THE PRIORY INVESTIGATES QUEST NUMBER THIRTEEN:

DEEPER INTO THE BLOODLINES…

  • St Guthlacs Church Market Deeping
  • St Giles Church Matlock
  • Holy Trinity Church Rollestone
  • St Mary’s Church Buckden

St Guthlacs Church Market Deeping: As our night-time visit to St Guthlacs Church in Market Deeping proved to be so interesting and eventful, we decided that a day-time visit was certainly called for. (details of the church etc and our previous visit can be found in Quest Number Twelve; our previous quest) The tales of St Guthlac of course do contain a strong connection to Demonology which you can read about in these links or find out much more from our video link.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Guthlac%27s_Church,_Market_Deeping

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guthlac_of_Crowland

St Guthlac’s Church is a plain church yet we did found some interesting symbolism shown below and explained in the video above:-

One can see in the stained glass window above, another reference to The Serpent, and four tiles on the floor around the font with Mathew, Mark, Luke and John represented by specific symbolic creatures and an unusual carving on the wall of a winged creature.

In respect of our research into the blood-lines; we find a big connection here to the important Neville line; other names we are tracing that surface here are the Ford line and the Fordham line.

St Giles Church Matlock Derbyshire: So next we journed onwards until we reached the rugged countryside of Derbyshire and St Giles Church in Matlock. This church seems to sit precariously upon steeply stepped limestone cliffs overlooking the River Derwent. Reflecting the ‘lie of the land’ as they say, also overlooking the town of Matlock; the views are indeed stunning from the church’s high and splendid vantage point.

Matlock Parish Church and its splendid views (click on any image to enlarge)

Although there has been a church on this spot since the middle of the twelfth century, most of the church was rebuilt in Victorian times but parts of the original building do remain including the twelfth century font and and fifteenth century tower. Matlock itself was mentioned in the Doomsday book, but not the church though, in 1086. The earliest written evidence for the existence of a church in Matlock dates from 1291. But importantly this church goes back to the Templars and even beyond; having connections to the banking system for the region and it was even said to have been a sheltering place for ‘The Grail’…

http://stgilesmatlock.co.uk/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matlock,_Derbyshire

This is a truly amazing church full of so much Templar symbolism within it’s walls. We have connections here to The Serpent (again) the Sun, Moon and Star, Ninhursag (the Mother Goddess), The ‘Jesus’, the Eastern Star and the Red and the Silver, which all makes perfect sense in respect of our quests. They say every picture tells a story and in this church of St Giles in Matlock, Derbyshire certainly does; an untold story in fact, of a hidden history of our homelands. These are stories just waiting to be told; just itching to find the light – one of the purposes of these amazing and wonderful quests in fact! See the link below for further indepth explanations of all th symbolism:-

Click on images to enlarge

We have connections in these photos above to The Serpent (again) the Sun, Moon and Star, Ninhursag (the Mother Goddess), The ‘Jesus’, the Eastern Star and the Red and the Silver, to name but a few.

The names asociated here in respect of the bloodlines we are tracing and researching are: the Clark (e) line, the Andrew (s) line and the Gregory line – evidence of which can all be found within the church itself.

for-poem

On the steep hillside….

Holy Trinity Church Rollestone: Still in Derbyshire and maybe the best and most revealing find of the day; if not of all our quests put together and how apt to be our thirteenth quest too! Our find here was a revelaton to say the lest, making all our quests very current and relevant. The church itself dates from the 12th century; the chancel was restored in 1878 and the tower in 1889. It apears that a church of some sort exsisted on this site from Saxon times, for there is a mention in the Doomsday book of 1086 which states that at Rollestone there was a priest and a church and indeed at about 1895, (which you will see in our video link) when parts of the present church were being restored some fragments of a Saxon cross-shaft were found.

At the very beginning of the 14th.century the tower was built, a broad low structure of two stories only, with thick walls of rubble.All its belfry windows remain in the walls, but blocked up; when, however, the tower was restored in 1889, the one in the western face was re-opened so as to be seen outside. In the bottom storey are three curious little single-light windows. During the 15th century two additional storeys were added regardless of the fact that the old rubble walls were never intended to carry such weight.  Certainly, buttresses were added, but these afforded insufficient support, and the ragstone of the lower part gradually decayed and gave way under the pressure, and as a result, in addition to placing the whole of the tower in great peril, thrust the nave arcades out of shape. The work of restoration was carried out in 1889-1890; first the old buttresses were taken down and rebuilt with new and substantial stone in very deep foundations of concrete; then the entire outer casing of the walls was gradually taken way and replaced with new stone. The tower arch was also taken down and rebuilt, and the old gallery which stretched across the arch was removed. The crown of the tower was repaired where necessary. This restoration cost about £800.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Trinity_Church,_Rolleston

Photos from outside of Holy Trinity Church Rollestone

The Neville family (de Neville) truly come to life here at Rollestone, especially when seeing the video above. It is almost as if they are walking out of history to greet us in person as we are introduced to them in their very own private family chapel! An amazing find making all our research culmative and very worthwhile. The other names from the blood-line here are Clarke which was a surprise to our head researcher who also had a ‘heads up’ to other Clarkes in the area.

Photos above (click to enlarge) taken in the private family chapel of the Neville Family; the family of the ‘Bloodline’. Within this small private chapel are to be found the family emblems of the Nevilles and those ‘of the Path’ will certainly recognise them as KT symbols from the teachings and degrees; symbols that of course connect to ‘The Serpent Priesthood’ and the untold histories of these lands. Below are general images from inside The Holy Trinity Church Rollestone showing in particular the heraldry of the True Royal Bloodline; in pride of place excactly where it would be expected to be  🙂

St Mary’s Church Buckden:  And so with night-time and darkness rapidly descending we made our way down the A1 to the village of Buckden in Cambridgeshire, to what was to be our last port of call for the day. Because of the un-earthly hour we did not for one moment expect to gain entry inside the church, although the fates had been very kind to us all day so far. So imaging our suprise then when turning up St Mary’s Church in Buckden in the dark, to find its doors somewhat welcomingly open with a church meeting going on in an anti-room. Time then to slide in for a good look around  🙂 Obviously it was dark in and around the church but we did get a good feel for the place and were also greeted later on, and had a chat with the gentleman of the gathering there. Out of respect of others being around it was not possible to film there on this occasion, but actually being able to gain entry more than sufficed!

http://www.stmarysbuckden.org.uk/

Buckden Church is recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086, within the jurisdiction of the Bishops of Lincoln, whose palace stands a few metres to the North. From Anglo-Saxon times until Georgian times, the church was well endowed by them. Sadly no traces of the Saxon church survives, although there are a few remnants from late Norman times. The structure of the church as it stands today is mostly unchanged from when it was rebuilt between 145 and 1440 by Bishop Gray and Alnwick of Lincoln, apart for the pews and the organ unfamiliar at that time to them. The porch was added around 1485 and the vestry and organ were replaced in the 1880’s. The last major work, involving the stripping of the interior and exterior plaster and the installation of new pews was completed in 1909.

It seemed like a peaceful church with some nice carvings, tile work and sculptures but i am still deciding whether the wooden carved ‘choir of angels’ flying aloft in the high ceiling beams are beautiful or creepy….  Talking of which my collegue managed to take these shots and of course i will leave it entirely up to you to decide whether the pillars and orbs of light are camera lens distortion or not, but look very closely at the last pew in the last shot towards the left of the photo, for ‘someone’ seems to be sitting there……

October 2016: Keeper of Scrolls

By all means contact us via this webpage if you are curious to find out much more about our quests on an England you thought you knew….

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“The Grail Kingship is within the realm of impossibilities”