QUEST TWENTYSIX: IRELAND:

Day Three: The Giants Causeway: Three wonderful days had already passed and time was indeed flying by in Ireland; we had travelled many miles northwards today, two miles from Busmills village in county Antrim, to one of the many stretches of coastline very near to Scotland and to the very mysterious place known as The Giants Causeway; a place of many legends and tales; see links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant%27s_Causeway

The wonderful and beautifully rugged coastline that surrounds the causeway in Northern Ireland is a joy to behold; the day we were there the seas and wind were amazing and certainly were displaying their natural power! This is an energetic and magical place that makes one’s heart sing! The sea roars loudly and one can make no mistake of it’s powers – the greatest giver and taker on the earth; the power and might of the ‘Walvbane’….

 

 

There are many tales of rivalry between the Irish and Scottish giants of long ago, when the world was very different from today; after all for any aspiring giant worth his own tellings, Scotland is only a mere hop, skip & a giants leap away, over to the left in fact! But be well advised to remember that giants (especially baby giants) and history are never ever what they seem to be…..

https://giantscausewaytickets.com/finn-mccool

 

 

Nothing on this planet is ever what it seems, often time is the biggest secret keeper of all; unlock it’s mysteries and time will reveal all.. What beautiful yet strange shapes; natural, manmade or something else? You decide…..

 

 

The Giants Causeway; far from being natural….? <click to enlarge>

Filming at the Giants Causeway, Ireland: see link below. Again another very windy day, so lots of noise and camera wobble as i perched precariously atop these amazingly constructed columns, with my dear tutor hanging on to me while i moved around filming, to prevent me falling!
I walked much further out than i thought i would with my balance probs, and hung on to my camera for dear life!
Look closely at the very precise enginnering of the hexagonal columns and how they all fit together; truths that belong to another time and space within history…..
Scotland is just off to the right – a mere hop and a skip for any reputable giant!

The Hill of Tara & The Giants Causeway

  • Bloodline Connection: Lord of the Isles and tied into Greenland and Iceland

Derry and St Columba’s Church: Derry today (named Londonderry by the British is a million miles away from what it was during the troubles, yet the echoes of those times still remain in areas such as the ‘Free Derry Corner’. Derry is the second-largest city  in Northern Ireland and the fourth-largest city on the island of Ireland. The name Derry is an anglicisation of the Old Irish name Daire (modern Irish: Doire) meaning “oak grove”. In 1613, the city was granted a Royal Charter by King James 1 and gained the “London” prefix to reflect the funding of its construction by the London guilds. While the city is more usually known colloquially as Derry, Londonderry is also commonly used and remains the legal name. Read more about it’s history below;  from the tourist site one can see that the city is a very vibrant and upcoming city to visit and an absolute mecca for the arts!:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry

http://www.visitderry.com/

 

Amazing, yet deeply poignant & meaningful urban street art in Derry, alluding to a time when raw passion and ideals overflowed with a desire for what was righteous. <click to enlarge – well worth it!>

St Columba’s Church: We drove around the church a couple of times before we found our access to it and a parking spot, but once there and insde the sght that grreets one upon enterng is amazing to say the lest.  St Columba’s Church, Long Tower is a Roman Catholic church in the Diocese of Derry and is located in the heart of Derry.

 

 

The outside of St Colunba’s Church, Derry

The present church is built on the site of Roman Catholic worship which goes back as far as the 12th century. The current Long Tower Church began life in 1783 in a much smaller scale than seen today. Father John Lynch, a parish priest in Derry started action to raise funds for building the Long Tower Church and he received finance not just from Roman Catholics but also Protestant people in Derry at the time. The church was opened in 1788.

 

The suptuous wood & marble interior of Derry Church <click to enlarge>

The church was extended and refurbished in 1810 with the introduction of gallery seating, nave and the changing of the Altar to the northern side of the church. The High Altar was constructed with marble and supported by four pillars. The four pillars were first made of wood put proved to be not strong enough to hold the large and heavy marble altar and so the pillars were changed to be made out of marble. The layout of the church from 1810 onwards has remained largely unaltered. However, in 1908 a full refurbishment of the Long Tower took place which included addition of new stained glass windows, statues, shrines, baptismal font and the reposition of the High Altar and the introduction of a new sacristy. The church’s refurbishment was completed in 1909 and the church was then officially opened to the general public.

 

 

The stunning works of art & treasures inside St Columba’s Church, Derry

The current parish population as of December 2015 is 6,761. The church overlooks the Catholic Bogside of Derry which has seen many instances of violence such as Bloody Sunday of 1972 and so would have been at the centre of the troubles, but this church ensures that people find peace and quiet there no matter what is going on outside the church grounds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Columba%27s_Church,_Long_Tower

 

See video for more info: starts at 11.09

Three Irish Churches

  • Bloodline Connection: Takes one to the time of ‘The Troubles’ and links to ‘previous experiences’

GOING BEYOND THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR & MASONIC SYMBOLISM: On our quests around the uk and now in Ireland too, we have come to understand and acknowledge the significance and history of the vast array, and purposefully placed in time, templar and masonic symbolism. The two paths of Templarism and Free Masonry do have some commonalities within history yet are not to be confused for they are two entirely different paths. Understanding the symbols and emblems placed within time by our ancestors, the original inhabitants of this planet, can unlock the secrets to time and space and can bestow hidden knowledge upon those wishing to seek answers. Big clues to the past, present and future have been left all over the Celtic Lands and they are all just waiting to be discovered and decoded.

Here to wet your appetites are just a small selection of the symbols we discovered in Ireland; symbols which go back to our dawn of time and relate to our true ancestors; our creators. There were many Celtic Crosses too, which i have featured in part one. Many of the symbols here are extremely well-know and well-used within Craft Circles, Preceptories, Rites and Teachings etc. Those folk of the Craft path today and especially within the Priory will have the keys to decode and understand these mysterious symbols and emblems that crop up all over our planet; it is indeed a fascinating and elightening pursuit, unravelling these mysteries. A symbol can say a thousand words and can therefore replace a thousand  words, thus  crossing all language and cultural divides. Symbols can and will, when correctly interpreted speak to those of Craft whom truly seek to know.

 

 

<please click to enlarge>

 

The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

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October 2018