Tag Archive: The Devil


Exmore 1

“Beautiful and Wild Exmoor which we all loved so much”

  • St Paul’s Church, Honiton:
  • St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway:
  • St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh:
  • St Michael’s Church, Beer:
  • Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: 
  • All Saint’s Church, Dulverton:
  • St Mary the Virgin, Lynton:
  • Valley of the Rocks, Lynton:
  • St Michael’s Mount, Cornwall:
  • Braddock Church, Churchyard & Fields: Cornwall:

Our next quest was amazingly Quest 21 and so starting out in the direction of Devon and Cornwall, we travelled all day down country to Woodbury in Devon, just outside of Honiton; our base for the next few days. To start off our journey and explanation of the area, here is a taster in the link below of what was to come…

EXETER, DEVON: PLACES OF PEACE & PLACES OF POWER

 

EXETER CATHEDRAL & EXMOOR: OPPOSITE SIDES OF THE COIN: Two totally opposite ends of the spectrum are portrayed in the above video, filmed in the beautiful and largely unspoilt county of Devon.  Exeter Catherdral on the one hand is a vast and amazing building; a wondrous piece of architecture in fact; yet it is sadly a place of strange and very draining energies, experienced by all to one degree or another. I certainly got very zapped and depleted by the energies here, so much so i felt quite unwell upon entering the Cathedral and had to sit down for a few minutes to re-align myself…
Exmoor on the other hand is a beautifully stunning place of natural peace, beauty and tranquility, very reviving, very refreshing and the time we were there the sky was a clear blue with no sign of a chemtrail anyway in sight, with the air being pure and untainted; two sides of coin then. Interestingly too, no sign of any earth curvature on the 360 degree video we filmed up on Exmoor. The one very interesting discovery from inside of the cathedral was the depiction of ‘The Jesus’ from around the front of the pulpit, showing quiet clearly the Ninasian salute; feel free to wonder why ‘The Jesus’ is shown using this sign and just what exactly is ‘The Ninasian Salute’ and from whence did it originate….

The Ninasian Salute shown here <click on all photos to expand & enlarge>

Day One Friday 21st April 2017: St Paul’s Church, Honiton: Honiton is a bustling market town and civil parish in East Devon, close to the River Otter and the home of the once thriving lace making industry. The town grew up along the line of ‘The Fosse Way’, the ancient Roman road which links Exeter to Lincoln, of which Honiton was an important stopping off point with a mention in the Doomsday Book.

Although the heyday of the lace making industry was in the 17th century, Queen Victoria, who herself had many connections to the area, famously used Honiton lace on her wedding gown. The gown can be seen in all it’s fine splendour in the local museum next to the church; the actual dress itself being made in the nearby village of Beer. Lace making was introduced to the area by Flemish migrants in the Elizabethan era and although the lace making industry has greatly declined, there is something of a small resurgence as local people are encouraged to take up the craft once more, for fear of it dying out.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honiton

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/honiton-st-pauls.htm

St Paul’s Church: which is right next door to the lace museum, which itself was once an old chapel, is very well kept and obviously loved by the local community but sadly has been much modernised and in the process of which, has lost some of its much older artifacts and items of interest to us upon this quest;  it has sadly lost it’s ‘energies’ too, although intrestingly there may, as mentioned in the video be interesting finds within the very foundations of St. Paul’s Church itself.

Inside and out of Honiton Church in Devon, showing ‘The Ford line’ connection too. Click on individual photos to enlarge.

  • The bloodline connection here is of Henry John Clarke (or variations of the spelling) 1900 – 1982 (Our Alek’s GGF)

See our link below for our account of St Paul’s Church Honiton & St Michael’s Church Farway

ST PAULS CHURCH HONITON & ST MICHAELS CHURCH FARWAY

 

St Michael’s Church and All Angel’s Church Farway: Hidden away off the beaten track, this beautiful church is well and truly secluded within the Devonshire countryside, and very importantly placed within our quests with the knowledge that those who are meant to find it will indeed do so. The church was built in the Norman period with a west tower added in the 15th century with a north aisle being added in 1682, though the entire church was rebuilt in 1877. ‘The East Devon Way’ long distance footpath runs directly past the church.

Farway Church & Graveyard, near Exmoor

There are many Templar and Freemasonic symbols within this church, which are a delight to discover and the whole church itself has an amazing feeling to it. The symbols significant here include the Rose Cross, the Red Rose, The Red Robes of the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (King of Kings) and the Red Wings of the Archangels; red being the colour of blood, of the rose and of sacrifice and obviously very significant here. Also here we seee the ‘triskelion’ symbol with the daisys and the ‘leaves of hope’, both of which relate to higher Masonic chapters. The video above will show and explain more.

Templar & Masonic influences and symbolism inside of Farway Church

Local tales of interest are of a Humphrey Hutchins who was ploughing the land at the top of the hill when his plough turned up a crock of gold. He gave part of his miraculous treasure to the church to rebuild the north aisle. The field where Hutchins discovered his golden hoard is still known as ‘Money Acre’; sadly no sign of any further hoards while we were there. In the church yard are a pair of old yew trees. The largest of which measures 25 feet around its base and is thought to be 800 years old.

http://www.britainexpress.com/counties/devon/churches/farway.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Robert Clark 1773 – 1861 (Our Alek’s 4xGGF) but John Moyne is also an important character to research.

St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh: Cotleigh is a small, pretty village and civil parish near Honiton in the beating heart of rural Devon; it is the final resting place of the author John Green. Once again another of Devon’s churches to be found well off the beaten track, nestled in the heart of the most delightful and beautiful scenery that one could possibly imagine. People have been praying at this site since 500 BC and in it’s present guise is a traditional old fashioned English church. The church was restored with a rebuilt chancel in 1867 with local stone and flint rubble with Beerstone and some Hamstone detail; the tower is partly plastered with a slate roof and sadly most of the exterior detail has been replaced.

St Michael’s Church Cotleigh showing the Neville Shield, the Lilly Banner and the mystrious hidden vault in the grave yard.

The church boasts some rather unsual and stunning stained glass windows; non more so than those showing the ‘Chi Rho’ symbol in it’s full glory; the very first thing one notices when pulling up outside the shurch, we comment and expand upon further in the video, sharing the “Blood turn Black and Blood turn Blue” aspect that Priory and Craft folk will relate to. The fittings inside the church are not that old, yet some very interesting symbolism on the stained glass windows and an interesting church banner beside the altar depicting a lily, with strong hints to Sumerian connections and to the Alpha and Omega. There is also a modern version of The Neville Sheild hanging just inside the entrance. Outside in the grave yard we came across a rather mysterious hidden vault where in past times there would have been steps leading down to; now hidden by the hand of time and possibly mankind….

The stunningly beautiful and magical windows inside of Cotleigh Church – click on image to enlarge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cotleigh

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir William Clark 1804 – 1861 (Aleks 3xGGF) and also Adophus Clark – a past rector.

See our link below for our account of St Michael’s Church, Cotleigh and St Michael’s Church, Beer

ST MICHAELS CHURCH’S: COTLEIGH & BEER

 

St Michael’s Church, Beer: The present church was erected in 1877 but a previous church had exsited on the site since about 1600. An even earlier religous building was thought to have stood here dating back to  1122AD when Beer and Seaton belonged to the Abbey of Sherbourn

St Michael’s Church Beer; in the ‘devils own’ village  (Click on photos to expand)

The village of Beer is traditional and lively with some fine old buildings full of character; it even has a stream running down the side of the main street and through it. Beer is nicknamed ‘The Devils Own Village’ and fascinatingly has many connections from it’s past history to the very devil himself. It is thought very apt then that the Archangel that threw Satan out of heaven should be the patron saint of the church itself and seemingly there are other ‘satanic’ influences inside the church, if one knows what one is looking for and explained further in the video. Again more Masonic influences here and some interesting symbolic windows and artifacts found within and also explained. As always, these churches, as are all the churches we visit, are found on ancients sites of ‘energy alignments‘ puposefully hidden aons ago within our planet.

Stained glass windows at Beer with connections to the ‘Bennu Bird’ and the ‘Wolf in Sheeps Clothing’ (click to expand inages)

http://pastremains.co.uk/stmichaelsbeer.htm

  • The bloodline connection here is Sir Edward Clark  1574 – 1623 (Our Alek’s 9xGGF) and Walter George Clark.

Day Two Saturday 22nd April 2017: Exeter Cathedral, Exeter: This huge cathedral in the heart of the bright and busy city of Exeter is properly known as the Cathedral of St Peter at Exeter; being an Anglican cathedral and the seat of the Bishop of Exeter, Devon. The founding of the cathedral is dedicated to Saint Peter dating from 1050 when the seat of the bishop of Devon and Cornwall was transferred from Crediton because of a fear of sea-raids. In 1107 William Warelwast, a nephew of William the Conqueror, was appointed to the see, and this was the catalyst for the building of a new cathedral in the Norman style.

Exeter Cathedral – click to enlarge

The present building was completed by about 1400 and has several noteable features including an early set of misery cords, an astronomical clock and the longest uninterupted vaulted ceiling in England. The catherdral is built in the Norman Romanesque style and the two towers and the lower part of the Nave walls survive the present cathedral. A major rebuild in decorated Gothic style was carried out  between c. 1270 and c. 1350, where the Norman towers were incoporated into this enlarged building as the North and South Transepts. It is a vast magnificant building yet i could not help feeling that when looking up at the ceiling, that i was trapped inside a very large extinct whale…..

The Neville Crest in situ can be seen placed in the right hand side of the catherdral when facing the altar.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exeter_Cathedral

  • The bloodline connection is once again that of ‘The ‘Nevilles’ particularily Garth Neville-Walford, Captain of the Royal Artillery who died 26th April 1915.

 

All Saint’s Church, Dulverton: This pretty little church is once again situated right off the beaten track in a small village in the heart of Devon. It has a timeless peace about the place and is set within the typically traditional English graveyard. This present church has been here since the early 1800, but before that the site had been in use for seemingly aons;  the use of which was a for a very different purpose. The church was almost entirely rebuilt in 1885 in Pependicular style, with the exception of the plain tower, of moorland character which is said to be or 12th to 13th century origin.

Beautiful Dulverton near Exmoor: Also in the church grounds is a very interesting and ancient way marker which no doubt has many a tale to tell…

There are many very interesting artefacts and histories within the church itself. The ‘bloodline’ connection here is that of the Neville and Cainan connection; the Cainan line which can be traced back to 7000 years ago, which together with some very fascinating archeolological discoveries under the actual church itself, made for a fascinating and worthwhile trip across the stunning moors.  The said discoveries were in the form of excavations beneath the flagstone floor of the northen aisle, which revealed a set of five stone steps observed via a ventilation hole. This set of steps led down to a blocked corridoor, the walls of which were painted white. Directly to the south of the central aisle a concave area of brick work was revealed beneath a row of pews. The curved brick work is very likely to be the top of a vault and if so may have formed the entrance to a crypt which extends across the central part of the nave. It may be that the vault and steps relate to an earlier phase of the church prior to the 1850’s rebuild. As an observation, we have come to realise and recognise that many of the churches visited on our quest do have hidden underground vaults, whether hidden on purpose or within the confines of passing time, i will allow you to decide, but often one need to be eagle eyed and awake to recognise the signs of ‘activities’ now well buried within time itself….

All Saints Church Dulverton

Most of the interior of the church is original and there are some very symbolic stained glass windows here depicting man’s evolution and a rather special statue of St Nikalaus complete, dare i say it, with horns; something that many of you astute readers will find interesting to say the lest. The Lady Chapel is dedicated in this instance to a male species. The tomb there, of the Viscount de Vesci, who died in the Great War, has an amazing amount of energy emanating from it and almost felt alive; in fact the whole area felt qute amazing. In the chapel itself are to be found the Templar Cross and the Fleur de Lyss and there are other artifacts within the church older than the church itself. Once again there is reference here to the ‘Ninasian’ salute and the ‘Sarrui Sarru’ (the King of Kings)

The stained glass windows at Dulverton Church

See our link below to find out much more on Dulverton Church

ALL SAINTS CHURCH DULVERTON

  • The bloodline connection is that of The ‘Neville’ and ‘Cainan’ connection

Day Three Saturday 22nd April 2017: St Mary the Virgin, Lynton: Sitting atop of tall craggy cliffs and overlooking, on this particular day, the most crystal clear azure-blue sea, St Mary the Virgin Church could possibly have the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited. We were so lucky when we arrived as we did not expect to be able to enter the church due to the lateness of the hour, yet were delighted to discover that a local meeting taking place was just coming to an end so were able to sneak in and take a few photos but sadly no video out of respect for the gentleman who kindly let us have a quick look around before locking up.

“…the most stuuning and spectacular view of any church i have visited”

Lynton itself is a small town on the Exmoor coast, settled atop of the cliffs above the harbour village of Lynmouth, connected to Lynton by the narrow gauge cliff railway. The beautiful church here on its commanding outlook across the bay has been enlarged and altered over the years, most notable in 1741 when the nave was build, yet the tower is mainly 13th century. Much of the rebuilding is broadly medieval in form, yet there is some good Art Nouveau detailing, including some combined with neo-Norman features. Many of the towns buildings were constructed in the latter half of the 19th century and the early part of the 20th century and befitting a cliff top seaside town, many of the streets up on different levels connected by alleyway and steps going up and down. Evidence of Iron Age activity can be found at the nearby Roborough Castle and the novel Lorna Doone was set in the Lynton area and their are many beautiful coastal walks and paths running nearby. Nearby is the spectacular Valley of the Rocks with it’s stunning views and mysterious tales of the werewolves to just waiting to be divulged and our next port of call. But before moving on we made time to simply stand and stare in peace at this ‘out of the world‘ view….

The interior of St Mary the Virgin Church at Lynton, once again showing the Neville Sheild and some beautiful stained glass windows

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynton

  • The bloodline connection is again that of The ‘Cainan’ connection

Valley of the Rocks, Lynton: Tales of Old Kingdoms and werewolves may seem to have fallen straight out of the pages of Folkelore and Fantasy, but are they? The Valley of the Rocks is a truly magical and wild place where these ancient tales of of old kingdoms and roaming werewolves really do come to life. It is situated just half a mile west of Lynton in Devon and is a vast scenic area of outstanding natural beauty, with coastal views unsurpassed and ferral goats running wild. There have been many reported sightings of werewolf activity up to the 1990’s which we talk about further in the video.

A spectacular sunset over ‘The Valley of the Rocks’ which is not quite as ‘natural’ as one is led to believe….

But most importanly and undocumted, the whole area was once a vast early kingdom for the Irish Kings, of which almost nothing has ever been written about; it was the actual landing place of the first invading kings from Ireland who thus settled here and left many traces upon the land. My first instinctual thoughts when driving into the valley, not knowing anything about it, was ‘wow!’ what an amazing castle; something that took me completely by surprise! When one looks around the area one can indeed see the remains of a large fortress, temples and many other buildings of ancient everyday life of which is explained in the video but of which nothing is written about. One can sense a great power and energy alignment here as the early settlement was built purposefully  on the site of ancient pyramids placed within the land, by by those who came first with intent and design, hence why it is such an important place. The pyramids are there for all to see and ‘feel’ yet hidden carefully within ‘plain sight’ and most folks will never know… One can certainly feel the energies and power here; it is indeed a very sacred site. Interestingly as soon as we started filming, what had been a quiet and deserted scene was now populated by a mixture of ‘listeners’ and ‘watchers’ seemingly intent on diverting us off the track as it were, though patience and stealth prevailed. Listen carefully to the video for further explanation.

Close up detail of the ‘Old Kingdom’ showing where once fine buildings and temples etc would have been

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Valley_of_the_Rocks

The stunning sunset as we departed reluctantly from this very sacred place & video below with previously untold tellings

THE VALLEY OF THE ROCKS & OVER THE SEA TO ST MICHAELS MOUNT

 

Day Four Sunday 23rd April 2017: St Michael’s Mount: After a beautifully relaxing, yet all too brief journey across the sea to St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, we embarked upon the shores of the the beautiful and fairy tale world of St Michael’s Mount. The mount has many secrets to reveal to those who are willing to look and listen, secrets not ever documented in the present world of men…. In the meantime enjoy the ride across the waters in the video above. 🙂

St Michael’s Mount & terraced gardens over looking the ocean & a first glimps of the solitary unmarked cross…

St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall is a small tidal island in Mount’s Bay, linked to the mainland by a man-made causeway of granite, of which much of the actual island is made, and which is passable between mid-tide and low water. It is managed by the National Trust; the castle and chapel having been in the hands of the St Aubyn family since about 1650. The earliest buildings on the summit date to the 12th century. The mount’s cornish language name literally means ‘the grey rock in a wood’ maybe hinting to a time before the sea flooded and the island was cut off from the main-land with maybe many more tales that lie hidden within ‘folk memory’. Remains of trees have been seen at low tide following storms on the beach at Perranuthoe and radiocarbon dating has established the submerging of the hazle wood at about 1700BC.

Views from te summit overlooking the battlements & ocean – click to enlarge

Historically, St Michael’s Mount was a Cornish counterpart of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy, France with which it shares the same tidal island characteristics and the same conical shape, in spite of it being much smaller, it was given to the Benedictine religous order  by Edward the Confessor in the 11th century. There is evidence of people living in the area during the Neolithic period, as important ancient finds such as an arrow-head and flint tools have been unearthed in the gardens on the island.  It is thought that the site could have been a monastry in the 8th to early 11th centuries and as said Edward the Confessor gave it to the Norman Abbey of Mont Saint-Michael. It was a priory of that abbey until the dissolution of the alien house, as a side-effect of the of the war in France by Henry V, when it was given to the Abbess and Convent of Syon at Iselworth, Middlesex in 1424, thus ending its association with Mont St Michael and any connetion with Looe Island, dedicated to the Archangel Michael.

The monastic buildings were built during the 12th century and in 1275 an earthquake destroyed the original Priory Church, which was subsequently rebuilt in the late 14th century and has thus remained in use. In 1755 the Lisbon earthquake cause a tsunami to strike the Cornish coast over 1,000 miles away. The sea rose six feet in ten minutes at St Michaels Mount, ebbing at the same rate and continuing to rise and fall for some five hours and it was reported that a great loss of life and property occurred along this Cornsh coast.

Inside the Abbey & Chapel on the mount – click each image to expand

A local legend states that during the 6th century, before a castle was ever built, the island sat upon what was once home to an 18 foot giant names Cormaran, who lived in a cave with his ill-gotten treasures from terrorizing local towns and villages. That is, until a young farmer’s son named Jack took on this gigantic menace, who had an appetite for cattle and children, and killed him by trapping him in a concealed pit, bringing down his axe upon his head. When he returned home, the elders in the village gave him a hero’s welcome and henceforth, called him ‘Jack the Giant Killer.

On the quiet terraces of the island that overlook the sea, and not writen about anywhere, is a mysterious single solitary cross; a reminder of an earlier time in our history, that to some is lost forever but to others is as alive and vibrant as it ever was. The cross is a direct bloodline connection to ‘Solomon Solamh’ and to those who choose to know, a further significant ‘Neville Stronghold’. So for the first time on our quests we have mention now of the Irish Bloodline connection and of how the ‘True Bloodline‘ came to these lands….

Our lasting thoughts of that day would be with that solitary cross, that if ever there were a place so profound, it would be that of St Michael’s Mount. Standing alone upon the mount and looking towards the ocean we see the solitary cross upon the mound.and to that we cast our eyes and thoughts to Solomon, to the of Solamh. Such that a place so sacred and treasured should always be. As the tides of time do wash the sands of history away, we see that the mound exists to share with those whom see it’s beauty beyond the mundane…

  • The bloodline connection is of the ‘Solomon Solamh, whos unmarkd cross is seen above’ and again of the enigmatic ‘Nevilles’

Farewell to a magical island

Braddock Church Braddock Cornwall: Churchyard and Fields: So here we were in the dead of night, on a night time quest to a very deserted and lonely church in Cornwall. Braddock Church is dedicated to St Mary the Virgin; the earliest parts of the building being Norman with a Norman font inside. This area is the site of the Battle of Braddock Down; a hard fought battle of the civil war which took place on the 19th January 1643. It was a crushing defeat for the parliamentarian army where many souls were lost. It is the site of the Cromwellian Defeat in fact. Braddock (or Broadoak) village itself is a civil parish in Cornwall which is situated about seven miles west of Liskard and five miles south-east of Bodmin. it is rural in character and is well wooded, especially in the north. The earliest parts of the church are Norman but an asle and a tower were added in the 15th century. The font is Norman and there are many good examples of woodcarvings in the church. Obviously it was the dead of night so unable to get in and see for our selves.

There are stories abound here of various manifestations in the churchyard and nearby fields, roaming vampires and connections to the werewolf tales at the Valley of the Rocks. and so we were here to investigate further; to see if there were any truths in the tales.

Although nothing untoward shows in the photos one does get a sense of the desolation & atmosphere here; amazed that anything came out at all…

It was very dark and challenging to film and the sense of forboding and negative energies felt by most of our party is very hard to convey on film, but one can hear the reactions of our party as we venture around the church, especially when we all heard the deep growling warning noise emanating from out of the darkness. One does get a sense of the darkness and desolation of the area too; both of physical and of a metaphysical darkness as the link below treis to convey….

Again not much on film but a very interesting experience at Bradock Church in Cornwall

HAUNTED BRADOCK CHURCH

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braddock,_Cornwallmystery

 

the moors

We loved Devon & Cornwall, the peace, the beauty, the many tales and of course the truths…”

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

May 2017 “The Keeper of Scrolls”

THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES: QUEST NUMBER THREE

  • ST MARY’S CHURCH, AKENHAM SUFFOLK

St Mary’s Church situated near Akenham in Suffolk really is right off the beaten track; up the grass track in fact. It winds past Rise Hall (formely Rice Hall); one of the church’s ancient manors and nestles timelessly in the beautifully serene English countryside or so it would seem. For this lovely little almost abandoned church does hold some secrets to a very interesting past. It also has the nickname of ‘St Mary’s in the Fields’, standing on a rise amidst the meadows, over a quarter of a mile from the nearest road and so a challenge in itself to actually locate it in the first place. Once at St Mary’s the vews across the surrounding coutryside are truly stunning. But yet again another church that seemingly no-one wants ‘outsiders’ to find and like Borley Church there are no road signs or direction to it. We ended up having to ask  directions a few times to folks who seemed reticent to give them. So thus St Mary’s here became quest number three…

To read more about the church and it’s history please see the links below:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Mary’s_Church,_Akenham

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akenham

IMAG0189      IMAG0225

This flint-towered church from the later middle ages lies hidden in the heart of the rural English countryside.

There are several interesting tales about St Mary’s church; stories of  strange ‘happenings’ ocurring; people seeing ‘ghosts’ appearing at the church windows and as was mentioned breifly in the previous clip, the bombings of world war two and reports from the village of the bells ringing for no reason. It has even been said that one can ‘raise the devil’ by walking thirteen times widdershins around the church – well we are going to put all this to the test later.

Obviously the church is clearly not in use and is curently beeing restored to its former glory. What is further interesting is that Queen Mary 1st of England, King Henry 8th’s and Catherine of Aragon’s daughter was quiet heavely envolved in this particular area of the land. It is interesting to note that when we went to Borley Church, Sir Edward Walgrave, who was buried in one of the tombs there, inside of the church, was the chief adviser to Queen Mary 1st and when she had her coronation, it was at this very church, St Mary’s of Akenham pretty much in the middle of nowhere, that there was a major celebraton to mark her coronation on becoming Queen after Henry died. There was also another ‘mystery’, that of a very young child who had died and who was buried not in the graveyard, but on the actual boundary of the church.

The church was actually built, we think in the thirtenth century but there are reports of another church on this site pre the thirteenth century  but we cannot be sure that this is fact. What is more important is that the church was involved under the ‘Burial Reformation Act’ in one of the most major cases of the time in England. This act gave people the right to be buried and it all came about because of a man named Drury who was a a reverend here; he was very devout to his religon and faith and the last of the ‘line’ of reverends who shared the same name.The case is quiet well known and has been documented in many publications over the years.

IMAG0226

The Strange Tale of Little Joseph Ramsey: One of the most interesting stories is the fascinating account of  a young lad called Joseph Ramsey who died when he was only two years old, in according to varying accounts, in quite suspicous circumstances. Because he was classed as what is known as a ‘non conformist’ he was not allowed to be buried within the church and it was agreed between Drury and the other reverend that Joseph could be buried on the outer part of the fences of the church boundary. But something happened for Rev Drury to agree to bury this poor lad in the church but on unsanctified ground. There is a small gravestone to the edge of the church boundary which to all intents and purposes seems to be Joseph’s gravestone and many people of the nineteenth century believed this to be so but in fact this is NOT his stone; his small stone which is said to have been blown down by the wind and was subsequently moved and re-erected is to be found even further out still.

See our Youtube link to discover more about the tale and the mystery of little Joseph Ramsey….

AKEMAN CHURCH & JOSEPH RAMSEY

PART TWO: RAISING THE DEVIL….

  •  ST MARY’S CHURCH AKENHAM

As a ‘willing’ Simon made his way widdershins (anti-clockwise) around the church we did notice some strange changes in the overall atmosphere of the area and more than one of our party experienced pressures to the forehead occuring round about the 3rd lap. On completing the laps a weird ‘darkness’ had descended and the atmosphere had become decidedly ‘heavy’. So was it the ‘devil’ or something else or maybe just coincidence? Though as anyone knows there is no such thing as coincidence….. Of course one has to keep an open mind and decide for one’s  self.

Follow our Youtube link to see our willing volunteer on his journey to ‘raise the devil’

AKEMAN CHURCH: RAISING THE DEVIL

We were very priviledged to be able to obtain the keys to the church from Jeremy at Rise Hall nearby and thus were able to enter in. It was a fascinating experience as there were several points of ‘energy’ within the church, mainly within the lectern where one could also sense other strong ‘anomalies’ too, at the altar where the energy was very strong yet very calming and from the ‘real’ cross itself, the priests staff which was buzzing with healing energy. The feel and power of the energies at this site were not at all unlike the powerful energies we experienced at Spooks Hill.

Summary of the day and points to ponder on…

  1. Important to note that when Simon went round on the 6th lap of the church, the black cloud arrived, yet ONLY above the church and the immediate vicinity and thus hail stones happened;  BUT NOT down at Rise Hall or anywhere else!
  2. The distinct vibrations occurred from the Lectern in the church and were strong in sense and being, BUT the main Priest Altar was a calm flowing vibration; this is significant
  3. The Priest Staff had a lot of power to it; oddly it had healing power
  4. Joseph Ramsey’s gravestone was certainly worth the visit to make the connection to previous quests.
  5.  Joseph Ramseys tombstone is of relevance and interesting, as its another link to the past and a certain future
  6. On Simon’s 6th lap widdershins,  our physic researcher, Alek had an intense pressure in the front and side of his head and that is also when the black cloud arrived as previously mentioned
  7. We seemed to have two people ‘walking their dogs’ and lurking about nearby when we first arrived; similar to the Borley experience
  8. Speaking with Jeremy Hall, a really nice chap. He gave the true account passed down to him by his past family members and confirmed the issues raised over Joseph’s burial which led to the Burial Reformation Act and was covered in the national newspapers for some 12 months.
  9. Drury when he stormed off from the burial service, actually locked the people in the graveyard by locking the main gate! That piece of information is not recorded anywhere, but clearly true.

IMAG0195    IMAG0196   IMAG0204

The three areas of the church where the various ‘energies’ were focused; namely the priests altar, the lectern and the priests staff (the REAL cross). The eagle-eyed and astute amongst you, may already have spotted certain connections to our other quests this far and that a ‘pattern’ seems to be emerging to form the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The answers as always are hidden between the lines often in plain sight.

If you are interested in joining us in our quests please leave a message here or email: moon.willow@ntlworld.com

if you are interested in joining The Priory itself please see this link: http://priory7.wix.com/priory

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

The Devil and I…..

Betwixt the strokes of the clanging bell

Midnight hangs like a waiting shroud.

There’s a place so dark no shadows fall;

Tis a void amidst the changing years

So go not there for you’ll not return.

Behind the chimes of the old and the new,

Is an alleyway ancient between the realms

And in this place you must not wait

Lest you be seen by those who observe.

Only the brave will want to go.

Only the courageous will want to know.

For this is the land at the end of time;

The forgotten land where the Devil rides out.

If you hear him, you must close your eyes.

If you see his chariot above the skies

You must wish three wishes so he’ll then pass by.

Do not linger and do not look

For if you do, your soul he will pluck.

At the stroke of midnight

Just walk away,

Do not look back

And do not stay.

How do I know this?

How could this be?

Well of course

The Devil and I keep good company…..

The Devil Rides Out...

The Devil Rides Out…

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