Tag Archive: St Michael ley Line


QUEST 31 CONT: “Even when we find the church doors closed all is not lost, for being in different parts of the country one is able to pick up on the different energies of the land; pick up on the ‘vibes’ as it were, the ‘lie of the land’, which certainly do change from area to area. Even when travelling around Europe as in Quest 28, going from country to country one can certainly feel the different energies and i am sure as we walk in Arthur’s footsteps he would have felt the same energies also, the energies that guided him to where he needed to be on his quest for the Grail, as they are indeed guiding us today”

“A SON LOST”

DAY FOUR: MONDAY 3RD AUGUST: ST EDWARDS CHURCH. EGGBUCKLAND PLYMOUTH. 

Eggbuckland is a suburb of the city of Plymouth in Devon, which before the second world war was a small village, a few miles north of Plymouth.  ‘Bocheland’ is of Saxon origin and means “Royal land held by charter”. The Domesday Book of 1086 recorded that this manor was held by King William of Normandy but was granted to the Saxon Heche or Ecca, thus the land was known as Heche or Ecca’s Bocheland. This was the site of a Saxon church which was replaced by the present church of St Edward in 1470. The village was held by the Royalist Cavaliers during the Civil War against the Parlimentarian Roundheads and was badly damaged. During the 19th century the area was host to new Palmerston Forts built as part of a northern defense line around Plymouth. Much of the structures remain but are privately owned and used for differing purposes.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eggbuckland

Sadly today the doors of St Edwards Church were shut, but it was early in the morning and early on in our quest so maybe all is not lost. It is thought that a church has stood on the current location since Saxon times and the present building dates from the fifteenth century (1420-30). Sir Walter Swyft, the church vicar from January 1349, is believed to have fallen victim to the Black Death, so only holding the vicariate for a short three months. There was only one bell in the church tower when first built, but others were installed in 1682 and 1768. These were melted down in 1882 and the metal used to cast the current peal of six. In 1653 the Plymouth Puritans wreaked revenge on Eggbuckland, destroying many religious artifacts and turning out the 80 year old vicar. A Governor was appointed in 1819 to administer the five Parish work houses situated at the north of the church. The pinnacles of the church were rebuilt in 1864 and the church was enlarged with the building of the north aisle and chancel. The clock was installed in 1901 in memory of Charles Turner who had been Vicar for 40 years. In 1906 the new church vestries were completed, including a new organ chamber and other improvements. 1914 saw the Consecration of the new church at Laira (St Mary the Virgin), replacing the Crabtree Mission Church (which had opened in November 1874). The new building was a daughter church of St Edward’s and stayed within the parish until 1931(when the city boundaries were redrawn).

A brief wander around the outside of St Edwards Church, Eggbuckland <click to enlarge>

http://www.eggbucklandhistory.co.uk/church.php

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTION: 

  • Lord George Neville: Wrotham Kent 1659 (8 x GGF) ‘a son lost’

“INTO THE NIGHT”

ST MICHAEL’S CHURCH: BRENTNOR TAVISTOCK.

After a short journey following the route towards Dartmoor and driving up and up, we arrived as near as we could to the amazing St Michaels Church on top of Brent Tor, which from a distance looks as if it is going to be an epic climb! But fear not, for as we wound our way up onto the moors the road too climbed and climbed to offer a very walkable trek. Still quiet a walk, but steadably doable. Brent Tor is on the western edge of Dartmoor, approximately four miles (6.5 km) north of Tavistock, rising to 1100 ft (330m) above sea level. The Tor is surmounted by the Church of St Michael, the parish church of the village of Brentor, which lies below the Tor. Around the Tor are iron Age earthworks and the remnants of a Hill Fort. Unusually, the fortifications are at the base of the Tor, rather than the summit as is more normal. No serious archaeological work has been carried out on this sacred site upon the St Michael Ley Line, which maybe is a good thing….

Beautiful views climbing up to Brent Tor and from the summit <click to enlarge>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brent_Tor

St Michaels Church is also known as  (St Michael of the Rock) and it has been likened to St Michaels on Glastonbury Tor and is a stunning example of a church on a height. There are magnificent views from the churchyard in clear weather, across Dartmoor, Plymouth Sound, Whitsand Bay, the Tamar Valley and Bodmin Moor and even the heights of Exmoor is just visible in clear weather. Even when the thick moorland fogs descend, this is an eerily beautiful place, as the wind whips shreds of cloud past the hill. The church stands 1,110 feet above sea level on an ancient, extinct, volcanic cone. It is an ancient site situated upon St Michaels Ley line and is a site of amazing and powerful energies.

Inside St Michaels Church the decor is very simple, yet simple in a very sacred way; we certainly felt the energies while we were there. The church is thirty-seven feet (11.3m) long, and fourteen feet six inches (4.4m) wide; it is the fourth smallest complete parish church in England. It consists of a nave, chancel (not developed), north porch, and a low, unbuttressed tower thirty two feet (9.8m) high, probably built in the fourteenth century and raised to its present height and embattled a century later. There are doorways in both north and south walls, which is unusual in so small a building, although the porch is slightly more recent. They are similar in design and are probably fourteenth century. The stunning stained glass window in the east wall depicts St. Michael holding the sword of and the scales of justice. This window was damaged in 2002, but has since been restored.

Inside the church and the stunning window dedicated to St Michael <click to view>

In 1995 the church was struck by lightning, and significant damage was done to the Tower. This was repaired, and four new lightning conductors installed to prevent future recurrence. The font is an octagonal granite basin standing on a pedestal of the same shape. The remains of the iron fastening for securing the cover may be seen in the rim of the bowl. In the Middle Ages fonts were ordered to be kept locked in case the hallowed water was stolen and used for black magic! The font is the only furnishing of the church that dates from before the restoration of 1890. There are five bells in the tower, two from the fourteenth or fifteenth century, one seventeenth and two from the early twentieth century; although all were re-cast in 1909. Two bear the medieval inscription Gallus vocor ego, solus per omne sono (I am called the cock, and I alone sound above all); and two “TPI Colling W Nichol H Davis Wardens 1668”. The heaviest of them only weighs six hundredweight (305kg). There is a stone sundial on the south side of the tower, one of the oldest in south Devon. At the top of the dial is a strange figure, half imp, half angel, wearing a flat cap and with outstretched wings. The name Walter Batten is at the foot of the dial, which is dated 1694.The churchyard has never been closed for burials, but owing to a lack of earth and the presence of rabbits it is considered by modern standards unsuitable as a burial ground. A granite path was made around the church in 1980 with the assistance of the Dartmoor National Park Authority.

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: Newton Somerset 1551 (11 x GGF) ‘into the night’

“OF PRECIOUS STONES”

ST LUKES CHURCH: TIDEFORD SALTASH.

After a lovely lunch we made our way to Tideford, a small village in east Cornwall which is is twinned with Plouguerneau in Brittany, France. Its name derives from its location on the River Tiddy, literally meaning “Ford on the River Tiddy”. Tideford is not listed in the Domesday Book but the earliest settlement is thought to have been around 1100AD. The bridge over the River Tiddy at the bottom of Bridge Road dates from the 14th century and this is the earliest surviving structure. Tideford grew in the eighteenth century as the nearby Port Eliot country estate built a number of houses in the village.

   

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tideford

St Luke’s Church was very sadly shut for us today, but we had a quick wander around, but access was difficult; we do try and make contact with those connected, but often to no avail. To be truthful there was not much outside that we could see, to take photos of apart from a general shot of the church and the separate bell tower. The Victorian church of St Luke was designed by renowned architect George Wightwick. The building was originally erected as a chapel-of-ease in St Germans parish and was consecrated on 31 July 1845, 175 years ago. It consists of nave and chancel and the east window with its nativity theme was given by a former incumbent, the Rev’d Edward Glanville in memory of his daughter. For safety reasons the bell cot which housed two bells was removed from the roof. To-day there is just one bell now at shoulder level by the south door. I did find by chance, a video on youtube of the church and it looked looked quite bare inside, the walls especially, so maybe over time it has lost its artifacts….

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron William Neville: Wrotham 1701 (7 x GGF) ‘of precious stones’

“ON EASTERN SHORES THE LAND WAS”

TALLAND CHURCH: TALLAND BAY. LOO.

Travelling further into the rural countryside of Cornwall, the views were astounding and driving along the coast, over hill and down dale, our eyes were given a true feast. Many folks never see this side of England and rush towards other countries for their leisure but belive you me, there can be no more spectacular place on this planet than right under our feet here in England. There are beautiful walks around the area, which are part of the Cornish Celtic Way; a pilgrimage walk of 125 miles from St German to St Michael’s Mount, that passes right by the door of Talland Church. The path includes The Saints Way, St Michaels Way and 60 miles of the South-West Coastal Footpath, so sacred indeed with St Michaels Ley Line running through the site. Sadly though, yet again we found G-d’s doors well and truly closed, but the energies there were lovely, the views astounding from the cliff tops and most important some Craft pointers relating to our bloodines were discovered under the little porchway in the cut.

The stunning view from Talland Church, that overlooks Talland Bay and forms part of a 125 mile pilgrimage walk <click to view>

Set beside the South West Coast footpath, between Looe & Polperro, Talland Church is a place of peace & tranquility, the church as we see it today was not built to serve a large community but to maintain a holy site where the Christian faith had been established some 1500 years ago. The church is a grade 1 listed building located on the cliff-top at Talland near Looe, Cornwall, it is dedicated to St Tallanus and was built by Augustinian monks from Launceston. ‘Tal-Lan’ means holy place on a hill, in the Cornish and indeed it is, for the  altar of the present-day church is situated on the site of the original Celtic altar. The altar of the church is said to date from the time of Tallan and was built at the junction of ley lines. However, St Tallanus’s existence is disputed and the ley lines cannot be proved to exist either (some say). Yet to those of Craft and to those whom follow the old original teachings of the planet, know that the church is in fact built upon the St. Michael Ley Line, and also acknowledged are the geomagnetics of this planet (see all our quests so far)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tallanus

St Talland Church on the cliff-top – the Cornish Celtic Way footpath goes right past the front door <click to enlarge>

The church celebrated its 500th anniversary in 1990. Part of the nave and the first stage of the tower probably remain from a 13th-century church: the remainder must be late 15th century and is in typical Cornish Perpendicular style. Unusually it has a detached bell-tower on the south side which was only joined to the main body of the church in the 15th century. Looking on the internet there are some interesting sculptures and carvings in the church, so such a shame it was locked.

Hidden within the beams of the porchway under the cut, are symbols relating to our quest and bloodlines <click to view>

Snuggling up close to the windows i was able to get some interia shots of the church thanks to the wonders of digital photography!

<click to expand>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Tallanus%27_Church,_Talland

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  • Barron Edward Neville: 1551 Newton Somerset (11 x GGF) ‘on Eastern shore the land was’

All journeys and travelling should be fun and all part of the experience and our journeys certainly are always loads of fun! We rounded off this day of knowledge and enjoyment with time spent at the historic fishing village of Polperro before continuing back to Plymouth for the night. Tomorow we travel to St Austell, Padstow and Bodmin.

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

 

 

 

QUEST 31 CONT: “Still very much walking in Arthur’s footsteps and continuing our quest for the grail in the magical and beautiful south-west lands of England, we left our apartment in Roman Cirencester on Sunday 2nd of August to travel in a southerly direction towards Plymouth, yet with lots of exciting stops along the way. This day was to take us even nearer to Arthur and The Grail”

‘WHAT DID RALPH LEAVE BEHIND?’     

DAY THREE: SUNDAY 2ND AUGUST: ST MARY REDCLIFFE CHURCH. REDCLIFFE BRISTOL.   

Framed by the River Avon and the Floating Harbour, Redcliffe is a bustling commercial hub. It is home to ancient landmarks such as the medieval, Gothic-style St. Mary Redcliffe Church with its with stained-glass windows and 18th-century ironwork, residential tower blocks and the port of Bristol. It is bounded by the loop of the Floating Harbour to the west, north and east, together with the New Cut of the River Avon to the south.nn Redcliffe takes its name from the red sandstone cliffs which line the southern side of the Floating Harbour. These cliffs are honey-combed with tunnels, known as the Redcliffe Caves, constructed both to extract sand for the local glass making industry and to act as store houses for goods. Interesting to us, in the 12th century, Robert Fitzroy gave the Knights Templar part of Redcliffe, which then became known as Temple Fee. The Templars were granted the power to hold courts and execute felons. This right passed, along with the fee, to the Knights of St John of Jerusalem after the suppression of the Templars.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redcliffe,_Bristol

The parish church of  St Mary Redcliffe is an impresive looking church within a setting of green grounds; it is one of Bristol’s best known churches, with the spire at a height of 292 ft (90m) making it the tallest building in the city, and one of the largest parish churches in England, yet sadly on the day we visited, the church was well and truly locked to all visitors. Whether this was due to corona virus or whether it was the policy to keep G-d’s door so unwelcoming is anyone’s guess, but either way the small amount of pilgrims and visitors would pose no threat at all and if the reason was not because of the virus, one does have to question why such an important church would be so locked?

The church itself is an Anglican parish church, the bulding being constructed from the 12th to 15th centuries and has been a place of Christian worship for over 900 years. It was famously described by Queen Elizabeth I, who spoke highly of the church, as “the fairest, goodliest, and most famous parish church in England”. Yet the mystery of our quest remains of just what was left behind? Little is left of the earliest churches on the site although a little of the fabric still remaining has been dated to the 12th century. Much of the current building dates from the late 13th and 14th centuries when it was built and decorated by wealthy merchants of the city. The spire fell after being struck by lightning in 1446 and was not rebuilt until 1872. Although the church plan dates from an earlier period, much of the church as it now stands was built between 1292 and 1370 and the first church was built in Saxon times. Obviously there would have been some fascinating artifacts to see, but sadly today we were unable to enter this church.

During the Bristol Blitz in the Second World war a bomb exploded in a nearby street, throwing a rail and tram from the tramway over the houses and into the churchyard of St Mary Redcliffe, where the rail became embedded in the ground. The rail is left there as a monument. An accompanying memorial plaque reads “On Good Friday 11th April this tramline was thrown over the adjoining houses by a high explosive bomb which fell on Redcliffe Hill. It is left to remind us how narrowly the church escaped destruction in the war 1939-45.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary_Redcliffe

St Mary Recliffe – important yet sadly very closed…. <please click on image to enlarge>

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:  

  • Earl Ralph Neville;1364 Raby Durham (16 xGGF)  “What did Ralph leave behind?”

‘FROM LEFT TO RIGHT’

BRISTOL CATHEDRAL BRISTOL:

Bristol is a city in south-west England with a population of 463,400, between Gloucestershire to the north and Somerset to the south, with South Wales just across the Severn Estuary. Iron Age hill forts and Roman villas were built near the confluence of the rivers Frome and Avon, and also around the beginning of the 11th century, the settlement was known as Brycgstow “the place at the bridge”. Bristol was a starting place for early voyages of exploration to the New World and on a ship out of Bristol in 1497 John Cabot, a Venetian became the first European to land on mainland North America. At the height of the Bristol slave trade from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slave ships carried an estimated 500,000 people from Africa to slavery in the Americas. The Port of Bristol has since moved to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth and Royal Portbury Dock. Bristol’s modern economy is built on the creative media, electronics and the aerospace industries, and the city-centre docks have been redeveloped as centres of heritage and culture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol

BRISTOL CATHEDRAL: formally the Cathedral Church of the Holy and Undivided Trinity, is a Church of England cathedral in the city of Bristol. Founded in 1140 and consecrated in 1148, it was originally St Augustine’s Abbey but after the  Dissolution of the Monastries it became in 1542, the seat of the newly created Bishop of Bristol and the cathedral of the new Diocese of Bristol. It is a Grade I listed building and as with many of our cathedrals, stunning to look at both inside and out inside, but all spirituality or sacred energies long dissapated. Covid restrictions were very much applying here, so visitor numbers limited yet sadly the visitors whom were there, were unacknowlegded by the clergy there….

In a beautiful setting and ‘Covid ready’ <please click to enlarge>

The eastern end of the church includes fabric from the 12th century, with the Elder Lady Chapel, which was added in the early 13th century. Much of the church was rebuilt in the English Decorated Gothic style during the 14th century despite financial problems within the abbey. In the 15th century the transept and central tower were added. The nave was incomplete at the Dissolution in 1539 and was demolished, but in the 19th century Gothic Revival, a new nave was built. The western twin towers, showing a big similarity with Wells Cathedral in Somerset, designed by John Loughborough Pearson were completed in 1888. The cathedral has tall Gothic windows and in addition to the cathedral’s architectural features, it contains several memorials and an historic organ. Little of the original stained glass remains, some being replaced in the Victorian Era with further losses during the Bristol Blitz.

Stunning to look at yet no spirituality left… <please click to enlarge>

https://bristol-cathedral.co.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bristol_Cathedral

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

  1. Sir Ralph Neville : 1301 Raby (18 x GGF) ‘From left to right’

“WHAT CONNECTIONS?”

THE NINE MAIDENS STONE CIRCLE/BELSTONE STONE CIRCLE. OKEHAMPTON. After the heat and sterile enviroment of the city i was pleased to be driving all the way to Dartmoor where i knew great adventures and true spirituality would great me. Dartmoor has always had a place in my heart and although it was a long drive, it was a relaxing and enjoyable drive through gorgeous scenery and pretty villages. This was to be the highlight of the day by any mile! When we reached Belstone village it was quite a little trek upwards and over the moors to gain access to the circle and one had to take ones time, but the steady walk was enjoyable and well worth it. There was hardly anyone around and the few folks whom were there were chatty but did not linger. The sacred energies and earth magnetics are very evident and strong here; the St Michael Ley Line runs right through the circle or rather the stone circle was purposefully placed upon the ley line; the frequencies are very strong here and at times felt as if time was truly standing still and the stones breathing…. A powerful place on so many levels, the day being full of revelations…..

The Belstone Circle – full of magic and mystery <click to enlarge>

The Nine Maidens, is a bronze age circle and settlement located near the village of Belstone on Dartmoor, in Devon, and one can still see evidence of the settlement in the landscape all around the circle, and yet it was so much more than that. It is also known as the Seventeen Brothers, for there were in actual fact seventeen stones, including an altar stone, just outside the main circle; in these days is no longer complete. It is said that the circle may have been called the ‘nine maidens’ due to the origins of the number nine and to the connections of the site of the number nine, ie the ninth, the ‘hidden one‘. The number nine in sacred geometry from a Ninansian perspective (grammer and language) means ‘the hidden one’. The number nine has many magical or occult meanings such as the ninth gate, the nine stones, the nine maidens, the nine ships, the nine battles. All relating to the ‘hidden one’, the secret underlying knowledge of Craft. Folks whom are astute and tuned in will certainly pick up on this while visiting the circle and will feel the energies for themselves. And of course there are secrets hidden there that maybe no one in our life times will ever know, things forever hidden from the current cycle of mankind. The stones here are so much more significant than Stonehenge or Avebury yet are almost deserted so maybe the curse is working and is in actual fact a blessing?

The stones here are so much more significant than Stonehenge or Avebury<click to enlarge>

There are many folklore tales attached to the stones and despite the fallen stones of the past, the locals are said to be apprehensive of restoration work, believing that anyone whom tampers with the stones will be cursed. Locals cite a film crew which added an extra stone to the circle in 1985; the ‘curse’ was the unfortunate loss of the only copy of the film, ‘The Circle of Doom’, in the post. The St Michael’s ley line, which runs 350 miles from Lands End to Hopton on Sea, Norfolk, via Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk, is one of our points of study and focuss on this quest, and runs right through the Nine Maidens. This ley-line goes through many sites dedicated to St Michael, such as St Michael’s Tower on Glastonbury Tor, with the line matching the sunrise on 8 May when the Catholic Church celebrated the apparition of St Michael. Local folklore too suggests that the stones dance: The stone circles on Dartmoor, are said to have been made “when there were wolves on the hills, and winged serpents in the low lands.” On the side of Belstone Tor, near Okehamton is a small grave circle called “Nine Stones.” It is said to dance every day at noon. The stones are also said to have originally been nine maidens who were cast into stone and damned to dancing every noon for eternity as a punishment for dancing on the Sabbath. Equally, the story has involved seventeen brothers. It is also said that the ringing of the nearby church bells brings them to life.

The Altar Stone and Burial Chamber <click to enlarge>

From our point of view, from a Craft and Quest point of view this is said to be a far more important site in the true tellings of King Arthur, of Lancelot Desposyni and the Fordham line, than even Tintagel, which is a bit of a very big red herring. Also we know that in the distant past the site has in actual fact been used as a burial chamber – yet for whom, being far enough above sea level to be placed forever safe in this realm. I was very relunctant to be leaving the moors and the stones behind after our visit.  So it was a sad farewell and heavy heart i felt in leaving this wild magical beauty behind me to trave to pastures anew. I attained new knowledge up on those moors and felt the energies of the land shift and change, felt time stand still as vibrations pulsed, and dimensions shifted. I felt acknowledged as a part of a whole. Up on the moors, the energies were very strong; a place where the metaphysical truly connected to the physical and whispers on the winds told a hidden tale or two….

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Maidens_stone_circle

GRAIL BLOODLINE CONNECTIONS:

Sir John H. Fordham: 1423 Kelshall Hertfordshire (18 x GGF) ‘What Connections?’

And so after a magical end to day three of Quest 31 we made our way towards our very posh apartment at Phoenix Quay, Plymouth where we would be spending the next three nights. The apartment overlooking the harbour and night ferry terminus to Spain treated us to some lovely views and sunsets from its huge windows.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHEFtsG5tjE

Please enjoy our (very windy!) video of Belstone Circle

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ September 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

“Onwards then as our quest continued, to Buckland near Plymouth, Brentnor near Tavistock, Tideford near Saltash, Talland Bay near Loo, Charles Town near St Austell, Trevone near Padstow and Temple near Bodmin. Not all would be opened to us but the ‘jewel in the crown’ would prove to be the amazing Temple Church on Bodmin…”

 

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