Tag Archive: Sacred Energies


‘Our Grail Quest Continues, seeking out the places in these lands that were important to ‘Arthur’ and ‘Lancelot’; following in their footsteps and knowing them and their journeys too…’

QUEST 31: Travelling around the beautiful lands of the south-west was amazing and was everything we had hoped it would be, despite the very intense heat, and being so thankful for air conditioning in the car, our quest was a triumph where much knowledge was assimilated and new places explored. All the apartments stayed in whilst journying had been more than up to scratch and the places visited and knowledge gained has been second to non. As said before, our quests are all for an ultimate purpose within the transitioning sphere of time; past, present and future becoming one as knowledge gainrd becomes personal power…

DAY ONE: FRIDAY 31ST JULY: CIRENCESTER:  With the boundaries of Cambridge left miles behind us, we escaped to the first destination of our quest; the tranquill beauty of Cirencester, a market town in Gloucestershire, 80 miles west of London. Cirencester lies on the  River Churn, a tributary of the Thames, and is the largest town in the Cotswolds. The Roman name for the town was Corinium which is thought to have been associated with the ancient British tribe of the Dobunni, having the same root word as the River Church. The earliest known reference to the town was by Ptolemy in AD 150. I had never been to Cirencester before and it was much prettier and older than i was expecting, and had a most definite ‘Roman’ feel to it, and the ‘energies’ there reminded me of Autun in France.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirencester

 

The Roman town of Corinium, now known as Cirencester <click to enlarge>

“FOUND HIS HEART IN JOHN”

CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST:  Sadly closed due to the virus; a situation that was to follow us around on this quest, we never the less did what we needed to do… The church is a medieval Church of England parish church, and is the largest in Gloucestershire.  Some parts date from the 12th century, though most is from the 15th and 16th centuries, of the perpendicular gothic style. The chancel is the oldest part of the church; construction starting around 1115. To the north of the chancel is St Catherines Chapel, which dates from around 1150 and contains a wall painting of St Christopher carrying the Christ child and vaulting given by Abbot John Hakebourne (whom liked to be simply called John), in 1508. The church was originally part of a monastery (Augustinian), founded here by Henry I in 1117, on the site of an earlier Saxon church replacing an ancient Roman settlement. Because of its size, grandeur and historical importance, the church is known, informally, as the Cathedral of the Cotswolds, and is constructed out of the local yellowish Cotswold limestone, which illuminates lovely in the sun.

Besides the tall tower, the exterior is also notable for the south porch, originally a separate, administration building, connected to the church in the 18th century. The church interior includes five chapels and an assortment of historical artefacts including a 14th century font, a 15th century pulpit, fragments of wall paintings, coats of arms, a collection of tombs and memorials, often very ornate, and the Anne Boleyn cup, given by Anne to a local doctor (Richard Master) who treated her, and presented to the church in 1561. Sadly non of these artifacts did we see due to the church being closed but we took some good exterior photos.

St John the Baptist Church Cirencester <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_of_St._John_the_Baptist,_Cirencester

https://www.uksouthwest.net/gloucestershire/church-of-st-john-baptist-cirencester/

Grail Bloodline Connections:

UNDERSTOOD THE ROMAN CONNECTION’

THE ROMAN AMPHITHEATRE: Just a short drive from the main town centre is to be found the wonderful Roman Amphitheatre, which would become in time, the second largest in the UK. Archeological digs have uncovered earthworks revealing the outline of the construction, with the banking reaching 25 feet from the bottom of the arena. The arena itself is approximately 150 feet by 135 feet. Roman artefacts including coins and pottery have been discovered on the site. It is estimated that it was constructed towards the beginning of the 2nd century. The earthworks show evidence of tiered wooden seating, for around 8000 people, placed upon a terraces of stone, although a timber only structure may have existed before the 2nd century. There are two entrances, located at the North-Eastern and South-Western ends of the stadium. During the 5th century, when the Western Roman Empire was under attack and soldiers returned to Rome to defend it, the amphitheatre was fortified to defend against the invading Saxons. Unlike other amphitheatres, it is aligned in parallel to the streets of the town itself. It has also been referred to as the ‘Bull Ring’ due to the ‘sport’ of bull baiting taking place there; yet also ‘human sport’ would have taken place there too. It also has one or two other secrets hidden in plain sight within the arena itself; the Romans of course understanding completely the geo-magnetics of this site…

Corinium’s Amphitheatre <plese click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cirencester_Amphitheatre

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/cirencester-amphitheatre/history/

‘See our video below for a trip to the Roman Amphitheatre’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKjdx036OHA

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • James Fordham: 1697 Ware Herts (9 x GGF) ‘Understood the Roman Connection’

So after a very long and busy day we had a lovely meal and coffee in Cirencester, using the (then) new phone scanning method of ordering and paying, before retiring to our very nice apartment for the night.

DAY TWO: SATURDAY 1ST AUGUST: BATH AND AVEBURY. Because of the restrictions of covid we had booked in a time slot for the Roman Baths in the beautiful Roman city of Bath which in many ways is not unlike Cambridge. Bath is the largest city in Somerset, known for and named after the Roman-built baths.  The city became a spa  known as Aquae Sulis (“the waters of Sul”) c. 60 AD when the Romans built baths and a temple in the valley of the River Avon, although  hot springs were known even before then.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath,_Somerset

‘OF SECRET MEETINGS’

THE ROMAN BATHS: It was an extremly hot day and we were so greatful to be queing in the shade of the baths entrance, albeit only for a short while. Navigating the labyrinth of the baths proved to be very challenging due to covid distancing, and although it meant only a few people in any one space at any one time, it did mean movement around the baths was very slow. The baths are very well-preserved and certainly worth a visit. A temple was constructed on the site between 60-70CE in the first few decades of Roman Britain and its presence led to the development of the small Roman settlement known as Aquae Sulis, around the site. The Roman baths, designed for public bathing were used until the end of the Roman rule in Britain in the 5th Century CE. According to the Anglo Saxon Chronocle, the original Roman baths were in ruins a century later but the area around the natural springs was redeveloped several times during the Early and Late Middle Ages. Although i have visited the Roman Baths before, they never cease to amaze me and I wondered upon, what meetings and social occasions must have been held here; many a secret assignations too… Some even say that this was the place where secret meetings were held with King Henry VI himself, in the year 1459 – what were these meetings about i wonder. A hot sacred spring fed from below ground, the Penyquick fault, where ‘fault lines’ hold their own secrets too, looked very inviting…. This was also a place of worship by the Celts, so always sacred and special throughout the years.

The amazing Roman Baths, where new bathing areas are still being discovered were a place of social activity and shall we say ‘fun’ and where a hot spring bubbles up an from underground fault <please click on an image to enlarge>

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Baths_(Bath)

https://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS: Barron George Neville: 1440 Aberganveny (14 xGGF) ‘Of secret meetings’

“A MEETING HELD IN SECRET”   “A SECRET TO TELL”

BATH ABBEY & ST THOMAS CHURCH Both sites over time would have had many secrets to keep and maybe keen ears overhearing secrets whispered in the pews would have voved never to tell. One of these meetings held in secret at Bath Abbey was with a king with Jacobs Ladder upon their lips, a meeting so to ‘enhance’ the Ladder, but sadly today due again to ‘Miss Rona’ and social distancing, entry into the Abbey was via a very long queue in sweltering sunshine, which was not possible to do. The abbey is a parish church of the Church of England and a former Benedictine monastery. It was founded in the 7th century and was reorganised in the 10th century and rebuilt in the 12th and 16th centuries; major restoration work was carried out by Sir George Gilbery Scott in the 1860s. It is one of the largest examples of Perpendicular Gothic Architecture in the West Country. Although we were unable to enter in we made notes of the important features of both ‘Jacobs Ladder’ and also the ‘Tree of Life’, both very significant on a Craft level, upon both sides of the entrance to the Abbey.

 

Bath Abbey showing ‘Jacobs Ladder’ and the ‘Tree of Life’ <please click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_Abbey

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS: Barron George Neville: 1440 Aberganveny (14 xGGF)A meetig held in secret’

Sadly in respect of St Thomas Church, tucked away on a quite hillside just outside the main centre of Bath (blink and you would miss it) in a very peaceful spot, we yet again found G-ds doors well and truly locked, so lovely exterior photos were all we could manage. St Thomas à Becket Church is a parish church of  Widcombe, Bath and is one of a number of churches named after Thomas Becket and a Grade II listed building. The church was built between 1490 and 1498 by John Cantlow, Prior of Bath Abbey and took the place of an older Norman church. However, there was a common tradition that a weaver was the founder of the church, and an escutcheon bearing a weaver’s shuttle can be seen on the outside of one of the north battlements of the tower. It is believed that there was originally a Saxon chapel on the site. The church was commonly called Old Widcombe Church and used to be the principal church of the parishes of Widcombe and Lyncombe. The Domesday survey of 1086 shows a small settlement around the church although no trace of it remains. the wardens of St Thomas’s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Thomas_%C3%A0_Becket_Church,_Widcombe

https://www.batharchives.co.uk/cemeteries/st-thomas-%C3%A0-becket-and-st-marks-widcombe

St Thomas Church where there are writtings hidden within this church <please click to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: 1518 Newton Somerset (12 x GGF) ‘A secret to tell’
  • St Thomas Beckett: Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162; murdered by followers of King Henry II in 1170

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Becket

‘UNDERSTOOD THE IMPORTANCE OF A COLLECTION’

AVEBURY STONE CIRCLE: Thought by many to have ‘pagan’ connections, this enigmatic site may in fact have other secrets to tell, other stories hidden firmly in time with similarities to other significant sites recently visited and connecting to our Craft Quests. Here at Avebury in the beautiful countryside of Wiltshire, important messages were given and recieved (for me), messages that will change my outlook for ever and will forever have far reaching effects (for me) in this physical world. Of course i had been to Avebury on a few occasions before for different reasons, but this time with fresh eyes wide open i saw a very different Avebury indeed, and those marvelous structures whispered a few secrets to me of past times, past ocurences and past peoples. Avebury Stone circle in Wiltshire, contains the largest megalithic stone circle in the world and is a place of many pilgrimages and rituals alike, for modern day pagans. Yet its history does not connect to the pagan world or pagan ways and is certainly not what it is commonly thought to be (even though many say its original purpose is unknown. It was constructed in a different time period than is usually thought; the following link is here for reference only, and the true history and purpose of the site is different than many previously think. It was a lovely day out and the structures were shimmering in the sunshine.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/avebury

https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/avebury/

Avebury: modelled to be ‘The Stones of Time’ and created in 3,000 BC (5K years ago) <please click to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Sir John H. Fordam: 1423 Kelshal Hertfordshire 918 x GGF) ‘Understood the importance of a collection’

‘Watch our video of our Quest so far: the round up with lots of interesting facts’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdVNWRNvFnQ

“A day where more pieces of the Grail puzzle fell into place and a time and history previously thought known was scattered as ashes to the sands of time”

“The Keeper of Scrolls” September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

Next: Day three and four: On the Dartmoor trail…..

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The Neville Crest at Newport Minster

DAY FOUR: The Minster Church of St Thomas Newport: This was our second visit to this church; we had previously arrived in the freezing cold, when the the church was closed and the snow had covered all around in a white shroud, so it was welcoming to see the church in a different ‘LIGHT’. St Thomas Church is a very vibrant church full of energy and life which emanates from the folks in charge, namely The Revd Kevin Arkell and his wife. So it was well worth the wait and also for the very warm and freindly welcome afforded to us. The church is slap bang in the middle of the town in a very surburban setting and ironically (or not) just outside and across the road from a Craft building of another kind…

 

The original late 12th-century church was dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury known as Thomas Becket (1118–1170). Later, under the rule of King Henry V111 of England, (1509–1547), when Becket was declared to have been a traitor, the Canterbury part of the name was dropped. Its name and the ambiguous dedication to St Thomas was thereafter, over time, assumed by many to refer to Thomas the Apostle. From the 18th century its deterioration made any renovation futile, and funds were raised for a new church on its site. The new church was built over the years 1854 and 1855 to a design by the architect S. W. Dawkes of Cheltenam. Reflecting the building’s history, but arguably unusual, the new church was dedicated on the feast of Thomas the Apostle to both him and St Thomas of Canterbury. The tower contains a ring of 12 bells.

Inside the church is a wealth of history and information and the church is actively setting up its own achive and history corner and can boast some amazing and historic artifacts; there is also a wealth of old photographs which are posted here. Revd. Kevin and his wife have an enthusiastic team around them who have some good projects on the go and ideas to draw in the community, children and all; so the very best of luck to them.

 

Sarrui Sarru: St Thomas’s Church has a great deal of history attached to it; it has some amazing stained glass windows that also show a wealth of past history; from the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line and of course the Fluer de Lys, towards the top of the window. Looking to the top we see the cross, a symbol representitive of, or a reminder that there is no such a thing as a ‘king on earth’ or ‘Sarrui Sarru’ from the ancient Sumerian meaning ‘King of Kings’;The Jesus’. A reminder then that throughout all the battles of the civil wars etc, the end result/the end game would alwayd be ‘The Jesus’….

Merkabah: One of the most detailed stained-glass windows in St Thomas’s, Newport is the second window below which shows six triskellian; three to  the left and three to the right, masked in gilted gold but right at the top of the window and clearly shown, is the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, re-inforcing the fact that the cross is a new addition; the Merkabah was/is the symbol used for aeons before the modern-day cross, a new addition to the christian faith, took its hold upon history and also the minds of people. If we go back to grass roots, what people think of as ‘The Star of David’, the Merkabah, is in actual fact the true representation of christianty and for very good reasons too.

 

Window one is representitive of the civil war, the war of the roses, the Neville line, the Fluer de Lys and the Sarrui Sarru. Window two shows the Merkabah, the original symbol of christianity

Museum Section: Within this section of the church are some very beautiful and ancient artifacts; a few of which can be seen here including some amazing archive photos which we were giver permision to photograph. There are also some beautiful old bibles, ancient wooden chests and a wonderful wooden carved depiction of the last supper.

 

 

<click on all images to enlarge>

The Pulpit: The pulpit is from the old church and is carved in wood and thought to be carved by Flemish craftsmen.  It is original and displays some very intricate carvings around its sides, some of which i managed to get some close ups of. It is unique insomuch that the figures carved on it are not biblical at all but are relating to the sciences and philosophies of the time. Also round the top of the pulpit is reference to the ‘trumpet’, as mentioned in the Book of Revelations; some of which have already occured….

 

The Font: There are two fonts here; the later one is shown here with carvings all around that we have become so familiar with over the course of these quests; the older of the two is to the right of the altar. When the church was rebuilt the original font was not returned with the pulpit etc, so the new font was built at the south door. Then someone came knocking on the door to say that the old font had been found in a garden in Newport and had been used as a bird bath for many years! So the church now boasts two fonts; the new one being used for major baptisms.

 

The newer font with its very symbolic and familiar carvings, the descriptions of which can be found on other quests… <click to enlarge>

Taize Service: In the evening of our daytime visit we were most fortunate to be invited back by Revd. Kevin, to a candlelit evening of chanting and meditation, a taize service, something that i had not encountered before. It sounded so lovely that we immedietly said yes. Although it was a taize servive for the christian lent, one can easily adapt it, in one’s own mind, to suit ones own path or spirituality or even to just enjoy the experience and chanting as a whole. It was a small intimate gathering; there was a small choir from the church’s own choristers attending, dressed in formal long red robes and every participant attending was invited to hold a lighted candle throughout the service.

We can all relate to the words below taken from the introduction to the taize service, whatever our faith. In The Priory, in Templarism, we do have an understanding of G-D. but from a different perspective to the christian understanding and we do not actually worship any higher being, yet have an acknowlegement of such. So a perfect end to a perfect day…

“Many trivial things in our lives shift our focus away from God. This evening we worship in the style of Taize style, clear your mind and let the music, prayers and readings help you to focus on God. We ask God to calm our hearts and clear our minds of life’s many distractions as we come to worship”

 

 

….and finally more of the artworks from around St Thomas Church including the Neville Sheild in situ over the entrance just below the organ, more beautiful stained-glass windows, carvings from around the altar, the Ford connection and a glimpe of the wonderful ceiling <please click to enlarge>

You can see more of and read about the history of this church in the links below:-

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • John Thomas Neville 1878 – 1953: directly connected to the church, Great Grandson of Edward King 1878 -1953 amd Great Grand Uncle of our lead researcher)

All Saints Church, Calbourne: A possitive change in the weather bought us to the little church of All Saints in Calbourne, although extensive roof repairs are being carried out we were still able to wander around inside. The church is set atop a ‘hill’ amidst picturesque rolling countryside. The church is medieval with the tower being rebuilt in 1752; its churchyard contains the commonwealth war graves of two British soldiers of World War 1. The church is built with Isle of Wight stone rubble with some flintwork and tiled roofs. The church is grouped with Holy Spirit Church, Newtown.

 

In the middle part of the church extensive roof repairs are being carried out and thus there was scaffolding up inside and out, yet we were still able to gain good access and take some unusual as well as general shots and a good video too.

 

You can hear much more about the church and its metaphysical and Craft connected history and further facts that relate to mythology by linking to our video below…

St Thomas Newport & All Saints Calbourne

 

 

Further shots that relate to the windows, the ‘spinning wheel’ and an unusual plaque tucked on a window ledge to the left of the altar and of course the Neville shield…

 

We were not able to gain access to the graveyard due to the health and safety reasons of the scaffolding being up but one can see an alternative view of the spinning wheel from the outside  <please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • A full Neville connection with McAndrew
  • A full connection to Robert McAndrew 1829 – 1879 (3 x Great Uncle to our head researcher) born in Elgin and died at Calbourne

Read more about the building and its construction here:

 

Holy Trinity Church, Cowes: This church at the popular seaside resort of Cowes has a very commanding position directly overlooking the sea but sadly on this occasion the church was well and truly closed to us, so a quick wander around its perimeter to take some quick shots for the record was all we could muster.

 

The church is situated on the north-east side of the Isle of Wight; the town of Cowes is world famous for its yachting and other sea-side related activities. Holy Trinity Church was conscecrated on midsumers day in 1832 by Bishop Sumner, the Bishop of Winchester as a ‘place of worship on Cowes foreshore for the sailors and seafarers’. The church was built in distintive yellow Isle of Wight brick in the Gothic style. The building was designed by Mr William Bramble of Portsmouth. In 1862 the church was enlarged by the addition of a Chancel and Sanctury. One of the penalties of being so close to the sea is that the land underneath the building tends to move. During the past year extensive works have been carried out to stabilise the buliding.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Cowes

The Bloodline Connection is:

  • Maurice Neville: 1915 – 1990 (2 x cousin, twice removed to our head resercher)

 

 

Our intrepid researchers chilling out on the sea-front in Cowes; and yes after all that snow and ice it really was that glorious!

St Mildred’s Church Whippingham: It had turned into a stunningly gorgeous and sunny day when we arrived at Whippingham; who could have guessed that two days earlier the island had been covererd in a blanket of snow and ice and at one point we had to have assistance to get our vehicle up an icy slope! As we drove up to the church it looked a picture in the glorious sunshine set amidst its beautiful grounds.

 

The village of Whippingham and the church are best known for their connection with Queen Victoria. Whippingham was the centre of a royal estate supporting Osborne House and Barton Manor. Queen Victoria always took  close interest in ‘her people’ at Whippingham. This fact is reflected in the many memorials in St Mildred’s Church which commemorate members of the royal family and household. The chancel of the church was built in 1854/55 by the architect Albert Jenkins Humbert, although Prince Albert is thought to have had a guiding hand. The remainder of the church was constructed in 1861/62; a side chapel is dedicated to the Battenberg/Mountbatten family. Sadly the church was shut, so no interior shots but you can discover more in the links below:

However we did manage to see some rather interesting carvings and windows from the outside of the church, indicating very strongly the Craft connection here. The carvings around the entrance porch were particularily fascinating as they point towards an Enochian connection (the root/route of Craft), the windows depict the ten pillars and above the archway a square and compass is very evident, showing ‘one point still in darkness’ telling a tale of masonic and templar connections to this church.

 

<Please click on all images to enlarge>

The Bloodine Connection here is:

  • Robert Neville: 1907 – 1969 (2 x cousin twice removed to our lead reasearcher)

 

 

At the end of a very busy and revealing day; time to unwind with the sun and the views and all that St Mildred’s Church and the beautiful Isle of Wight has to offer

DAY FIVE: All Saints Church, Ryde and homeward bound…  So our last day on the beautiful Isle of Wight had arrived all too quickly and yet just one final destination before we ventured forth on the ferry and over the seas back to England. All Saints Church is a parish church located in Ryde; not very far away from where we were staying. The building is a landmark of the island; the spire being visable from many points around the island and indeed even from the mainland itself, projecting beyond the very skyline.

 

Although the church has lost a lot of its sacred energies it does still contain some beautiful carvings and artworks, all of which are well worth a look at. The church, which is often referred to as the ‘Cathedral of the Island‘ is a grade two listed building. It was built between 1868 and 1872 by the architect George Gilbert Scott; the spire was an addition in 1881/82 and is climbed early on the Feast of Ascension to sing an Ascension hymn. There are some lovely stained-glass windows here including one dedicated to the memory of Samuel Poole, in the Chapel of the Good Shepherd, but many windows were destroyed in the second world war.

 

The carvings around the font show a merkabah, the original symbol of christianity, a simple carved cross also utilises the merkabah and one can see other artworks here too:

Bloodline Connection is:

  • Alfred Neville (1904 – 1997) 2nd cousin 2 x removed to our head researcher)

 

 

The Isle of Wight proved to be an island of revelations and surprises and provided us with many more dots to connect on our quests for the true bloodlines, but what does that actually means and why….?

Please stay connected with us for our next quest to Ireland, Quest 25, going back to the start….

 

The Keeper of Scrolls March 2018: email me for further info ‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

“A perfumed tree, how sweet the smell… But a fruitful tree is far from wells,

Doth carry the roseline from land to air, then once to the four winds as all do stare”

 

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An ancient clay tablet

So what exactly do we consider to be natural in this world today and what precisely does it mean to follow a natural path; a path of nature? Many folks today who follow a pagan spirituality connect deeply to the seasons of the year, honouring  the wheel of the year by celebrating at the eight quarter days and cross quarter days; the fire festivals and equinoxes. Although these dates and days can vary accordingly to tradition, custom or culture, they are the days of sacred connection and are deeply embedded in the natural cycles and energies of this planet.

Over the centuries of time, mankind’s perception of what is natural cannot fail to have changed as wisdom and knowledge of the world has constantly evolved and expanded and with it humanities relationship to the natural world. Yet the world has always been what is was meant to be; the living, evolving planet on which we all depend for our nourishment and our life – it is that which sustains us. What we as human beings achieve and learn whilst living on this planet influences our own individual perceptions of the world and this also changes from generation to generation. In actual fact we all do ‘create our own realities’, realities that differ from centuries to centuries, generation to generation, individual to individual yet the world on which we all depend remains steadfast and very much alive, despite all that mankind throws at it..

As far as caring for and looking after this planet goes ‘guardianship’ is something that we all as spiritual beings are very much aware of and many of us share a deep sense of responsibility to do all we can to preserve what we have here on earth. To me the Earth is indeed the shinning  jewel in the crown of the universe – it is the enduring ‘mothership’.

Yet on a universal level we are but a very small part of the universal truths and as human beings we are only a very small part of the overall plan. Life of earth is very, very precious and yet this gift is often wasted by many who sadly fail to realise that we are all a part of a ‘whole’; all connected by the threads of the past, present and future that bind us together as one.

Waves of energy resonate within our lives and within our world and nothing is ever disconnected; every thing we do, every action we take has an effect on someone or something. But this is the natural order of things, it is the physics of the universe; how it all works on a metaphysical level is the real natural order of our world, for without the physics, the numbers, the maths so to speak, there would be nothing. As is written in many sacred texts, order came out of chaos and it is that order that makes our world and the universe in which it resides work. It is also that which makes our world such a beautiful, magical and wonderous planet on which to live.

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

 

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