Tag Archive: Symbols


IRELAND: QUEST TWENTY SIX:

Day Four: Dublin: Although sadly we never had time to see anything of the city of Dublin as such, i did manage a few quick photos whilst traveling to our designated destinations, but certainly a city to come back to and explore at leisure.

 

Driving through Dublin!

 St Andrews Church: Although we were unable to actually stop here due to location and parking challenges, we did indeed drive past and acknowledged that it is now the Central Tourist Office for Dublin! Times change, people change and the use of buildings change, but let us not be sad as it is indeed good to see the building being used and vibrant, even though not in a religious sense.

The original St Andrews Church was located on present-day Dame Street, but disapeared during Oliver Cromwell’s reign in the mid-17th century. A new church was built in 1665, a little further away from the city walls and due to its shape was commonly known as the ‘Round Church’. Thomas Dalton, Lord Chancellor of Ireland was buried here in 1730. The population of the parish in 1901 was 3,058, in 1971 it was 300. It has to be noted also that there is a high Lithuanian population here.

You can read more about St Andrews Church in the link below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Andrew%27s_Church,_Dublin_(Church_of_Ireland)

 

  • Bloodline Connections: Both Albert John Fordham (1928-1987) and John Fordham (1892) were baptised here.
  • Also connection to the Neville line.

Christ Church Cathedral/The Cathedral of the Holy Trinity: This is the cathedral of the United Diocese of Dublin and Glendalough and the cathedral of the Ecclesiastical Province of the United Provinces of Dublin and Cashel in the Church of Ireland. It is the elder of the capitals two medieval churches being founded in c.1030, the other being St Patricks Cathedral. There were extensive renovations being carried out while we were there which were tad disorientating, but the hoardings themselves were fun and very photogenic in themselves, giving an opurtunity for some colourful photography!

 

Christ Church Cathedral: There are many richly sumptuous artifacts and fine decor here, yet at the same time there are equally (or in fact more) relevant and important histotical artifacts seemingly hidden away in corners…

 

The ‘hidden’ artifacts; many of which relate directly to ‘The Neville’ bloodline; but just why would they be kept low key and mostly unmarked?

Christ Church is officially claimed as the seat (cathedra) of both the Church of Ireland and Roman Catholic archbishops of Dublin. The cathedral was founded probably sometime after 1028 when King Sitric Silkenbeard, the Hiberno-Norse king of Dublin made a pilgrimage to Rome. The first bishop of this new Dublin diocese was Dunan or Donat; the diocese was at that time a small island of land surrounded by the much larger  Diocese of Glendalough and was for a time answerable to Canterbury rather than to the Irish Church hierarchy. The church was built on the high ground overlooking the Viking settlement at Wood Quay and Sitric gave the “lands of Baldoyle, Raheny and Portrane for its maintenance.” Of the four old Celtic Christian churches reputed to have existed around Dublin, only one, dedicated to St Martin of Tours lay within the walls of the Viking city, and so Christ Church was one of just two churches for the whole city.

 

Some of the amazing and priceless artworks in Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin; more photos from this cathedral can be seen in the section on Celtic Crosses (part one) and Templar Symbolism (part two)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christ_Church_Cathedral,_Dublin

https://christchurchcathedral.ie/visit-us/

Right next door to the cathedral is a venue known as Dublinia; a historical recreation (or living history) museum and visitor attraction focusing on the Viking and  Medieval history of the city. Dublinia is located in a part of Christ Church Catherdral, known as the Synod Hall.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dublinia

  • Bloodline connection is to the Neville line

St Patrick’s Cathedral: Dublin: On this occasion, although on our itinery, we never actually made it to St Patricks Catherdral which was some distance away; the journey had been fairly long getting to Dublin from our base that morning and still lots lay ahead. But hopefully in the future was shall be sure to visit. Please do follow the links though to read up about it:

https://www.stpatrickscathedral.ie/learn/life-and-history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Patrick%27s_Cathedral,_Dublin

 

  • Bloodline connection is to the Neville line

St Nicholas Parish Church: Dundalk: After another drive through the Irish countryside we arrived in the busy town of Dunalk in County Louth; part of the diocese of Armagh. This is a bustling and very friendly town, it’s name in Irish is Dún Dealgan, which means “Dalgan’s fort” and it is the county town of County Louth. It is on the Castletown River, which flows into Dundalk Bay, and is near the border with Northern Ireland, halfway between Dublin and Belfast, so we had travelled a fair few miles that day. It has associations with the mythical warrior hero  Cu Chulainn.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dundalk

 

St Nicholas Parish Church, sits on a busy road junction in the heart of the town, surrounded by local shops, cafes and takeaways. Again once inside it is a beautiful church with a very peaceful energy. The original church was built in the 1220’s and some parts of the church have not born the ravishes of time very well, while in other parts restoration has been carried out.

 

The interior of St Nicholas Church

A Dr. Oliver Davies, who examined all the old churches of County Louth in 1945, put the probable date of the church in the thirteenth century and considered that it was the need of a rising seaport which called for its erection. In this connection it is suggestive that St. Nicholas is the patron saint of merchant venturers by sea, and that many sea ports have churches dedicated in his name. During the troubled times of the Rebellion in 1641-50, when Dundalk was taken by assault, and of the campaigns of Schomberg and James II, 1688-90, the church fabric became sadly damaged. It was re-roofed in part in 1702, as a stone in the vestry records, when Rev. Ralph Lambert was vicar, it was “restored in a new and more elegant form.” and as is the case for so many churches restoration continued down the centuries.

 

For a parish church St Nicholas did have some rather stunning stained-glass windows

https://www.stnicholas-greenchurchdundalk.com/history

http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=LH&regno=13701004

  • Bloodline Connection: the home of the ‘Fallen’ Nevilles of the Great War with actual records of the returned on ‘The Returned Army’ page.
  • NEVILLE, C, Royal Irish Rifles. From Church Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, Sapper, E V, 68 Division, Signal Corps, Royal Engineers. From New Street, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, Lieutenant, ERNEST W, Royal Engineers (Telegraphist). (Tempest’s Annual 1917)
  • NEVILLE, Sergeant, W, Royal Army Service Corps. From New Street, Dundalk.(Tempest’s Annual 1916)
  • NEVILLE, WILLIAM,  HMS Anemone. From 1 Brunswick Row, Dundalk. (Tempest’s Annual 1916)

Actual Records here:- http://www.jbhall.freeservers.com/the_returned_army_page_d.htm

Day Five: Belfast Jewish Community: As part of the Priory teachings we endevour to gain insight and understandings of all the earthly religions; to see common threads but also differences too. The Jewish community in Belfast dates back to 1079, but this building here was built in the 1960’s; as well as a temple of prayer and service it is also a community hub. The people there were very friendly and welcoming, and to someone who’s first time this was, the ladies kindly guided and engaged me in the service which was a massive three hours long due to the time of year!

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It is quite a big building; much bigger inside than it appears on the outside and  is decorated  in a modern style with lots of blue and light coloured wood. As expected, treasures of the religion are housed there for services, but as there was a service taking place when we visited (our reason for going) i was unable to take any photos. It has to be noted though that even in these so called enlightened times, there was a small police presence outside the building the whole time that worship was taking place.

http://www.belfastjewishcommunity.org.uk/history/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belfast_Hebrew_Congregation

 

Bloodline Connection: The Neville line

St Anne’s Cathedral: Belfast: A beautiful building with the largest Celtic Cross on the outside that i have ever seen! St Anne’s Cathedral, also known as Belfast Cathedral, is a cathedral of the Church of Ireland in Donegall Street, Belfast, Northern Ireland. It is unusual in serving two separate dioceses (Connor and Down and Dromore). A cathedral is the place where a bishop has a seat but Belfast Cathedral is unusual in having the seats of two bishops – the Bishop of Connor and the Bishop of Down & Dromore. It is the focal point of the Cathedral Quarter, Belfast.

 

The first architect was Sir Thomas Drew, the foundation stone being laid on 6 September 1899 by the Countess of Shaftesbury. The old parish church of St Anne by  Francis Hiorne of 1776 had continued in use, up until 31 December 1903, while the new cathedral was constructed around it; the old church was then demolished. The Good Samaritan window, to be seen in the sanctuary, is the only feature of the old church to be retained in the cathedral.

 

In 1924 it was decided to build the west front of the cathedral as a memorial to the Ulstermen and women who had served and died in The Great War. The foundation stone for this was laid by the Governor of Northern Ireland, the Duke of Abercorn on 2 June 1925 and the completed facade, to an amended design by the architect Sir Charles Archibald Nicholson, was dedicated in June 1927. The cathedral is very grand inside and spacious and of course very photogenic!

 

 

Some of the beautiful artworks and stained-glass windows to be found inside Belfast Cathedral

 

The Columba Challice, The Hand of G-d; note the position of the fingers. The Pyramids in stained-glassan unusual design for a cathedral; if one looks close, one can see the sphinx too.

Bloodline Connection is that of the Neville line but we also saw a Forde reference too!

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Anne%27s_Cathedral,_Belfast

Stained-Glass Windows; the stories told: Throughout the lands of mankind, stories and myths have always been told; by scribes, by artisans, by painters, by monks in the old times, verbally by story tellers then and now, and of course by those craftsmen whom painstakingly worked on the stained-glass windows seen in churches all over our lands at certain sacred points in time. To understand the messages contained within, we have to look deep into our past history, yet not as we know it, not as we are told but of the real history, often hidden in plain-sight right there on the windows.

The windows often depict the life and death of ‘The Jesus‘, often showing him with a serpent entwined around a segment of the windows design. One would be forgiven to assume that it was a reference to the serpent of the well-known bible stories and in a way it is.  Yet it alludes to ‘The Serpent Priesthood‘; the path of the true Knight Templar. The serpent connects to freedom,  of being totally consumed by dogma; yet freedom has to be tasted within before it can be tasted without, so one (with knowledge of the Serpent Priesthood) learns over time how to control the serpent; how to be free.

The Jesus is often seen wearing the colours of the Templar (Neville) lineage, of Red and White (silver) representing blood and honour, especially in battle, with honour originating from the past monetery use of silver. Colours are never by accident; they are a very integral part of the hidden symbology and convey numerous meanings.

The lives and deeds of the saints are often depicted and of course it was St Patrick or Saint Columba here in Ireland;  a saint having a certain connection to an area will often be depicted in the local church windows, yet they are also shown in mythological  or esoteric connotations.

Of course many symbols and emblems to be found incorporated in these window designs again relate to the Neville bloodline, the Serpent Priesthood and to the Knight Templars, thus making them a fascinating source of history and thus traceble through time. But just why do these images always connect to each other in the way they do and how or why did they come to be? Enscriptions, together with Masonic and Templar symbols are very often placed strategically on the windows telling a truth without words, hidden from mankind.

The ladies in the life of the Jesus play a big part too, and if one looks closely at the windows, gender is not always what it seems to be either – or what we have been led to believe. Many artists of the day were involved in the creation of stained-glass windows, non more so than the Pre-Raphalite artists who were inexplicitly drawn towards mysticsm and knowledge. Celestial objects; the sun, stars and moon and other lesser-known planets, mean something much different in Templarism and often hold centre stage on many windows, often predicting the future times to come; yet offering a warning too. Caskets, boxes, scrolls, children and of course ‘The Lamb’ are often widely used too, as is nature and flowers, but always with a secret Craft meaning which eludes to the potions of creation.

 

.A selection of the stained-glass windows discovered in Ireland; many with messages hidden well within plain sight

So on these quests we are discovering among many things, how ancient buildings are speaking to us. The stunningly beautiful and exquisite artwork and mosaic tiles that adorn the wall and floors of many a church or cathedral is not just for the sake of the artwork alone, but also for the clues left to us, hidden ‘within stone’ of the true untold history of our country. All left for us to decipher; left for the astute truth seekers to discover and acknowledge – truly and surely a quest for the modern-day Knight…

Dan Brown did kind of have the right ‘idea’ in a very loose sense but was way, way off track with his actual facts and tellings; he had the wrong locations, the wrong churches and followed a few expertly placed red herrings, as one would. However the symbols of the past are all still here, expertly placed within plain sight for all to see, awaiting the astute to rip off their old hoodwinks and to decipher…..

These symbols do not connect to ‘modern day Christianity‘ for they hark back to a much older time, travelling through the lineages of The Knights Templars, the Free Masons, the Eastern Star, to the Egyptian Mysteries, to Ancient Sumeria and even much further back in time and beyond our world. The clues and stories have survived, yet few know of the real meanings and of the ‘placement’ of the clues in specific areas. It is truly a quest of a lifetime and most certainly beyond, and that is why we love these quests so very much!

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“The Grail Kingship is merely seasons in front.
So be it that all those whom disbelieve shall cease to remain” K. N.

“…show me that L.i.g.h.t that burns bright amongst the stars and the moon. Show me the dawn of a land that was never known and I shall see you in the trinity of time.” K. N.

Conclusion to our Irish Quest; many Templar secrets shared here:

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ October 2018

Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day One: Found us in a mood of anticiption as we traveled from East Anglia to the mythical lands of North Wales for what would turn out to be a vey busy, informative and exciting quest. Traveling with caravan in toe to our chosen base for the duration of this quest; Rhualt Country Park, we soon pitched up and made home  Night-time fell and with the long journey ended, we were soon the next day, amidst deserted beaches and snow capped peaks. What a wonderful way to welcome in the new Gregorian year. This quest turned out to be an absolute delight for all of us, yet was more more of a fact finding historical quest than the others; no ghost hunting, no unexplained mysteries, no dog walking entitties and certainly no headless horsemen! We were here to unravel the mysteries of the untold royal bloodlines…

Day Two: 13th January 2017

  • St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli
  • St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog

St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli: The first stop of day two, the first real questing day, found us at St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli. It was quite a journey to arrive there; it is along the Llyn Penisular and the seas on both side and elsewhere on this journey were truly manificent to behold. The town was given its charter as a borough by Edward the Black Prince, in 1355 and a market is still held each Wednesday in the centre of the town on ‘Y Maes’ (“the field” or “the town square” in English). The town grew around the  shipbuilding and fishing industries and the granite quarry Gimlet Rock. (Carreg yr Imbill). During the 1890s, the town was developed by Solomon Andrews, a Cardiff businessman. This work included the Promenade, roads and houses at West End. A tramway was built linking the town to Llanbedro; the trams ran until 1927 when the section of track between Carreg-y-Defaid and Tyddyn-Caled was seriously damaged by a storm.

Inside St Peter’s Church (click on images to enlarge)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pwllheli

There has been a church on the site serving the peoples of the parish since ancient times; right back as far as the 6th century although not always on the same site. The first church was built by St Beuno or his disciples about half a mile north of this present site and the old cemetry still remains on ths spot. Like all churches many changes came and went over the years and in 1834 a new church was built on the present site and thus the old St Beuno’s Church became St Peter’s Church. It is built in the early decorated gothic style from local granite and from yellow felstone on the outer walls. It is interesting to note that the local landscape and building materials really do give these old churches their own very unique and distnctive flavour; they seems to nestle into the landscape without any effort at all.

  • Bloodline connections:  Gwen Wynn, Alek’s 10 x Great Grandmother who was born here in 1560. Gwen Wynn married Richard Perry and thus a great feud began between the Wynns, the Perry’s and the Nevilles…

St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog: Llanbedrog is a stunning coastal village in North Wales,  situated on the south side  of the Llyn penisulay of Gwynedd, between Pwllheli and Abersoch.  Formerly in the county of Caernarfonshire, it has a population of 1,020, reducing slightly to 1,002 at the 2011 Census. The village takes its name from Saint Petroc, a 6th-century Celtic saint. Petroc may be a form of the name Patrick, but Saint Petroc should not be confused with Saint Patrick. Saint Petrog’s church is a grade II* listed building. South of the village is the headland and open area of Mynyyd Tir-y-cwmwd. Granite quarrying was commercially important in the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The quarry closed down in 1949.

Pretty views of St Pedrogs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanbedrog

The day we visited we were the only visitors at this small but stunning church and we were privy to our very own private bell ringing session with warm thanks to a great guy; Malcolm. Yet also worth a very big mention; we were very fortunate to gain access at all as the church would have been closed to us, but we happened to bump into the vicar whilst at the previous church (St Peter’s) who performed some vicarly magic for us – and lo and behold, we had entry! The church of St. Pedrog was probably established sometime in the 5th century; when St. Pedrog landed and he set up a community here. The original founding of the Church was probably built of wattle and daub. He died in 564 and his ministry predates St. Augustine, who died in 597. The link below is well worth a read as another link to one or our bloodline families (the Parrys) can be discovered in connection to the bells here.

http://www.llanbedrog.info/llanbedrogstpedrognotes.htm

Inside St Pedrogs; the close of of the window is worth a look at for the KT symbolosm – click on to enlarge

The beach; a short walk away and delightfully empty in winter, was so beautiful and totally deserted and interestingly we did find a rather unusual ‘mystery’ object on the beach…

mystery-object

  • Bloodline connection: The Neville line which also connects to Scotland, Ireland and to the Knights Templar.
  • The Parry line too were very important in respect of the very fine bells here.

Follow the link for the video of our trip and discover the secrets of bell ringing

ST PETER’S CHURCH PWLLHELI & ST PEDROG’S CHURCH LLANBEDROG.

Day Three: 14th January 2017

  • St Giles Church: Wrexham
  • St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen
  • St Peters Church: Ruthin

St Giles Church: Wrexham: Wrexham is very large town in North Wales with a lot of history connected to its past; the town lies between the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley on the borders of England. Human activity in the Wrexham area dates back to the Mesolithic period (8000 to 4300 BC) By the early Middle Bronze Age the area had developed into a centre for an innovative metalworking industry. A Roman civilian settlement was located in the Plas Coch area of Wrexham and excavations have revealed evidence of agriculture and trade with the wider Roman world. By the end of the 6th century AD, the area was being contested between the Celtic-speaking inhabitants and the English-speaking invaders advancing from the east. The Anglo-Saxons went on to dominate north-east Wales from the 8th to 10th centuries and the settlement of Wrexham was likely founded by Mercian colonists on the flat ground above the meadows of the River Gwenfro during the 8th century. The origins of the name “Wrexham” may possibly be traced back to this period.

Views from outside St Giles Church, showing the very ancinet carvings; <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrexham

St Giles’ Church: is the parish church of Wrexham and is a Grade 1 listed building, described by Simon Jenkins as “the glory of the Marches”. At 180-feet long, it is the largest mediaeval Parish Church in Wales. Since 2012, its interior has been re-ordered to include a remodelling of the Chancel as St David’s Chapel, and its north aisle is the home of the regimental chapel of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (now part of the Royal Welsh). The core of present building dates from the 14th century, although it was extensively remodelled in the later 15th century by Thomas, Lord Stanley and his wife Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Giles%27_Church,_Wrexham

The stunning interior structure of St Giles, Wrexham

We were here to pull together some more of the threads on our search for the true royal bloodlines and the hidden histories of these Celtic Lands. One again we found a strong connection to the Neville line; a beautifully stunning shield (Alek’s family shield) hangs up inside the church that will testify to this fact. Photos are on this webpage but we were not able to film inside; however the stunning shots that we do have prove the Templar connection beyond any doubt.

Some of the amazing and symbolic artwork in St Gile’s Church; including a stunning example of the Neville Family Crest

Click on the link to view our clip on St Giles Church, Wrexham

ST GILES CHURCH: WREXHAM

  • Bloodline connection: The Wynn family, the Perrys, the Parrys and of course the Nevilles.
  • Alek connects the famlies with their movements around the country from Ireland and Scotland.
  • King Henry 7th’s mother was involved with this church and also with St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli and St Pedrogs, Llanbedrog.

Up over and traveling on higher ground, we then made our way to Corwen and Ruthin, with plenty of wonderful scenery still to view; the weather was cold, which did not seem to matter, as there was plenty to investigate to keep us all warm and busy. The scenery is rugged and the buidings nestle into the hillsides becoming part of the living landscape.

wales-4-for-fb

St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen: St Maels Church was fun tracking down; indeed we were  up and down some steep tracks finding it, half hidden away on a hillside at the back of the delightful town. Corwen is a very old town, formely in the ancient county of Merionethshire, which has always been enshrined in Knights Templar history; the church itself dating from the eleven hundreds and once one is inside, it has some amazing and meaningful artwork to discover.

St Mael and St Suliens Corwen

 

The church itself dates from the twelfth century and is a single chambered structure set within a rectangular churchyard, with walls of fourteenth or fifteenth century origin. Its baptismal font dates from the twelfth or thirteenth century and the churchyard includes a tomb from the seventeenth century, besides war graves of two soldiers of world war one. The church is dedicated to St Mael and St Sulien, two Celtic saints of the sixth century, though it has been suggested that an earlier foundation stood on the hill above. Sulien is a Welsh variant of the given name “Julian” but has also been interpreted as being derived from the Welsh sul, meaning “sun” plus also geni, meaning “born”; Sulien being the name of a Celtic soler diety.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Mael_and_Sulien’s_Church,_Corwen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corwen

A church full of mystery, magic and of many tales still untold; as are the churches of North Wales…

The ‘secrets’ or rather lies of the murder of ‘The Jesus’ are told here, together with a depiction of a true unicorn, and ‘the potions of life’; all aspects of Priory teachings, secrets hidden in plain sight for all to see… There are many stunning stained glass windows here that all tell their own story of our true (yet always hidden) creation and history…

Click on the link to unravel some of the mysteries of St Mael’s and take a tour in the darkeness of St Peter’s ….

ST MAEL & ST SULIEN’S CHURCH CORWEN & ST PETER’S CHURCH RUTHIN.

St Peters Church: Ruthin: Ruthin (Rhuthun) is the county town of Denbighshire in North Wales. Located around a hill in the southern part of the Vlae of Clwyd; the older part of the town, the castle and Saint Peter’s Square are located on top of the hill, while many newer parts of the town are on the floodplain of the River Clwyd. The name ‘Ruthin’ comes from the Welsh words rhudd (red) and din (fort), and refers to the colour of the new red sandstone which forms the geologic basis of the area and from which the castle was constructed in 1277–84. The original name of Ruthin was ‘Castell Coch yng Ngwern-fôr’ (red castle in the sea-swamps). The town developed around the castle and the nearby mill. ‘Maen Huail’ is a registered ancient monument attributed to the brother of Gildas and King Arthur and is located outside Barclays Bank (formerly Exmewe House), on St Peter’s Square.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthin

Sadly St Peter’s Church at Ruthin, whe we arrived was in complete darkness, but we did our best to document the important features in the murkiness!. There were some very interesting aspects to this church, which hopefully the photos will show more of. Lo and behold though, as we were finishing the lighs came on! But as the church was being used by ‘others’ then, it was respectful as always to not disturb them, although they were freindly people; maybe church wardens or similar who were non the less keen to chat to us.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collegiate_and_Parochial_Church_of_St_Peter,_Ruthin

Taken in St Peter’s in the dark with the camcorder camera

If one looks aloft into the rafters, one can often see an amazing aray of mythical creatures or symbols of the ‘old ways’…

  • Bloodline conection: The Jones, The 3rd Earl of Kent, King Henry 7th, Lady Beaufort, The Duke of Kent (Freemasonry)

Webs being woven upon the shores of time….

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Part two following….

Thank you for reading; if you would like to find out more, please take a look at our Priory Webpage

http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

January 2017: ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

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