow, which seemed very strange.

This is where events of the day start getting very interesting, for upon coming home and doing avid internet research in respect of all the folks who in the past had a strong connection to the Church and the Rectory at Borley, but yet who are no longer around today; we were in for a great shock and many revelations to say the lest! Even though ‘somethingon the day told us that things were not quite right and events did not seem to add up; especially the folks we met on the day whom we had wondered; were they real people?

They say seeing is believing and this is what we saw….

HARRY PRICE: ghost hunter aka ‘our gardener’

   Harry Price: Ghost Hunter or Harry Price: Gardener?

 As the photos above show, Harry Price was the original investigator at Borley, yet also this is the exact image of our mysterious gardener in the present day. All of our party made the connection and recognised him instantly from the photos!

So the gardener appears to be Harry Price the Ghost Hunter who lived from 17:01:1881 to 29:03:1948. He has been dead for 68 years but seemingly well and truly alive on this particular day!

MOLLIE GOLDNEY: physic researcher aka ‘tour guide’

Mollie Goldney

This photo shows (on the right – looking at it) Mollie Goldney, who was also (or so it appeared) the lady in the second car, that appeared out of nowhere!

On the far left (looking at the picture) the gardener we met on the day, who also appeared out of nowhere. This picture is 1939! Again, we all recognised her as the lady we had met on the day! Mollie Goldney was a Psychic Researcher and died in 1992. She has been dead 24 years! Mollie has/had a wealth of ESP government research papers that she has in trust NOT to be published until the year 2020, this was her direct and strange request.

REVEREND LIONEL FOYSTER: aka ‘Steve’

Also in the photo, next to Mollie is the Reverend Lionel Foyster with his wife Marianne. ‘He’ also said to us that he is often there at the church, which would make total sense if he had been the actual Reverend of the church! So Steve is The Reverend Lionel Foyster who lived from 1878 to 18:04:1945. He has been dead for 71 years!

In the picture also is the Foysters adopted daughter, Adelaide and the Lodger’s son, Frank Junior. Again and independently, we all made the connection here!

LORD MARK KERR-PEARCE: aka the man in the car with Mollie with the binoculars

 MarkKerrpearceLord Mark Kerr-Pearce, was the ‘official observer’ for Harry Price. He  was also the second man in the car we met on the day with Mollie; Lord Mark Kerr-Pearce; a Psychic Researcher who was born in 1818 and who died in 2005, he has been dead 11 years! Again, we all independently made the connection as we instantly recognized him!

BURRYING THE BONES…

Foyers and price

The photo above clearly shows Reverend Foyers (Steve) and Harry Price (the gardener) burying the bones of the murdered lady; exactly where in our video; our head investigator Alek said they were buried, before actually finding this photo! After the bones had been buried here, was when all the ‘happenings’ started to occur in the church. Putting together all our findings, there is certainly a mystery waiting to be solved and one, which we will in due course return to.

See the link below for our personal thoughts on the day….

BORLEY RECTORY: MULLING OVER THE DAY

Joining the dots of the Quest

  • Clearly, the ‘gardener’ was looking out for us as he told us a white lie thus we would not be harmed. It is clear that the entities (ghosts) of today (27th March 2016) all welcomed us, especially inside the church itself, but they did not want us to go to the rectory site across the road.
  • Note to Priory Team: Clearly, we should take note of that warning and not attempt to go to the site.
  • What is of interest here is that Alek, our head investigator, discovered on the evening of March 17th 2016, that the wife of Sir Edward Waldegrave (1517-1561) is resting in the actual tomb inside Borley Church next to his wife (Alek’s relative) Frances Waldegrave, which explains our encounters of the day and why the entities were welcoming for us and how by amazement we were freely able to enter the church.

 Edward: husband of Frances Frances: wife of Edward & relative of Alek.  

 There is a direct connection between Borley Church (built in 984 CE) and the Magnetic Hill at Warboys, if you choose to remain on this Quest, then more shall be discovered.

  • Sir Edward Waldgrave, buried here in Borley Church, was the chief adviser to Queen Mary 1st. When she had her coronation, it was at St Mary’s Church at Akenham that there was a major celebration to mark her coronation on becoming Queen after Henry died.

March 2016

  • Intereste in joining us?
  • Want to find out more of what we do?
  • Would like to know what we are all about?
  • Pleae feel free to message me here 🙂

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

%d bloggers like this: