Archive for January, 2020


THE GRAIL QUEST:

“Some sources say the Grail Bloodline came from Christ, but we of Craft know it to be much older, yet ‘the’ Jesus was still a carrier of the royal bloodline in this timeline. We have been taught in later degrees that the dynasty of kings whom descended from this royal bloodline were known as sorcerer-kings, some of whom hinted or even stated outright that they were in fact descendants of Lucifer. There is much speculation too of the royal/grail bloodline being connected to Cain/Samael/Lilith and Asmodeus; far too much to write about here but maybe for another day?  We can of course pause for some dot connections here; why sorcery? What is the connection to the Knights of the Round Table? What is the connection to the Templars? What is the connection to the Apostles? Could they all be one and the same; i.e. all have the same source?”

QUEST 28: GERMANY

30TH OCTOBER 2019

St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf, Germany: a dull, slightly wetter day today, but certainly not cold as we drove an hour from our digs, to reach St Nicholaus Church in a very quiet suburb of Dusseldorf; the capital and second-largest city of the most populous German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, after Cologne. The city lies in the centre of both the Rhine-Ruhr and the Rhineland Metropolitan Regions; most of the city lies on the right bank of the Rhine (as opposed to Cologne, whose city centre lies on the river’s left bank). “Dorf” means “village” in German  but of course these days Dussledorf is now a large city. There are strong Roman connections here, and thus to King Arthur, yet when the Roman Empire was strengthening its position throughout Europe, a few Germanic tribes clung on in marshy territory off the eastern banks of the Rhine. In the 7th and 8th centuries, the odd farming or fishing settlement could be found at the point where the small river Dussell flows into the Rhine. It was from such settlements that the city of Düsseldorf grew.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D%C3%BCsseldorf

St Nikolaus Church is a beautiful church and it was such a shame to find it locked, for it was the place of instruction for King Arthur, which is interesting for us and our quest; it is also the very same place where our head researcher’s grandfather recieved his instruction, for he was here in the area in relation to ‘religious’ reasons. A place of intruction too, in our current time frame, for holders of the quest/grail bloodline. So who know what treasures lie waiting inside but sadly the church was locked so those treasures inside were not for our eyes on this occasion, and we could find no telephone number to make contact with anyone.

This is an older-style church which has been here for the last 300 years, but obviously as we know with churches, built upon a much older and sacred site. There are some really nice Roman/Knights Templar connected artworks in the grounds of the church; a lovely peaceful feel to the site and a great shame we could not get inside. There is very little on the internet about this church, although it does have a facebook page, but more for social activities rather than history, so this church will remain an enigma…

The grounds and artworks at St Nikolaus Church, Dusseldorf <click on an image to expand>

St Nickolaus Church, Dusseldorf; last video on link

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur; his place of Instruction
  • Place of instruction also of our head researcher’s grandfather
  • Frotmund (Frotherius) link to the year 794 AD

Cologne Cathedral, Cologne, Germany: An approximately 50 minute drive bought us to the hustle and bustle of Cologne; one of Germany’s most well-know and much visited city. It is the largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the fourth-most popolous city in Germany. With slightly over a million inhabitants (1.08 million) within its city boundaries. Cologne is the largest city on the Rhine and also the most populous city both of the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region.  Centered on the left bank of the Rhine, Cologne is about 45 kilometres (28 mi) southeast of North Rhine-Westphalia’s capital of  Dusseldorf, where we had just driven from.

Cologne was founded and established in Ubii territory in the 1st century AD as the Roman Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, the first word of which is the origin of its name. An alternative Latin name of the settlement is Augusta Ubiorum, after the Ubii. “Cologne”, the French version of the city’s name, has become standard in English as well. Cologne functioned as the capital of the Roman province of  Germania Inferior and as the headquarters of the Roman military in the region until occupied by the Franks in 462. During the Middle Ages the city flourished as being located on one of the most important major trade routes between east and western Europe. Cologne was one of the leading members of the Hanseatic League and one of the largest cities north of the Alps in medieval and Renaissance times. Prior to World war two, the city had undergone several occupations by the French and also by the British (1918–1926). Cologne was one of the most heavily bombed cities in Germany during World War II, with the Royal Air Force (RAF) dropping 34,711 long tons (35,268 tonnes) of bombs on the city. The bombing reduced the population by 95%, mainly due to evacuation, and destroyed almost the entire city. With the intention of restoring as many historic buildings as possible, the successful postwar rebuilding has resulted in a very mixed and unique cityscape.

The hustle & bustle of Cologne with many styles of architecture

Cologne Cathedral or the Cathedral Church of St Peter: is a Catholic cathedral whch lies right in the heart of Cologne and it’s famous spires can be seen from right across the river and makes for a compelling sight. It was actually built upon a past Roman Temple and a Roman museum is nearby full of fascinating history and finds. It is the largest Gothic church in Northern Europe and has the second-tallest spires. The towers for its two huge spires gives the cathedral the largest façade of any church in the world. Construction of Cologne Cathedral began in 1248 but was halted in 1473, unfinished. Work did not restart until the 1840s, and the edifice was completed to its original Medieval plan in 1880.

When construction began on the present Cologne Cathedral in 1248,  the site had already been occupied by several previous structures. The earliest may have been for grain storage and possibly was succeeded by a Roman Temple built by Mercurius Augustus. From the 4th century on, the site was occupied by Christian buildings, including a square edifice known as the “oldest cathedral” commissioned by Maternus, the first bishop of Cologne. During excavations of the present cathedral, graves were discovered in the location of the oldest portion of the building; including that of a boy that was richly adorned with grave goods and another of a woman, popularly thought to be Wisigard. Both graves are thought to be from the 6th century.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cologne_Cathedral

Sadly there is no actual spirituality left at the cathedral, yet it is non the less a very splendid and impresive building, loved and visited by thousands. There is a bloodline connection here to King Marcomer 38-458, and there is much meaningful Templar symbology contained within this beautiful building.

Cologne Cathedral is full of beautiful & meaningful peices of art upon the floor and above… <click on an image to expand>

Grail Bloodline Conections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458 (51st GGF) born here, though a prior building.
  • King Arthur; the place of apprenticeship

St Paul’s Cathedral, Munster, Germany: With night-time almost upon us it was hit and miss whether we would make it to Munster on time to gain access to the cathedral as it was a two hour drive from Cologne, but made it we did by the skin of our teeth. The cathedral is a very imposing building set in a big square in the heart of the city and with festive lights sparking from the nearby shops, it cut quite an impresive sight. The name Munster is said to derive from Latin and Greek words meaning monastry and the building does indeed have a very monastry feeling to it. It is an independant city  in North Rhine-Westphalia,  Germany. It is in the northern part of the state and is considered to be the cultural centre of the Westphalia region. It is also capital of the local government region Munsterland and is today it is known as the bicycle capital of Germany. The city’s built-up area is quite extensive. There are no skyscrapers and few high-rise buildings but very many detached houses and mansions

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster

Munster Cathedral; very impresive looking in the dark.

Münster Cathedral or St.-Paulus-Dom is the cathedral church of the  Roman Catholic Diocese of Munster in Germany, and is dedicated to St Paul. It is counted among the most significant church buildings in the city and along with the City Hall, is one of the symbols of the city. The cathedral stands in the heart of the city, on a small hill called Horsteberg, which is encircled by streets and the and the Munstersche Aa river. Today the cathedral is the parish church for this area. The cathedral had two predecessors. The first cathedral (called the Ludgerus Dom, 805-1377) stood to the north of the current cathedral; the second cathedral was built in the tenth or eleventh century and was demolished during the construction of the third and current cathedral between 1225 and 1264. The imposing westwek with its nearly identical towers was built as part of the second cathedral around 1192 and was incorporated into the current building. As a result, the cathedral is a mixture of styles, combining the Romanesque westwerk, old choir and west towers with the Gothic nave, transepts, high choir and ring of chapels.

Some rather nice artifacts inside the cathedral including the mechanical clock, that found us ‘stealing’ our photos of it, much to the disgruntlement of the cathedral ‘holy man’ and ‘jobsworth’!

As it was dark outside, there seemed to be a lovely warm glow inside the cathedral and there were one or two lovely items that needed closer examination but time and the lateness of hour were not in our favour. However it has to be said that both my brother and i objected to being hurried along in quite a ‘gruff’ fashion by one of the so called ‘holy men’; the priest ‘on duty’ there who was intent in getting us outside of the doors as quickly as possible for the ‘witching’ hour of 7pm was striking. We were at the door, having finished our historical research and just wanted to take a quick photo of the beautiful clock and its mechanism, just inside the door, but he was having non of it, making sure we knew they were now closed! So we just had to take the photos anyway. My brother and i are both ordained as priests and we were treated disrespectfully, but other than this it is no way to treat anyone whom has travelled from afar to visit a sacred building; ‘jobsworths’ are everywhere it seems and holy buildings are no exception, we were not expectng clergy to act like this. A lovely building yet sadly again with no spirituality.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M%C3%BCnster_Cathedral

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Marcomer 387-458, whom was educated here.
  • King Arthur

‘The Red Cross is the coded symbol used within the Grail teachings and you will see this symbol in many places around the globe’

X

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

 

 

THE GRAIL QUEST

“Over the years the Grail has been linked to (the) Jesus (at the last supper), being it is said, the cup that Jesus and his disciples drank from, yet also the cup that caught Jesus’s blood while on the cross. But the accounts of a crucifixion we know to be untrue, so we must discount them. Even so they could still have drunk from a cup, a ‘vessel’. In the Knight Templar teachings/degrees we are informed that the Grail was in fact ‘Jul’, carrying the sacred royal bloodline; further info on this is that the Son of Christ (the anointed) is referred to in the Essene scrolls as ‘Gebiya’, which is Hebrew for ‘Goblet’, and further a name (or term used) for him was ‘Jul’; The Green Man of Destiny, again showing the translations and distortions over time”

QUEST 28: GERMANY

29TH OCTOBER 2019

We journeyed across Holland to reach Germany by late afternoon; the weather had been sunny all day and everywhere was looking very resplendent and autumnal. We were to stay three nights in Haltern,  Norddrhein- Westfalen, a small and very pretty village in the German countryside, where once there had been a castle, a fortress in Roman times and Haltern would have once been within the castle grounds, so the whole area has a wealth of history. Let it be noted that King Arthur was born in the North-Rhine, Westphalia, Germany. We had a basement flat in a lovely garden setting and had everything we needed for the next three nights. It was a peaceful area, very spiritual and devout with many beautifully maintained shrines along the roadsides.

Haltern, the lovely area of Germany we stayed in with garden steps leading down to our apartment.

Day Three: St Mary Magdalene Church (St Maria Magdalena) Stiftskirche: This lovely small church with its connections to King Arthur’s conception and Mary Magdalene, was only a few minutes drive from where we were staying and turned out to be a gorgeous sunny start to a very good day. The church was originally a monastry in 1166, just before the town was formed in 1200’s. It does indeed have a very ‘monastry’ kind of feel to it. As far as our grail quest goes, in respect of following in the footsteps of King Arthur, this was the place where he  recieved his instruction. One must never disregard churches for they are as a vast library of information and knowledge; knowledge that often seems very far removed from that which one understands of as ‘christian’, for the hidden knowledge coded within plainsight (for all to see) can tell a vastly different story to that which is commonly told or shared.

St Maria Magdalena as known, Stiftskirche

The church was founded in 1166 by Count Otto von Ravensberg as a Premonstratensian Nuns Monastery. In 1550 it became a secular temple for the ladies after the unrest culminated throughout the Reformation, the Flaesheim nuns no longer accepted their abbot and the archbishop approved new statutes in 1558. The monastery was still used during the 18th century as a supply institute for unmarried ladies of the surrounding nobility. The abbey buildings were destroyed in 1790. Only the west tower is certainly from the early days. When Napoleon occupied the Rhineland in 1803, the ownership of the monastery.

On the outside of the building is a very interesting door, showing depictions of bible scenes; of importance to this path and this quest (The Priory/Knights of the Red Order) is one in particular showing  ‘Adam’ and ‘Eve’ being cast out of Eden, having very important significance and implications to this path. There is also another very interesting carved plaque of a knight on horse back on another wall. Many churches and cathedrals do show knights on horseback riding through; where do these images come from and why? If one casts one’s mind back to a previous mention, churches are as vast libraries and the symbolism if read correctly tell many a tale or two from past times and in this case many a knight has ridden through many a church, maybe on many a quest….

Knights on horseback & biblical scenes telling stories that resonate in the world today…

There were some peaceful energies within the church and some original old wooden artifacts too.

King Arthur, also known as Lucius Artorius Castus, German born and said to have recieved his instructions here, which would make sense for in his earlier years as a Roman soldier having strong connections to the area; and travelling through here. Inside the church is an amazing vaulted ceiling and an impresive golden eagle upon the wooden carved altar. Some of the disiples are depicted upon the windows either side of the altar and also Mary and Martha upon the carved part of the altar, bathing the feet of the Jesus. There are many beautiful carved artworks here and suprisingly on one painting is Jesus portrayed with ginger hair, not often seen but proving just how the different cultures and countries represent the Jesus. A beautiful statue representing ‘Non shall pass but those of God’ on the left of the altar and to the right a small urn with the chiro symbol scribed upon it, a newish font with cherubs is also to be seen.

Above is a very profound statue of Mary Magdalene, shown in her true colours, those used across all continents; a red dress covered by a blue robe, (sometimes vica verca) representing ‘The Blood’,  blue and red, oxygenated and de-oxygenated. A fairly modern set of paintings adorns the right-hand wall, but like most churches they do show the Jesus dying on the cross, which according to our Templar/Priory/Koro reseach is untrue, for the way of those times was actually to be crushed between two boulders; it was only actual theives and low scale people whom were put to death on crosses. History is not always what it is puported to be… Of interest is one particular painting here, is the last painting in the sequence of Jesus being supported into a coffin (or taken out?) by three of his diciples; the positioning of their legs telling ‘stories within stories’ (early masonic degree symbolism?) Though Christ is not looking very dead at all – very much alive in fact and almost seems to have wings, modern art but very deep and meaningful. One can see the paintings and everything else mentioned in the video link below:-

Day Three Germany: Haltern, Dortmund, Essen

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • King Arthur (conception & birthplace)
  • Mary Magdalene
  • Frotmund link

Roman Museum: Westfalisches Romermuseum: Our next port of call was across country, with a forty minute drive towards Dortmund to a church with Fisher King connections. However on our way there we called in at the Roman Museum: Westfalisches Romermuseum; although not a site on our quest as such, it was an important place for us to visit for as we now know with knowledge gained on this path, King Arthur was indeed a Roman centurion known as Lucius Artorius Castus and as such would have travelled with the Roman army when upon his own grail quest, so it was important to get a taste and feel of the times. The museum showed an excellent film which really did get down to the nitty gritty of the times and hard conditions of those days.

Remains and artifacts from the Roman Museum

https://www.livius.org/museum/haltern-westfalisches-romermuseum/

Marien Church Dortmund: So we next made our way to Dortmund, the third-largest city of Germany’s most populous federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia after Cologne and Dusseldorf and Germany’s eighth largest cityand about 40mins away from the museum. It lies in the  Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Region and is considered the administrative, commercial, and cultural centre of the eastern Ruhr. Founded around 882, Dortmund became an Imperial Free City. Throughout the 13th to 14th centuries, it was the “chief city” of the Rhine, Westphalia, the Netherlands Circle of the Hanseatic League.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dortmund

St Mary’s Church or Marienkirche is located in the heart of the city amidst the hustle and bustle of the city streets with shops all around. We thought it was closed as could find no obvious way in until a very helpful cyclist led the way to a rather closed looking entrance. Often in these churches the entrance is never where one thinks it is. The area around the church was getting ready for the winter festivities with market stall, wooden grottos and fun fair rides being erected all around!

Since the Reformation it has been a Lutheran parish church of St Marien. The church was destroyed in World War Two, but larely rebuilt and restored and it now also serves as a concert venue for sacred music. It show elements of Romanesque and Gothic architecture and houses some peices of notable Medieval art. A cruxifix hangs in the triumphal arch which separates the congregation for the clergy. There was a rather wonderful ‘All Seeing Eye Plaque’ upon one of the walls, some lovely wooden carvings, some knights emblems and shields and some beautiful paintings and sculptures, but sadly lots of the original artfacts have been removed. The grail quest link here is to The Fisher King, who was the 10th Grand Master of the true Knight Templars, who have a strong link in time to this area

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marienkirche, Dortmund

The enigmatic ‘All Seeing Eye’ plus some of the other artworks in the church <click to expand>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • The Fisher King 10th GrandMaster, Frotmund 764-850 (39th Great Grandfather)
  • King Arthur

St John the Baptist Church Essen:  Another 40 mins drive away and we arrived in the vibrant city of Essen with its winter festival activities well under way! Street vendors and market stall, music, fun fair and a big wheel, with all the shops open late. There was a happy bustling festive feeling with the pedestrian precinct and surrounding area really alive! And we enjoyed a lovely walk around after we had been in the church. Essen is the central and second largest city of the Ruhr, the largest urban area in Germany. Its population of 583,109 makes it the ninth largest city of Germany, as well as the fourth largest city of the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia.  Founded around 845, Essen remained a small town within the sphere of influence of an important ecclesiastical principality (Essen Abbey) until the onset of industrialization. The city then, especially through the Krupps family iron works, became one of Germany’s most important coal and steel centers

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essen

The Catholic parish church of St. Johann Baptist is a Gothic hall church in Essen, dedicated to John the Baptist, which stands on Kettwiger Straße, the main street of Essen, in front of Essen Minster, to which it is connected. On account of its position and the fact that its spire towers over the Minster, visitors often mistake it for part of the Minster. The church is descended from a chapel of St John the Baptist, which already belonged to Essen Abbey in the tenth century. According to the will of Abbess Theophanu who died in 1058, candles were to be burnt in her memory ad sanctum Iohannem, which appears to be the first mention of the church. The dedication of the church to John the Baptist suggests that it was originally a baptistry. The foundations of this original chapel were identified in archaeological excavations after the Second World War. In 1264, the Abbess Berta von Arnsberg promoted the chapel to the rank of a filial parish church of the Abbey. The church was rebuilt in 1471 as a gothic hall church and a rectangular east choir was added. From 1699 until 1768 the baroque furnishings were added. These included choir stalls, side altars and a pulpit. The pulpit was replaced by one in the rococo style in 1769. The church was renovated and repainted in 1968.

The church had a lovely warm spiritual feeling to it making everyone feel very welcomed. There was a service being held at the time we visited with many folks in attendance and the church was actually very packed. For this reason we could not stroll around or coment at all so nestled in quietly at the back to embrace the experience. From sitting at the back i managed to take a couple of photos and a little video of the service without moving from my seat, so hopefully everyone can get an idea and sense of the church.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Johann_Baptist,_Essen

St John the Baptist Church in Essen is a very spiritual place. A service was being conducted yet sitting at the back we were able to shoot a little bit of it. Again Mary is depicted here in her red and blue robes – connecting to the blood of life. <click to enlarge>

Grail Bloodline Connections:

  • Frotharius 794-883 (38th Great Granfather) known as Faramond.
  • King Arthur – of course all a point in time upon King Arthurs earthly journey.

 

“Time keeps its secrets hidden; crack the code of time and all will be revealed”

 

The Knights of the Red Order January 2020

‘The Keeper of Scrolls’

moon.willow@ntlworld.com

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