Tag Archive: Bloodline connections


THE GRAIL QUEST

“Our scriptures hint at the fact that the Grail is associated with the Holy or ‘pure’ blood lineages, such as that of the Ninasians, or the Nevilles, as in coming from heaven and that the Grail Kingship, the Holy Knights, ‘the’ Jesus, the Apostles, The Templars, all had an understanding of the Grail; a connection within time and space. The Templar Knights are often known as the Grail custodians or guardians, so would that make the Knights of the Round Table and Jesus and his disciples guardians of it too? The Grail is said to equal purity and relates to DNA, so could the Grail be within the DNA that relates to specific bloodlines? DNA does not neccesarily follow a linear path line, it is metaphysical, and can (and will) jump in and out of bloodlines of specific peoples (traits) such as those being of certain bloodlines; the Mary Magdalene line and the Jesus line. These people (traits) of these lines are often the ‘keepers of the secrets’. It is important to stop thinking in linear, mundane earthly terms and to start thinking in metaphysical/dimensional terms.”

QUEST 28: BRITTANY: FRANCE

MONDAY 4TH NOVEMBER 2019

Monday 4th Nov: Chartres Cathedral: So after a truly lovely stay in Autun, full of revelations, surprises and more dots to join on our Grail Quest, we sadly left our lovely chateau for an early start on a four hour drive to Chartres Cathedral, hoping to arrive at about 12pm. The weather was divine and the drive enjoyable and we arrived to see the catherdral bathed in bright sunlight, with time enough for a well deserved lunch before visiting the cathedral. The cathedral has a wonderfully comanding view over its surrounding and looked stunning bathed in sunlight.

This cathedral, shown above, is also known as Cathedral of Our Lady of Chartres and is actually the ‘real’ Notre Dame; the real ‘our lady’. Chartres is a commune and capital of the Eure-et-Loir department in France. It is located about 90 km (56 mi) southwest of Paris and is famous world-wide for its  cathedral. Mostly constructed between 1193 and 1250, the Gothic cathedral is in an exceptional state of preservation.  Much of the old town, including the library associated with the School of Chartres, was destroyed by bombs in 1944. Chartres has an interesting history, read more in the link below, and was one of the principal towns in Gaul of the Carnutes, a Celti . In the Gallo-Roman period, it was called Autricum, name derived from the river Autura (Eure), and afterwards civitas Carnutum, “city of the Carnutes”, from which Chartres got its name. The city was burned by the Normans in 858, and unsuccessfully besieged by them in 911.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartres

Chartres and its stunning cathedral

The Cathedral is very famous for its rose windows and of course it’s labyrinth, which was sadly covered with chairs the day we visited, only being removed on certain occasions. However the outside and in of this magnificant building is covered with much beauty. The cathedral is well-preserved for its age: the majority of the original stained-glass windows survive intact, while the architecture has seen only minor changes since the early 13th century. The building’s exterior is dominated by heavy flying buttresses which allowed the architects to increase the window size significantly, while the west end is dominated by two contrasting spires; a 105-metre (349 ft) plain pyramid completed around 1160 and a 113-metre (377 ft) early 16th-century Flamboyant spire on top of an older tower. Equally notable are the three great façades, each adorned with hundreds of sculpted figures illustrating key theological themes and narratives.  Since at least the 12th century the cathedral has been an important destination for travellers. It remains so to the present, attracting large numbers of Christian pilgrims, many of whom come to venerate its famous relic, the Sancta Camisa, said to be the tunic worn by the Virgin Mary at Christ’s birth, as well as large numbers of secular tourists who come to admire the cathedral’s architecture and historical merit.

At least five cathedrals have stood on this site, (read much more in the link below) each replacing an earlier building damaged by war or fire. The first church dated from no later than the 4th century and was located at the base of a Gallo-Roman wall; this was put to the torch in 743 on the orders of the Duke of Aquitaine. The second church on the site was set on fire by Danish Pirates in 858. This was then reconstructed and enlarged by Bishop Gislebert, but was itself destroyed by fire in 1020. A vestige of this church, now known as Saint Lubin Chapel, remains, underneath the apse of the present cathedral. It took its name from Lubinus, the mid-6th-century Bishop of Chartres. It is lower than the rest of the crypt and may have been the shrine of a local saint, prior to the church’s re-dedication to the Virgin Mary.

The Grail Clues of Chatres Cathedral

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chartres_Cathedral

As far as our Quest goes there is a connection to Johanns Desposyni here (47th GGF) (505-590). There are three paintings of a particular interest here to us and importantly two important clues in our Grail Quest. The rose window is stunning; the rose being very important to the Templars and Craft folks; connecting to ‘Life’ on many deep and symbolic levels. Sadly though the cathedral itself has lost most of the energy that it would once have had, dissipated over time by human interaction, i would guess, but never the less i was thrilled and honoured to have seen the grail clues for myself, although only a part of the bigger picture; i was humbled to take my stand amongst rising clouds and gleaming chalices….

Grail Bloodline Connection:

  • Johanns Desposyni here (47th GGF) (505-590)

We left Chatres after a lovely few hours and some well deserved retail therapy and headed off on the road again to Boussac, Bretagne. Four hours later we arrived at our next charming destination in Boussac, a rather lovely flat right next to the local church; our home for the next three nights.

Redon Abbey, Redon: After a fairly leisurly start to the day we journeyed in the sunshine for about an hour and a half to reach Reddon to visit Reddon Abbey. Redon is a  commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine department in Brittany in northwestern France. It borders the Morbihan and Loire-Atlantique departments. It is situated at the junction of the Oust and Vilaine rivers and  Nantes-Brest canal, which makes it well known for its autumn and winter floods. Very little information exists about this area before 832, however it would seem that there was a parish by the name of Riedones which gave the town its name. In 832, Conwoion, a Breton monk with the help of the Carolingian Emperor Loues le Pieux founded the abbey of Saint-Sauveur de Redon. Today, documents relating to the life of the abbey still exist. In the Middle Ages, Redon benefited from maritime commerce due to its location on the Vilaine. It is a very lively and interesting looking town with lots to see and do with some lovely old shopping streets. Even at the time of year we were there, the town was alive with plenty of tourists, and i would imagine the streets to be really buzzing and packed in the summer months.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redon,_Ille-et-Vilaine

Redon Abbey, or Abbey of Saint-Sauveur, Redon (‘Abbey of the Holy Saviour’) is a former Benedictine abbey founded in 832 by Saint Conwoion, at the point where the Oust into the  Vilaine, on the border between Nesstria and Brittany. The abbey reached its height during the late 11th century and the 12th century, when it governed 27 priories and 12 parishes throughout Brittany, and was a popular pilgrimage destination. The monastery consisted of a dormitory, gatehouse, guesthouse, an infirmary and a garden, where Saint Condeloc worked: among other things he dismissed a plague of caterpillars by an appeal to the Holy Trinity. The former chapter house is now a separate chapel. The crossing tower and parts of the porch are Romanesque, of the 11th century. The nave, with an octagonal cupola, was extended in the 12th century in the Gothic style, and the transept and the cloister were also added then.  A fire in 1780 damaged the nave, and it was rebuilt shorter than it had been previously. During restorations in 1950 medieval frescos were revealed.

Beautiful artworks and grail secrets hidden within the peace of Redon Abbey

From a Craft/Templar perspective the abbey had an amazing ‘feel’ to it and I always think that abbeys do have a different feel to them than churches, a different vibe. See our video below for a lovely tour around with some beautiful chanting in the background; one gets a true sense of days gone by when the monks would have been around. In the pas,t the the whole area would have been under the Roman command and later on under the Knights Templar command. There are many beautifully stunning, and i would guess priceless artworks in the abbey.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redon_Abbey

The third clue to the Grail is here, making this a very special place indeed and also another dot to join up. From Chartres Catherdral to Redon Abbey, grail secrets revealed… There are also some rather suprising ‘finds’ here, if one knows where to look; a shield with an inverted cross that connects to an apostle which has nothing to do with satanism, or the anti-christ as portrayed in the movies, for they are all red herrings within time. We were lucky today, within the abbey for we timed it well, lots of school trips were bustling about outside waiting to enter, yet we managed to find a lovely peaceful slot in time. When one walks around there are lots of little altars and chapels, often to our lady, and various saints, all giving thanks. We filmed a wonderful painting (see above in the photos) of clouds descending from heaven, with ‘Magdalene’ (?) passing the child to one of the ‘wise men’ as it were; a wonderful representation of certain aspects of how things were.

Redon Abbey & the view from St Michaels Mount

Before leaving we had a splendid lunch in a rather swish resturant followed by a stroll around the lovely old streets of Redon. A good day…..

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Connects to the Fordham Line
  • Adalrad was born here (37th GGF) 840-904

Saint Malo Church, Dinan: After another short drive of just over an hour, we arrived at Saint Malo Church in the lively town of Dinan; a walled Breton town and a commune in the Cotes-d’Armor department in northwestern France. The town has an exceptional setting upon the hillside overlooking the river Rance. The area alongside the River Rance is known as the port of Dinan and is connected to the town by the steep streets Rue Jerzual and its continuation outside the walls, the Rue de Petit Fort.  It is a lovely medieval town on the hilltop, and has many fine old buildings, some of which date from the 13th century. The town retains a large section of the city walls, part of which can be walked round.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinan

There is not much about this large, almost cathedral-like church on the internet but i managed to source a few  details. The church of Saint Malo in Dinan was built in 1490 on land located inside the ramparts of the town to replace a more exposed church outside the walls that had been destroyed. The choir, apse and transept were built during the 15th century in a flamboyant Gothic style. By the end of the 16th century, the nave was still incomplete and hard to imagine, the church had a simple thatched roof.

The architecture inside & out Saint Malo Church is stunning and would rival any cathedral

During the French Revolution almost all the original furnishing and religious works of art were destroyed, burned or sold and the church was amazingly converted into a stable and forge. During this period the nave and the tower were destroyed by a fire. The church eventually fell into ruin but it was re-consecrated in 1803 and reconstruction and restoration work began in 1808. and eventually completion in 1885. But we did have a good stroll around, there are some amazing windows here; one in particular. A beautiful building with some amazing artworks, although not directly seen as clues on our grail quest, but the Templar symbology is undeniable.

Many wonderful treasure are to be inside the church with some stunning stained-glass windows

https://loirevalleyexperiences.blogspot.com/2014/11/church-on-sunday-saint-malo-dinan.html

The town is abundant with interesting and tempting shops selling much fine Breton produce and of course gifts galore. We stayed awhile here and enjoyed a nice coffee,  some wonderful retail therapy buying local produce and goods. It had turned out to be a rater wet day, causing the whole town to glisten in the rain!

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Has associations with Knight Alain De Bretagne (42nd GGF) 680-740, whom lived at Dinan and was born in Ilk-et-Villaine.

Church of Saint Michael, Saint Malo: We had a short night-time drive right out to the coast at Saint Malo, Bretan; an historic sea port in Brittany on the Channel coast. It is a walled city with a long history of piracy (interesting) earning much wealth from local extortion and overseas adventures. In 1944, the Allies heavly bombarded Saint Malo, which was garrisoned by German troops. Today it is a popular tourist centre, with a ferry terminal serving Portsmouth, Jersey, Guernsey and Poole.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Malo

Sadly it was quiet late and very dark when we arrived so we kind of had to play it by ear a bit to get our bearings. We found our way to the beach but it was very cold, very dark and extremely windy, but spectacular non-the-less, so worth a stop to admire the view. We eventually found the cathedral of the town, down some small side streets, but expectedly it was closed, yet i managed a few night-time shots. Even though I was glad we found it, i am not actually sure whether this was where we were actually meant to be or not. It was cold and very dark so not a time for exploring; it was an adventure anyway!

On looking further at our info the Church of Saint Michel de Rotheneuf was also listed on our agenda; just slightly along the coast, so if ever we go back in daylight we can decide,   but on the other hand they say that everything is meant to be, everything happens for a reson and maybe we were meant to be where we were after all…..

https://www.airbnb.co.uk/things-to-do/places/1283414?s=4&_set_bev_on_new_domain=1584215706_jkP4EzkNuRUEKRRO

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Has associations with Knight Alain De Bretagne (42nd GGF) 680-740.

 

“In time and space a story told
A shining challice from ages old
A kingly quest; a pot of gold
Yet only a few will forever hold”

 

challice

 

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’ March 2020

‘moon.willow@ntlworld.com’

Quest Number Eighteen: The Templar Sites of North Wales

Day Four: 15th January 2017

  • St Thomas Church: Rhyll
  • St Marchellos: Whitchurch, Denbigh
  • St Asaph Cathedral: Denbighshire

Beautiful Colwyn Bay at dusk

Rhyl: is a seaside resort town in the historic county of Denbigshire, situated on the north east coast of Wales, on the mouth of the River Clwyd. To the west is the suburb of Kinmel Bay, with the resort of Towyn further west, Prestatyn to the east and Rhuddlan to the south. At the 2011 census, Rhyl had a population of 25,149.  Rhyl has long been a popular tourist destination for people from all over Britain. Once an elegant Victorian resort, there was an influx of people from Liverpool and Manchester after the second world war, changing the face of the town. The area had declined dramatically by 1990, but has since improved due to a series of regeneration projects, including the sea front re-developement, bring new life to the area.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyl

St Thomas Church: This beautiful church in Rhyl is a listed building, containing many beautiful artworks and artifacts of a symbolic nature; it is a very fine example of high Victorian Gothic. The day we arrived was a Sunday and very busy with sunday services and christenings taking place, so we kind of had to sneak in for a quick look around between these activities, trying not to disturb the proceedings at all, so of course no filming though the church staff we welcoming and frindly.

The church is fairly new at 1867, with the spire being completed in 1865 but of course older building had been on the site previously. It boasts some stunning stained glass windows, includng a depiction of ‘The Light of the World’, one of my personal favourite pieces of art.

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/wa-1422-parish-church-of-st-thomas-rhyl#.WJcurDhAHIU

Wood carvings inside the church looking rather interestingly like a set of Tracing Boards…

Beautiful embroidery and other stunning artworks plus the two beautiful stained glass windows depicting the following quotes…

“I am The Good Shepherd, the good shepherd giveth his life for his sheep”

“I am The Light of the World, he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness but shall have the Light of Life”

Bloodline connections: The Parry’s were very strong here; we had hoped for some Fords (Ffords, Ffoords) but no evidence…

st-th-ryhl

St Marchellos: Whitchurch Denbigh: Following a very scenic drive we arrived at the equally scenic St Marchello’s church; a grade one listed church in the vale of Clwyd, with stunning views towards  Moel Famau. The grandest of all medieval Denbighshire parish churches, St. Marcella’s (or Llanfarchell) is also known as Whitchurch or Eglwys Wen ‘the white church’, probably from its originally whitewashed exterior. Its patroness Marchell the Virgin is said to have established her hermitage by a holy well here in the 7th century, and clearly the site was honoured as especially sacred. For though it now stands alone a mile from the present town centre (and further still from the old walled town by the castle), St. Marcella’s has always been Denbigh’s parish church. As such it was lavishly rebuilt in the local double-naved form during the late 15th century, with an imposing tower and a noble range of big ‘Perpendicular’ style windows.

One can see from the style of building that this is a true Templar church <click on image to enlarge>

Happily we were able walk straight inside this very beautiful Templar church, which stands upon a hillside commanding magnificant views across the countryside. The church is very old and one gets a real sense of history and peace within it. The ravages of time always take their toll on these old building yet thankfully much is left here to appreciate, including some depictions of very unusual animal carvings…

http://medieval-wales.com/site_31_denbigh.php

Our video clip will show and explain more and the photos show many details

ST MARCHELLO’S CHURCH NEAR WHITCHURCH

 

Many treasures to be found inside St Marchello’s Church (click on image to view)

 

Bloodline connections:

  • The connections here are of Gabrielle Parry of 1613, who was the Vicar here, and  then from 1290 Henry de Clerk; both noteworthy finds.
  • Saint Marchello herself was what would be known as a pilgrim, but who was she really and where did she come from? I am reminded of a little church in Cormwall; similar names…

 

St Asaph Cathedral: And so we had reached the last part of the journey of this particular quest to North Wales. St Asaph’s cathedral is in the centre of the town and dates back 1,400 years, though the current building dates from the 13th century. It is sometimes claimed to be the smallest Anglican cathedral in Great Britain. A church was originally built on or near the site by Saint Kentigern in the 6th century. Saint Asa (or Asaph) a grandson of Paba Post Prydain, followed after this date. The earliest parts of the present building date from the 13th century when a new building was begun on the site after the original stone cathedral was burnt by King Edward 1 in 1282; this present building being established in 1285.

It is certainly a magnificant building yet not overwhelming or overpowering in it’s pressence at all and luckily it was open to us on this late afternoon visit, so time for a perfect look around. There are some interesting pieces of artwork and evidence of certain names from the bloodline we are researching, so good finds.  Beautiful and meaningful works of art can be found here relating to the Knights Templar, John the Baptist and The Lamb of God etc. Certainly a beautiful cathedral with a very peaceful and serene atmosphere. Much more to see here in our video..

ST ASAPHS CATHERDRAL, DENBIGHSHIRE.

Click to enlarge and view image

Bloodline connections:

  • The Bloodline connection here is to the Clarke’s, the Parry’s and Perry’s.
  • Displayed is a copy of one of Karl’s ancestors bible’s; the bible of Richard Parry, from Alek’s mother’s side.

So a very fitting end to a very memorable quest in a beautiful country; there were two sites we did not gain access too and one further site; Worcester Cathedral, which we paid a brief visit to on the journey home.

Day Five

  • Worcester Catherdral: Worcester
  • Travel Home

Worcester Cathedral: And so the last part of the North Wales puzzle makes itself known; we arrived in Worcester rather late in the day, as an extra treat on out journey home. However we knew the building to be open until 6pm and we just made it by the skin of our teeth. An evening service was going on as we arrived, though visitors were still welcomed with parts of the cathedral made out of bounds while the service was going on. However afterwards, a few minutes were still available to walk around the altar area of the cathedral, despite rope cordens being hasilty erected and an over-zealous chief chorester trying to evict us dead on 6pm, at the poing of us viewing the altar…. We did manage some stunning photos though and see clear evidence of the ‘Clarke’ bloodline here.

Worcester Cathedral, before the English Reformation was known as Worcester Priory. An  Anglican Cathedral in Worcester, England it is situated on a bank overlooking the River Severn.  It is the seat of the Bishop of Worcester; it’s official name is ‘The Cathedral Church of Christ and the Blessed Mary the Virgin of Worcester’. Built between 1084 and 1504, Worcester Cathedral represents every style of English architecture from Norman Perpendicular Gothic. It is famous for it’s Norman crypt and unique chapter house,  it’s unusual Transitional Gothic bays, it’s fine woodwork and its “exquisite” central tower (see above photos)

The interior of Worcester Cathedral showing off it’s stunning Gothic  designs – click on image to enlarge

What is now the Cathedral was founded in 680 as a Priory with Bishop Bosel at it’s head. The first priory was built in this period, but sadly nothing now remains of it. The crypt of the present-day cathedral dates from the 10th century and the time of St Oswold, Bishop of Worcester. Monks and nuns had been present at the Priory since the seventh century and the monastery became Benedictine in the second half of the tenth century although dates do vary here. There is an important connection with Fleury Abbey in France, as Oswald the bishop of Worcester from 961 to 992 and prior at the same time, was professed at Fleury and introduced the monastic rule of Fleury to Worcester. Remains of the Priory dating from the 12th and 13th centuries can still be seen. The Priory came to an end with King Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monastries and thus the Benedictine monks were removed on 18 January 1540 and replaced by secular canons.

It is worth noting that Henry Parry; of the Parry line we are researching and Alek’s own family bloodline, was Bishop of Worcester here from 1610 to 1616 as the plaque below will testify. he was a very important and highly values person of his time.

http://www.worcestercathedral.co.uk/Heritage.php

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester_Cathedral

A example of some of the Templar influenced artifacts and carvings and the  Parry and Clarke connections found inside Worcester Cathedral

A few extra snippets to round up our trip below

GATHERING LOOSE ENDS…. ST PETERS CHURCH PWLLHELLI ST THOMAS CHURCH RHYLL ST ASAPH CATHEDRAL DENBIGSHIRE

Bloodline connection:

  • Upon the war memorial we have several Clarkes ver cleary indicated.
  • Th Bishop of Worcester from 1610 to 1616 was indeed Henry Parry no less.

The Clarke and Parry connection

Sadly we never managed to gain access to St Paul’s Church, Colwyn Bay or St Mary’s Church, Menai Bridge due to the late hour of the day when we arrived, nevertheless i have included some info on them anyway for those interested in tracking our quests. However i was unable to document or photo any bloodline evidence at this current point in time due to not gaining access; although the sites are definitlely on the ‘points of time’

c-b

Across Colwyn Bay at night; an apt farewell to an amazing quest in time…

January 2017 ‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

Take a look at the new Priory webpage too: http://priory7.wixsite.com/priory

“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”

%d bloggers like this: