Category: Templar Practices


QUEST TWENTY TWO: YORKSHIRE: For this one-day quest to Yorkshire, we travelled northwards on Thursday 25th May; the day proved to be stunning as we ventured over the mighty Humber Bridge to our first port of call for the day, which was to be Hessle.

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: HESSLE: The town of Hessle, near Hull is a pretty little town and the bright sunshine made it extremely picturesque. Hessle has a rather lovely town square with many little shops and listed buldings to it’s credit. It is very near by to that marvelous feat of engineering, the Humber Bridge. In the past Hessle has been a thriving centre for shipbuiding and even earlier on, for the building of wooden boats. It was also a centre for chalk quarying; the largest being at the Humberside Bridge Park, now a nature reserve.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hessle

The medieval, largely Gothic church itself has been here since the twelth century with modernization in 1884; there are some rather interesting original carvings on dispay to the right of the altar area and more info on them is mentioned in our video; they depict some rather ancient Gaelic symbols together with a representation of a female minatuar. The Neville family shield is on very prominent display here.

Inside All Saints, Hessle showing the Neville Shield & the name of Clarke on the wall plaque; all part of the ‘bloodline’ <click to enlarge images>

http://www.allsaintshessle.karoo.net/History%20-%20All%20Saints%20Church%20Hessle.htm

The ancient relics showing the female minataur & the entry to the church vault upon the floor – blink & you will miss it!

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: PRESTON: A short car ride away was the next stop of the day, although the church was sadly locked up with the keys being too far away to collect; even so i managed some good shots of the exterior of the church. Preston is a village in the East Riding of Yorkshire, six miles east of Hull. The parish church of All Saints is a grade one listed building.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Preston,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/Details/Default.aspx?id=166663

Memorial showing the ‘Fords’ & the ‘Clarks’ <click to enlarge>

 ALL SAINTS CHURCH: RISE: Tucked away behind some beautiful tall trees amidst a sea of green countryside; Rise Church is easy to miss and drive straight past, which is exactly what we did do! Rise is a village and small parish in East Riding in Yorkshire, in the heart of a very rural area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rise,_East_Riding_of_Yorkshire

This beautiful church is a grade two listed building in Rise: this current version of the church was rebuilt in 1844/45 using some old reclaimed medieval roof timbers. There was a church at Rise by 1221 but years of neglect sadly took their toll. The current church was built by local landowner Richard Bethal to designs by R. D. Chantrel.

Rise Church in it’s very rural setting <click to enlarge>

The beautiful painted ceiling here is very similar to other Templar churches we have visited over the past few months and to that also of the Italian Chapel in the Orkneys, Scotland.

Quite clearly there is a very strong Templar connection here, especially from the aspect of a sacred site and the church is indeed still used by and supported by the local Freemasons of today. There is also a big connection here to the shipbuilding industry of Hull.
Other significant symbols to look out for are the Harp, the tower of Babel with a direct connection to the Unicorns of earlier quests and strong connections to the female Minataur of Hessle, from ealier today. Take note also of the ‘Demons’ wheel; (the Samnu Emua) of the Templar teachings, all of which have strong Priory connections…
The bloodline names are once again the Nevilles, in particular Frederick W. Neville who was christened in this church, but who sadly died at a young age, and also the name of Bethal, the current church warden and estate owners.

See the Harp upon the window, the beautiful and very old bibles and the name of ‘Clark’ upon the gravestone, noted as leaving…

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1083419

ALL SAINTS CHURCH: DRIFFIELD: After  short journey we arrived at our next destination of the day and after phoning the reverend, she very kindly came with the keys to let us in, as the church was unusually locked for that hour of the day. We were so glad she did, as this is an amazing church with so much to see once inside. Driffield, also known as Great Driffield is a market town and parish in the East Riding of Yorkshire. A bronze-age mound just outside of Driffield was excavated in the nineteenth century; the findings of which are now in the British Museum.

All Saints, Driffield <please click to view>

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Driffield

This church has been here since the early part of the twelth century and probably going back to Saxon times even. A church, as is usual practice, has been built over a site of earlier significance. Basically what we have now is a Norman church, without side aisles with remodelling carried out over the centuries. It has a beautiful five hundred year old tower which is very dominant within the landscape; the churches bells of which were restored for the millenium. There are many beautiful and rather delightful gargoyles, grotesques and other little stone creatures all around the outside of the church.

Inside, the Templar influence on the stained glass widows is very evident for all to see, with the symbolism, yet the windows do stand alone in their maginficance, design and above all their colour.

Click to enlarge to see the Templar symbolism of these stunning windows

SKIPSEA CASTLE: It was a beautifull and peaceful evening when we arrived here at this ancient site, in the middle of a very rural landscpe, complete with it’s own grazing herd. The ‘castle’ is situated near the village of Skipsea in the East Riding of Yorkshire. I was unable to make it up to the summit myself, but the walk around the ramparts was stunning in itself. It is said to have been an impressive Norman motte and bailey castle, dating from before 1086 and among the first raised in Yorkshire, with the earthworks of an attendant fortified ‘borough’. The mound itself has recently been shown to date from the Iron Age. This is of course true but the actual site goes back much further still and is a site of one of the UK’s hidden and strategically placed pyramids, of which we are currently tracing and recording.  The energy here does indeed testify to this fact and our video will explain more still and also about the hauntings here too. It is a beautifully peaceful, energetic and picturesque site and well worth a visit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skipsea_Castle

Skipsea ‘Castle’, site of a very ancient pyramid <please click to enlarge>

HORNSEA: We did very briefly call in at the seaside resort of Hornsea and had a quick stretch of legs by way of a stroll along the concrete sea-defence wall, which serves as a ‘promenade’ too, sadly though one cannot see the actual sea whilst strolling along. The area where we stopped is rather comercialised and ‘touristy’ which is a shame, hence we never stayed long. The settlement itself dates back to the early medieval period at lest; the town was expanded in Victorian times with the coming of the Hull and Hornsea Railway.

DSC01581

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornsea

  • The family bloodline name significant to the whole area of today’s quest; ie the East Riding of Yorkshire is once again that of The Nevilles and are as follows:-
  • Arthur Henry Neville: born 1864, Hull
  • Arthur John Neville: married 1898, Hull
  • Augusta Emma Neville: born 1887, died 1888
  • Edward Neville: born 1908, died 1908
  • Ellen Neville: married 1843, Hull, died 1975, Hull
  • Enid Neville: born 1923, died 1946  (23 years old)
  • Eva Neville: married (Harper) 1951
  • Frederick W. Neville: born Sealcoates 1927, died Hull 1941 (14 years old)
  • Henry Thorpe Neville: born Sealcoates 1857, married Hull 1873
  • Margaret Elizabeth Neville: born Sealcoates 1845, married Hull 1908, died Sealcoates 1918

 

Take a look at the Priory webpage too:
http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

 

Exmore 1

Beautiful and Wild Exmoor

Our next quest was amazingly Quest 21 and so starting out in the direction of Devon and Cornwall, we travelled all day down country to Woodbury in Devon, just outside of Honiton; our base for the next few days. To start off our journey and explanation of the area, here is a taster of what was to come…

EXETER CATHEDRAL & EXMOOR: OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE COIN

Two totally opposite ends of the spectrum are portrayed in the above video, filmed in the beautiful and largely unspoilt county of Devon.  Exeter Catherdral on the one hand is a vast and amazing building; a wondrous piece of architecture in fact; yet it is sadly a place of strange and very draining energies, experienced by all to one degree or another. I certainly got very zapped and depleted by the energies here, so much so i felt quite unwell upon entering the Cathedral and had to sit down for a few minutes to re-align myself…
Exmoor on the other hand is a beautifully stunning place of natural peace, beauty and tranquility, very reviving, very refreshing and the time we were there the sky was a clear blue with no sign of a chemtrail anyway in sight, with the air being pure and untainted; two sides of coin then. Interestingly too, no sign of any earth curvature on the 360 degree video we filmed up on Exmoor. The one very interesting discovery from inside of the cathedral was the depiction of ‘The Jesus’ from around the front of the pulpit, showing quiet clearly the Ninasian salute; feel free to wonder why ‘The Jesus’ is shown using this sign and just what exactly is ‘The Ninasian Salute’ and from whence did it originate….

Day One Friday 21st April 2017: St Paul’s Church, Honiton: Honiton is a bustling market town and civil parish in East Devon, close to the River Otter and the home of the once thriving lace making industry. The town grew up along the line of ‘The Fosse Way’, the ancient Roman road which links Exeter to Lincoln, of which Honiton was an important stopping off point with a mention in the Doomsday Book.

Although the heyday of the lace making industry was in the 17th century, Queen Victoria, who herself had many connections to the area, famously used Honiton lace on her wedding gown. The gown can be seen in all it’s fine splendour in the local museum next to the church; the actual dress itself being made in the nearby village of Beer. Lace making was introduced to the area by Flemish migrants in the Elizabethan era and although the lace making industry has greatly declined, there is something of a small resurgence as local people are encouraged to take up the craft once more, for fear of it dying out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honiton

St Paul’s Church: which is right next door to the lace museum, which itself was once an old chapel, is very well kept and obviously loved by the local community but sadly has been much modernised and in the process of which, has lost some of its much older artifacts and items of interest to us upon this quest;  it has sadly lost it’s ‘energies’ too, although intrestingly there may, as mentioned in the video be interesting finds within the very foundations of St. Paul’s Church itself.

Inside and out of Honiton Church in Devon, showing ‘The Ford line’ connection too. Click on individual photos to enlarge.

  • The bloodline connection here is of Henry John Clarke (or variations of the spelling) 1900 – 1982 (Our Alek’s GGF)

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/honiton-st-pauls.htm

St Paul’s Church Honiton & St Michael’s Church Farway

St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway: Hidden away off the beaten track, this beautiful church is well and truly secluded within the Devonshire countryside, and very importantly placed within our quests with the knowledge that those who are meant to find it will indeed do so. The church was built in the Norman period with a west tower added in the 15th century with a north aisle being added in 1682, though the entire church was rebuilt in 1877. ‘The East Devon Way’ long distance footpath runs directly past the church.

Farway Church & Graveyard, near Exmoor

There are many Templar and Freemasonic symbols within this church, which are a delight to discover and the whole church itself has an amazing feeling to it. The symbols significant here include the Rose Cross, the Red Rose, The Red Robes of the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (King of Kings) and the Red Wings of the Archangels; red being the colour of blood, of the rose and of sacrifice and obviously very significant here. Also here we seee the ‘triskelion’ symbol with the daisys and the ‘leaves of hope’, both of which relate to higher Masonic chapters. The video above will show and explain more.

Templar & Masonic influences and symbolism inside of Farway Church

Local tales of interest are of a Humphrey Hutchins who was ploughing the land at the top of the hill when his plough turned up a crock of gold. He gave part of his miraculous treasure to the church to rebuild the north aisle. The field where Hutchins discovered his golden hoard is still known as ‘Money Acre’; sadly no sign of any further hoards while we were there. In the church yard are a pair of old yew trees. The largest of which measures 25 feet around its base and is thought to be 800 years old.

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/farway.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Robert Clark 1773 – 1861 (Our Alek’s 4xGGF) but John Moyne is also an important character to research.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh: Cotleigh is a small, pretty village and civil parish near Honiton in the beating heart of rural Devon; it is the final resting place of the author John Green. Once again another of Devon’s churches to be found well off the beaten track, nestled in the heart of the most delightful and beautiful scenery that one could possibly imagine. People have been praying at this site since 500 BC and in it’s present guise is a traditional old fashioned English church. The church was restored with a rebuilt chancel in 1867 with local stone and flint rubble with Beerstone and some Hamstone detail; the tower is partly plastered with a slate roof and sadly most of the exterior detail has been replaced.

St Michael’s Church Cotleigh showing the Neville Shield, the Lilly Banner and the mystrious hidden vault in the grave yard.

The church boasts some rather unsual and stunning stained glass windows; non more so than those showing the ‘Chi Rho’ symbol in it’s full glory; the very first thing one notices when pulling up outside the shurch, we comment and expand upon further in the video, sharing the “Blood turn Black and Blood turn Blue” aspect that Priory and Craft folk will relate to. The fittings inside the church are not that old, yet some very interesting symbolism on the stained glass windows and an interesting church banner beside the altar depicting a lily, with strong hints to Sumerian connections and to the Alpha and Omega. There is also a modern version of The Neville Sheild hanging just inside the entrance. Outside in the grave yard we came across a rather mysterious hidden vault where in past times there would have been steps leading down to; now hidden by the hand of time and possibly mankind….

The stunningly beautiful and magical windows inside of Cotleigh Church – click on image to enlarge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotleigh

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir William Clark 1804 – 1861 (Aleks 3xGGF) and also Adophus Clark – a past rector.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh and St Michael’s Church, Beer

St Michael’s Church, Beer: The present church was erected in 1877 but a previous church had exsited on the site since about 1600. An even earlier religous building was thought to have stood here dating back to  1122AD when Beer and Seaton belonged to the Abbey of Sherbourn

St Michael’s Church Beer; in the ‘devils own’ village  (Click on photos to expand)

The village of Beer is traditional and lively with some fine old buildings full of character; it even has a stream running down the side of the main street and through it. Beer is nicknamed ‘The Devils Own Village’ and fascinatingly has many connections from it’s past history to the very devil himself. It is thought very apt then that the Archangel that threw Satan out of heaven should be the patron saint of the church itself and seemingly there are other ‘satanic’ influences inside the church, if one knows what one is looking for and explained further in the video. Again more Masonic influences here and some interesting symbolic windows and artifacts found within and also explained. As always, these churches, as are all the churches we visit, are found on ancients sites of ‘energy alignments‘ puposefully hidden aons ago within our planet.

Stained glass windows at Beer with connections to the ‘Bennu Bird’ and the ‘Wolf in Sheeps Clothing’ (click to expand inages)

http://pastremains.co.uk/stmichaelsbeer.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Edward Clark  1574 – 1623 (Our Alek’s 9xGGF) and Walter George Clark.

Day Two Saturday 22nd April 2017: Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: This huge cathedral in the heart of the bright and busy city of Exeter is properly known as the Cathedral of St Peter at Exeter; being an Anglican cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, Devon. The founding of the cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter dating from 1050 when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107 William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style.

Exeter Cathedral – click to enlarge

The present building was completed by about 1400 and has several noteable features including an early set of misery cords, an astronomical clock and the longest uninterupted vaulted ceiling in England. The catherdral is built in the Norman Romanesque style and the two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls survive the present cathedral. A major rebuild in decorated Gothic style was carried out  between c. 1270 and c. 1350, where the Norman towers were incoporated into this enlarged building as the North and South Transepts. It is a vast magnificant building yet i could not help feeling that when looking up at the ceiling, that i was trapped inside a very large extinct whale…..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter_Cathedral

  • The bloodline connection is once again that of ‘The ‘Nevilles’ particularily Garth Neville-Walford, Captain of the Royal Artillery who died 26th April 1915.

The Neville Crest in situ can be seen placed in the right hand side of the catherdral when facing the altar.

All Saint’s Church, Dulverton: This pretty little church is once again situated right off the beaten track in a small village in the heart of Devon. It has a timeless peace about the place and is set within the typically traditional English graveyard. This present church has been here since the early 1800, but before that the site had been in use for seemingly aons;  the use of which was a for a very different purpose. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1885 in Pependicular style, with the exception of the plain tower, of moorland character which is said to be or 12th to 13th century origin.

Beautiful Dulverton near Exmoor

There are many very interesting artefacts and histories within the church itself. The ‘bloodline’ connection here is that of the Neville and Cainan connection; the Cainan line which can be traced back to 7000 years ago, which together with some very fascinating archeolological discoveries under the actual church itself, made for a fascinating and worthwhile trip across the stunning moors.  The said discoveries were in the form of excavations beneath the flagstone floor of the northen aisle, which revealed a set of five stone steps observed via a ventilation hole. This set of steps led down to a blocked corridoor, the walls of which were painted white. Directly to the south of the central aisle a concave area of brick work was revealed beneath a row of pews. The curved brick work is very likely to be the top of a vault and if so may have formed the entrance to a crypt which extends across the central part of the nave. It may be that the vault and steps relate to an earlier phase of the church prior to the 1850’s rebuild. As an observation, we have come to realise and recognise that many of the churches visited on our quest do have hidden underground vaults, whether hidden on purpose or within the confines of passing time, i will allow you to decide, but often one need to be eagle eyed and awake to recognise the signs of ‘activities’ now well buried within time itself….

All Saints Church Dulverton

Most of the interior of the church is original and there are some very symbolic stained glass windows here depicting man’s evolution and a rather special statue of St Nikalaus complete, dare i say it, with horns; something that many of you astute readers will find interesting to say the lest. The Lady Chapel is dedicated in this instance to a male species. The tomb there, of the Viscount de Vesci, who died in the Great War, has an amazing amount of energy emanating from it and almost felt alive; in fact the whole area felt qute amazing. In the chapel itself are to be found the Templar Cross and the Fleur de Lyss and there are other artifacts within the church older than the church itself. Once again there is reference here to the ‘Ninasian’ salute and the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (the King of Kings)

The stained glass windows at Dulverton Church

Also in the church grounds is a very interesting and ancient way marker which no doubt has many a tale to tell…

  • The bloodline connection is that of The ‘Neville’ and ‘Cainan’ connection

Day Three Saturday 22nd April 2017: St Mary the Virgin, Lynton: Sitting atop of tall craggy cliffs and overlooking, on this particular day, the most crystal clear azure-blue sea, St Mary the Virgin Church could possibly have the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited. We were so lucky when we arrived as we did not expect to be able to enter the church due to the lateness of the hour, yet were delighted to discover that a local meeting taking place was just coming to an end so were able to sneak in and take a few photos but sadly no video out of respect for the gentleman who kindly let us have a quick look around before locking up.

“…the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited”

Lynton itself is a small town on the Exmoor coast, settled atop of the cliffs above the harbour village of Lynmouth, connected to Lynton by the narrow gauge cliff railway. The beautiful church here on its commanding outlook across the bay has been enlarged and altered over the years, most notable in 1741 when the nave was build, yet the tower is mainly 13th century. Much of the rebuilding is broadly medieval in form, yet there is some good Art Nouveau detailing, including some combined with neo-Norman features. Many of the towns buildings were constructed in the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century and befitting a cliff top seaside town, many of the streets up on different levels connected by alleyway and steps going up and down. Evidence of Iron Age activity can be found at the nearby Roborough Castle and the novel Lorna Doone was set in the Lynton area and their are many beautiful coastal walks and paths running nearby. Nearby is the spectacular Valley of the Rocks with it’s stunning views and mysterious tales of the werewolves to just waiting to be divulged and our next port of call. But before moving on we made time to simply stand and stare in peace at this ‘out of the world‘ view….

The interior of St Mary the Virgin Church at Lynton, once again showing the Neville Sheild and some beautiful stained glass windows

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynton

  • The bloodline connection is again that of The ‘Cainan’ connection

Valley of the Rocks, Lynton: Tales of Old Kingdoms and werewolves may seem to have fallen straight out of the pages of Folkelore and Fantasy, but are they? The Valley of the Rocks is a truly magical and wild place where these ancient tales of of old kingdoms and roaming werewolves really do come to life. It is situated just half a mile west of Lynton in Devon and is a vast scenic area of outstanding natural beauty, with coastal views unsurpassed and ferral goats running wild. There have been many reported sightings of werewolf activity up to the 1990’s which we talk about further in the video.

A spectacular sunset over ‘The Valley of the Rocks’ which is not quite as ‘natural’ as one is led to believe….

But most importanly and undocumted, the whole area was once a vast early kingdom for the Irish Kings, of which almost nothing has ever been written about; it was the actual landing place of the first invading kings from Ireland who thus settled here and left many traces upon the land. My first instinctual thoughts when driving into the valley, not knowing anything about it, was ‘wow!’ what an amazing castle; something that took me completely by surprise! When one looks around the area one can indeed see the remains of a large fortress, temples and many other buildings of ancient everyday life of which is explained in the video but of which nothing is written about. One can sense a great power and energy alignment here as the early settlement was built purposefully  on the site of ancient pyramids placed within the land, by by those who came first with intent and design, hence why it is such an important place. The pyramids are there for all to see and ‘feel’ yet hidden carefully within ‘plain sight’ and most folks will never know… One can certainly feel the energies and power here; it is indeed a very sacred site. Interestingly as soon as we started filming, what had been a quiet and deserted scene was now populated by a mixture of ‘listeners’ and ‘watchers’ seemingly intent on diverting us off the track as it were, though patience and stealth prevailed. Listen carefully to the video for further explanation.

Close up detail of the ‘Old Kingdom’ showing where once fine buildings and temples etc would have been

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Rocks

The stunning sunset as we departed reluctantly from this very sacred place

Day Four Sunday 23rd April 2017: St Michael’s Mount: After a beautifully relaxing, yet all too brief journey across the sea to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, we embarked upon the shores of the the beautiful and fairy tale world of St Michael’s Mount. The mount has many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen, secrets not ever documented in the present world of men…. In the meantime enjoy the ride across the waters in the video above. 🙂

St Michael’s Mount & terraced gardens over looking the ocean & a first glimps of the solitary unmarked cross…

St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, linked to the mainland by a man-made causeway of granite, of which much of the actual island is made, and which is passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust; the castle and chapel having been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since about 1650. The earliest buildings on the summit date to the 12th century. The mount’s cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe many more tales that lie hidden within ‘folk memory’. Remains of trees have been seen at low tide following storms on the beach at Perranuthoe and radiocarbon dating has established the submerging of the hazle wood at about 1700BC.

Views from te summit overlooking the battlements & ocean – click to enlarge

Historically, St Michael’s Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, it was given to the Benedictine religous order  by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. There is evidence of people living in the area during the Neolithic period, as important ancient finds such as an arrow-head and flint tools have been unearthed in the gardens on the island.  It is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries and as said Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman Abbey of Mont Saint-Michael. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien house, as a side-effect of the of the war in France by Henry V, when it was given to the Abbess and Convent of Syon at Iselworth, Middlesex in 1424, thus ending its association with Mont St Michael and any connetion with Looe Island, dedicated to the Archangel Michael.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century and in 1275 an earthquake destroyed the original Priory Church, which was subsequently rebuilt in the late 14th century and has thus remained in use. In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake cause a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in ten minutes at St Michaels Mount, ebbing at the same rate and continuing to rise and fall for some five hours and it was reported that a great loss of life and property occurred along this Cornsh coast.

Inside the Abbey & Chapel on the mount – click each image to expand

A local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant names Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack took on this gigantic menace, who had an appetite for cattle and children, and killed him by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

On the quiet terraces of the island that overlook the sea, and not writen about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever but to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant ‘Neville Stronghold’. So for the first time on our quests we have mention now of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands….

Our lasting thoughts of that day would be with that solitary cross, that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound.and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty beyond the mundane…

  • The bloodline connection is of the ‘Solomon Solamh, whos unmarkd cross is seen above’ and again of the enigmatic ‘Nevilles’

Farewell to a magical island

Braddock Church Braddock Cornwall: Churchyard and Fields: So here we were in the dead of night, on a night time quest to a very deserted and lonely church in Cornwall. Braddock Church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin; the earliest parts of the building being Norman with a Norman font inside. This area is the site of the Battle of Braddock Down; a hard fought battle of the civil war which took place on the 19th January 1643. It was a crushing defeat for the parliamentarian army where many souls were lost. It is the site of the Cromwellian Defeat in fact. Braddock (or Broadoak) village itself is a civil parish in Cornwall which is situated about seven miles west of Liskard and five miles south-east of Bodmin. it is rural in character and is well wooded, especially in the north. The earliest parts of the church are Norman but an asle and a tower were added in the 15th century. The font is Norman and there are many good examples of woodcarvings in the church. Obviously it was the dead of night so unable to get in and see for our selves.

There are stories abound here of various manifestations in the churchyard and nearby fields, roaming vampires and connections to the werewolf tales at the Valley of the Rocks. and so we were here to investigate further; to see if there were any truths in the tales.

Although nothing untoward shows in the photos one does get a sense of the desolation & atmosphere here; amazed that anything came out at all…

It was very dark and challenging to film and the sense of forboding and negative energies felt by most of our party is very hard to convey on film, but one can hear the reactions of our party as we venture around the church, especially when we all heard the deep growling warning noise emanating from out of the darkness. One does get a sense of the darkness and desolation of the area too; both of physical and of a metaphysical darkness .

Again not much on film but a very interesting experience at Bradock Church in Cornwall

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock,_Cornwallmystery

the moors

We loved Devon & Cornwall, the peace, the beauty, the many tales and of course the truths…”

Take a look at the new Priory webpage too:
http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017 “The Keeper of Scrolls”

When I fell to earth I landed with a very hard bump somewhere in the northern isles, onto very cold hard ground.

Yet it was not meant to be that way or so I had imagined.

I had always envisaged my arrival to be a much more glamorous entrance

With maybe a cloud or two parting and a revelry of trumpets blazing;

A great and glorious light in the sky would have been an added bonus of course.

However my Father was not won over by such pomp and circumstance

And was having none of it.

So my much anticipated entry into the mundane was something of an anti climax

And not an event that I care to chat about much.

Accepting the fact that an earthly entry of splendour was not to be

I set about discovering my first of many very humbling challenges.

Looking down through the lenses of my new but limiting physical eyes

I realised I now had a body;

In fact a body of condensed matter, hence the novelty of the bump and pain upon landing;

No Garment of Light in this realm then.

No my new garment was well and truly that of flesh and blood human;

This minor creation of my family’s doing, I of course had previous knowledge of

Whilst sojourning in the higher realms with Dad.

Yet at that point in time we did have very great and splendid hopes for this quaint species…

This new body then was very dense and movement was somewhat clumsy at first

But over time I kind of got used to it.

Everything was of the physical here,

No need for that now redundant third eye then

And my earthy feet actually could walk upon the lands.

This earthly lark is harder than I thought;

I actually need a team around me I mused to myself.

Support, company, a partner; all of that and more I longingly wished for,

And I set about casting my net far and wide upon the shores of time.

I knew that the teachings of Love and Light

Would come in time and many would rejoice in The Way,

But equally there would be those who’s hearts and minds were destined always to remain closed.

My team were good; I had chosen them well amongst mankind and they in turn helped in spreading The Wisdom of the Word to new lands afar.

In the world of men there were certainly others out there, also like me preaching the ultimate truths of the universe

But also there were those that desired me dead.

So life became a series of adventures spent teaching and leaving clues for those who would follow, to one day read and decipher.

There followed years of much ducking and diving as the spears of adversity constantly whistled passed my ears.

Times too, when the only life I knew was that of keeping well and truly in front of those swift bullets of destiny.

I knew my time upon the physical plain in this body was to be very limited,

Yet my life was full of honouring and spreading my Father’s word and teaching the truths and beauty of our race, with my companions by my side.

I was fully aware when my time upon the mundane sphere was to end

And had complete knowledge of they who would deliver the final treacherous blow,

It had always been known to me.

I knew also that when I left, it was not to be for ever, far from it in fact,

For I have returned time and time again so to complete the cycle, my purpose.

I will always be the Alpha and Omega; your beginning and your end.

And please don’t believe all you read about me, my press is truly horrendous and           as with the so called modern day tabloids, it is all fake news, false flags and false events.

Pay no heed to the many false prophets either, for those who shout the loudest have by far the lest to say.

But humans if nothing, are creatures of great imagination and guile

And will make anything up for a quick buck,

Always being ‘in it’ for themselves.

Out for anything they can get, including murder…

Often the wheels of destiny have to be turned for certain events to play out

And once set in motion those wheels simply cannot be unturned.

I fully knew my fate upon this physical plain;

I knew what lay in store, yet had great sadness for those who were destined to deliver it.

But a cross!!?

My ending on a cross!?

Now come on, really?

Whose bright idea was that to invent this little tale?

The true tale of the cross is something else entirely and for another day.

Other lands, other bodies and other lives I always constantly sought out.

I have always been with you.

I am with you still

Yet you know me not,

My fate and yours have always been mapped through time

Always intermingled

Always hand in hand

Centuries came and centuries went

Only the few faithful ones ever knew me and took me by the hand fully knowing me.

True friendships forged will always be welded strong in truth and bonded for ever.

As the Blacksmith welds the iron sword strong in the flame

So my armour is welded strong around me by the flame of truth.

The time for looking back is no more;

The days of the past are done.

The days of uri ma esentu are coming to an end.

Shadows are once more being cast upon the lands

And new tales and new beginnings are being woven among the stars.

E Utu Nana ma Adar will forever hold the truths.

There are those who will always know my tale

Will always tell it as it was.

There are those who cast shadows on all I do

And will never give up seeking me,

Yet with a lightness of spirit I rise and fall time and time again

As do the perpetual oceans of the new unseen worlds.

So this is my tale, my truth, within your world of illusion.

I could be anywhere still;

Forever coming to terms with this challenging corporeal body

Yet still walking firmly (just) with sartorial elegance and grace

Upon these magical shores,

Within your time

And all time

Til this time is no more

And the sound of the rising oceans

Herald that my tale is finally told….

druid

“The Keeper of Scrolls”

April 2017

Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day Four: 15th January 2017

  • St Thomas Church: Rhyll
  • St Marchellos: Whitchurch, Denbigh
  • St Asaph Cathedral: Denbighshire

Beautiful Colwyn Bay at dusk

Rhyl: is a seaside resort town in the historic county of Denbigshire, situated on the north east coast of Wales, on the mouth of the River Clwyd. To the west is the suburb of Kinmel Bay, with the resort of Towyn further west, Prestatyn to the east and Rhuddlan to the south. At the 2011 census, Rhyl had a population of 25,149.  Rhyl has long been a popular tourist destination for people from all over Britain. Once an elegant Victorian resort, there was an influx of people from Liverpool and Manchester after the second world war, changing the face of the town. The area had declined dramatically by 1990, but has since improved due to a series of regeneration projects, including the sea front re-developement, bring new life to the area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyl

St Thomas Church: This beautiful church in Rhyl is a listed building, containing many beautiful artworks and artifacts of a symbolic nature; it is a very fine example of high Victorian Gothic. The day we arrived was a Sunday and very busy with sunday services and christenings taking place, so we kind of had to sneak in for a quick look around between these activities, trying not to disturb the proceedings at all, so of course no filming though the church staff we welcoming and frindly.

The church is fairly new at 1867, with the spire being completed in 1865 but of course older building had been on the site previously. It boasts some stunning stained glass windows, includng a depiction of ‘The Light of the World’, one of my personal favourite pieces of art.

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/wa-1422-parish-church-of-st-thomas-rhyl#.WJcurDhAHIU

Wood carvings inside the church looking rather interestingly like a set of Tracing Boards…

Beautiful embroidery and other stunning artworks plus the two beautiful stained glass windows depicting the following quotes…

“I am The Good Shepherd, the good shepherd giveth his life for his sheep”

“I am The Light of the World, he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness but shall have the Light of Life”

Bloodline connections: The Parry’s were very strong here; we had hoped for some Fords (Ffords, Ffoords) but no evidence…

st-th-ryhl

St Marchellos: Whitchurch Denbigh: Following a very scenic drive we arrived at the equally scenic St Marchello’s church; a grade one listed church in the vale of Clwyd, with stunning views towards  Moel Famau. The grandest of all medieval Denbighshire parish churches, St. Marcella’s (or Llanfarchell) is also known as Whitchurch or Eglwys Wen ‘the white church’, probably from its originally whitewashed exterior. Its patroness Marchell the Virgin is said to have established her hermitage by a holy well here in the 7th century, and clearly the site was honoured as especially sacred. For though it now stands alone a mile from the present town centre (and further still from the old walled town by the castle), St. Marcella’s has always been Denbigh’s parish church. As such it was lavishly rebuilt in the local double-naved form during the late 15th century, with an imposing tower and a noble range of big ‘Perpendicular’ style windows.

One can see from the style of building that this is a true Templar church

Happily we were able walk straight inside this very beautiful Templar church, which stands upon a hillside commanding magnificant views across the countryside. The church is very old and one gets a real sense of history and peace within it. The ravages of time always take their toll on these old building yet thankfully much is left here to appreciate, including some depictions of some very unusual animal carvings…

http://medieval-wales.com/site_31_denbigh.php

Our video clip will show and explain more and the photos show many details

Many treasures to be found inside St Marchello’s Church (click on image to view)

 

Bloodline connections:

  • The connections here are of Gabrielle Parry of 1613, who was the Vicar here, and  then from 1290 Henry de Clerk; both noteworthy finds.
  • Saint Marchello herself was what would be known as a pilgrim, but who was she really and where did she come from? I am reminded of a little church in Cormwall; similar names…

St Asaph Cathedral: And so we had reached the last part of the journey of this particular quest to North Wales. St Asaph’s cathedral is in the centre of the town and dates back 1,400 years, though the current building dates from the 13th century. It is sometimes claimed to be the smallest Anglican cathedral in Great Britain. A church was originally built on or near the site by Saint Kentigern in the 6th century. Saint Asa (or Asaph) a grandson of Paba Post Prydain, followed after this date. The earliest parts of the present building date from the 13th century when a new building was begun on the site after the original stone cathedral was burnt by King Edward 1 in 1282; this present building being established in 1285.

It is certainly a magnificant building yet not overwhelming or overpowering in it’s pressence at all and luckily it was open to us on this late afternoon visit, so time for a perfect look around. There are some interesting pieces of artwork and evidence of certain names from the bloodline we are researching, so good finds.  Beautiful and meaningful works of art can be found here relating to the Knights Templar, John the Baptist and The Lamb of God etc. Certainly a beautiful catherdral with a very peaceful and serene atmosphere. All shown and explained on the video and photos.

Click to enlarge and view image

Bloodline connections:

  • The Bloodline connection here is to the Clarke’s, the Parry’s and Perry’s.
  • Displayed is a copy of one of Alek’s ancestors bible’s; the bible of Richard Parry, from Alek’s mother’s side.

So a very fitting end to a very memorable quest in a beautiful country; there were two sites we did not gain access too and one further site; Worcester Cathedral, which we paid a brief visit to on the journey home.

Day Five

  • Worcester Catherdral: Worcester
  • Travel Home

Worcester Cathedral: And so the last part of the North Wales puzzle makes itself known; we arrived in Worcester rather late in the day, as an extra treat on out journey home. However we knew the building to be open until 6pm and we just made it by the skin of our teeth. An evening service was going on as we arrived, though visitors were still welcomed with parts of the cathedral made out of bounds while the service was going on. However afterwards, a few minutes were still available to walk around the altar area of the cathedral, despite rope cordens being hasilty erected and an over-zealous chief chorester trying to evict us dead on 6pm, at the poing of us viewing the altar…. We did manage some stunning photos though and see clear evidence of the ‘Clarke’ bloodline here.

Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation was known as Worcester Priory. An  Anglican Cathedral in Worcester, England it is situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn.  It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester; it’s official name is ‘The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester’. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman Perpendicular Gothic. It is famous for it’s Norman crypt and unique chapter house,  it’s unusual Transitional Gothic bays, it’s fine woodwork and its “exquisite” central tower (see above photos)

The interior of Worcester Cathedral showing off it’s stunning Gothic  designs – click on image to enlarge

What is now the Cathedral was founded in 680 as a Priory with Bishop Bosel at it’s head. The first priory was built in this period, but sadly nothing now remains of it. The crypt of the present-day cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St Oswold, Bishop of Worcester. Monks and nuns had been present at the Priory since the seventh century and the monastery became Benedictine in the second half of the tenth century although dates do vary here. There is an important connection with Fleury Abbey in France, as Oswald the bishop of Worcester from 961 to 992 and prior at the same time, was professed at Fleury and introduced the monastic rule of Fleury to Worcester. Remains of the Priory dating from the 12th and 13th centuries can still be seen. The Priory came to an end with King Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monastries and thus the Benedictine monks were removed on 18 January 1540 and replaced by secular canons.

It is worth noting that Henry Parry; of the Parry line we are researching and Alek’s own family bloodline, was Bishop of Worcester here from 1610 to 1616 as the plaque below will testify. he was a very important and highly values person of his time.

http://www.worcestercathedral.co.uk/Heritage.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

A example of some of the Templar influenced artifacts and carvings and the  Parry and Clarke connections found inside Worcester Cathedral

Bloodline connection:

  • Upon the war memorial we have several Clarkes ver cleary indicated.
  • Th Bishop of Worcester from 1610 to 1616 was indeed Henry Parry no less.

The Clarke and Parry connection

Sadly we never managed to gain access to St Paul’s Church, Colwyn Bay or St Mary’s Church, Menai Bridge due to the late hour of the day when we arrived, nevertheless i have included some info on them anyway for those interested in tracking our quests. However i was unable to document or photo any bloodline evidence at this current point in time due to not gaining access; although the sites are definitlely on the ‘points of time’

c-b

Across Colwyn Bay at night; an apt farewell to an amazing quest in time…

January 2017 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Take a look at the new Priory webpage too: http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day One: Found us in a mood of anticiption as we traveled from East Anglia to the mythical lands of North Wales for what would turn out to be a vey busy, informative and exciting quest. Traveling with caravan in toe to our chosen base for the duration of this quest; Rhualt Country Park, we soon pitched up and made home  Night-time fell and with the long journey ended, we were soon the next day, amidst deserted beaches and snow capped peaks. What a wonderful way to welcome in the new Gregorian year. This quest turned out to be an absolute delight for all of us, yet was more more of a fact finding historical quest than the others; no ghost hunting, no unexplained mysteries, no dog walking entitties and certainly no headless horsemen! We were here to unravel the mysteries of the untold royal bloodlines…

Day Two: 13th January 2017

  • St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli
  • St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog

St Peter’s Church: Pwllheli: The first stop of day two, the first real questing day, found us at St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli. It was quite a journey to arrive there; it is along the Llyn Penisular and the seas on both side and elsewhere on this journey were truly manificent to behold. The town was given its charter as a borough by Edward the Black Prince, in 1355 and a market is still held each Wednesday in the centre of the town on ‘Y Maes’ (“the field” or “the town square” in English). The town grew around the  shipbuilding and fishing industries and the granite quarry Gimlet Rock. (Carreg yr Imbill). During the 1890s, the town was developed by Solomon Andrews, a Cardiff businessman. This work included the Promenade, roads and houses at West End. A tramway was built linking the town to Llanbedro; the trams ran until 1927 when the section of track between Carreg-y-Defaid and Tyddyn-Caled was seriously damaged by a storm.

Inside St Peter’s Church (click on images to enlarge)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pwllheli

There has been a church on the site serving the peoples of the parish since ancient times; right back as far as the 6th century although not always on the same site. The first church was built by St Beuno or his disciples about half a mile north of this present site and the old cemetry still remains on ths spot. Like all churches many changes came and went over the years and in 1834 a new church was built on the present site and thus the old St Beuno’s Church became St Peter’s Church. It is built in the early decorated gothic style from local granite and from yellow felstone on the outer walls. It is interesting to note that the local landscape and building materials really do give these old churches their own very unique and distnctive flavour; they seems to nestle into the landscape without any effort at all.

  • Bloodline connections:  Gwen Wynn, Alek’s 10 x Great Grandmother who was born here in 1560. Gwen Wynn married Richard Perry and thus a great feud began between the Wynns, the Perry’s and the Nevilles…

St Pedrogs Church: Llanbedrog: Llanbedrog is a stunning coastal village in North Wales,  situated on the south side  of the Llyn penisulay of Gwynedd, between Pwllheli and Abersoch.  Formerly in the county of Caernarfonshire, it has a population of 1,020, reducing slightly to 1,002 at the 2011 Census. The village takes its name from Saint Petroc, a 6th-century Celtic saint. Petroc may be a form of the name Patrick, but Saint Petroc should not be confused with Saint Patrick. Saint Petrog’s church is a grade II* listed building. South of the village is the headland and open area of Mynyyd Tir-y-cwmwd. Granite quarrying was commercially important in the late 19th century and the first half of the 20th century. The quarry closed down in 1949.

Pretty views of St Pedrogs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Llanbedrog

The day we visited we were the only visitors at this small but stunning church and we were privy to our very own private bell ringing session with warm thanks to a great guy; Malcolm. Yet also worth a very big mention; we were very fortunate to gain access at all as the church would have been closed to us, but we happened to bump into the vicar whilst at the previous church (St Peter’s) who performed some vicarly magic for us – and lo and behold, we had entry! The church of St. Pedrog was probably established sometime in the 5th century; when St. Pedrog landed and he set up a community here. The original founding of the Church was probably built of wattle and daub. He died in 564 and his ministry predates St. Augustine, who died in 597. The link below is well worth a read as another link to one or our bloodline families (the Parrys) can be discovered in connection to the bells here.

http://www.llanbedrog.info/llanbedrogstpedrognotes.htm

Inside St Pedrogs; the close of of the window is worth a look at for the KT symbolosm – click on to enlarge

The beach; a short walk away and delightfully empty in winter, was so beautiful and totally deserted and interestingly we did find a rather unusual ‘mystery’ object on the beach…

mystery-object

  • Bloodline connection: The Neville line which also connects to Scotland, Ireland and to the Knights Templar.
  • The Parry line too were very important in respect of the very fine bells here.

Follow the link for the video of our trip and discover the secrets of bell ringing

Day Three: 14th January 2017

  • St Giles Church: Wrexham
  • St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen
  • St Peters Church: Ruthin

St Giles Church: Wrexham: Wrexham is very large town in North Wales with a lot of history connected to its past; the town lies between the Welsh mountains and the lower Dee Valley on the borders of England. Human activity in the Wrexham area dates back to the Mesolithic period (8000 to 4300 BC) By the early Middle Bronze Age the area had developed into a centre for an innovative metalworking industry. A Roman civilian settlement was located in the Plas Coch area of Wrexham and excavations have revealed evidence of agriculture and trade with the wider Roman world. By the end of the 6th century AD, the area was being contested between the Celtic-speaking inhabitants and the English-speaking invaders advancing from the east. The Anglo-Saxons went on to dominate north-east Wales from the 8th to 10th centuries and the settlement of Wrexham was likely founded by Mercian colonists on the flat ground above the meadows of the River Gwenfro during the 8th century. The origins of the name “Wrexham” may possibly be traced back to this period.

Views from outside St Giles Church, showing the very ancinet carvings; click to enlarge

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrexham

St Giles’ Church: is the parish church of Wrexham and is a Grade 1 listed building, described by Simon Jenkins as “the glory of the Marches”. At 180-feet long, it is the largest mediaeval Parish Church in Wales. Since 2012, its interior has been re-ordered to include a remodelling of the Chancel as St David’s Chapel, and its north aisle is the home of the regimental chapel of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers (now part of the Royal Welsh). The core of present building dates from the 14th century, although it was extensively remodelled in the later 15th century by Thomas, Lord Stanley and his wife Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Giles%27_Church,_Wrexham

The stunning interior structure of St Giles, Wrexham

We were here to pull together some more of the threads on our search for the true royal bloodlines and the hidden histories of these Celtic Lands. One again we found a strong connection to the Neville line; a beautifully stunning shield (Alek’s family shield) hangs up inside the church that will testify to this fact. Photos are on this webpage but we were not able to film inside; however the stunning shots that we do have prove the Templar connection beyond any doubt.

Some of the amazing and symbolic artwork in St Gile’s Church; including a stunning example of the Neville Family Crest

Click on the link to view our clip on St Giles Church, Wrexham

  • Bloodline connection: The Wynn family, the Perrys, the Parrys and of course the Nevilles.
  • Alek connects the famlies with their movements around the country from Ireland and Scotland.
  • King Henry 7th’s mother was involved with this church and also with St Peter’s Church, Pwllheli and St Pedrogs, Llanbedrog.

Up over and traveling on higher ground, we then made our way to Corwen and Ruthin, with plenty of wonderful scenery still to view; the weather was cold, which did not seem to matter, as there was plenty to investigate to keep us all warm and busy. The scenery is rugged and the buidings nestle into the hillsides becoming part of the living landscape.

wales-4-for-fb

St Mael and St Suliens: Corwen: St Maels Church was fun tracking down; indeed we were  up and down some steep tracks finding it, half hidden away on a hillside at the back of the delightful town. Corwen is a very old town, formely in the ancient county of Merionethshire, which has always been enshrined in Knights Templar history; the church itself dating from the eleven hundreds and once one is inside, it has some amazing and meaningful artwork to discover.

St Mael and St Suliens Corwen

The church itself dates from the twelfth century and is a single chambered structure set within a rectangular churchyard, with walls of fourteenth or fifteenth century origin. Its baptismal font dates from the twelfth or thirteenth century and the churchyard includes a tomb from the seventeenth century, besides war graves of two soldiers of world war one. The church is dedicated to St Mael and St Sulien, two Celtic saints of the sixth century, though it has been suggested that an earlier foundation stood on the hill above. Sulien is a Welsh variant of the given name “Julian” but has also been interpreted as being derived from the Welsh sul, meaning “sun” plus also geni, meaning “born”; Sulien being the name of a Celtic soler diety.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Mael_and_Sulien’s_Church,_Corwen

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corwen

A church full of mystery, magic and of many tales still untold; as are the churches of North Wales…

The ‘secrets’ or rather lies of the murder of ‘The Jesus’ are told here, together with a depiction of a true unicorn, and ‘the potions of life’; all aspects of Priory teachings, secrets hidden in plain sight for all to see… There are many stunning stained glass windows here that all tell their own story of our true (yet always hidden) creation and history…

Click on the link to unravel some of the mysteries of St Mael’s and take a tour in the darkeness of St Peter’s ….

St Peters Church: Ruthin: Ruthin (Rhuthun) is the county town of Denbighshire in North Wales. Located around a hill in the southern part of the Vlae of Clwyd; the older part of the town, the castle and Saint Peter’s Square are located on top of the hill, while many newer parts of the town are on the floodplain of the River Clwyd. The name ‘Ruthin’ comes from the Welsh words rhudd (red) and din (fort), and refers to the colour of the new red sandstone which forms the geologic basis of the area and from which the castle was constructed in 1277–84. The original name of Ruthin was ‘Castell Coch yng Ngwern-fôr’ (red castle in the sea-swamps). The town developed around the castle and the nearby mill. ‘Maen Huail’ is a registered ancient monument attributed to the brother of Gildas and King Arthur and is located outside Barclays Bank (formerly Exmewe House), on St Peter’s Square.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruthin

Sadly St Peter’s Church at Ruthin, whe we arrived was in complete darkness, but we did our best to document the important features in the murkiness!. There were some very interesting aspects to this church, which hopefully the photos will show more of. Lo and behold though, as we were finishing the lighs came on! But as the church was being used by ‘others’ then, it was respectful as always to not disturb them, although they were freindly people; maybe church wardens or similar who were non the less keen to chat to us.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collegiate_and_Parochial_Church_of_St_Peter,_Ruthin

Taken in St Peter’s in the dark with the camcorder camera

If one looks aloft into the rafters, one can often see an amazing aray of mythical creatures or symbols of the ‘old ways’…

  • Bloodline conection: The Jones, The 3rd Earl of Kent, King Henry 7th, Lady Beaufort, The Duke of Kent (Freemasonry)

Webs being woven upon the shores of time….

wales-7-for-fb

Part two will follow…

Thank you for reading; if you would like to find out more, please take a look at our Priory Webpage

http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

January 2017: ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER FOURTEEN

RAF UPWOOD: CAMBRIDGESHIRE

So a dark yet mild Friday evening at the end of October 2016, found us on our way to the dissused and derelict airfield of RAF Upwood, practically on our doorstep in the Cambridgeshire countryside. It was to prove to be a very interesting night indeed. This is a site used frequently by urban explorers and ghost hunters alike and yet a site which proved intitially quite difficult for us to locate. We were seeking the run down living quarters, admin blocks and accomadation of a once thriving community;  a facility for airmen after the wars and, it has been told, a great source of paranormal activity. This site has a direct connection to the first site we visited (Quest Number One) at Spooks Hill, Warboys and is in the general area of Warboys and Ramsey; the sites share the same underground magnetic connections. There is much evidence on the internet and youtube that the site is haunted and we were very excited to be finding out for ourselves.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Upwood

Our ‘satnav’ took us to the general area but did not locate the airfield itself, so seeking another source, we did eventually arrive at the vast open landscape of the dissused airfield. Asking our way of lads nearby, heading also in the same direction, we were advised to go back out onto the road and drive around to the front of the site and yet something told us to keep on. The airfield is a vast, open flat space with only a few flood-lights lighting up industrial buildings on the horizon. It is very dark with large open skies above, yet one can follow a laid down track, maybe a vehical access from many years ago. As we walked across this seemingly endless, dark plain of emptiness a feeling of not being alone, of being watched permeatted every pore of our being. As we walked, we passed by long strips of security fences protecting fields of solar panels; the biggest solor panel complex that we had ever seen… The complex was dotted with CTV cameras and sattelite dishes, so obviously we wondered what was going on there.

We did meet others too, again local lads, crouching in the shadows, who also advised we were gong the wrong way, but we just needed to check out further into the distance before coming back. For it was just as well that we did, for on the horizen and coming towards us we spied some bright lights which flashed a couple of times before dissapearing from the sky and out of our sight completely; we all saw them so no one persons over-imagination. We did try and walk towards the bright flood-lights but were met by high security fences with no way in. At that point we did decide to make our way back to the road, but still that sense of not being alone, of being followed and also more of the mysterious lights apeared on the horizon. We were definitely at the wrong part of the airfield but never the less the walk had proved to be very eye-opening indeed with the constant brooding feeling of not being alone still with us.

So back to the main road then as advised where we found the main gateway to the abandoned airfield; sadly high security fencing was all around with security and CCT in action, or so it said on the notices. At this point we did start to wonder how we could gain access, as obviously others before us had certainly done so; the whole area was about to be demolished to make way for new housing so important not to give up. Not to be deterred we got in the car again and started to continue our slow ride around the perrimeter, only to be very surprised moments later when two more young lads dissapeared between the trees and bushes around the perimiter and were gone – vanished! So we had to follow, as we knew this to be our way in; we parked up next to what was their parked car and followed  their tracks and sure enough, from behind the trees we could indeed walk right in. We never saw sight or sound of the two lads who guided us in, ever again….

Some of the corridors and grafitti at RAF Upwood

The whole area is amazing and truly is an urban explorers playground and a ghost hunters’s paradise too, for that matter. Wandering around in the dark, along the long pitch black corridoors of the living quarters, shower blocks and communial rooms, one could not help but wonder at what life would have been like in the heyday of the complex. It is now very eerie with graffiti everywhere, some of which is very beautiful, but one does get a huge sense of lost souls seeking some sort of sollace. The energies constantly changed from hot and cold, of being followed, of whisperings on the steps leading into one of the blocks; to two of our party actually seeing a fleeing male figure right in front of them, which promptly dissapeared into thin air…

Many of our photos revealed unexplained orbs, figures and other unexplained images…

Please ‘click’ on any image to enlarge

Take a look at our videos for a full tour around and see further evidence of the unexplained

(Please note we are actually at RAF Upwood – not Alconbury 🙂 )

Check out the background at 5.20 above!

Check out the orbs at 5.23!

The whole site is very eerie and yet extremely beautiful to behold and to explore. A dark, ethereal kind of beauty that is soon to be no longer and which does certainly come alive at night; alive with those lost souls of wartime airmen who have their mysterious tales still to tell…

End Oct 2016

‘Keeper of Scrolls’

“Through the veil we will see into the deep, dark sea eternally….”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER THIRTEEN:

DEEPER INTO THE BLOODLINES…

  • St Guthlacs Church Market Deeping
  • St Giles Church Matlock
  • Holy Trinity Church Rollestone
  • St Mary’s Church Buckden

St Guthlacs Church Market Deeping: As our night-time visit to St Guthlacs Church in Market Deeping proved to be so interesting and eventful, we decided that a day-time visit was certainly called for. (details of the church etc and our previous visit can be found in Quest Number Twelve; our previous quest) The tales of St Guthlac of course do contain a strong connection to Demonology which you can read about in these links or find out much more from our video link.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Guthlac%27s_Church,_Market_Deeping

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthlac_of_Crowland

St Guthlac’s Church is a plain church yet we did found some interesting symbolism shown below and explained in the video above:-

One can see in the stained glass window above, another reference to The Serpent, and four tiles on the floor around the font with Mathew, Mark, Luke and John represented by specific symbolic creatures and an unusual carving on the wall of a winged creature.

In respect of our research into the blood-lines; we find a big connection here to the important Neville line; other names we are tracing that surface here are the Ford line and the Fordham line.

St Giles Church Matlock Derbyshire: So next we journed onwards until we reached the rugged countryside of Derbyshire and St Giles Church in Matlock. This church seems to sit precariously upon steeply stepped limestone cliffs overlooking the River Derwent. Reflecting the ‘lie of the land’ as they say, also overlooking the town of Matlock; the views are indeed stunning from the church’s high and splendid vantage point.

Matlock Parish Church and its splendid views (click on any image to enlarge)

Although there has been a church on this spot since the middle of the twelfth century, most of the church was rebuilt in Victorian times but parts of the original building do remain including the twelfth century font and and fifteenth century tower. Matlock itself was mentioned in the Doomsday book, but not the church though, in 1086. The earliest written evidence for the existence of a church in Matlock dates from 1291. But importantly this church goes back to the Templars and even beyond; having connections to the banking system for the region and it was even said to have been a sheltering place for ‘The Grail’…

http://stgilesmatlock.co.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matlock,_Derbyshire

This is a truly amazing church full of so much Templar symbolism within it’s walls. We have connections here to The Serpent (again) the Sun, Moon and Star, Ninhursag (the Mother Goddess), The ‘Jesus’, the Eastern Star and the Red and the Silver, which all makes perfect sense in respect of our quests. They say every picture tells a story and in this church of St Giles in Matlock, Derbyshire certainly does; an untold story in fact, of a hidden history of our homelands. These are stories just waiting to be told; just itching to find the light – one of the purposes of these amazing and wonderful quests in fact! See the link below for further indepth explanations of all th symbolism:-

Click on images to enlarge

We have connections in these photos above to The Serpent (again) the Sun, Moon and Star, Ninhursag (the Mother Goddess), The ‘Jesus’, the Eastern Star and the Red and the Silver, to name but a few.

The names asociated here in respect of the bloodlines we are tracing and researching are: the Clark (e) line, the Andrew (s) line and the Gregory line – evidence of which can all be found within the church itself.

for-poem

On the steep hillside….

Holy Trinity Church Rollestone: Still in Derbyshire and maybe the best and most revealing find of the day; if not of all our quests put together and how apt to be our thirteenth quest too! Our find here was a revelaton to say the lest, making all our quests very current and relevant. The church itself dates from the 12th century; the chancel was restored in 1878 and the tower in 1889. It apears that a church of some sort exsisted on this site from Saxon times, for there is a mention in the Doomsday book of 1086 which states that at Rollestone there was a priest and a church and indeed at about 1895, (which you will see in our video link) when parts of the present church were being restored some fragments of a Saxon cross-shaft were found.

At the very beginning of the 14th.century the tower was built, a broad low structure of two stories only, with thick walls of rubble.All its belfry windows remain in the walls, but blocked up; when, however, the tower was restored in 1889, the one in the western face was re-opened so as to be seen outside. In the bottom storey are three curious little single-light windows. During the 15th century two additional storeys were added regardless of the fact that the old rubble walls were never intended to carry such weight.  Certainly, buttresses were added, but these afforded insufficient support, and the ragstone of the lower part gradually decayed and gave way under the pressure, and as a result, in addition to placing the whole of the tower in great peril, thrust the nave arcades out of shape. The work of restoration was carried out in 1889-1890; first the old buttresses were taken down and rebuilt with new and substantial stone in very deep foundations of concrete; then the entire outer casing of the walls was gradually taken way and replaced with new stone. The tower arch was also taken down and rebuilt, and the old gallery which stretched across the arch was removed. The crown of the tower was repaired where necessary. This restoration cost about £800.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Rolleston

Photos from outside of Holy Trinity Church Rollestone

The Neville family (de Neville) truly come to life here at Rollestone, especially when seeing the video above. It is almost as if they are walking out of history to greet us in person as we are introduced to them in their very own private family chapel! An amazing find making all our research culmative and very worthwhile. The other names from the blood-line here are Clarke which was a surprise to our head researcher who also had a ‘heads up’ to other Clarkes in the area.

Photos above (click to enlarge) taken in the private family chapel of the Neville Family; the family of the ‘Bloodline’. Within this small private chapel are to be found the family emblems of the Nevilles and those ‘of the Path’ will certainly recognise them as KT symbols from the teachings and degrees; symbols that of course connect to ‘The Serpent Priesthood’ and the untold histories of these lands. Below are general images from inside The Holy Trinity Church Rollestone showing in particular the heraldry of the True Royal Bloodline; in pride of place excactly where it would be expected to be  🙂

St Mary’s Church Buckden:  And so with night-time and darkness rapidly descending we made our way down the A1 to the village of Buckden in Cambridgeshire, to what was to be our last port of call for the day. Because of the un-earthly hour we did not for one moment expect to gain entry inside the church, although the fates had been very kind to us all day so far. So imaging our suprise then when turning up St Mary’s Church in Buckden in the dark, to find its doors somewhat welcomingly open with a church meeting going on in an anti-room. Time then to slide in for a good look around  🙂 Obviously it was dark in and around the church but we did get a good feel for the place and were also greeted later on, and had a chat with the gentleman of the gathering there. Out of respect of others being around it was not possible to film there on this occasion, but actually being able to gain entry more than sufficed!

http://www.stmarysbuckden.org.uk/

Buckden Church is recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086, within the jurisdiction of the Bishops of Lincoln, whose palace stands a few metres to the North. From Anglo-Saxon times until Georgian times, the church was well endowed by them. Sadly no traces of the Saxon church survives, although there are a few remnants from late Norman times. The structure of the church as it stands today is mostly unchanged from when it was rebuilt between 145 and 1440 by Bishop Gray and Alnwick of Lincoln, apart for the pews and the organ unfamiliar at that time to them. The porch was added around 1485 and the vestry and organ were replaced in the 1880’s. The last major work, involving the stripping of the interior and exterior plaster and the installation of new pews was completed in 1909.

It seemed like a peaceful church with some nice carvings, tile work and sculptures but i am still deciding whether the wooden carved ‘choir of angels’ flying aloft in the high ceiling beams are beautiful or creepy….  Talking of which my collegue managed to take these shots and of course i will leave it entirely up to you to decide whether the pillars and orbs of light are camera lens distortion or not, but look very closely at the last pew in the last shot towards the left of the photo, for ‘someone’ seems to be sitting there……

October 2016: Keeper of Scrolls

By all means contact us via this webpage if you are curious to find out much more about our quests on an England you thought you knew….

See also ‘The Priory’: http://priory7.wix.com/priory

If you are drawn towards the Priory teachings please contact us  🙂

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER TWELVE:

GUARDIANS, DEMONS & ANCIENT ENERGIES

  • St Margaret’s Church Laceby
  • St James’ Church Louth
  • St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke
  • St Guthlac’ Church Market Deeping

So after a small break, early September found us travelling all the way to farthest Lincolshire; almost all the way to the Yorkshire borders in fact, on what was to be ‘Quest Number Twelve’. Traffic was bad, very bad and the journey was long and slow but this day, this quest was to prove to be very exciting and interesting indeed.

St Margaret’s Church Laceby: Laceby is a village and civil parish in North East Lincolnshire, situated outside the western boundaries of Grimsby and is an ancient place in terms of human occupation; being listed in the Doomsday Book in 1086. There is a Mesolithic flint working site to the North-East of the village, found in 1958 and finds of Anglo-Saxon pottery were discovered in Coopers Lane in 1969. Welbrooke Hill nearby, is the site of Roman pottery finds and there is an Anglo-Saxon cemetry just South of the village alongside Barton Street. Further Anglo-Saxon evidence can be seen in the remains of an Anglo-Saxon cross found embedded in the North wall of St Margarets’s Church. The oldest part of the church is said to be the lower third of the Tower; constructed in the twelth century. Among the many stained glass windows is a very small window, left of the main entrance, which depicts St Margaret of Antioch, of whom the church is dedicated to. She is depicted here with a dragon, which could denote strength and courage, or strength in battle or adversity. The other side of the doorway is depicted St John the Baptist.

imgp0126-1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laceby

St Margaret was a native of “Antioch” and the daughter of a pagan priest named Aedesius. imgp0142-1Her mother, it is said, died soon after her birth and Margaret was thus nursed by a Christian woman five or six leagues from Antioch. Having embraced Christianity and consecrated her ‘virginity’ to God, Margaret was then disowned by her father and was adopted by her nurse; she lived in the country keeping sheep with her foster mother (in what is now Turkey). Olybrius, Governor of the Roman Diocese of the East, asked to marry her, but with the demand that she renounced her Christianity. Margaret refused and upon her refusal, she was cruelly tortured during which, various miraculous incidents occurred. One of these involved her being swallowed by Satan, in the shape of a dragon from which she escaped alive when the cross she was carrying irritated the dragon’s innards. This tale is said to represent Margaret’s escape from her fathers false beliefs of paganism and of her being born anew by escaping from the dragon’s belly. However the account never the less was not taken seriously, especially the last incident which was descibed as “apocryphal and not to be taken seriously” and thus sadly she was put to her death; attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning but she miraculously survived and managed to convert many spectators who were also  subsuequently executed, before being finally beheaded, in AD 304.  Because of this tale she has become the patron saint of childbirth, labour and pregancy. As Saint Marina, she is associated with the sea, which “may in turn point to an older goddess tradition,” reflecting the pagan divinity, Aphrodite. But how interesting that a church in England would take her name and that she would be it’s patron but even odder and more interesting still, she has patronage to Cambridge too; what a fascinating connection with furhter stories to be told….

‘The Blacksmith’s Ghost’: Solomon Fenner it is said, is still around the area of Laceby to this day. Around 1710 Solomon Fenner lived in the village of Laceby where he worked as the local Blacksmith, but although highly skilled and profesional he was not a rich man as such, yet neither did he live in poverty. He had previously served in the army of King William and King Henry on the continent, before returning home to Linconshire to take up his trade of which he had apprenticed for as a youth. He was known as a pious man who attended church each Sunday and whom gave a little of what he earned to the poor of the parish.

He never married but fell under the charms of one Rebecca Pettitt; a beautiful, witty young woman with long red hair and green eyes, who lived in the market town of Caister. It is said she had many suitors but her father Wiiliam Pettit; a greedy man who owned land and several shops in Caister, was determined that his daughter’s husband to be, would be one who would be financially advantageous to William.

And so it was that one day Solomon Fenner, was walking the country road to Caister and showed himself at the Pettit’s home, asking William for his daughters hand in marriage. William Pettit was furious that a humble blacksmith should ask such a question and thus angrily denied him and threw him out onto the street where something inside the normally gentle and pious blacksmith snapped. So knowing William Pettit to be a man of habit who regularily drunk and gambled with freinds at a hamlet near Cabourn, on a Saturday afternoon, Solomon made note. It was always late, lonely and dark when William made his way home through the Linconshire fens and the next Saturday night the vengeful Solomon was thus to be found waiting in the shadows….

When he saw the drunk and helpless William Pettit coming along on his own, he leapt out at him and bludgeoned him to death with a hammer. When his ‘red mist’ cleared and Solomon Fenner realise what he had done, he was filled with instant remorse and ran to the nearest farmhouse to confess to the sleepy inhabitants what he had done. When the body of William Pettit was discovered, bloody and battered, there was no doubt to Fenner’s confesion and so in due course he was of course hanged, as was the way in those times. Before his death it is said he wept bitterly, cursing his actions of that night, expressing fear for his imortal soul. His body was gibbeted on a hill near Cabourn overlooking the scene of his crime and to this day, if legend is anything to go by Solomon Fenner is still not at rest. For according to local folklore, travellers walking between Cabourn and Caister late at night will be approached by a tall and robust looking man, stepping out of the shadows to confront them. He wears dirty apparel and caries a blood-stained hammer in his hand. His red eyes do not lie; he has been weeping, yet he tells the travellers not to be afraid; he will do them no harm as he sadly recounts his story of his crime, adding that they must remember that all life is sacred and his punishment for forgetting this is to spend all enternity telling others of his crime…

We were unable to carry out any filming inside the church on this occason due to an afternoon ‘tea’ social and community gathering going on in the church, but we did manage to take some interesting photos which once again showed a great deal of Templar and Masonic symbolism and even from further beyond; symbols that are certainly not ‘christian’. Though sadly the church has very little of it’s former ‘energy’ alive to this day…

Masonic and Templar symbolism in St Margaret’s Church, Laceby, also showing a reference to the ‘Neville’ linage (click on images to enlarge)

A short video taken from outside of St Margaret’s Church, Laceby; here you will discover the beginnings of the ‘Neville’ line and more references to the symbolism inside the church (as shown above in the photos)

Laceby as mentioned in the clip above is actually where the ‘Neville’ line originated; and interestingly our lead researchers 18th grandmother’s father has a connection here. People always asume that the Neville line started from France (de Ville in France); going back to Geoffrey De Neville who was actually granted, by King Henry 3rd on 26th Dec 1234, an act, was given permission for this area, the right to hold a fair on the 24th July, as anyone at that time had to have the King’s permission to do so. Interestingly though, for some reason the locals were not tuned into the history of their church…..

St James Church Louth: Louth is situated at the foot of the beautiful Lincolshire Wolds, at the point where they meet the Lincolshire Marshes; it is known as the Capitol of the Lincolshire Wolds. It developed where the ancient trackway along the wolds, known as Barton Street, crossed the river Lud. The town is east of a gorge carved into the Wolds that forms the Hubbards Hill. This area was formed from a glacial overspill channel in the last glacial period; the River Lud meanders through the gorge before entering the town. Various interesting archeology finds have been unearthed in the area including hand axes dating from between 424,000 ans 191, ooo years ago, indicating inhabitation in the Paleolithic era. Bronze age finds include a ‘barbed and tangled’ arrowhead in the grounds of Monks Dyke, Tennyson College. There is an Anglo-Saxon burial ground, northwest of Louth, which dates from the fifth to sixth centuries. It was  first excavated in 1946 and with an estmated 1200 urn burials is one of the largest Anglo-Saxon cemetries in England.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louth,_Lincolnshire

This mainly fifteeth century parish church with the tallest medieval parish church spire in England, is the third building on the site here, succeeding the previous eleventh and thirteeth century structures. The chancel and nave were rebuilt in 430-40 but the very tall spire was not completed until 1515. This was the site of the Lincolnshire Rising, the first serious rebellion that threatened the crown which was followere by the Pilgrimage of Grace. These occurances were the results of the national discontent resulting from Henry V111’s taxation and ecclesiastical changes; sadly both rebellions failed and serious represions followed; the church then being swept clean of its richest, icluding the dismantling of the rood screen.

The unusual happening here is said to be of the appearance of the ghost of St. Hererith, the Bishop who died in 873, killed at the hands of the invading Danes and whom is also known as Louths ‘forgotten Saint’. Sadly due to being delayed by the trafic on the road on this particular day, the church was closed when we arrived so we were not able to prove or disprove any ‘tales’ but we managed some very useful video and photos from outside…

St James’s Church, Louth showing the tallest medieval spire in the counrty and an interesting sigil carved into the church wall; often know as the ‘Awen’ sign in the modern druidic world, more can be read about it here:-

To most people this symbol represents the modern day ‘Awen’ sign, yet the truth and meaning is very far removed as the symbol goes back much further in time; it was adopted with the re-birth of the ‘old ways’ in the 1960’s. In Templarism it actually represents the ‘three pillars’

Earth: Body & Love,
Sea:Mind / Wisdom,
Air:Spirit / Truth

The ‘Awen’ symbol is also said to represent ‘Inspiration of Truth’ and it is further suggested that without Awen (inspiration) one could not understand truth, so the original truths have stuck and been passed down. What is further interesting is the three rays (three pillars) also represent the universe in balance, meaning:

Left Ray:Female
Centre Ray:Balance
Right Ray:Male

One needs to attune to the three rays (or rather the ‘three pillars’) to fulfil their understanding of the world within them and all around them (the without)  (There is much more on the original metaphysical meaning of this symbol within Templarism in The Knights Bible found on Amazon)

Follow the link to our youtube channel for some interesting historical comments on the history of this spendid church and of its Knight Templar connection…

St Botolph’s Church Skidbrooke: This very interesting, hidden away, redundant Anglican church situated near the village of Skidbrooke, seven miles northeast of Louth in Lincolnshire is now under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. This isolated church is nestled well off the beaten track in a woodland copse, in the heart of rural Lincolnshire and totally not what any of us was expecting at all… Upon arriving, the site was very open, the fields were bare and the harvet was in, all in all a typical scene of the English countryside. The apearance of the church on the horizon, as it looms from under its secret cover of lush surrounding trees could easily be mistaken for a very atmospheric and eerie film set and indeed tales of ghosthunters, witch covens and satanic ritual still freshly abound and entice to this very day. This once, and i can only assume beautiful church, is now a vast empty shell; a ghost of its former self yet strangely very beautiful and compelling. The stained glass windows and what were probably wonderful church fittings etc have now all been removed and yet the ceiling still remains fairly intact as do surprisingly some of the carvings and significant writings which we may learn about later.

imgp0188-1

As said , an isolated church standing in the flat Lincolnshire marshes, St Botolph’s is early medieval, dating from the early thirteeth century with various renovations covering the Decorated and Perpendicular Gothic periods.This spacious building is composed of a nave with clerestory, north and south aisles, south porch, chancel, and an embattled west tower. The interior of the church is almost completely bare and unadorned, with unplastered walls letting the bones of the building show. The nave arcades are Early English, with wide, slender arches and nicely carved column capitals. The south arcade, built circa 1400, has it’s columns built up on