Tag Archive: Djinn


Angel lost; fell through stone
Blood and clay far from home.
Fell to earth through stormy waters,
Rebirthed in water, Leviathan’s daughter.

A million years, a thousand stars,
Dismissed from heaven at the eleventh hour.
A portal of slaughter or man’s salvation,
Demon hunger, a sacrament waiting.

Blood red flesh
Bound as one.
Blood is truth
Under a sun.

A Messenger spoke of truth or dare
Told the tale to those with no fear.
In chambers deep with no rebirth,
Secrets kept by G-d on earth.

A magic hill,
A golden tomb
Forever hidden,
Mankind’s doom.
Beauty stirred
Within a thought,
A test of time,
Battles fought.
Love was lost,
Grail diluted.
A story done
But never ended.

Time is endless
Existence not.
A waking serpent,
A fire to stoke.
A dark knight waiting,
The church’s curse.

Turn around
Turn around
My little child.
Water is wet
Wind is wild.
Those we shall meet
And meet again,
Brothers, Sisters,
Lovers. Friends.

Within a season
Within a time
A purpose known
Yet living a lie.

Stoke the embers
Raise the flame,
Time has come
And come again.
Cycles repeat
And repeat once more,
We are born to death,
Few reborn.
Dark waters spilled
Under a dome,
Within a thought
Dark beauty sought.

Ice and fire
Carry the key.
A sinking land
Eternally.
Those we have loved,
We will love again
As ‘we’ carry the Flame
Again and again.

 

The Keeper of Scrolls Feb 2019

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER FOURTEEN

  • RAF UPWOOD: CAMBRIDGESHIRE

So a dark yet mild Friday evening at the end of October 2016, found us on our way to the dissused and derelict airfield of RAF Upwood, practically on our doorstep in the Cambridgeshire countryside. It was to prove to be a very interesting night indeed. This is a site used frequently by urban explorers and ghost hunters alike and yet a site which proved intitially quite difficult for us to locate. We were seeking the run down living quarters, admin blocks and accomadation of a once thriving community;  a facility for airmen after the wars and, it has been told, a great source of paranormal activity. This site has a direct connection to the first site we visited (Quest Number One) at Spooks Hill, Warboys and is in the general area of Warboys and Ramsey; the sites share the same underground magnetic connections. There is much evidence on the internet and youtube that the site is haunted and we were very excited to be finding out for ourselves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Upwood

Our ‘satnav’ took us to the general area but did not locate the airfield itself, so seeking another source, we did eventually arrive at the vast open landscape of the dissused airfield. Asking our way of lads nearby, heading also in the same direction, we were advised to go back out onto the road and drive around to the front of the site and yet something told us to keep on. The airfield is a vast, open flat space with only a few flood-lights lighting up industrial buildings on the horizon. It is very dark with large open skies above, yet one can follow a laid down track, maybe a vehical access from many years ago. As we walked across this seemingly endless, dark plain of emptiness a feeling of not being alone, of being watched permeatted every pore of our being. As we walked, we passed by long strips of security fences protecting fields of solar panels; the biggest solor panel complex that we had ever seen… The complex was dotted with CTV cameras and sattelite dishes, so obviously we wondered what was going on there.

We did meet others too, again local lads, crouching in the shadows, who also advised we were gong the wrong way, but we just needed to check out further into the distance before coming back. For it was just as well that we did, for on the horizen and coming towards us we spied some bright lights which flashed a couple of times before dissapearing from the sky and out of our sight completely; we all saw them so no one persons over-imagination. We did try and walk towards the bright flood-lights but were met by high security fences with no way in. At that point we did decide to make our way back to the road, but still that sense of not being alone, of being followed and also more of the mysterious lights apeared on the horizon. We were definitely at the wrong part of the airfield but never the less the walk had proved to be very eye-opening indeed with the constant brooding feeling of not being alone still with us.

So back to the main road then as advised where we found the main gateway to the abandoned airfield; sadly high security fencing was all around with security and CCT in action, or so it said on the notices. At this point we did start to wonder how we could gain access, as obviously others before us had certainly done so; the whole area was about to be demolished to make way for new housing so important not to give up. Not to be deterred we got in the car again and started to continue our slow ride around the perrimeter, only to be very surprised moments later when two more young lads dissapeared between the trees and bushes around the perimiter and were gone – vanished! So we had to follow, as we knew this to be our way in; we parked up next to what was their parked car and followed  their tracks and sure enough, from behind the trees we could indeed walk right in. We never saw sight or sound of the two lads who guided us in, ever again….

Some of the corridors and grafitti at RAF Upwood

 

The whole area is amazing and truly is an urban explorers playground and a ghost hunters’s paradise too, for that matter. Wandering around in the dark, along the long pitch black corridoors of the living quarters, shower blocks and communial rooms, one could not help but wonder at what life would have been like in the heyday of the complex. It is now very eerie with graffiti everywhere, some of which is very beautiful, but one does get a huge sense of lost souls seeking some sort of sollace. The energies constantly changed from hot and cold, of being followed, of whisperings on the steps leading into one of the blocks; to two of our party actually seeing a fleeing male figure right in front of them, which promptly dissapeared into thin air…

Many of our photos revealed unexplained orbs, lights,  figures and other unexplained images…

Please ‘click’ on any image to enlarge

 

Take a look at our videos for a full tour around and see further evidence of the unexplained

(Please note we are actually at RAF Upwood – not Alconbury!! 🙂 )

RAF UPWOOD: PART ONE

Check out the background at 5.20 above!

RAF UPWOOD: PART TWO

RAF UPWOOD: PART THREE

Check out the orbs at 5.23!

The whole site is very eerie and yet extremely beautiful to behold and to explore. A dark, ethereal kind of beauty that is soon to be no longer and which does certainly come alive at night; alive with those lost souls of wartime airmen who have their mysterious tales still to tell…

End Oct 2016

‘Keeper of Scrolls’

“Through the veil we will see into the deep, dark sea eternally….”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER TWELVE: LINCOLNSHIRE

  • St Margaret’s Church Laceby
  • St James’ Church Louth
  • St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke
  • St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping

So after a small break, early September found us travelling all the way to farthest Lincolnshire; almost all the way to the Yorkshire borders in fact, on what was to be ‘Quest Number Twelve’. Traffic was bad, very bad and the journey was long and slow but this day, this quest was to prove to be very exciting and interesting indeed.

St Margaret’s Church Laceby: Laceby is a village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire, situated outside the western boundaries of Grimsby and is an ancient place in terms of human occupation; being listed in the Doomsday Book in 1086. There is a Mesolithic flint working site to the North-East of the village, found in 1958 and finds of Anglo-Saxon pottery were discovered in Coopers Lane in 1969. Welbrooke Hill nearby, is the site of Roman pottery finds and there is an Anglo-Saxon cemetry just South of the village alongside Barton Street. Further Anglo-Saxon evidence can be seen in the remains of an Anglo-Saxon cross found embedded in the North wall of St Margarets’s Church. The oldest part of the church is said to be the lower third of the Tower; constructed in the twelth century. Among the many stained glass windows is a very small window, left of the main entrance, which depicts St Margaret of Antioch, of whom the church is dedicated to. She is depicted here with a dragon, which could denote strength and courage, or strength in battle or adversity. The other side of the doorway is depicted St John the Baptist.

imgp0126-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laceby

St Margaret was a native of “Antioch” and the daughter of a pagan priest named Aedesius. imgp0142-1Her mother, it is said, died soon after her birth and Margaret was thus nursed by a Christian woman five or six leagues from Antioch. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her ‘virginity’ to God, Margaret was then disowned by her father and was adopted by her nurse; she lived in the country keeping sheep, with her foster mother (in what is now Turkey). Olybrius, Governor of the Roman Diocese of the East, asked to marry her, but with the demand that she renounced her Christianity. Margaret refused and upon her refusal, she was cruelly tortured during which, various miraculous incidents occurred. One of these involved her being swallowed by Satan, in the shape of a dragon from which she escaped alive when the cross she was carrying irritated the dragon’s innards. This tale is said to represent Margaret’s escape from her fathers false beliefs of paganism and of her being born anew by escaping from the dragon’s belly. However the account never the less was not taken seriously, especially the last incident which was descibed as “apocryphal and not to be taken seriously” and thus sadly she was put to her death; attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning but she miraculously survived and managed to convert many spectators who were also  subsuequently executed, before being finally beheaded, in AD 304.  Because of this tale she has become the patron saint of childbirth, labour and pregancy. As Saint Marina, she is associated with the sea, which “may in turn point to an older goddess tradition,” reflecting the pagan divinity, Aphrodite. But how interesting that a church in England would take her name and that she would be it’s patron but even odder and more interesting still, she has patronage to Cambridge too; what a fascinating connection with further stories to be told….

‘The Blacksmith’s Ghost’: Solomon Fenner it is said, is still around the area of Laceby to this day. Around 1710 Solomon Fenner lived in the village of Laceby where he worked as the local Blacksmith, but although highly skilled and profesional he was not a rich man as such, yet neither did he live in poverty. He had previously served in the army of King William and King Henry on the continent, before returning home to Linconshire to take up his trade of which he had apprenticed for as a youth. He was known as a pious man who attended church each Sunday and whom gave a little of what he earned to the poor of the parish.

He never married but fell under the charms of one Rebecca Pettitt; a beautiful, witty young woman with long red hair and green eyes, who lived in the market town of Caister. It is said she had many suitors but her father Wiiliam Pettit; a greedy man who owned land and several shops in Caister, was determined that his daughter’s husband to be, would be one who would be financially advantageous to William.

And so it was that one day Solomon Fenner, was walking the country road to Caister and showed himself at the Pettit’s home, asking William for his daughters hand in marriage. William Pettit was furious that a humble blacksmith should ask such a question and thus angrily denied him and threw him out onto the street where something inside the normally gentle and pious blacksmith snapped. So knowing William Pettit to be a man of habit who regularily drunk and gambled with freinds at a hamlet near Cabourn, on a Saturday afternoon, Solomon made note. It was always late, lonely and dark when William made his way home through the Linconshire fens and the next Saturday night the vengeful Solomon was thus to be found waiting in the shadows….

When he saw the drunk and helpless William Pettit coming along on his own, he leapt out at him and bludgeoned him to death with a hammer. When his ‘red mist’ cleared and Solomon Fenner realise what he had done, he was filled with instant remorse and ran to the nearest farmhouse to confess to the sleepy inhabitants what he had done. When the body of William Pettit was discovered, bloody and battered, there was no doubt to Fenner’s confesion and so in due course he was of course hanged, as was the way in those times. Before his death it is said he wept bitterly, cursing his actions of that night, expressing fear for his imortal soul. His body was gibbeted on a hill near Cabourn overlooking the scene of his crime and to this day, if legend is anything to go by Solomon Fenner is still not at rest. For according to local folklore, travellers walking between Cabourn and Caister late at night will be approached by a tall and robust looking man, stepping out of the shadows to confront them. He wears dirty apparel and caries a blood-stained hammer in his hand. His red eyes do not lie; he has been weeping, yet he tells the travellers not to be afraid; he will do them no harm as he sadly recounts his story of his crime, adding that they must remember that all life is sacred and his punishment for forgetting this is to spend all enternity telling others of his crime…

We were unable to carry out any filming inside the church on this occason due to an afternoon ‘tea social’ and community gathering going on in the church, but we did manage to take some interesting photos which once again showed a great deal of Templar and Masonic symbolism and even from further beyond; symbols that are certainly not ‘christian’. Though sadly the church has very little of it’s former ‘energy’ alive to this day…

 

 

Masonic and Templar symbolism in St Margaret’s Church, Laceby, also showing a reference to the ‘Neville’ linage (click on images to enlarge)

ST MARGARETS CHURCH: LACEBY LINCOLNSHIRE

A short video taken from outside of St Margaret’s Church, Laceby; here you will discover the beginnings of the ‘Neville’ line and more references to the symbolism inside the church (as shown above in the photos)

Laceby as mentioned in the clip above is actually where the ‘Neville’ line originated; and interestingly our lead researchers 18th grandmother’s father has a connection here. People always asume that the Neville line started from France (de Ville in France); going back to Geoffrey De Neville who was actually granted, by King Henry 3rd on 26th Dec 1234, an act, was given permission for this area, the right to hold a fair on the 24th July, as anyone at that time had to have the King’s permission to do so. Interestingly though, for some reason the locals were not tuned into the history of their church…..

St James Church Louth: Louth is situated at the foot of the beautiful Lincolshire Wolds, at the point where they meet the Lincolshire Marshes; it is known as the Capitol of the Lincolshire Wolds. It developed where the ancient trackway along the wolds, known as Barton Street, crossed the river Lud. The town is east of a gorge carved into the Wolds that forms the Hubbards Hill. This area was formed from a glacial overspill channel in the last glacial period; the River Lud meanders through the gorge before entering the town. Various interesting archeology finds have been unearthed in the area including hand axes dating from between 424,000 ans 191, ooo years ago, indicating inhabitation in the Paleolithic era. Bronze age finds include a ‘barbed and tangled’ arrowhead in the grounds of Monks Dyke, Tennyson College. There is an Anglo-Saxon burial ground, northwest of Louth, which dates from the fifth to sixth centuries. It was  first excavated in 1946 and with an estmated 1200 urn burials is one of the largest Anglo-Saxon cemetries in England.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louth,_Lincolnshire

This mainly fifteeth century parish church with the tallest medieval parish church spire in England, is the third building on the site here, succeeding the previous eleventh and thirteeth century structures. The chancel and nave were rebuilt in 430-40 but the very tall spire was not completed until 1515. This was the site of the Lincolnshire Rising, the first serious rebellion that threatened the crown which was followere by the Pilgrimage of Grace. These occurances were the results of the national discontent resulting from Henry V111’s taxation and ecclesiastical changes; sadly both rebellions failed and serious represions followed; the church then being swept clean of its richest, icluding the dismantling of the rood screen.

The unusual happening here is said to be of the appearance of the ghost of St. Hererith, the Bishop who died in 873, killed at the hands of the invading Danes and whom is also known as Louths ‘forgotten Saint’. Sadly due to being delayed by the trafic on the road on this particular day, the church was closed when we arrived so we were not able to prove or disprove any ‘tales’ but we managed some very useful video and photos from outside…

 

 

St James’s Church, Louth showing the tallest medieval spire in the counrty and an interesting sigil carved into the church wall; often know as the ‘Awen’ sign in the modern druidic world, more can be read about it here:-

To most people this symbol represents the modern day ‘Awen’ sign, yet the truth and meaning is very far removed as the symbol goes back much further in time; it was adopted with the re-birth of the so called ‘old ways’ in the 1960’s. In Templarism it actually represents the ‘three pillars’ yet in Priory something different again, where it goes back to it’s original roots.

Earth: Body & Love,
Sea:Mind / Wisdom,
Air:Spirit / Truth

The ‘Awen’ symbol is also said to represent ‘Inspiration of Truth’ and it is further suggested that without Awen (inspiration) one could not understand truth, so the original truths have stuck and been passed down. What is further interesting is the three rays (three pillars) also represent the universe in balance, meaning:

Left Ray:Female
Centre Ray:Balance
Right Ray:Male

One needs to attune to the three rays (or rather the ‘three pillars’) to fulfil their understanding of the world within them and all around them (the without)  (There is much more on the original metaphysical meaning of this symbol within Templarism in The Knights Bible found on Amazon)

Follow the link to our youtube channel for some interesting historical comments on the history of this spendid church and of its Knight Templar connection…

ST JAMES CHURCH: LOUTH,  LINCS

St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke: This very interesting, hidden away, redundant Anglican church situated near the village of Skidbrooke, seven miles northeast of Louth in Lincolnshire is now under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. This isolated church is nestled well off the beaten track in a woodland copse, in the heart of rural Lincolnshire and totally not what any of us was expecting at all… Upon arriving, the site was very open, the fields were bare and the harvet was in, all in all a typical scene of the English countryside. The apearance of the church on the horizon, as it looms from under its secret cover of lush surrounding trees could easily be mistaken for a very atmospheric and eerie film set and indeed tales of ghosthunters, witch covens and satanic ritual still freshly abound and entice to this very day. This once, and i can only assume beautiful church, is now a vast empty shell; a ghost of its former self yet strangely very beautiful and compelling. The stained glass windows and what were probably wonderful church fittings etc have now all been removed and yet the ceiling still remains fairly intact as do surprisingly some of the carvings and significant writings which we may learn about later.

imgp0188-1

As said , an isolated church standing in the flat Lincolnshire marshes, St Botolph’s is early medieval, dating from the early thirteeth century with various renovations covering the Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic periods.This spacious building is composed of a nave with clerestory, north and south aisles, south porch, chancel, and an embattled west tower. The interior of the church is almost completely bare and unadorned, with unplastered walls letting the bones of the building show. The nave arcades are Early English, with wide, slender arches and nicely carved column capitals. The south arcade, built circa 1400, has it’s columns built up on bases several feet high. The tower arch is much narrower, in Perpendicular style. The church is constructed in limstone and brick with some rendering and the roof is in slate with stoned coped gables. Once inside it really opens out and has the feeling of a large hall; light pours in through the many glassless windows and the many fine arches all the way along the inside of the building hint at older different times. The piers of the arches are octagonal in construction representing ‘the eight points of perfection.’

 St Botolph’s; an abandoned yet beautiful chuch…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Botolph%27s_Church,_Skidbrooke

If the building is used for rituals and gatherings, and by the looks of things remaining and clues opon the ground, it most probably is, one can immedietly sense why; the whole place most certainly have a feel to it; an atmosphere not of this world. Skidbrooke has been the subject of much publicity due to reports of paranormal activity at the church. Several ghosthunters have reported unusual goings-on at the building, and the church was nicknamed ‘the Demon church’ after it became popular with groups of Satanists in the 1970’s and 1980’s. Visitors have reported seeing a ghostly monk on the site, seeing odd lights and hearing sounds of storms in calm weather, and hearing strange, unexplained noises at night. Also reported at the sight are the cries of screaming satanists, a headless knight and demons from a specific tomb, where it is said is an entrance to ‘dimensional changes’.

 

 

Some of the symbols still left in this abandoned church <click on any image to enlarge>

Follow the link to our youtube channel for a tour around St Botolph’s Church and hear of the scary tales old and new, of dark gatherings still taking place here…

ST BOLTOPHS CHURCH:  SKIDBROOKE, LINCS

We all experienced many different feelings here; feelings of the atmosphere changing, sensing the atmosheric presure changing, sensing hot and cold; in fact great activity all around us, feelings of breathlessness and tight chestedness. The ‘energies’ of the site constantly changed from knowing ‘others’ were there to a quite openly unfriedly, unwelcomed feeling; a deep and oppresive atmosphere that manifested in a physical way upon us. So certainly we were definitely not alone here but i get a true sense that the ‘guardians’ here are a tad fed up with it all and just want to be left in peace guarding ‘their truths’….. I myself loved the place and was very reluctant to leave, although it is not for the faint-hearted. I loved the whole experience of being there with communication from other dimensions, although some folks say that even today events of a ‘not nice’ nature are still practiced to this very day……

St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping:  And so with nightfall well and truly upon us we arrived at St Guthlac’s Church in the pretty town of Market Deeping, for what was to be our first full night time visit. This church is largely fifteenth century and is the only church in Market Deeping, being part of the Church of England Anglo-Catholic tradition. On the south face of the tower is a very unusual sundial with ‘The Day is Thine’ enscribed upon it, while on the north face is a similar one enscribed with the words ‘The Night Cometh’; very compelling indeed… St Guthlacs is a grade 1 listed building that has been contiuously in use in Market Deeping for at lest eight hundred years. The site was clearly a centre of worship long before that as Anglo-Saxon religous masonry had been discovered in the grounds. It has a fascinating history, not only the building but also of St Gutlac himself. As we intend to return in the daytime for a more indepth look at this fascinating church; much more will follow…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Market_Deeping

Of interest to us is the fact that demons are said to roam the grounds and torment the living. Wandering around these church burial grounds at night, one certainly gets the direct sense of not being alone, of being watched and of experiencing very intense ‘energies’ in certain parts of the grave yard. Some of our team experienced hearing and seeing unexplained movements and sounds emancipating from certain areas, an orb was seen and also figures at the upper church windows when the security lights did not turn off. We did manage a few night-time photos and all will be continued….

 

 

In the graveyard of St Guthlac’ at night; look closely for the orbs….

If you wish to join us on our quests, especially if you love uncovering untold histories, please leave a message here in the comments section.

To find out more about The Priory, who we are and what we do please see the following link:-  http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“It is not the falsety of religion to rely upon for there is no meaning. It is Dumuzi, the son of Enki whom shall rise as a King amongst the wolves”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

 

 

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER ELEVEN

THE GARDEN OF ENGLAND

  • St Peter and St Paul’s Church Seal
  • St George’s Church Wrotham
  • St Nicholas’ Church Pluckley

An early morning start found us on quest number eleven and on our way to Kent; commonly known as ‘The Garden of England’ and one can certainly see why, as once off the ‘beaten track’ one is in wooded countryside, pretty little villages and amongst rolling chalk downs – a taste of ‘Old England’ to be sure and a lovely place to be for a day of questing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seal,_Kent

ST PETER AND ST PAUL: SEAL. Our first stop of the day was this small medieval church, a grade one listed building, in the village of Seal,  just outside Sevenoaks. The church was built in 1243 upon the grounds of a former Saxon church and burial ground. It is a very quiet spot with stunning views right across the north downs. There is altogether a lovely peaceful feel to the church and graveyard; yet upon entering the church itself, many surprises await the eagle eyed Craft explorer, for this is a very Masonic driven English church…

A very peaceful and picturesque setting with stunning view across the downs <click on all photos for a larger view>

On entering St Peter and Paul church, one can see straight away over the main doorway, the figure of Boaz, from the two biblical figures; the two pillars, while inside the porch itself and the entrance are placements upon the windows of very masonic symbols; the square and compass, the tau within the philosophers stone, the keys, the sword (logos), emblems of blood sacrifice and blood letting and within the church itself many references to, and symbols of the Raised (third) Degree icluding the skull and crossbones.

Let our head researcher show you around and explain all the meaning of the Masonic symbolism for you (apologies for the noises from the wind outside)

ST PETERS & ST PAULS CHURCH: SEAL KENT

In 1874 a female apparition (Djinn) with a pair of garden ‘loppers’ was recorded as being seen frantically chopping the bushes in the graveyard, while in 1263 a faceless monk was seen from the now blocked over window, looking outwards. In 2015 a Seal man named Paul Gevauxx was jailed for commiting a double stabbing. One wonders just how these kind of incidents occur and what could have provoked someone to carry out such a crime as this… We ourselves (our team) whilst in the church experienced a few ‘happenings’ sadly not on camera though; seeing white lights near the organ, various loud bangings/thumpings and a white light near the original doorway.

See our second video link to explain further about St Peter and Paul Church

ST PETERS & ST PAULS CHURCH: SEAL KENT

St Peter and St Paul: A church  full to the brim with Masonic symbolism

The ‘family lines’  we were particularly researching today in Kent were:

  • Richard Neville 1674
  • Catherine Turner 1716
  • Robert Neville 1714
  • Anne Neville 1679

As shared in the above clip there ocurred a subsequent ‘family’ migration to Shipdham in Norfolk, where of course we have previously quested at.

ST GEORGES CHURCH: WROTHAM. The church is located on the ‘north’ side of a small square in Wrotham village, but sadly on this occasion the church doors to this little late Saxon/early Norman period church were not open to us, due to extensive electrical wiring renovations being carried out. The church was founded in 946 AD by Richard de Wrotham. We stayed awhile though strolling aroung the burial ground at the church itself and also the second graveyard just over the road, where many beautiful celtic crosses can be seen; obviously again carrying their fare share of Templar and Masonic symbols, as can also be seen around the outside of the church. The ‘family’name associations to be discovered here are as that in Seal, Kent.

http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/01/03/WRO.htm

Some of the beautiful Celtic crosses and other ‘non christian’ sybolism to be found in the pretty setting of St George’s Church in Wrotham.

By way of an introduction and a record of our visit, even though we were unable to gain entry, we did make a very short video – see below:

ST GEORGE CHURCH: ROTHERAM KENT

ST NICHOLAS: PLUCKLEY. This church, which is also a grade one listed building and is situated in the picturesque vilage of Pluckley, has been on the site in some form or other since Saxon times; the present church being some 900 years old, with Pluckley being a name of Saxon origin and record of the monks of Cantebury actually recording a church being here in 1090. As the village is so pretty and typically English one can totally see why the TV series ‘The Darling Buds of May’ was mostly filmed in and around this village.

The inside of St Nicholas showing the many brasses to be found on the floor, but especially pay attention to the beautiful ‘prophetic’ window with tellings of our earth’s future….

Of course the village and church does now have the infamous reputation of being the most haunted church and village in England; whether true or not or just folklore tales, one as usual has to make up ones own mind on the matter. The village though, certainly does attract its fair share of ‘ghost hunters’, especially on nights such as Halloween/Samhain. Among the ‘ghosts’ seen or recorded here are ‘The Highwayman’, The sounds of a ‘horse drawn’ coach, a gypsy woman or watercress woman, a ‘red’ lady and a ‘white’ lady and a monk; these are just a few of the many sightings recorded here so one can only assume that the Djinn are in proliferation here; maybe protecting much more than meets the eye… While we ourselves were here, we did experience a mysterious woman and a dog entering the church and then leave, but as the video below explains, Alek who was outside at the time, just near the door, witnessed no one what so ever entering or leaving the church….

http://www.mysteriousbritain.co.uk/england/kent/hauntings/pluckley.html

So while most visitors are seeking verification of ‘hauntings’ they are of course missing the whole point of why this church is really here; the reason why all the churches we are visiting are where they are, ie the placement of pyramids within the earth. From the actual church’s themselves, especially this one today; the real truths of existence and of life on this planet are here for all to see… The overiding theme of the day, from the churches we visited certainly seemed to revolve around blood sacrifice, blood letting and blood offerings; of offerings and the taking of ‘energy’ as told within the designs of the stained glass windows; presenting us with a lesser know yet true tale of ‘The Jesus’ and whom he really was; his true origins and the customs of his kin and how they fit into the ‘jigsaw’ of life on earth. We also see a future time in relation to this so called planet, spread out before us upon the magnificant window, messages from the past for all to decipher…

See the video link of this amazing and very special window to find out more:

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH: PLUCKLEY KENT

There were a couple of ‘hidden’ rooms, above the entrance porch and in the bell tower area which we did wonder about; why were they closed, why no public access? That was a bit of a mystery to us… then sadly before we had finished filming and taking our photographs, the present day ‘Keeper of the Keys’ arrived on the scene at this point in time, to lock up. However before she bade us farewell she did mention that the ‘hidden’ rooms were being refurbished as a visitors diaplay and historical centre, which was useful to know. Thus then our research for the day was cut abruptly short, though thankfully we had enough to gain much knowledge and insight.

See our Youtube link to the last video of the day at St Nicholas, Pluckley where more symbolism is revealed….

ST NICHOLAS CHURCH: PLUCKLEY KENT

The Days Thoughts and Conclusions….

  1. We know that the churches on the sites we are investigating are full of Masonic symbolism, but where did these symbols originate from in the first place?
  2. Why are the churches built upon sites where underground ‘secrets’ need to be kept buried from the people of the lands?
  3. We know that the ‘Djinn’ are very much in attendence at these sights but are they protecting or hiding something?
  4. We have learnt today of the exsistence of The Kolbrin bible and of the truths that it contains and the fact that many of the Freemasons scriptures do in fact originate from The Kolbrin.
  5. The windows are full of prophetic happenings; we saw the future history of our planet before us today bold as brass, as foretold in the Kolbrin Bible.
  6. We learnt of the truths and real life of  ‘The Jesus’;  of blood spilling, blood letting and of blood scarifice and that the giving and receiving of ‘energy’ is not what one is lead to believe.
  7. We now know that Mary Magdalene was indeed male; so what then of this realationship to The Jesus?
  8. We learnt today of the ‘family’ migration from Kent to Norfolk; the ‘Nevilles’ as always being very prominent ‘players’ in our quests;  the bloodline of whom goes back as far as Enoch.
  9. All the churches of all the quests attract the inquisitve public, the ‘ghost hunters’, the ‘paranormal investigaters’ etc., for all the wrong reasons. What better way then to hide a secret; hidden well, in the spooky tales of headless horseman, white ladies, monks, black schucks, knights, people with dogs etc. Smoke and mirrors and more than a little bit of misdirection; perfect camoflauge to hide the truths i would say!

August 2016

If you are fascinated with a history, especially the truths, then you are very welcome to  email me for further info at moon.willow@ntlworld.com

  “The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

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