Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day One: Found us in a mood of anticiption as we traveled from East Anglia to the mythical lands of North Wales for what would turn out to be a vey busy, informative and exciting quest. Traveling with caravan in toe to our chosen base for the duration of this quest; Rhualt Country Park, we soon pitched up and made home  Night-time fell and with the long journey ended, we were soon the next day, amidst deserted beaches and snow capped peaks. What a wonderful way to welcome in the new Gregorian year. This quest turned out to be an absolute delight for all of us, yet was more more of a fact finding historical quest than the others; no ghost hunting, no unexplained mysteries, no dog walking entitties and certainly no headless horsemen! We were here to unravel the mysteries of the untold royal bloodlines…

Day Two: 13th January 2017

  • St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli
  • St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog

St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli: The first stop of day two, the first real questing day, found us at St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli. It was quite a journey to arrive there; it is along the Llyn Penisular and the seas on both side and elsewhere on this journey were truly manificent to behold. The town was given its charter as a borough by Edward the Black Prince, in 1355 and a market is still held each Wednesday in the centre of the town on ‘Y Maes’ (“the field” or “the town square” in English). The town grew around the  shipbuilding and fishing industries and the granite quarry Gimlet Rock. (Carreg yr Imbill). During the 1890s, the town was developed by Solomon Andrews, a Cardiff businessman. This work included the Promenade, roads and houses at West End. A tramway was built linking the town to Llanbedro; the trams ran until 1927 when the section of track between Carreg-y-Defaid and Tyddyn-Caled was seriously damaged by a storm.

Inside St Peter’s Church (click on images to enlarge)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pwllheli

There has been a church on the site serving the peoples of the parish since ancient times; right back as far as the 6th century although not always on the same site. The first church was built by St Beuno or his disciples about half a mile north of this present site and the old cemetry still remains on ths spot. Like all churches many changes came and went over the years and in 1834 a new church was built on the present site and thus the old St Beuno’s Church became St Peter’s Church. It is built in the early decorated gothic style from local granite and from yellow felstone on the outer walls. It is interesting to note that the local landscape and building materials really do give these old churches their own very unique and distnctive flavour; they seems to nestle into the landscape without any effort at all.

  • Bloodline connections:  Gwen Wynn, Alek’s 10 x Great Grandmother who was born here in 1560. Gwen Wynn married Richard Perry and thus a great feud began between the Wynns, the Perry’s and the Nevilles…

St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog: Llanbedrog is a stunning coastal village in North Wales,  situated on the south side  of the Llyn penisulay of Gwynedd, between Pwllheli and Abersoch.  Formerly in the county of Caernarfonshire, it has a population of 1,020, reducing slightly to 1,002 at the 2011 Census. The village takes its name from Saint Petroc, a 6th-century Celtic saint. Petroc may be a form of the name Patrick, but Saint Petroc should not be confused with Saint Patrick. Saint Petrog’s church is a grade II* listed building. South of the village is the headland and open area of Mynyyd Tir-y-cwmwd. Granite quarrying was commercially important in the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The quarry closed down in 1949.

Pretty views of St Pedrogs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanbedrog

The day we visited we were the only visitors at this small but stunning church and we were privy to our very own private bell ringing session with warm thanks to a great guy; Malcolm. Yet also worth a very big mention; we were very fortunate to gain access at all as the church would have been closed to us, but we happened to bump into the vicar whilst at the previous church (St Peter’s) who performed some vicarly magic for us – and lo and behold, we had entry! The church of St. Pedrog was probably established sometime in the 5th century; when St. Pedrog landed and he set up a community here. The original founding of the Church was probably built of wattle and daub. He died in 564 and his ministry predates St. Augustine, who died in 597. The link below is well worth a read as another link to one or our bloodline families (the Parrys) can be discovered in connection to the bells here.

http://www.llanbedrog.info/llanbedrogstpedrognotes.htm

Inside St Pedrogs; the close of of the window is worth a look at for the KT symbolosm – click on to enlarge

The beach; a short walk away and delightfully empty in winter, was so beautiful and totally deserted and interestingly we did find a rather unusual ‘mystery’ object on the beach…

mystery-object

  • Bloodline connection: The Neville line which also connects to Scotland, Ireland and to the Knights Templar.
  • The Parry line too were very important in respect of the very fine bells here.

Follow the link for the video of our trip and discover the secrets of bell ringing

Day Three: 14th January 2017

  • St Giles Church: Wrexham
  • St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen
  • St Peters Church: Ruthin

St Giles Church: Wrexham: Wrexham is very large town in North Wales with a lot of history connected to its past; the town lies between the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley on the borders of England. Human activity in the Wrexham area dates back to the Mesolithic period (8000 to 4300 BC) By the early Middle Bronze Age the area had developed into a centre for an innovative metalworking industry. A Roman civilian settlement was located in the Plas Coch area of Wrexham and excavations have revealed evidence of agriculture and trade with the wider Roman world. By the end of the 6th century AD, the area was being contested between the Celtic-speaking inhabitants and the English-speaking invaders advancing from the east. The Anglo-Saxons went on to dominate north-east Wales from the 8th to 10th centuries and the settlement of Wrexham was likely founded by Mercian colonists on the flat ground above the meadows of the River Gwenfro during the 8th century. The origins of the name “Wrexham” may possibly be traced back to this period.

Views from outside St Giles Church, showing the very ancinet carvings; click to enlarge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrexham

St Giles’ Church: is the parish church of Wrexham and is a Grade 1 listed building, described by Simon Jenkins as “the glory of the Marches”. At 180-feet long, it is the largest mediaeval Parish Church in Wales. Since 2012, its interior has been re-ordered to include a remodelling of the Chancel as St David’s Chapel, and its north aisle is the home of the regimental chapel of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (now part of the Royal Welsh). The core of present building dates from the 14th century, although it was extensively remodelled in the later 15th century by Thomas, Lord Stanley and his wife Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Giles%27_Church,_Wrexham

The stunning interior structure of St Giles, Wrexham

We were here to pull together some more of the threads on our search for the true royal bloodlines and the hidden histories of these Celtic Lands. One again we found a strong connection to the Neville line; a beautifully stunning shield (Alek’s family shield) hangs up inside the church that will testify to this fact. Photos are on this webpage but we were not able to film inside; however the stunning shots that we do have prove the Templar connection beyond any doubt.

Some of the amazing and symbolic artwork in St Gile’s Church; including a stunning example of the Neville Family Crest

Click on the link to view our clip on St Giles Church, Wrexham

  • Bloodline connection: The Wynn family, the Perrys, the Parrys and of course the Nevilles.
  • Alek connects the famlies with their movements around the country from Ireland and Scotland.
  • King Henry 7th’s mother was involved with this church and also with St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli and St Pedrogs, Llanbedrog.

Up over and traveling on higher ground, we then made our way to Corwen and Ruthin, with plenty of wonderful scenery still to view; the weather was cold, which did not seem to matter, as there was plenty to investigate to keep us all warm and busy. The scenery is rugged and the buidings nestle into the hillsides becoming part of the living landscape.

wales-4-for-fb

St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen: St Maels Church was fun tracking down; indeed we were  up and down some steep tracks finding it, half hidden away on a hillside at the back of the delightful town. Corwen is a very old town, formely in the ancient county of Merionethshire, which has always been enshrined in Knights Templar history; the church itself dating from the eleven hundreds and once one is inside, it has some amazing and meaningful artwork to discover.

St Mael and St Suliens Corwen

The church itself dates from the twelfth century and is a single chambered structure set within a rectangular churchyard, with walls of fourteenth or fifteenth century origin. Its baptismal font dates from the twelfth or thirteenth century and the churchyard includes a tomb from the seventeenth century, besides war graves of two soldiers of world war one. The church is dedicated to St Mael and St Sulien, two Celtic saints of the sixth century, though it has been suggested that an earlier foundation stood on the hill above. Sulien is a Welsh variant of the given name “Julian” but has also been interpreted as being derived from the Welsh sul, meaning “sun” plus also geni, meaning “born”; Sulien being the name of a Celtic soler diety.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Mael_and_Sulien’s_Church,_Corwen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corwen

A church full of mystery, magic and of many tales still untold; as are the churches of North Wales…

The ‘secrets’ or rather lies of the murder of ‘The Jesus’ are told here, together with a depiction of a true unicorn, and ‘the potions of life’; all aspects of Priory teachings, secrets hidden in plain sight for all to see… There are many stunning stained glass windows here that all tell their own story of our true (yet always hidden) creation and history…

Click on the link to unravel some of the mysteries of St Mael’s and take a tour in the darkeness of St Peter’s ….

St Peters Church: Ruthin: Ruthin (Rhuthun) is the county town of Denbighshire in North Wales. Located around a hill in the southern part of the Vlae of Clwyd; the older part of the town, the castle and Saint Peter’s Square are located on top of the hill, while many newer parts of the town are on the floodplain of the River Clwyd. The name ‘Ruthin’ comes from the Welsh words rhudd (red) and din (fort), and refers to the colour of the new red sandstone which forms the geologic basis of the area and from which the castle was constructed in 1277–84. The original name of Ruthin was ‘Castell Coch yng Ngwern-fôr’ (red castle in the sea-swamps). The town developed around the castle and the nearby mill. ‘Maen Huail’ is a registered ancient monument attributed to the brother of Gildas and King Arthur and is located outside Barclays Bank (formerly Exmewe House), on St Peter’s Square.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthin

Sadly St Peter’s Church at Ruthin, whe we arrived was in complete darkness, but we did our best to document the important features in the murkiness!. There were some very interesting aspects to this church, which hopefully the photos will show more of. Lo and behold though, as we were finishing the lighs came on! But as the church was being used by ‘others’ then, it was respectful as always to not disturb them, although they were freindly people; maybe church wardens or similar who were non the less keen to chat to us.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collegiate_and_Parochial_Church_of_St_Peter,_Ruthin

Taken in St Peter’s in the dark with the camcorder camera

If one looks aloft into the rafters, one can often see an amazing aray of mythical creatures or symbols of the ‘old ways’…

  • Bloodline conection: The Jones, The 3rd Earl of Kent, King Henry 7th, Lady Beaufort, The Duke of Kent (Freemasonry)

Webs being woven upon the shores of time….

wales-7-for-fb

Part two will follow…

Thank you for reading; if you would like to find out more, please take a look at our Priory Webpage

http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

January 2017: ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”